THE CATHOLIC THREAD

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Del
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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by Del » Fri Aug 04, 2017 5:32 pm

hugodrax wrote:
Fri Aug 04, 2017 10:59 am
Del wrote:
Fri Aug 04, 2017 9:35 am
hugodrax wrote:
Thu Aug 03, 2017 8:06 pm
Skip wrote:
Thu Aug 03, 2017 7:25 pm
Del wrote:
Thu Aug 03, 2017 7:04 pm
hugodrax wrote:
Thu Aug 03, 2017 1:26 pm
Skip wrote:
Thu Aug 03, 2017 1:08 pm
I just came across a Facebook post regarding the new 4th degree KoC uniforms, which look more like real US military uniforms, including beret. Seems to be causing quite the kerfuffle with the traditionalists holding nothing back from knocking the new look. It made me happy to see that good Catholics can get just as pissy and rude as the rest of us.
I'm against it on other grounds. I think it takes away from actual military service.
Interesting.

Cigarson jumped into a social-media kerfuffle. He likes the new uniform. He respects the 4th Degree, but he also thought the capes and ostrich plumes looked like old guys playing at clowns.

His only gripe is that hardly any of the guys in the new uniforms seems to have any idea how to form and wear a beret.
Cigarson and I are friends; that's why I saw the Facebook post... :wink:

I like the way he presented his case and even linked to a site to teach how to properly wear a beret. (And I agree with him on how the capes and plumes look... :D )
They look like the old Catholic orders of Chivalry...the Knights of Malta, the Order of St Hubertus, papal knights...now it's an American paramilitary order.
Swiss Guard To Modernize Uniforms To Hipster Jeans And Beanies
I love that site. Reverently irreverent. Please don't think I'm such a reactionary that I view all change as bad. I don't. I never bought the Cape and funny hat, although I am a 4th degree kaniggut. But I really don't care for much military symbolism in my religious organizations. The Church Militant does not have to be the Church Military. I never purchased the tin sword, eother.

During our stay here, we're going to pilgrimage. Hawai'i can boast two saints, one of whom is interred here. Moral lepers like myself can use all the help we can get!
Please say a prayer for us -- in the proximity of St. Damien's pipe.
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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by wosbald » Sat Aug 05, 2017 8:53 am

+JMJ+

Cleric alleges Cameroon bishop killed for resisting gay priests
Image
The body of Bishop Jean Marie Benoit Bala of Bafia, Cameroon, is examined after being discovered in a local river on June 2. (Credit: Stock image.)

At a memorial Mass this week for a Cameroon bishop who died under mysterious circumstances, a cleric who's taken over as the administrator of the diocese charged that the authors of the murder were in the church, "pretending to sympathize," and that the bishop died for standing up against gays in the priesthood.

YAOUNDÉ, Cameroon - Ever since the body of Bishop Jean Marie Benoit Bala of Bafia, Cameroon, was discovered in a local river about four miles from where his car had been abandoned, questions have abounded about his death - was it suicide, as the police allege, or a “brutal assassination,” as the country’s bishops insist?

If it was indeed murder, who killed the 58-year-old prelate?

In response, the current apostolic administrator of Bala’s diocese, Monsignor Joseph Akonga Essomba, delivered a blunt answer on Thursday during a homily at a memorial Mass: The bishop was killed, he said, because he stood up against homosexuals in the Church and the priesthood.

Pointing to the front rows of the Church where most government ministers and other important personalities sat, and casting a sweeping look at fellow priests and bishops, Essomba charged:

“Shame to all those people in black suits and black spectacles always sitting in the front rows of the Church,” he said.

“Shame to all those priests who have come here, pretending to sympathize. These are the people who killed our bishop, because he said ‘no’ to the homosexuality perpetrated by those priests,” Akonga said.

[…]

While Bishop Andrew Nkea of the Mamfe diocese, in Cameroon’s southwest region, said the real reasons for the murder can only be explained by the assassins, his colleague from Kumbo in the northwest region, Bishop George Nkuo, offered a more spiritual explanation.

“The same reasons for which Christ was crucified apply to the killing of the bishop,” he told Crux. “He was killed because he stood for the truth. Any pastor, any bishop, any priest who stands for the truth should be ready to face the sword. It’s a beautiful way to die.”

The Bishop of Obala, Sosthéne Léopold Bayemi, said Bala’s death has strengthened his own faith in Christ, and gives him the “certitude that the rock on which Christ founded his Church will always resist the forces of evil,” he told Crux.

Bala’s nephew, Alexis Bala, told Crux that his uncle was the “pillar” of the family, and his parting has completely “shattered” their dream.

“We pray that God should give us the strength to live through the pain,” he said, before insisting that Bala’s “killers need to be brought to justice.” …




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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by Del » Sat Aug 05, 2017 10:24 am

British Catholic writer for the Catholic Herald (U.K.) offers his insight as to why the article by Jesuit Fr. Spadaro is four-barrel stupid:

Why is Civiltà Cattolica attacking American Christians? I have a theory
If the essayists are allowed to engage in corny psychoanalysis, then permit me to do the same...
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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by hugodrax » Sat Aug 05, 2017 11:12 am

Del wrote:
Sat Aug 05, 2017 10:24 am
British Catholic writer for the Catholic Herald (U.K.) offers his insight as to why the article by Jesuit Fr. Spadaro is four-barrel stupid:

Why is Civiltà Cattolica attacking American Christians? I have a theory
If the essayists are allowed to engage in corny psychoanalysis, then permit me to do the same...
Excellent and well-reasoned article. I enjoyed it.

I see the original article by Fr. Spadaro as fundamentally an attempt at interference. Not that I necessarily disagree with his conclusions as drawn (the left and the right in the US are both polarized and increasingly seem to view their own dogma as the revealed word of God--with us or against us, absolute good vs. Absolute evil. Also, it gave me an opportunity to stick my finger in Del's eye, for which my apologies, but it was fun), but that it's essentially no different than another country's foreign ministry issuing a statement about our government.

As an American, I don't like that. As a Catholic, I follow my Church. As a voter, I believe a Catholic can vote either side of almost any issue and remain a Catholic--I resent the attempt at controlling the electorate. I'm frankly surprised more on the political left didn't take umbrage--I saw the original article as an attack on political absolutism regardless of the source. Both sides bear guilt here. Both sides should work it out, but not at the behest of Rome.

That, and I really, really don't trust Jesuits.
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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by Thunktank » Sat Aug 05, 2017 12:40 pm

hugodrax wrote:
Sat Aug 05, 2017 11:12 am
Del wrote:
Sat Aug 05, 2017 10:24 am
British Catholic writer for the Catholic Herald (U.K.) offers his insight as to why the article by Jesuit Fr. Spadaro is four-barrel stupid:

Why is Civiltà Cattolica attacking American Christians? I have a theory
If the essayists are allowed to engage in corny psychoanalysis, then permit me to do the same...
Excellent and well-reasoned article. I enjoyed it.

I see the original article by Fr. Spadaro as fundamentally an attempt at interference. Not that I necessarily disagree with his conclusions as drawn (the left and the right in the US are both polarized and increasingly seem to view their own dogma as the revealed word of God--with us or against us, absolute good vs. Absolute evil. Also, it gave me an opportunity to stick my finger in Del's eye, for which my apologies, but it was fun), but that it's essentially no different than another country's foreign ministry issuing a statement about our government.

As an American, I don't like that. As a Catholic, I follow my Church. As a voter, I believe a Catholic can vote either side of almost any issue and remain a Catholic--I resent the attempt at controlling the electorate. I'm frankly surprised more on the political left didn't take umbrage--I saw the original article as an attack on political absolutism regardless of the source. Both sides bear guilt here. Both sides should work it out, but not at the behest of Rome.

That, and I really, really don't trust Jesuits.
I can see this, but I'm at place in my life where I want NOTHING to do with politics. I hardly ever read the news anymore either. It all feels beyond my control anyway. I simply attempt to be authentic in my own life with those I really can make a difference with. I began feeling this way In my doubt, more so as a believer again. As far as I can tell, both the right and left are fundamentally flawed and cannot be used effectively to sanctify the world. Maybe I'm wrong, but that's my thoughts on it.

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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by hugodrax » Sat Aug 05, 2017 9:18 pm

Thunktank wrote:
Sat Aug 05, 2017 12:40 pm
hugodrax wrote:
Sat Aug 05, 2017 11:12 am
Del wrote:
Sat Aug 05, 2017 10:24 am
British Catholic writer for the Catholic Herald (U.K.) offers his insight as to why the article by Jesuit Fr. Spadaro is four-barrel stupid:

Why is Civiltà Cattolica attacking American Christians? I have a theory
If the essayists are allowed to engage in corny psychoanalysis, then permit me to do the same...
Excellent and well-reasoned article. I enjoyed it.

I see the original article by Fr. Spadaro as fundamentally an attempt at interference. Not that I necessarily disagree with his conclusions as drawn (the left and the right in the US are both polarized and increasingly seem to view their own dogma as the revealed word of God--with us or against us, absolute good vs. Absolute evil. Also, it gave me an opportunity to stick my finger in Del's eye, for which my apologies, but it was fun), but that it's essentially no different than another country's foreign ministry issuing a statement about our government.

As an American, I don't like that. As a Catholic, I follow my Church. As a voter, I believe a Catholic can vote either side of almost any issue and remain a Catholic--I resent the attempt at controlling the electorate. I'm frankly surprised more on the political left didn't take umbrage--I saw the original article as an attack on political absolutism regardless of the source. Both sides bear guilt here. Both sides should work it out, but not at the behest of Rome.

That, and I really, really don't trust Jesuits.
I can see this, but I'm at place in my life where I want NOTHING to do with politics. I hardly ever read the news anymore either. It all feels beyond my control anyway. I simply attempt to be authentic in my own life with those I really can make a difference with. I began feeling this way In my doubt, more so as a believer again. As far as I can tell, both the right and left are fundamentally flawed and cannot be used effectively to sanctify the world. Maybe I'm wrong, but that's my thoughts on it.
I don't think this is far off. In the world but not of it pretty much leaves out the political side. I'm too flawed to fix the world, or too selfish to try to fix anything but myself.
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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by wosbald » Mon Aug 07, 2017 9:26 am

+JMJ+

Pope ‘deeply saddened’ after church attack in Nigeria kills at least 11
Image
Nigerian police on Sunday described a shooting spree at a Catholic church in the country's southeast as a local dispute rather than a Boko Haram assault. (Credit: Image courtesy of the Nigerian Police Dpartment.)

Following an attack at a Nigerian church, where gunmen opened fire against the faithful while Sunday Mass was being celebrated, killing at least 11 people, the Vatican's Secretary of State sent a telegram to the local bishop saying that Pope Francis was "deeply saddened" to learn about the loss of life following the "violent attack in the Saint Philip's Catholic Church."

ROME- Pope Francis on Monday extended his “heartfelt condolences” to the faithful of the Diocese of Nnewi in Nigeria, where at least 11 people were killed and another 18 critically wounded when gunmen attacked a church in the country’s southeastern Anambra state.

The gunmen opened fire as Sunday Mass was being celebrated at the St. Philip Catholic Church. Police officials say they don’t yet know precisely who was responsible, but quickly excluded any link with the radical Islamic group Boko Haram.

“Deeply saddened to learn of the loss of life and injury following the violent attack in Saint Philip’s Catholic Church, Ozubulu, His Holiness Pope Francis extends heartfelt condolences to you and to all the faithful of the Diocese of Nnewi, in particular the families of the deceased and all those affected by this tragedy,” says the telegram signed by the Vatican’s Secretary of State, Italian Cardinal Pietro Parolin.

Addressed to the local Bishop Hilary Paul Odili Okeke, Parolin also wrote that Francis “willingly invokes the divine blessings of consolation and strength.” …




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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by wosbald » Mon Aug 07, 2017 9:03 pm

+JMJ+

Trump advisor seeks meeting with Pope Francis after “incendiary” article in Jesuit journal
Image
In this May 24, 2017, file photo. U.S. President Donald Trump stands with Pope Francis during a meeting at the Vatican. (Credit: Evan Vucci/AP, Pool.)

An Evangelical leader aligned with Donald Trump has called an article about U.S. politics in the Jesuit-run journal La Civiltà Cattolica “incendiary,” but says "rather than being offended, we have chosen to attempt to make peace," and asked for a meeting with Pope Francis.

A leading Evangelical advisor of President Donald Trump has written a letter to Pope Francis, requesting that the pontiff meet with Evangelical leaders after an article in a Vatican-reviewed journal accused the Trump administration of being under the sway of a “strange ecumenism” made up of fundamentalists and “integralist” Catholics leading to a “Manichean vision.”

The August 3 letter was sent by Johnnie Moore, a member of Trump’s evangelical advisory board. Moore currently serves as the CEO of The Kairos Company, a public relations and communications consulting firm he founded, and is a former vice president at Liberty University.

Only a short excerpt of the letter has been made public, and was published in Time on August 7, 2017.

“It’s in this moment of ongoing persecution, political division and global conflict that we have also witnessed efforts to divide Catholics and Evangelicals. We think it would be of great benefit to sit together and to discuss these things. Then, when we disagree we can do it within the context of friendship. Though, I’m sure we will find once again that we agree far more than we disagree, and we can work together with diligence on those areas of agreement.”

[…]

“I am and a lot of us are genuinely surprised that a pope who has principally a reputation as a bridge builder, if he did know about this, that he’d allow something like this to be published,” Moore told the Washington Post. “Whether his bridge-building extends even to those in his own church and the greater church or the extended church that disagree with this piece.”

On Twitter, Moore called the article “incendiary,” adding, “rather than being offended, we have chosen to attempt to make peace.”

Moore also tweeted two Bible verses related to the issue: “Why do you pass judgment on your brother? Or you, why do you despise your brother?” (Romans 14:10); and “If possible, so far as it depends on you, live peaceably with all.” (Romans 12:18).

[…]

There has been no comment from the Vatican regarding Moore’s letter, nor any indication if any meeting with Francis will take place.




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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by wosbald » Tue Aug 08, 2017 10:47 am

+JMJ+

Scottish lessons for the Church in the United States
Image
Archbishop Philip Tartaglia of Glasgow with Pope Francis. (Credit: Archdiocese of Glasgow.)

At a recent meeting of priests in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia, the Archbishop of Glasgow, Philip Tartaglia, spoke about what lessons could be learned in the United States from the Church in Scotland and the rest of the United Kingdom. He also said the Church in America has reason to hope, because the people in the pews haven't wavered in their faith.

As an outsider, I look at the Church in the United States with a certain amount of envy. Compared to the United Kingdom, you’re stronger and more blessed than you probably know.

However, despite the distance between our two countries, we share many of the same challenges. So we need to understand and support each other for the sake of the people God puts in our care.

[…]

The new “religious” consensus in the UK is a combination of skepticism, consumer appetite, and political intolerance. It masks itself with progressive vocabulary, but its targets tend to be practicing Christians.

Old-fashioned Protestant “No Popery here” slogans may have faded, but today’s discrimination is much more sophisticated. Atheists and secularists in the 1960s and 1970s were content to ignore or mock the Catholic Church, but today many see her as the single most formidable threat to their notions of justice and equality, particularly when it comes to matters of human sexuality.

This hostility shows itself in different ways in the UK and in the States. Campus protests are worse in America, but the U.S. Constitution guarantees freedom of religion and freedom of expression much more concretely than ours.

Nonetheless, some version of the problems we face today in Scotland will be heading your way tomorrow – the UK can be seen as the canary in a coal mine.

The chief errors of our time are anthropological, and when a culture becomes global, so do its problems. If the Church dissents from today’s new rulebook for the human person – and she must — then she should expect rough treatment. …




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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by wosbald » Wed Aug 09, 2017 6:59 am

+JMJ+

Pope Francis and the convert problem
Image
Pope Francis greets one of 12 new members of the church as he celebrates the Easter Vigil in St. Peter's Basilica at the Vatican March 26, 2016. (Credit: Paul Haring/CNS.)

Some of the biggest critics of Pope Francis are people who joined the Catholic Church from a different faith, or none at all. Is it possible the baggage they brought with them has distorted their hermeneutic, and they are suffering from 'convert neurosis'?

For one, I don’t want to be seen to be sniffy and condescending towards people who become Catholic, which is how Dr. Stephen Bullivant, writing in First Things, said he felt about a comment in Michael Sean Winters’s blogpost. “I am so tired of converts telling us that the pope is not Catholic,” complained the sage of the National Catholic Reporter.

[…]

Winters wasn’t being sniffy about converts either, but simply pointing out the - let’s just call it, for the time being, incongruity - of those who join the Catholic Church in a blaze of Damascene fervor later announcing noisily, after a new pope is elected, that the pope is not doing what they believe popes should do.

And if the many retweets of my retweet of Winters’s complaint is anything to go by, many share his view not just that this stance is not just incongruous, but annoying, because rather than consider the possibility that there may be something deficient in their own view of the Church and its tradition, they prefer to assume that it is the successor of St. Peter - chosen by the Holy Spirit in a conclave free from outside interference - who is lacking.

[…]

I began to notice this reaction among former Anglicans during the synods of 2014-15. A friend, a Catholic priest, told me he had seen these kinds of arguments before in the Church of England, and they always ended badly; and that he hadn’t joined the Catholic Church to go through it all again. He was deeply disturbed by what he imagined was happening, fueled by Douthat’s predictions of a schism and his dark warning that the pope “may be preserved from error only if the Church itself resists him.”

Which was all, obviously, silly. What in fact happened, as was obvious it would to those free of neurosis, was a vigorous good-faith disagreement that resolved in a two-thirds majority vote that laid the basis for an apostolic exhortation. Amoris Laetitia did not settle forever those disagreements - when do they ever go away? - but provided a basis for the Church to move forward, still one body, while staying faithful to doctrine. That’s the difference between disagreeing under a papal magisterium, and disagreeing in the absence of one. …




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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by wosbald » Fri Aug 11, 2017 6:54 am

+JMJ+

On Amoris guidelines, Brazil bishops leave sacraments open for some divorced and remarried
Image
A journalist takes photos of copies of Pope Francis's apostolic exhortation on the family, "Amoris Laetitia" ("The Joy of Love"), during the document's release at the Vatican April 8. The exhortation is the concluding document of the 2014 and 2015 synods of bishops on the family. (Credit: Paul Haring/CNS.)

Brazil's bishops do not explicitly assert that remarried people could receive communion in some cases. Instead, they clearly say that a discernment process “is not simply a return to the sacramental life, which is not always possible.” However, their document ponders "limited cases" where mitigating circumstances "may attenuate or even annul" the moral responsibility of people in irregular unions.

SÃO PAULO, Brazil - The Brazilian Bishops’ National Conference did not close the door that leads to the sacraments for divorced and remarried couples.

In a pastoral guide to Amoris Laetitia, the bishops said that, even though Pope Francis’s apostolic exhortation reaffirms the indissolubility of marriage, it also notes that “conditioning factors and extenuating circumstances” may “attenuate or even annul the moral responsibility and imputability of unlawful acts.”

[…]

Brazil’s bishops affirm that Francis’s apostolic exhortation Amoris Laetitia avoids a “normative pronouncement” on cases like those of divorced and remarried people. “The apostolic exhortation does not present a guide for the discernment of the so-called irregular cases,” says paragraph 37. Instead, Amoris “reinforces the need of a pastoral attention that is really particularized.”

The document argues that Amoris is not a rupture with previous Church teaching, but a development. “Nothing more contrary to the content of Chapter VIII of Amoris Laetitia than the idea of a moral relativism or even situational morality. On the contrary, it reaffirms the doctrine about the indissolubility of marriage and the intrinsic malice of adultery,” says paragraph 39.

As it follows, the text calls on pastors to “enter” in concrete cases, “finding the proper way to help the formation of the faithful’s conscience.”

Therefore, pastors should lead people through a discernment process based on six items: Conversion through a personal encounter with Christ; accompaniment in moral and spiritual growth; comprehension and maturing of their particular situation; the possibility of opening a canonical process of matrimonial nullity; the analysis of eventual conditioning and attenuating circumstances; and sexual continence. …




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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by Thunktank » Sun Aug 13, 2017 10:40 pm

Cardinal Burke. . .
He recalled a young priest who recently asked him why, given the “possibly apocalyptic nature” of the present time in the Church and the world, and the need for teaching the truth of the faith, there is a “seeming lack of clarity and courage” coming from the hierarchy.

Cardinal Burke said it could be put down to the “materialist and relativist culture” pervading modern life which “encourages the confusion and division in the Church.” The cardinal also said he felt uneasy when the secular media is no longer attacking the Church as it used to, as it means the Church is “failing badly in her clear and courageous witness to the world for the salvation of the world.”

He also warned of “worldly” Church governance, where those who teach what the Church has always taught are viewed as “rigid fundamentalists” hindering the pastoral approach wanted by Pope Francis. And he observed the “sad situation” of members of the hierarchy “publicly accusing one another of a political and mundane agenda, as politicians attack one another to advance a political agenda.”
Stressing that Christ’s teachings do not change, he gave 10 ways to deal with the crisis:

1. Study the Catechism more attentively and be prepared to defend the Church’s teaching;
2. Recall the “many edifying signs” of fidelity to Christ among “many good and steadfast faithful, priests and bishops”;
3. Have recourse to the Blessed Virgin Mary, imitate the oneness of her heart with Jesus;
4. Invoke frequently, “throughout the day,” the intercession of St. Michael the Archangel as there is “definitely diabolical involvement in the ever spreading confusion, division and error within the Church”;
5. Pray to St. Joseph daily to protect the Church from “confusion and division which are always the work of Satan”;
6. Pray to the great pope saints who guided the Church in difficult times;
7. Pray for the cardinals of the Church to give them “particular clarity and courage”;
8. Be serene, knowing our confidence is in Christ, that the “gates of hell” will not prevail against the Church, and avoid a “worldly desperation” that is expressed in “aggressive and uncharitable ways.”
9. Be ready to “accept ridicule, misunderstanding, persecution, exile and even death” to remain one with Christ in the Church, following the example of St. Athanasius and other great saints.
10. Safeguard love for Pope Francis by praying fervently for him and seeking the intercession of St. Peter on his behalf.
:thumbsup:

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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by wosbald » Mon Aug 14, 2017 7:27 am

+JMJ+

Former Belgian PM challenges Pope Francis on euthanasia ban for religious hospitals
Image
Pope Francis greets Brother Rene Stockman, superior general of the Brothers of Charity, at the end of a 2016 meeting of the U***n of Superiors General at the Vatican.(Credit: CNS photo/L'Osservatore Romano.)

Herman Van Rompuy, who has formerly served as the President of the European Council and Prime Minister of Belgium, has tweeted a message implying Pope Francis cannot tell a Belgian religious order to stop performing euthanasia at its medical clinics. Van Rompuy serves on the board of the Brothers of Charity Group.

ROME - With the clock ticking for the Brothers of Charity to comply with a Vatican request to stop offering euthanasia in their 15 centers for psychiatric patients across Belgium, the matter is far from resolved, with one of the members of the board openly challenging Pope Francis’s order on Twitter.

“The time of ‘Roma locuta causa finita’ is long past,” is what Herman Van Rompuy, former President of the European Council and a member of the board of trustees of the Brothers of Charity Group, said on Twitter.

The message, quoting the Latin phrase “Rome has spoken; the cause is finished” - a paraphrase of St. Augustine, which means the pope is the final word - came as a response to a post from canon law expert Kurt Martens.
Kurt Martens @DrKurtMartens

Fmr EUCouncil Pres @HvRpersonal member Board Belgian Brothers of Charity that made contested euthanasia decision. Sic transit gloria mundi. pic.twitter.com/7HncsCPzLO

——————————————————————————————————————

Herman Van Rompuy
@HvRpersonal


De tijd van 'Roma locuta, causa finita' is al lang voorbij.

The original message was in Dutch, the official language of Flanders, one of the regions of Belgium. …




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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by wosbald » Tue Aug 15, 2017 6:41 am

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The history of the Assumption – and why it’s a Holy Day of Obligation
Image
Assumption of the Virgin Mary, fresco painting in San Petronio Basilica in Bologna, Italy. (Credit: Zvonimir Atletic / Shutterstock.)

The belief in the Assumption of Mary was a widely-held tradition, and a frequent meditation in the writings of saints throughout the centuries. However it was not defined officially until the past century. In 1950, Pope Pius XII made an infallible, ex-cathedra statement in the Apostolic Constitution Munificentissimus Deus officially defining the dogma of the Assumption.

[…]

The dogma of the Assumption of Mary - also called the “Dormition of Mary” in the Eastern Churches - has its roots in the early centuries of the Church. The Catholic Church teaches that when Mary ended her earthly life, God assumed her, body and soul into heaven.

This belief traces its roots back to the earliest years of the Church. While a site outside of Jerusalem was recognized as the tomb of Mary, the earliest Christians maintained that “no one was there,” Bunson said.

According to St. John of Damascus, in the 5th century, at the Council of Chalcedon in 451, Roman Emperor Marcian requested the body of Mary, Mother of God. St. Juvenal, who was Bishop of Jerusalem replied “that Mary died in the presence of all the Apostles, but that her tomb, when opened upon the request of St. Thomas, was found empty; wherefrom the Apostles concluded that the body was taken up to heaven,” the saint recorded.

By the 8th century, around the time of Pope Adrian, the Church began to change its terminology, renaming the feast day of the Memorial of Mary to the Assumption of Mary, Bunson noted.

The belief in the Assumption of Mary was a widely-held tradition, and a frequent meditation in the writings of saints throughout the centuries. However it was not defined officially until the past century. In 1950, Pope Pius XII made an infallible, ex-cathedra statement in the Apostolic Constitution Munificentissimus Deus officially defining the dogma of the Assumption.

“By the authority of our Lord Jesus Christ, of the Blessed Apostles Peter and Paul, and by our own authority, we pronounce, declare, and define it to be a divinely revealed dogma: that the Immaculate Mother of God, the ever Virgin Mary, having completed the course of her earthly life, was assumed body and soul into heavenly glory,” the pope wrote.…




"In the end, My Immaculate Heart will triumph." - Our Lady of Fatima

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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by Thunktank » Tue Aug 15, 2017 12:50 pm

wosbald wrote:
Tue Aug 15, 2017 6:41 am
+JMJ+

The history of the Assumption – and why it’s a Holy Day of Obligation
Image
Assumption of the Virgin Mary, fresco painting in San Petronio Basilica in Bologna, Italy. (Credit: Zvonimir Atletic / Shutterstock.)

The belief in the Assumption of Mary was a widely-held tradition, and a frequent meditation in the writings of saints throughout the centuries. However it was not defined officially until the past century. In 1950, Pope Pius XII made an infallible, ex-cathedra statement in the Apostolic Constitution Munificentissimus Deus officially defining the dogma of the Assumption.

[…]

The dogma of the Assumption of Mary - also called the “Dormition of Mary” in the Eastern Churches - has its roots in the early centuries of the Church. The Catholic Church teaches that when Mary ended her earthly life, God assumed her, body and soul into heaven.

This belief traces its roots back to the earliest years of the Church. While a site outside of Jerusalem was recognized as the tomb of Mary, the earliest Christians maintained that “no one was there,” Bunson said.

According to St. John of Damascus, in the 5th century, at the Council of Chalcedon in 451, Roman Emperor Marcian requested the body of Mary, Mother of God. St. Juvenal, who was Bishop of Jerusalem replied “that Mary died in the presence of all the Apostles, but that her tomb, when opened upon the request of St. Thomas, was found empty; wherefrom the Apostles concluded that the body was taken up to heaven,” the saint recorded.

By the 8th century, around the time of Pope Adrian, the Church began to change its terminology, renaming the feast day of the Memorial of Mary to the Assumption of Mary, Bunson noted.

The belief in the Assumption of Mary was a widely-held tradition, and a frequent meditation in the writings of saints throughout the centuries. However it was not defined officially until the past century. In 1950, Pope Pius XII made an infallible, ex-cathedra statement in the Apostolic Constitution Munificentissimus Deus officially defining the dogma of the Assumption.

“By the authority of our Lord Jesus Christ, of the Blessed Apostles Peter and Paul, and by our own authority, we pronounce, declare, and define it to be a divinely revealed dogma: that the Immaculate Mother of God, the ever Virgin Mary, having completed the course of her earthly life, was assumed body and soul into heavenly glory,” the pope wrote.…
The Feast of the Dormition of the Theotokos for us over here.

- St. Theodore the Studite, Encomium on the Dormition of the Theotokos

"It was right, therefore, that the body which brought forth the Son should be glorified with Him in divine glory, and that the ark of Christ's holiness should arise with Him who rose on the third day... It was not, however, necessary for her, as it was for her Son and God, to stay for a while longer on earth, so she was taken up directly from the grave to the heavenly realm, hence she sends bright shafts of holy light and grace down to earth, illuminating all the space around the world, and is venerated, admired, and hymned by all the faithful."

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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by wosbald » Wed Aug 16, 2017 4:24 pm

+JMJ+

For those who feel inspired to "resist", here is an excellent Catholic response. And it does it without demonizing/scapegoating anyone. Best part is that it works regardless of any current political regime or trendy ideological schemata du jour. Rather, it's simply the Science of the Saints.

The Catholic way to resist Trump-inspired hate and ignorance
Image
Supporters of Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump, left, faced off with protesters after a rally on the campus of the University of Illinois-Chicago in March. (Credit: Charles Rex Arbogast/AP.)

In a time of hot-tempered political polarization, it is all too easy to fuel the divides. But doing nothing faced with the tide of racism and xenophobia unleashed by the Trump election feels wrong too. Father Michael Rogers suggests a third way, inspired by the Catholic Worker movement.

Want to resist Trump? Want to at least resist the hate and ignorance that have risen up in his name, rightly or wrongly? There is a Catholic way to do that.

It is certainly not by rioting or becoming violent. It’s not by putting yourselves out on the street corners that we resist him. It is not in shouting up into the void above Fifth Avenue in New York that we express true discontent at his election despite having lost the popular vote.

No, we resist by doing the one thing that a celebrity can stand least. We resist by ignoring him and all of the people who may, rightly or wrongly, use his name to support racism, xenophobia, and sexism.

The Catholic way of ignoring Trump, however, is not simply a refusal to acknowledge his power - that would be merely an exercise of callous privilege for those of us in the majority. Nor do we act in the public sphere like petulant children refusing to accept reality.

No, the Catholic way of ignoring Trump, rather than turning our attention to him, is to acknowledge the sin that rests within ourselves and our systems.

[…]

If our system has failed the dignity of the human being such that we could abort so many innocents, or ignore them once they are born, we have work to do.

If our current system creates vast income inequality or puts profits before people, who are after all the image and likeness of God, we have work to do.

If our current system sees people as merely the sum of their worst moment, while condemning them to death; or our heroes as those who shout most loudly into the void while displaying the ostentation of celebrity, we have work to do.

[…]

To instruct the ignorant. To counsel the doubtful. To admonish sinners. To bear patiently those who wrong us. To forgive offenses. To console the afflicted. To pray for the living and the dead.

To resist. …




"In the end, My Immaculate Heart will triumph." - Our Lady of Fatima

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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by UncleBob » Wed Aug 16, 2017 5:22 pm

wosbald wrote:
Wed Aug 16, 2017 4:24 pm
+JMJ+


It is certainly not by rioting or becoming violent. It’s not by putting yourselves out on the street corners that we resist him. It is not in shouting up into the void above Fifth Avenue in New York that we express true discontent at his election despite having lost the popular vote.

No, we resist by doing the one thing that a celebrity can stand least. We resist by ignoring him and all of the people who may, rightly or wrongly, use his name to support racism, xenophobia, and sexism.
This is an interesting strategy. Well, except to resist abortion, right? :wink:
"One man's theology is another man's belly laugh." - Robert A. Heinlein

"Many of the points here, taken to their logical conclusions, don't hold up to logic; they're simply Godded-up ways of saying "I don't like that." - Skip

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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by wosbald » Wed Aug 16, 2017 5:42 pm

+JMJ+
UncleBob wrote:
Wed Aug 16, 2017 5:22 pm
wosbald wrote:
Wed Aug 16, 2017 4:24 pm
It is certainly not by rioting or becoming violent. It’s not by putting yourselves out on the street corners that we resist him. It is not in shouting up into the void above Fifth Avenue in New York that we express true discontent at his election despite having lost the popular vote.

No, we resist by doing the one thing that a celebrity can stand least. We resist by ignoring him and all of the people who may, rightly or wrongly, use his name to support racism, xenophobia, and sexism.
This is an interesting strategy. Well, except to resist abortion, right? :wink:
Political action can certainly be acceptable. And even violence is not absolutely precluded. Capital punishment is not precluded. Revolution is not precluded. Hell, even deporting the Jews from Spain is not precluded.

But is it prudent here and now? Does it serve the Common Good?




"In the end, My Immaculate Heart will triumph." - Our Lady of Fatima

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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by UncleBob » Wed Aug 16, 2017 5:51 pm

wosbald wrote:
Wed Aug 16, 2017 5:42 pm
+JMJ+
UncleBob wrote:
Wed Aug 16, 2017 5:22 pm
wosbald wrote:
Wed Aug 16, 2017 4:24 pm
It is certainly not by rioting or becoming violent. It’s not by putting yourselves out on the street corners that we resist him. It is not in shouting up into the void above Fifth Avenue in New York that we express true discontent at his election despite having lost the popular vote.

No, we resist by doing the one thing that a celebrity can stand least. We resist by ignoring him and all of the people who may, rightly or wrongly, use his name to support racism, xenophobia, and sexism.
This is an interesting strategy. Well, except to resist abortion, right? :wink:
Political action can certainly be acceptable. And even violence is not absolutely precluded. Capital punishment is not precluded. Revolution is not precluded. Hell, even deporting the Jews from Spain is not precluded.

But is it prudent here and now? Does it serve the Common Good?
I dunno. How white is the "Common Good"?
"One man's theology is another man's belly laugh." - Robert A. Heinlein

"Many of the points here, taken to their logical conclusions, don't hold up to logic; they're simply Godded-up ways of saying "I don't like that." - Skip

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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by wosbald » Wed Aug 16, 2017 6:00 pm

+JMJ+
UncleBob wrote:
Wed Aug 16, 2017 5:51 pm
wosbald wrote:
Wed Aug 16, 2017 5:42 pm
UncleBob wrote:
Wed Aug 16, 2017 5:22 pm
wosbald wrote:
Wed Aug 16, 2017 4:24 pm
It is certainly not by rioting or becoming violent. It’s not by putting yourselves out on the street corners that we resist him. It is not in shouting up into the void above Fifth Avenue in New York that we express true discontent at his election despite having lost the popular vote.

No, we resist by doing the one thing that a celebrity can stand least. We resist by ignoring him and all of the people who may, rightly or wrongly, use his name to support racism, xenophobia, and sexism.
This is an interesting strategy. Well, except to resist abortion, right? :wink:
Political action can certainly be acceptable. And even violence is not absolutely precluded. Capital punishment is not precluded. Revolution is not precluded. Hell, even deporting the Jews from Spain is not precluded.

But is it prudent here and now? Does it serve the Common Good?
I dunno. How white is the "Common Good"?
Dunno. I've no answers for you. Other than you're not helping things by staying on the outside.




"In the end, My Immaculate Heart will triumph." - Our Lady of Fatima

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