THE CATHOLIC THREAD

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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by Del » Sun Oct 08, 2017 6:56 pm

This position by the Brothers of Charity pulls a fast one, a sophistic rhetoric trick. They assert that "exceptional circumstances exist" in which killing a person before his natural death would the most charitable act. This situation does not exist in the real world, if we care about life and human dignity. We can treat people with pain relief and comfort as long as needed.

But it might become expensive, and then the worthless patient is just not worth our time. This is the line that has been crossed in Belgium.
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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by hugodrax » Sun Oct 08, 2017 7:13 pm

Del wrote:
Sun Oct 08, 2017 6:56 pm
This position by the Brothers of Charity pulls a fast one, a sophistic rhetoric trick. They assert that "exceptional circumstances exist" in which killing a person before his natural death would the most charitable act. This situation does not exist in the real world, if we care about life and human dignity. We can treat people with pain relief and comfort as long as needed.

But it might become expensive, and then the worthless patient is just not worth our time. This is the line that has been crossed in Belgium.
Is the world so black and white, though?
Etiam mihi opinio anserem perirent.

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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by Del » Sun Oct 08, 2017 8:37 pm

hugodrax wrote:
Sun Oct 08, 2017 7:13 pm
Del wrote:
Sun Oct 08, 2017 6:56 pm
This position by the Brothers of Charity pulls a fast one, a sophistic rhetoric trick. They assert that "exceptional circumstances exist" in which killing a person before his natural death would be the most charitable act. This situation does not exist in the real world, if we care about life and human dignity. We can treat people with pain relief and comfort as long as needed.

But it might become expensive, and then the worthless patient is just not worth our time. This is the line that has been crossed in Belgium.
Is the world so black and white, though?
Is there good? And evil?

I think so.

We should do good and avoid evil.

Other people may forge ahead into moral ambiguity, but we still have a duty to call it as we see it. Christian moral discernment teaches that we do not own our lives; we cannot dispense with a human life when we find it inconvenient.
"Utter frogshit from start to finish." - Onyx

"Let all bitterness and wrath and anger and clamor and slander be put away from you, along with all malice. Be kind to one another, tender-hearted, forgiving each other, just as God in Christ also has forgiven you." - Eph 4

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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by Rusty » Sun Oct 08, 2017 9:21 pm

Del wrote:
Sun Oct 08, 2017 8:37 pm
hugodrax wrote:
Sun Oct 08, 2017 7:13 pm
Del wrote:
Sun Oct 08, 2017 6:56 pm
This position by the Brothers of Charity pulls a fast one, a sophistic rhetoric trick. They assert that "exceptional circumstances exist" in which killing a person before his natural death would be the most charitable act. This situation does not exist in the real world, if we care about life and human dignity. We can treat people with pain relief and comfort as long as needed.

But it might become expensive, and then the worthless patient is just not worth our time. This is the line that has been crossed in Belgium.
Is the world so black and white, though?
Is there good? And evil?

I think so.

We should do good and avoid evil.

Other people may forge ahead into moral ambiguity, but we still have a duty to call it as we see it. Christian moral discernment teaches that we do not own our lives; we cannot dispense with a human life when we find it inconvenient.
I think this idea is at the crux of this: "Christian moral discernment teaches that we do not own our lives; we cannot dispense with a human life when we find it inconvenient."

So the result is the compulsion to prolong life even against the determined choice of the person whose life it is. That may result in much more suffering for that individual. And it can be considered evil. And I would guess that you disagree that the life belongs to the individual.

The choice of the individual is behind assisted death legislation. Not the expediency or economics of maintaining them against their will.
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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by wosbald » Sun Oct 08, 2017 9:59 pm

+JMJ+
Rusty wrote:
Sun Oct 08, 2017 9:21 pm
The choice of the individual is behind assisted death legislation. Not the expediency or economics of maintaining them against their will.
Perhaps. Or perhaps both.

But I thought the convo was about the Catholic identity of the Charity Bros.




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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by Rusty » Mon Oct 09, 2017 5:39 am

wosbald wrote:
Sun Oct 08, 2017 9:59 pm
+JMJ+
Rusty wrote:
Sun Oct 08, 2017 9:21 pm
The choice of the individual is behind assisted death legislation. Not the expediency or economics of maintaining them against their will.
Perhaps. Or perhaps both.

But I thought the convo was about the Catholic identity of the Charity Bros.
If a group or individual self-identifies as Catholic I accept that. I'm not qualified or knowledgeable on this topic to argue the point and it may not be pertinent to me. But there is a bit of a journey even to vaguely understand the points that Catholics here make. If individual autonomy in the matter of ones life is denied then something else has to be happening. Del's explanations of socialized medicine are another theory concerning the events if one insists that individual autonomy doesn't exist. But the law says otherwise in these places. And this is probably relevant to my comment on Del's ideological comments and your response to that.
Last edited by Rusty on Mon Oct 09, 2017 5:53 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by hugodrax » Mon Oct 09, 2017 5:43 am

Rusty wrote:
Mon Oct 09, 2017 5:39 am
wosbald wrote:
Sun Oct 08, 2017 9:59 pm
+JMJ+
Rusty wrote:
Sun Oct 08, 2017 9:21 pm
The choice of the individual is behind assisted death legislation. Not the expediency or economics of maintaining them against their will.
Perhaps. Or perhaps both.

But I thought the convo was about the Catholic identity of the Charity Bros.
If a group or individual self-identifies as Catholic I accept that. I'm not qualified or knowledgeable on this topic to argue the point and it may not be pertinent to me. But there is a bit of a journey even to vaguely understand the points that Catholics here make. If individual autonomy in the matter of ones life is denied then something else has to be happening. Del's explanations of socialized medicine are another theory concerning the events if one insists that individual autonomy doesn't exist. But the law says otherwise in these places.
Watching people deny the existence of refrigerators is endlessly fascinating.
That last line is amusing. You consistently ignore a pretty big fracking refrigerator, Rusty.
Etiam mihi opinio anserem perirent.

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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by Rusty » Mon Oct 09, 2017 6:01 am

hugodrax wrote:
Mon Oct 09, 2017 5:43 am
Rusty wrote:
Mon Oct 09, 2017 5:39 am
wosbald wrote:
Sun Oct 08, 2017 9:59 pm
+JMJ+
Rusty wrote:
Sun Oct 08, 2017 9:21 pm
The choice of the individual is behind assisted death legislation. Not the expediency or economics of maintaining them against their will.
Perhaps. Or perhaps both.

But I thought the convo was about the Catholic identity of the Charity Bros.
If a group or individual self-identifies as Catholic I accept that. I'm not qualified or knowledgeable on this topic to argue the point and it may not be pertinent to me. But there is a bit of a journey even to vaguely understand the points that Catholics here make. If individual autonomy in the matter of ones life is denied then something else has to be happening. Del's explanations of socialized medicine are another theory concerning the events if one insists that individual autonomy doesn't exist. But the law says otherwise in these places.
Watching people deny the existence of refrigerators is endlessly fascinating.
That last line is amusing. You consistently ignore a pretty big fracking refrigerator, Rusty.
I think there is symmetry in ignoring refrigerators. Both sides see the other as ignoring a refrigerator. I removed the comment because it is loaded language and not particular helpful. The point I wanted to make is that it is a stretch to understand each other. At least that's true for me.

It's just as Einstein told us; it's the theory that determines what we see.
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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by hugodrax » Mon Oct 09, 2017 6:21 am

Rusty wrote:
Mon Oct 09, 2017 6:01 am
hugodrax wrote:
Mon Oct 09, 2017 5:43 am
Rusty wrote:
Mon Oct 09, 2017 5:39 am
wosbald wrote:
Sun Oct 08, 2017 9:59 pm
+JMJ+
Rusty wrote:
Sun Oct 08, 2017 9:21 pm
The choice of the individual is behind assisted death legislation. Not the expediency or economics of maintaining them against their will.
Perhaps. Or perhaps both.

But I thought the convo was about the Catholic identity of the Charity Bros.
If a group or individual self-identifies as Catholic I accept that. I'm not qualified or knowledgeable on this topic to argue the point and it may not be pertinent to me. But there is a bit of a journey even to vaguely understand the points that Catholics here make. If individual autonomy in the matter of ones life is denied then something else has to be happening. Del's explanations of socialized medicine are another theory concerning the events if one insists that individual autonomy doesn't exist. But the law says otherwise in these places.
Watching people deny the existence of refrigerators is endlessly fascinating.
That last line is amusing. You consistently ignore a pretty big fracking refrigerator, Rusty.
I think there is symmetry in ignoring refrigerators. Both sides see the other as ignoring a refrigerator. I removed the comment because it is loaded language and not particular helpful. The point I wanted to make is that it is a stretch to understand each other. At least that's true for me.

It's just as Einstein told us; it's the theory that determines what we see.
Of course. And honest people try to rise above it but may fall prey themselves on any day. I didn't think it was divisive. I thought you were expressing self-deprecating humor.
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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by Del » Mon Oct 09, 2017 6:38 am

Rusty wrote:
Sun Oct 08, 2017 9:21 pm
Del wrote:
Sun Oct 08, 2017 8:37 pm
hugodrax wrote:
Sun Oct 08, 2017 7:13 pm
Del wrote:
Sun Oct 08, 2017 6:56 pm
This position by the Brothers of Charity pulls a fast one, a sophistic rhetoric trick. They assert that "exceptional circumstances exist" in which killing a person before his natural death would be the most charitable act. This situation does not exist in the real world, if we care about life and human dignity. We can treat people with pain relief and comfort as long as needed.

But it might become expensive, and then the worthless patient is just not worth our time. This is the line that has been crossed in Belgium.
Is the world so black and white, though?
Is there good? And evil?

I think so.

We should do good and avoid evil.

Other people may forge ahead into moral ambiguity, but we still have a duty to call it as we see it. Christian moral discernment teaches that we do not own our lives; we cannot dispense with a human life when we find it inconvenient.
I think this idea is at the crux of this: "Christian moral discernment teaches that we do not own our lives; we cannot dispense with a human life when we find it inconvenient."

So the result is the compulsion to prolong life even against the determined choice of the person whose life it is. That may result in much more suffering for that individual. And it can be considered evil. And I would guess that you disagree that the life belongs to the individual.

The choice of the individual is behind assisted death legislation. Not the expediency or economics of maintaining them against their will.
To be clear: Catholic bioethics stresses that it is immoral to unnaturally prolong life, just as it is immoral to unnaturally end life.

The new thing is that we have elevated "personal choice" above "respect for life." It seems that we have forgotten how often people tend to make bad choices, especially when they are in distress.

And if our culture embrace this "choice," it won't be long before government feels entitled to meddle in our private decisions about who lives and who dies.

For my part, I wonder at the sudden appearance of this notion that killing a person is suitable medical practice.
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"Let all bitterness and wrath and anger and clamor and slander be put away from you, along with all malice. Be kind to one another, tender-hearted, forgiving each other, just as God in Christ also has forgiven you." - Eph 4

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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by wosbald » Mon Oct 09, 2017 7:13 am

+JMJ+
Rusty wrote:
Mon Oct 09, 2017 5:39 am
If a group or individual self-identifies as Catholic I accept that. I'm not qualified or knowledgeable on this topic to argue the point and it may not be pertinent to me. But there is a bit of a journey even to vaguely understand the points that Catholics here make. If individual autonomy in the matter of ones life is denied then something else has to be happening. Del's explanations of socialized medicine are another theory concerning the events if one insists that individual autonomy doesn't exist. But the law says otherwise in these places. And this is probably relevant to my comment on Del's ideological comments and your response to that.
Ohhh, I can see what yer saying, now. My point was only that Del is not ideological in an anathematizable, Catholic sense.

But sure, in your sense, the Pope and Catholicity in general is ideological. Which is why I'd said that the Catholic Gospel is banned on CPS, as even the Pope is effectively silenced. Though not reducible to politics, Catholicity necessarily opens onto the sphere of politics.

But if you see Catholicity as ideological, then YMMV, sho'nuff.




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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by Rusty » Mon Oct 09, 2017 7:57 am

Del wrote:
Mon Oct 09, 2017 6:38 am
Rusty wrote:
Sun Oct 08, 2017 9:21 pm
Del wrote:
Sun Oct 08, 2017 8:37 pm
hugodrax wrote:
Sun Oct 08, 2017 7:13 pm
Del wrote:
Sun Oct 08, 2017 6:56 pm
This position by the Brothers of Charity pulls a fast one, a sophistic rhetoric trick. They assert that "exceptional circumstances exist" in which killing a person before his natural death would be the most charitable act. This situation does not exist in the real world, if we care about life and human dignity. We can treat people with pain relief and comfort as long as needed.

But it might become expensive, and then the worthless patient is just not worth our time. This is the line that has been crossed in Belgium.
Is the world so black and white, though?
Is there good? And evil?

I think so.

We should do good and avoid evil.

Other people may forge ahead into moral ambiguity, but we still have a duty to call it as we see it. Christian moral discernment teaches that we do not own our lives; we cannot dispense with a human life when we find it inconvenient.
I think this idea is at the crux of this: "Christian moral discernment teaches that we do not own our lives; we cannot dispense with a human life when we find it inconvenient."

So the result is the compulsion to prolong life even against the determined choice of the person whose life it is. That may result in much more suffering for that individual. And it can be considered evil. And I would guess that you disagree that the life belongs to the individual.

The choice of the individual is behind assisted death legislation. Not the expediency or economics of maintaining them against their will.
To be clear: Catholic bioethics stresses that it is immoral to unnaturally prolong life, just as it is immoral to unnaturally end life.

The new thing is that we have elevated "personal choice" above "respect for life." It seems that we have forgotten how often people tend to make bad choices, especially when they are in distress.

And if our culture embrace this "choice," it won't be long before government feels entitled to meddle in our private decisions about who lives and who dies.

For my part, I wonder at the sudden appearance of this notion that killing a person is suitable medical practice.
I'm sort of content with where the discussion is now. It was your point on individual autonomy ie that people don't own their own lives that really made it shockingly clear to me. But your first statement here is as clear as mud to me. You're not replying to a Catholic. You're leaving it up to an atheist to define "unnaturally prolong life" & "unnaturally end life". That's fine; what could go wrong? :D
As soon as you bring in Gov, as you have, we're into politics. BTW I don't believe your statement. We are the government eg in American terms .... "Government of the people, by the people, for the people, etc". BTW if you substitute healthcare for government in that statement you have Canada's healthcare. :D

Did you read the Brothers pdf document? They do not reject the individual autonomy wrt death, which is very real in Belgium.
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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by Skip » Wed Oct 11, 2017 11:09 am

[mod]

Okay, I deleted a few posts here, with no warnings being given - either warnings that I would delete or warnings in the formal board sense of the word. The original post wasn't necessarily a problem, but replies to it came too close to the "you know whos in the news" threads that have been outlawed for some time.

[/mod]

Jedi business; return to your drinks.

Which should answer your question, Del.
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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by wosbald » Wed Oct 11, 2017 2:42 pm

+JMJ+

It seems to me that proponents of a Filial Correction may have finally have grounds for one (though on entirely different grounds than the ill-concieved earlier attempt).

In a very recent papal address, Pope Francis has affirmed that the Death Penalty is "contrary to human dignity". Aye, this may certainly said to be true. OTOH, it can equally be said to be true that it is contrary to human dignity that Society allows itself to be victimized by an unjust aggressor.

So, his further claim that it is morally "inadmissible" is a step too far. All earlier Catechisms were dutifully careful to claim its strict moral admissibility, even whilst laudably trying to blunt its application by appealing to its untimeliness in the context of modern society.

An author at America magazine, in a rush to claim an ideological victory upon this intractably problematic philosophico-theological ground, had attributed Magisterial authority to this aforementioned papal address (a claim of which, thankfully, I got a screenshot):

Pope Francis: The death penalty is contrary to the Gospel [Original Version]
Image

He did so in a magisterial talk on Oct. 11 to an audience of …
—————————————————————————————————

However, within the hour, America had beaten a hasty retreat:

Pope Francis: The death penalty is contrary to the Gospel [Emended Version]
Image

He did so in a major talk on Oct. 11 to an audience of …
—————————————————————————————————

There is too much going on here to analyze in the space of a combox, though it certainly seems as if the Pope is flirting with Modernistic thought-patterns. That he wants to mitigate the death penalty is certainly a licit POV and a laudable goal. But short-circuiting the intractable problematics posed by Catholicity by fiat would not be. The fact that America tacitly admitted that this claim is not magisterial is significant for the relevance of "filial corrections" in general and for the assertion of the Sensus Catholicus in particular.

This is certainly a time for Catholics to be vigilant. No partisan group may bogart the Church or the Papacy for its own political ends, regardless of how noble or timely those ends may seem to be.




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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by Del » Wed Oct 11, 2017 7:20 pm

Skip wrote:
Wed Oct 11, 2017 11:09 am
[mod]

Okay, I deleted a few posts here, with no warnings being given - either warnings that I would delete or warnings in the formal board sense of the word. The original post wasn't necessarily a problem, but replies to it came too close to the "you know whos in the news" threads that have been outlawed for some time.

[/mod]

Jedi business; return to your drinks.

Which should answer your question, Del.
Yes. I didn't think ahead. Thank you.
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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by wosbald » Sat Oct 14, 2017 3:52 pm

+JMJ+

Pope's death penalty views may mean new approach to criminal justice
Image
Pope Francis at the Wednesday general audience in St. Peter's Square on June 17, 2015. Credit: Bohumil Petrik / CNA

[…]

Francis proposes that because the Church has gradually developed a deeper understanding of human dignity, over time, we are now able to recognize that execution is always immoral.

The development of doctrine is a thorny theological concept. Theologians have already begun asking whether Francis' proposal represents a development of prior positions, or a rupture from them. This debate will be complex, likely contentious, and not quickly resolved. But given increased attention to the death penalty in the last half-century, it is an important question to resolve.

[…]

Death penalty opponents across the world have cheered Pope Francis' comments on capital punishment. But his remarks on Thursday might also reveal something about the Pope's understanding of doctrine's development, a theological issue with effect on many other elements of the pontiff's teaching, including the already controversial Amoris Laetitia. That conversation will probably make fewer headlines, but for the Church, its implications could be significant.




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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by Del » Sat Oct 14, 2017 9:31 pm

There was no post here on the centennial of the Miracle of the Sun.

Making reparations now.
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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by wosbald » Sun Oct 15, 2017 5:19 am

+JMJ+

Middle East’s well-kept secret revealed when Jihad met the Virgin
Image
In the Middle East, Muslims and Christians live cheek-by-jowl, a fact of life with sometimes surprising consequences. (Credit: Stock image.)

It's a well-kept secret of societies where Christians and Muslims rub shoulders that conversions from one faith to the other happen with sometimes surprising frequency. Muslims who embrace Christianity face special challenges, but that doesn't mean it doesn't happen, as a story from Lebanon about the time Jihad met the Virgin illustrates.

[…]

Many Lebanese Catholics have stories to tell of conversions they personally witnessed, or in which they played a role. Both for poignancy and sheer irony, however, few stories pack the punch of one told by a corporate CEO my colleague Inés San Martín and I met last week.

[…]

A staunch Catholic, he’s a member of Opus Dei (a supernumerary, meaning he’s married with children) and a daily Mass-goer. He continued emerging from the bunkers of the town he was in to head to the local church every morning, despite the risk of being exposed to the bombs.

One morning, he said, a Muslim man he’d come to know through the NGO walked up to him on the way to morning Mass and asked if he could join him. The man’s name, by the way, was “Jihad” - it’s actually a fairly common male name among Muslims, despite its near-exclusive association in the West with terrorist violence.

Jihad, he said, was disabled, having lost one of his arms at the age of 14 in a woodworking accident. The CEO discouraged him from going to Mass, saying it wasn’t safe - not merely because of the danger of being caught in a bombardment, but because Jihad’s Muslim neighbors might be angry, or even blame the CEO and the organization he ran for “proselytizing” Muslims.

Jihad agreed not to go to Mass, the CEO said, but it was clear he wasn’t happy.

In mid-August that year, the CEO told us, Jihad came back and said he had heard that the next day was a major feast devoted to the Virgin Mary. (He was referring to the feast of the Assumption.) He had a special love for Mary, he said, and he really wanted to go to Mass. …




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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by Del » Sun Oct 15, 2017 7:44 am

wosbald wrote:
Sun Oct 15, 2017 5:19 am
+JMJ+

Middle East’s well-kept secret revealed when Jihad met the Virgin
Image
In the Middle East, Muslims and Christians live cheek-by-jowl, a fact of life with sometimes surprising consequences. (Credit: Stock image.)

It's a well-kept secret of societies where Christians and Muslims rub shoulders that conversions from one faith to the other happen with sometimes surprising frequency. Muslims who embrace Christianity face special challenges, but that doesn't mean it doesn't happen, as a story from Lebanon about the time Jihad met the Virgin illustrates.

[…]

Many Lebanese Catholics have stories to tell of conversions they personally witnessed, or in which they played a role. Both for poignancy and sheer irony, however, few stories pack the punch of one told by a corporate CEO my colleague Inés San Martín and I met last week.

[…]

A staunch Catholic, he’s a member of Opus Dei (a supernumerary, meaning he’s married with children) and a daily Mass-goer. He continued emerging from the bunkers of the town he was in to head to the local church every morning, despite the risk of being exposed to the bombs.

One morning, he said, a Muslim man he’d come to know through the NGO walked up to him on the way to morning Mass and asked if he could join him. The man’s name, by the way, was “Jihad” - it’s actually a fairly common male name among Muslims, despite its near-exclusive association in the West with terrorist violence.

Jihad, he said, was disabled, having lost one of his arms at the age of 14 in a woodworking accident. The CEO discouraged him from going to Mass, saying it wasn’t safe - not merely because of the danger of being caught in a bombardment, but because Jihad’s Muslim neighbors might be angry, or even blame the CEO and the organization he ran for “proselytizing” Muslims.

Jihad agreed not to go to Mass, the CEO said, but it was clear he wasn’t happy.

In mid-August that year, the CEO told us, Jihad came back and said he had heard that the next day was a major feast devoted to the Virgin Mary. (He was referring to the feast of the Assumption.) He had a special love for Mary, he said, and he really wanted to go to Mass. …
I recall several years ago, when fellows here scoffed at me for suggesting that love for Mary is something Christians and Muslims share, such that she can be a bridge for understanding.
"Utter frogshit from start to finish." - Onyx

"Let all bitterness and wrath and anger and clamor and slander be put away from you, along with all malice. Be kind to one another, tender-hearted, forgiving each other, just as God in Christ also has forgiven you." - Eph 4

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wosbald
Crux' Cleveland Correspondent
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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by wosbald » Sun Oct 15, 2017 12:57 pm

+JMJ+

Mary’s heart ‘gate of heaven,’ San Francisco archbishop tells Massgoers
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Carrying a statue of Our Lady of Fatima, worshippers process through San Francisco near St. Mary's Cathedral during an Oct. 7 rosary rally and consecration of the Archdiocese of San Francisco to the Immaculate Heart of Mary. (Credit: CNS photo/Debra Greenblat, Catholic San Francisco.)

In a ceremony last week, Archbishop Salvatore J. Cordileone consecrated the Archdiocese of San Francisco to the Immaculate Heart of Mary, saying, "In her maternal presence, Mary is there to advocate for us."

SAN FRANCISCO - Archbishop Salvatore J. Cordileone consecrated the Archdiocese of San Francisco to the Immaculate Heart of Mary Oct. 7, telling thousands of pilgrims packed shoulder-to-shoulder in St. Mary’s Cathedral that “her heart is the gate of heaven.”

The consecration combined the celebration of the centenary of the apparitions of Our Lady of Fatima in 1917 with the archdiocese’s annual rosary rally procession.

Just as Mary had a special role in mothering God’s son, she has a special role in mothering each of us into life in her son, the archbishop said in his homily.

We don’t need Mary to point us to Jesus, he said.

“We know where he is,” said San Francisco’s archbishop. “He’s in the tabernacle, in the sacraments, in his word. He is present in the church. Rather, what we need is someone to pick us up and carry us to him, because we are too weak to get there on our own.

“In her maternal presence, Mary is there to advocate for us,” he said. …




"In the end, My Immaculate Heart will triumph." - Our Lady of Fatima

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