THE CATHOLIC THREAD

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wosbald
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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by wosbald » Wed Oct 25, 2017 5:44 am

+JMJ+

Latin American leader calls Pope's Pan-Amazon Synod a 'kairos'
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Representatives of Colombia's indigenous community pose with Pope Francis in Villavicencio, Colombia, Friday, Sept. 8, 2017. (Credit: L'Osservatore Romano/Pool Photo via AP.)

Mauricio López, Executive Secretary of REPAM, the Pan-Amazonian Ecclesial Network, said, "We must understand the synod as a call to conversion, change, which the pope is doing, but also look beyond." He says, "it is not enough to thank the pope." Instead he thinks the important thing is that from the fruits of the synod, "comes a deep commitment of fraternity, discernment and ecclesial articulation, involving also people of good will, so that what gives us so much hope today, is sustainable in time and becomes something that can last for a lifetime. If not, the synod will remain as an opportunity, a place for great ideas that never came to fruition."

Among other things, López said:
  • Life in the Pan-Amazonian region is at risk, threatened by mining and oil companies producing “environmental disasters” with the complicity of local governments.
  • The voice of the laity, particularly indigenous people and peasants, must be heard at the synod.
  • Priestly celibacy “is not for us to discuss, or even comment on,” but added that there are several “hopeful experiences” of permanent deacons.
  • The challenges of the region can be divided according to two of Pope Francis’s recent documents: Evangeli Gaudium, meaning the challenge of pastoral conversion, and Laudato Si’, meaning the challenge of an ecological conversion.
  • “We need to understand that the synodal call is embedded in a greater kairos. Therefore, we have to be careful not to put all our expectations, energies and forces in the synod.”
What follows are excerpts of the 45-minute phone conversation López had with Crux. …




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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by wosbald » Wed Oct 25, 2017 10:06 am

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Pope Francis' unprecedented letter to Cardinal Sarah underscores vision for a church engaged [Opinion]
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Cardinal Robert Sarah, prefect of the Congregation for Divine Worship and the Sacraments, is pictured May 17, 2016. (CNS/Bob Roller)

… The Holy Father's letter [to Cardinal Sarah] was unprecedented. I have searched my memory and my history books and cannot find such a public rebuke of a cardinal. (Pope Alexander VI's use of cantarella to kill of some of his cardinal enemies is the stuff of popular culture, not historical fact.) Cardinal Louis Billot got into a protracted struggle with Pope Pius XI over the latter's condemnation of Action Française, and resigned his cardinal's hat, but the initiative was apparently Billot's. Certainly, not since Vatican II have we seen such a public spanking of a high-ranking prelate.

[…]

Liturgical translations may have been at issue in the pope's rebuke, but more is at stake. In the first place, Pope Francis is sending a message to the entire curia that he will not tolerate insubordination any longer. Members of the curia, even cardinals, work to help the pope in his apostolic ministry, not the other way 'round. Usually, the men selected have some expertise in the area of competency for the dicastery they are appointed to lead, although — and here I fault Francis — there is nothing in Sarah's biography to suggest any special competence in liturgical theology. In any event, they are there to help the pope do his job, and we have all heard stories of people in the curia trying to undermine Francis. Next March, he will have been pope for five years. It is time for everyone in the Roman curia to get on board or find another line of work. The fact that Sarah is a curial cardinal also explains why Francis was so public and direct in this rebuke while he has chosen only to quietly ignore the cardinals who posed faux-dubia about Amoris Laetitia. …




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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by wosbald » Sat Oct 28, 2017 6:42 am

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Pope insists on moral duty to protect human dignity, especially in conflicts ‎
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Pope Francis meeting participants in the 3rd Conference on International Humanitarian Law.

Pope Francis on Saturday insisted on the moral duty of protecting human dignity in every circumstance, especially in armed conflict, saying at the end of life we will be judged on our mercy and solidarity for the victims of war. He was speaking to some 250 participants in the 3rd Conference on International Humanitarian Law sponsored by the European Society of International Law. The Oct. 27-28 meeting in Rome discussed “The protection of civilian population in warfare - The role of Humanitarian Organizations and Civil Society.”


Atrocities and outrage during conflicts

The Pope noted that the Holy See, convinced of the essentially negative nature of war and man's most dignified aspiration to abolish it, ratified the 1977 Additional Protocols to the 1949 Geneva Conventions, in order to encourage the “humanization of the effect of armed conflict.” He drew attention to the atrocities and outrage perpetrated on civil populations and persons during conflicts, with mutilated and headless bodies and “our brothers and sisters tortured, crucified and burnt alive,” in total disregard for their human dignity. The destruction or damaging of cultural treasures, hospitals, schools and places of worship deprive entire generations of their right to life, health, education and religion. …




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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by hugodrax » Sat Oct 28, 2017 6:54 am

You bore me unspeakably, Wosbald.
Etiam mihi opinio anserem perirent.

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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by Del » Sat Oct 28, 2017 12:53 pm

hugodrax wrote:
Sat Oct 28, 2017 6:54 am
You bore me unspeakably, Wosbald.
I appreciate how Wozzie keeps an eye on the pope's news and comments for us.

But Francis doesn't do anything interesting more than once or twice a month.

And the media's reporting on him is even less interesting.
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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by wosbald » Sat Oct 28, 2017 2:37 pm

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Exorcist says there’s a demon that targets the family
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(Credit: FlickrToddPageCC by NC 20 24.08.15.)

An exorcist says that the devil is behind things like divorce which are are attacks on the family. He said, “Even today, and I'm more than 50 years old, just thinking that my mother and father love each other forever, I find comfort and courage. In contrast, the children of separated parents are more fragile and wavering.”

[…]

In that regard, the priest added that the devil also seeks to attack the family through ideologies and lifestyles, as well as individualistic thinking and the spread of divorce.

“They think ‘if I don’t like my husband anymore, I would be better off divorcing’ but they forget about the consequences to the children and society,” he said. “This mentality that works against the family pleases the devil - he knows that a man who is alone without any points of reference is manipulable and unstable.

[…]

In 2014, Pope Francis gave an address to the Charismatic Renewal, in which he pointed out that the devil seeks to destroy families because that is where Jesus grows, in the midst of the love of the spouses and in the lives of their children.

“He grows in the love of the spouses, he grows in the lives of the children. And that’s why the enemy attacks the family so much. The devil does not love the family. He seeks to destroy it, he wants to eliminate love there,” he warned at Rome’s Olympic stadium before 52,000 people. …




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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by wosbald » Mon Oct 30, 2017 10:25 am

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Cardinal Muller backs Pope Francis against critics of ‘Amoris Laetitia’
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Pope Francis is pictured with Cardinal Gerhard Müller, former prefect of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, during his general audience in St. Peter's Square at the Vatican Nov. 19. (Credit: Paul Haring/CNS.)

Cardinal Gerhard Müller acknowledges in his writing that there can be “mitigating factors in guilt,” referring to the case of access to the sacraments for divorced and civilly remarried people. The prelate also argued against the self-proclaimed liberal-progressive theologians who raise the phrases they like of Pope Francis to the level of dogma while they question papal magisterium in 'Humanae Vitae.'

ROME— Cardinal Gerhard Müller, allegedly replaced by the pontiff as the Vatican’s doctrinal chief for his rejection of Amoris Laetitia, has penned an essay defending it.

[…]

Müller also writes that the “bitter controversy” that’s developed around chapter 8 of the apostolic exhortation, called “Accompanying, discerning and integrating weakness,” is “regrettable.”

The question of communion for the “divorced and civilly remarried,” he writes, has been “falsely elevated to the rank of a decisive question of Catholicism and a measure of ideological comparison in order to decide whether one is conservative or liberal, in favor or against the pope.”

According to Müller, Pope Francis is more concerned with the pastoral effort to strengthen marriages and preventing their breakdown than the “pastoral care of [marital] failures.”

Therefore, from a new evangelization perspective, the effort to ensure that all of the baptized participate in the Mass on Sundays and holy days of obligation is more important than “the problem of the possibility of receiving communion in a legitimate and valid way from a limited group of Catholics with an uncertain marital situation.” …




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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by wosbald » Mon Oct 30, 2017 11:41 pm

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Faith, culture fused in a day to remember deceased loved ones
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Aztec dancers participate in the Dia de los Muertos (Day of the Dead) celebration at Calvary Cemetery in Los Angeles Nov. 1, 2015. (Credit: Victor Aleman/Archdiocese of Los Angeles via CNS.)

Dia de los Muertos evolved in Mexico from the rituals of Aztecs and Mayans. When the Spanish arrived, indigenous beliefs and Catholic religious practices merged, combining for a mix of somber celebration in homes and churches, and more lively festivities in secular spaces.

[…]

Dia de los Muertos begins at midnight Oct. 31, when it is said that the gates of heaven open and the spirits of the little children (“angelitos”) are allowed to reunite with their families for 24 hours. This is Dia de los Inocentes, the Day of the Innocents, and coincides with All Saints’ Day.

The following day, Nov. 2, is the actual Day of the Dead. It also is All Souls’ Day.

[…]

The purpose of both Dia de los Inocentes and Dia de los Muertos is to remember the dead and pray for their souls in purgatory, to help them atone for their sins and move into the presence of Christ.

Dia de los Muertos evolved in Mexico from the rituals of Aztecs and Mayans. When the Spanish arrived, indigenous beliefs and Catholic religious practices merged, combining for a mix of somber celebration in homes and churches, and more lively festivities in secular spaces.

Bermejo said the heart of each day centers on prayer, but there are cultural traditions unique to Dia de los Muertos.

One of the most important aspects in Mexico is the creation of altars in homes in honor of deceased family members. The displays range from one to seven levels; from simple to extravagant. They are decorated with a cross, candles, and tissue paper cutouts, and filled with objects meant to draw the spirit of the loved one, such as photos, personal objects, and favorite foods.

Bright orange flowers, “cempasuchil,” are placed all around the altars and in the cemeteries. A type of marigold, the blossoms are said to guide the spirits with their vibrant colors and scent.

Another custom are the sugar skulls. They have become so popular that they have evolved into an art form for tattoo artists. People have images of their loved ones inked in elaborate sugar skull designs, in honor of the deceased and in hopes it will bring their blessings. …




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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by wosbald » Tue Oct 31, 2017 8:24 am

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How the dead danced with the living in medieval society
Image
A German painting of the Danse Macabre from the 18th century. Nine women of different social rank from empress to fool dance with the dead. The entire economy of salvation is depicted, from the Fall, through the crucifixion, to Heaven and Hell. Twelve more traditional Dance Macabre figures, from pope and emperor down to fool, surround the central image. (Credit: Wikimedia Commons.)

Dance of Death (Danse Macabre) murals typically depicted decaying corpses dancing amid representative figures of late medieval society, ranked highest to lowest: A pope, an emperor, a bishop, a king, a cardinal, a knight and down to a beggar, all ambling diffidently toward their mortal end while the corpses frolic with lithe movements and gestures.

In the Halloween season, American culture briefly participates in an ancient tradition of making the world of the dead visible to the living: Children dress as skeletons, teens go to horror movies and adults play the part of ghosts in haunted houses.

But what if the dead played a more active, more participatory role in our daily lives?

It might appear to be a strange question, but as a scholar of late medieval literature and art, I have found compelling evidence from our past that shows how the dead were well-integrated into people’s sense of community.

[…]

When modern viewers see images like the Dance of Death, they might associate them with certain well-known but frequently misunderstood cataclysms of the European Middle Ages, like the terrible plague that swept through England and came to be known as Black Death.

My research on these images, however, reveals a more subtle and nuanced attitude toward death, beginning with the evident beauty of the murals themselves, which endow the theme with color and vitality.

The image of group dance powerfully evokes the grace and fluidity of a community’s cohesion, symbolized by the linking of hands and bodies in a chain that crosses the barrier between life and death. Dance was a powerful metaphor in medieval culture. The Dance of Death may be responding to medieval folk practices, when people came at night to dance in churchyards, and perhaps to the “dancing mania” recorded in the late 14th century, when people danced furiously until they fell to the ground. But images of dance also provoked a viewer to participate in a “virtual” experience of a community. It depicted a society collectively facing up to human mortality. …




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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by Del » Tue Oct 31, 2017 9:08 am

wosbald wrote:
Tue Oct 31, 2017 8:24 am
+JMJ+

How the dead danced with the living in medieval society
Image
A German painting of the Danse Macabre from the 18th century. Nine women of different social rank from empress to fool dance with the dead. The entire economy of salvation is depicted, from the Fall, through the crucifixion, to Heaven and Hell. Twelve more traditional Dance Macabre figures, from pope and emperor down to fool, surround the central image. (Credit: Wikimedia Commons.)

Dance of Death (Danse Macabre) murals typically depicted decaying corpses dancing amid representative figures of late medieval society, ranked highest to lowest: A pope, an emperor, a bishop, a king, a cardinal, a knight and down to a beggar, all ambling diffidently toward their mortal end while the corpses frolic with lithe movements and gestures.

In the Halloween season, American culture briefly participates in an ancient tradition of making the world of the dead visible to the living: Children dress as skeletons, teens go to horror movies and adults play the part of ghosts in haunted houses.

But what if the dead played a more active, more participatory role in our daily lives?

It might appear to be a strange question, but as a scholar of late medieval literature and art, I have found compelling evidence from our past that shows how the dead were well-integrated into people’s sense of community.

[…]

When modern viewers see images like the Dance of Death, they might associate them with certain well-known but frequently misunderstood cataclysms of the European Middle Ages, like the terrible plague that swept through England and came to be known as Black Death.

My research on these images, however, reveals a more subtle and nuanced attitude toward death, beginning with the evident beauty of the murals themselves, which endow the theme with color and vitality.

The image of group dance powerfully evokes the grace and fluidity of a community’s cohesion, symbolized by the linking of hands and bodies in a chain that crosses the barrier between life and death. Dance was a powerful metaphor in medieval culture. The Dance of Death may be responding to medieval folk practices, when people came at night to dance in churchyards, and perhaps to the “dancing mania” recorded in the late 14th century, when people danced furiously until they fell to the ground. But images of dance also provoked a viewer to participate in a “virtual” experience of a community. It depicted a society collectively facing up to human mortality. …
I still can't figure out what Crux thinks of their target audience. They often seem to aim for uncatechised, lukewarm, politically minded Catholics.

This article assumes that our relationship with the Dead is a historical, medieval thing, which we might consider bringing back a little bit.
Could bringing the dead back into a central role in the community offer a healthier perspective on death for contemporary Western cultures?

That process might begin with acknowledging the dead as an ongoing part of our image of community, which is built on the work of the dead who have come before us.
Like they have no clue what relationship we really have with death and the Dead. Memento mori!

Our pastor couldn't wait until November. Last Sunday, he gave a hearty sermon on praying for the souls in Purgatory and praying with the Saints. He spoke about how to gain indulgences for loves ones who have passed on. He talked about building a army of patron saints and grateful souls who were set free by our prayers and sacrifices, prayer warriors to empower us in our battles against evil and for evangelization.

There is nothing "lost" or "medieval" about our relationship with the Christians beyond the veil of death. We still carry the faith of ancient Christians who worshiped in the catacombs over the graves of martyrs.
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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by wosbald » Tue Oct 31, 2017 9:32 am

+JMJ+

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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by wosbald » Wed Nov 01, 2017 6:43 am

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Showing Its Age?
Image
Father Theodore Hesburgh, who convened the group that produced the 1967 Land O' Lakes statement on Catholic higher education, poses for a photo on Notre Dame campus in 1987

The Land O’Lakes Statement Could Use an Update

[…]

Updating “Land O’Lakes” now, in light of Francis’s ecclesiology, would thus be important—not because of the prospect of the unknown of the next pontificate, but rather because his papacy signals an epochal shift in global Catholicism and therefore U.S. Catholicism. Francis embodies a new relationship between propositional Catholicism and testimonial Catholicism—something that challenges both liberal and conservative takes on the relationship between higher education and the institutional Church. Though the propositional and dogmatic thinking of John Paul II and Benedict XVI constituted a big obstacle in the relationship between academic theology and the magisterium, it is time for liberal theologians to leave the papacies of those three decades in the past. There seems to be little consensus now, other than on the value of critical thinking about religion and culture, on the value of “Catholic” and “ecclesial.” On the other side, the language of Francis on life issues and its refusal to use the rhetoric of the “non-negotiable values” makes it apparently impossible for neo-conservative, traditionalist, and “orthodox” Catholicism to acknowledge the evangelical and missionary side of this pontificate and its potential for the culture of Catholic educators. It’s not clear whether Catholic theological academia still sees itself with an ecclesial role, cooperating in building the Catholic tradition.

Francis may have said little on Catholic higher education directly, but a reception (or non-reception, depending) of his ecclesiology would impact the future of Catholic colleges and universities. Reception would likely help correct some misperceptions on the real challenges facing Catholic higher education. The debate on the legacy of Land O’Lakes tends to focus on issues of Catholic “identity” and (or versus) “mission”, in a political-ecclesiological framework largely centered on the issue of the relationship between Catholic institutions of higher education and the institutional Church—the papacy and the bishops. This is a consequence of what happened after Land O’Lakes: a growing autonomy of Catholic universities from the Church, and the response of John Paul II with 1990’s Ex Corde Ecclesiae, issued in order to correct some trajectories of post-Vatican II Catholic higher education, especially in the United States.

In this respect, this pontificate has interacted less than its predecessors with academia, in part too because of Francis’s anti-elitist reluctance to engage in a dialogue with academic theologians. Yet his theology and ecclesiology are rich in suggestions for the future of Catholic higher education, and particularly applicable to the challenges of today, primarily the survival of the idea of “university as a community” that believes in the education of the human person, not her enslavement to the technocratic paradigm.

[…]




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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by wosbald » Wed Nov 01, 2017 8:04 am

+JMJ+

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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by Del » Wed Nov 01, 2017 1:53 pm

Hopefully, this is past the point of being too "political" for CPS, now that the Senate confirmation is done:

yeah, you knew it wouldn't be, Del-HD
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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by wosbald » Wed Nov 01, 2017 2:17 pm

+JMJ+
Del wrote:
Wed Nov 01, 2017 1:53 pm
yeah, you knew it wouldn't be, Del-HD
Who is this "Del-HD"? And what has been done with the one, true Del?




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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by hugodrax » Wed Nov 01, 2017 2:30 pm

wosbald wrote:
Wed Nov 01, 2017 2:17 pm
+JMJ+
Del wrote:
Wed Nov 01, 2017 1:53 pm
yeah, you knew it wouldn't be, Del-HD
Who is this "Del-HD"? And what has been done with the one, true Del?
Nothing. He's up to his usual shenanigans. No place for catholorepublicanism.

Now be quiet and go back to singlehandedly ruining this thread, will you?
Etiam mihi opinio anserem perirent.

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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by wosbald » Wed Nov 01, 2017 2:58 pm

+JMJ+
hugodrax wrote:
Wed Nov 01, 2017 2:30 pm
wosbald wrote:
Wed Nov 01, 2017 2:17 pm
Del wrote:
Wed Nov 01, 2017 1:53 pm
yeah, you knew it wouldn't be, Del-HD
Who is this "Del-HD"? And what has been done with the one, true Del?
Nothing. He's up to his usual shenanigans. No place for catholorepublicanism.

Now be quiet and go back to singlehandedly ruining this thread, will you?
Image




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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by John-Boy » Wed Nov 01, 2017 3:00 pm

Is the Friday fish thing all year?
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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by hugodrax » Wed Nov 01, 2017 3:04 pm

John-Boy wrote:
Wed Nov 01, 2017 3:00 pm
Is the Friday fish thing all year?
Yes and no.
Etiam mihi opinio anserem perirent.

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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by John-Boy » Wed Nov 01, 2017 3:06 pm

hugodrax wrote:
Wed Nov 01, 2017 3:04 pm
John-Boy wrote:
Wed Nov 01, 2017 3:00 pm
Is the Friday fish thing all year?
Yes and no.
I've been wanting to go to a fish fry thing at the local place. Will they have that this time of year? I think I'm putting that on my 2018 goal list... "Fish Fry at St. Joe's."
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