THE CATHOLIC THREAD

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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by wosbald » Thu Feb 09, 2017 2:49 pm

+JMJ+

For a good resource, one can read the Vulgate, the Douay/Challoner and, most excitingly, the Knox Bibles side-by side.*






*Site can also be configured to display each alone, all-by-its-lonesome.




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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by Hovannes » Sat Feb 11, 2017 11:02 am

wosbald wrote:
Thu Feb 09, 2017 2:49 pm
+JMJ+

For a good resource, one can read the Vulgate, the Douay/Challoner and, most excitingly, the Knox Bibles side-by side.*






*Site can also be configured to display each alone, all-by-its-lonesome.
That is cool!
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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by wosbald » Mon Feb 13, 2017 12:10 pm

+JMJ+

Since Francis is in continuity with tradition, his critics aren’t
Image
A traditional image of St. Thomas Aquinas, often cited by critics of Pope Francis.

For some time now it can be seen that some groups inside of the Catholic Church dislike Pope Francis. Nihil novum sub sole as John L. Allen correctly observes, other popes have experienced the same.

But, in recent days the attacks on Pope Francis just went a step further.

On Feb. 4, posters with the pope’s grumpy face asking “Where’s your mercy?” showed up on Saturday in the streets of Rome. While the posters reference some of Francis’s actions, it can be clearly understood that the background reason for them is doctrinal. Or better to say, ideological.

Authors of the posters most likely come from traditionalist or conservative groups, and they consider Francis’s teaching (at least) close to heresy.

That was followed a week later by a spoof version of the Vatican newspaper L’Osservatore Romano, expressing much the same sentiment.

At the same time, it is interesting to note how many of the pope’s critics seem unaware of an interesting fact. The three great persons in whose name they often attack Francis, accusing him of modernism or heresy, were all in their own time accused of the same - St. Thomas Aquinas, St. John Paul II and Benedict XVI.

Saints or heretics?

St. Thomas Aquinas flirted with teachings of Aristotle acquired through Arabic philosophers, and these teachings were previously banned in the Catholic Universities. Platonism was the philosophy of Christians, and Aristotle was in fact “the philosopher of the enemy,” Islam.

In this climate. Aquinas’s propositions were at one point considered for prohibition.

St. John Paul II, after publishing his most important philosophical work “Osoba i czyn” (later to be translated as “The Acting Person”), was accused of modernism and of syncretism between Thomism and phenomenology. This work later significantly influenced his encyclicals.

Similar things also happened after his book Sources of Renewal. Before the interreligious summit in 1986 in Assisi he initiated, some traditionalist groups denounced the pope and the event as heretical.

Benedict XVI, in his latest book interview with Peter Seewald, admits himself that he was on the so-called “progressive” side during Vatican II, and the accusations of modernism and heresy against their side was abundant. He personally was accused of heresy after his article “New pagans and the Church,” and his bishop, Cardinal Joseph Wendel, wanted to block his appointment as a professor in Bonn for the same reason.

We can also recall that then-Father Joseph Ratzinger’s draft document for Vatican II was depicted by some as Masonic. …




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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by wosbald » Tue Feb 14, 2017 9:47 am

+JMJ+

A dose of reality about the Steve Bannon/Cardinal Burke axis
Image
In this Friday, Nov. 11, 2016, file photo, Steve Bannon leaves Trump Tower in New York. (Credit: AP Photo/Evan Vucci.)

While everyone loves a conspiracy theory, reports about an "axis of evil" between Trump mastermind Steve Bannon and American Cardinal Raymond Burke may need to give way to Occam's razor. The simplest explanation may just be that both are doing what they do, with no need for a cabal.

[…]

First, so far as we know, there has only been one face-to-face encounter between Bannon and Burke, which came before Trump’s election and even before the release of Pope Francis’s controversial document Amoris Laetitia … in other words, before the raw material of any potential alliance was actually in place.

Second, there’s no clear evidence Bannon and Burke have become BFFs, beyond a suggestion from Ben Harnwell, the Rome-based head of a conservative group called the Dignitatis Humanae Institute, that they’ve kept in contact.

[…]

Third, there’s no evidence of Bannon having any close Roman contacts beyond Harnwell and Thomas Williams, a theologian and ex-Legionaries of Christ priest who writes for Breitbart. (Williams also has contributed to Crux.)

[…]

Fourth, Bannon and Burke are different personalities with distinctly different agendas.

For one thing, Burke’s idée fixe at the moment is defending classic Catholic doctrine on the indissolubility of marriage, an issue brought to the fore by Amoris Laetitia and its cautious opening on Communion for divorced and civilly remarried Catholics. Given that Bannon has been divorced and remarried three times, as has his boss, Burke probably wouldn’t regard them as his most natural partners.

Fifth, and perhaps most importantly, whatever else you want to say about Bannon, he’s not a political idiot. If his goal truly were to influence the direction of the Francis papacy somehow, away from potential conflict zones with his boss, he surely would have to know that Burke is hardly positioned to be helpful.

Indeed, if one were to compile a list right now of figures on the Roman landscape least likely to influence whatever Pope Francis says or does, Burke would be a great candidate for the top spot. …




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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by hugodrax » Tue Feb 14, 2017 10:03 am

wosbald wrote:
Tue Feb 14, 2017 9:47 am
+JMJ+

A dose of reality about the Steve Bannon/Cardinal Burke axis
Image
In this Friday, Nov. 11, 2016, file photo, Steve Bannon leaves Trump Tower in New York. (Credit: AP Photo/Evan Vucci.)

While everyone loves a conspiracy theory, reports about an "axis of evil" between Trump mastermind Steve Bannon and American Cardinal Raymond Burke may need to give way to Occam's razor. The simplest explanation may just be that both are doing what they do, with no need for a cabal.

[…]

First, so far as we know, there has only been one face-to-face encounter between Bannon and Burke, which came before Trump’s election and even before the release of Pope Francis’s controversial document Amoris Laetitia … in other words, before the raw material of any potential alliance was actually in place.

Second, there’s no clear evidence Bannon and Burke have become BFFs, beyond a suggestion from Ben Harnwell, the Rome-based head of a conservative group called the Dignitatis Humanae Institute, that they’ve kept in contact.

[…]

Third, there’s no evidence of Bannon having any close Roman contacts beyond Harnwell and Thomas Williams, a theologian and ex-Legionaries of Christ priest who writes for Breitbart. (Williams also has contributed to Crux.)

[…]

Fourth, Bannon and Burke are different personalities with distinctly different agendas.

For one thing, Burke’s idée fixe at the moment is defending classic Catholic doctrine on the indissolubility of marriage, an issue brought to the fore by Amoris Laetitia and its cautious opening on Communion for divorced and civilly remarried Catholics. Given that Bannon has been divorced and remarried three times, as has his boss, Burke probably wouldn’t regard them as his most natural partners.

Fifth, and perhaps most importantly, whatever else you want to say about Bannon, he’s not a political idiot. If his goal truly were to influence the direction of the Francis papacy somehow, away from potential conflict zones with his boss, he surely would have to know that Burke is hardly positioned to be helpful.

Indeed, if one were to compile a list right now of figures on the Roman landscape least likely to influence whatever Pope Francis says or does, Burke would be a great candidate for the top spot. …
American anti-Catholicism is laughably vulgar. This is the only country in the world to still accuse men of taking their orders from a foreign country based on their religion.
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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by Kerdy » Tue Feb 14, 2017 2:13 pm

hugodrax wrote:
Tue Jan 24, 2017 9:08 am
Kerdy wrote:
Tue Jan 24, 2017 8:41 am
Del wrote:
Mon Jan 09, 2017 9:13 am

I do not know what course we should take. The culture has turned from Christ and gotten themselves into a tangled mess of broken relationships, broken lives, and death. Jesus, and John the Baptist before Him, came to call the world to repent. Fix it, people! You can do it! But how to tell this to world that has already refused to listen?

Even though I probably shouldn’t post my thoughts, I will and see if any of you agree.

I agree with what you have stated about culture and marriage. Few people today have even the slightest clue as to what marriage is, what it represents, its purpose, or what marriage really entails. As I understand Annulments, they are a statement the Church agrees the “marriage” was never valid in the first place. There is no divorce needed, except for legal purposes, because there was never a real marriage. This happens for various reasons, but I imagine if two people were legally married and divorced, never understanding the truth of marriage, then became Catholic, they would simply need to submit a review to the Church to see if it can be Annulled. In other words, nothing has changed.

Until the process is complete and approved, the two would need to live as brother and sister. I have seen this even when one was Catholic, the other was not, and married at the Court House, until the marriage was validated. I imagine this would also include restraining from the Eucharist, unless they both attend Confession. Again, nothing has changed.

I suppose I am confused about all of the confusion.

As far as the world goes, we can only tell them, but it’s up to them to listen. If they refuse, as has been for many centuries, they pay the cost of their dissention. The Church doesn’t change to appease pop culture. The person changes to appease God.
Kerry Head Shaking Reunion Tour? Good to see you, sir!

The problem is Vatican II, in my mind. I've never been able to wrap my mind around it. We went from a properly catechised, tightly knit community to a place where a priest who hopes a woman may be ordained is still allowed to say the Mass. And don't get me started on the Maryknoll Fathers, liturgical dance, or children's Masses.

Angers.
I don't see the problem with Vatican II itself, rather the personal interpretation of it and the resulting implementation of improper interpretations.
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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by hugodrax » Tue Feb 14, 2017 2:56 pm

Kerdy wrote:
Tue Feb 14, 2017 2:13 pm
hugodrax wrote:
Tue Jan 24, 2017 9:08 am
Kerdy wrote:
Tue Jan 24, 2017 8:41 am
Del wrote:
Mon Jan 09, 2017 9:13 am

I do not know what course we should take. The culture has turned from Christ and gotten themselves into a tangled mess of broken relationships, broken lives, and death. Jesus, and John the Baptist before Him, came to call the world to repent. Fix it, people! You can do it! But how to tell this to world that has already refused to listen?

Even though I probably shouldn’t post my thoughts, I will and see if any of you agree.

I agree with what you have stated about culture and marriage. Few people today have even the slightest clue as to what marriage is, what it represents, its purpose, or what marriage really entails. As I understand Annulments, they are a statement the Church agrees the “marriage” was never valid in the first place. There is no divorce needed, except for legal purposes, because there was never a real marriage. This happens for various reasons, but I imagine if two people were legally married and divorced, never understanding the truth of marriage, then became Catholic, they would simply need to submit a review to the Church to see if it can be Annulled. In other words, nothing has changed.

Until the process is complete and approved, the two would need to live as brother and sister. I have seen this even when one was Catholic, the other was not, and married at the Court House, until the marriage was validated. I imagine this would also include restraining from the Eucharist, unless they both attend Confession. Again, nothing has changed.

I suppose I am confused about all of the confusion.

As far as the world goes, we can only tell them, but it’s up to them to listen. If they refuse, as has been for many centuries, they pay the cost of their dissention. The Church doesn’t change to appease pop culture. The person changes to appease God.
Kerry Head Shaking Reunion Tour? Good to see you, sir!

The problem is Vatican II, in my mind. I've never been able to wrap my mind around it. We went from a properly catechised, tightly knit community to a place where a priest who hopes a woman may be ordained is still allowed to say the Mass. And don't get me started on the Maryknoll Fathers, liturgical dance, or children's Masses.

Angers.
I don't see the problem with Vatican II itself, rather the personal interpretation of it and the resulting implementation of improper interpretations.

Indeed. Good to see you. That post should be bronzed to show the world that Kerdy does not deserve the reputation of a black and white thinker. Definitely shades of grey here. Let's try it this way: the problem with Vatican II is it allowed for personal and regional interpretation. And piss poor translation of the Latin. And polka masses.
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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by wosbald » Thu Feb 16, 2017 12:00 pm

+JMJ+

Could C9 cardinals backing the pope have unintended fallout?
Image

Recently Pope Francis's "C9" council of cardinal advisers issued a statement supporting the pope in light of recent attacks, and the intent was clearly noble. It's worth pondering, however, if it could have unintended consequences, including pressuring other bishops to follow suit.

[…]

Clearly, the intent here is noble - a group of cardinals who perceive the pope they serve to be under fire, and who wanted to express their solidarity. They may well have had in their minds something Cardinal Christoph Schönborn of Vienna asked back in February 2013, when Pope Benedict XVI announced his resignation and Schönborn wondered aloud if the cardinals had done enough to support him at critical moments.

[…]

First, one could ask whether such a statement lends a significance to the anti-Francis blowback that heretofore was debatable.

[…]

Up to this point, in other words, it’s been possible to suggest the blowback is no more than business as usual, and not especially serious. By engaging it in such a high-profile way, it’s at least worth mulling whether the cardinals have inadvertently done it a favor.

Second, it’s also worth considering whether the C9 may have unwittingly put pressure on other groups of bishops around the world to follow their lead and issue their own statements of support for the pope.

One could imagine, for instance, the next time the full College of Cardinals gathers for a consistory, media coverage may focus on whether they too will issue a statement - and, if they don’t, people may ask why not, who blocked it, who’s on which side, and so on almost ad infinitum.

Or, to take a different example, the next time the U.S. bishops gather, will commentators and reporters ask if they intend to follow the lead of the C9 and express their loyalty to the pope? Will the same thing happen to other bishops’ conferences around the world, or to regional gatherings of bishops such as SECAM in Africa and the FABC in Asia?

It’s certainly not much of a stretch to imagine that if the U.S. bishops come together and don’t say something akin to the C9 statement, some media outlets, already invested in perceptions of a rift between conservative American prelates and a progressive pope, may decide to make an issue out of it.

Granted, one could argue that because Pope Francis created his council of cardinal advisers to ensure that the voice of the local churches is heard when he makes decisions, there’s really no need for any specific local church to say anything, because these cardinals already represent them.

Whether others around the Catholic world or in the media will view it that way, however, remains to be seen. …




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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by Del » Thu Feb 16, 2017 12:25 pm

I don't know what they are deeming to be "attacks on the Pope." Is it Burke et. al. and the dubia?

In any case, I don't like this development. It used to be that Catholicism would discuss and defend doctrines.

This makes it all personal and political. "Conservatives" v. those who support a "progressive" pope. In this environment, truth quickly becomes a casualty.
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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by Hovannes » Thu Feb 16, 2017 1:12 pm

Del wrote:
Thu Feb 16, 2017 12:25 pm
I don't know what they are deeming to be "attacks on the Pope." Is it Burke et. al. and the dubia?

In any case, I don't like this development. It used to be that Catholicism would discuss and defend doctrines.

This makes it all personal and political. "Conservatives" v. those who support a "progressive" pope. In this environment, truth quickly becomes a casualty.
+1
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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by wosbald » Mon Mar 06, 2017 12:02 pm

+JMJ+

How Pope Francis and his conservative critics may both be right
Image
Pope Francis kisses a baby as he is driven through the crowd during his weekly general audience, in St. Peter's Square at the Vatican, Wednesday, Feb. 22, 2017. (Credit: AP Photo/Andrew Medichini.)

… The division starts with a fundamental disagreement about which of two problems is bigger in the Church today: the conservatives say it is doctrinal confusion, while Francis thinks it’s an insular attitude. Obviously these are both problems, but we’re talking about priorities, not just admitting they are issues here.

The Two Views of Church Problems

If doctrinal confusion is a bigger problem, then the pope and other high-ranking bishops should emphasize extreme clarity on dogma. We need to emphasize that the Eucharist is the body and blood of Christ, the Church’s teaching on contraception, the reality of the final judgment, etc.

On the other hand, if insularity is a bigger problem, the Church needs to step out and try to reach people in every place, and not just sit in the sacristy. We need to emphasize the fact that the Church is mission, the call of each Christian to evangelize, and the ability to use different words and attempt to explain the same dogma, etc.

Now, obviously, at all times the Church must try and do both, but unfortunately she has to pick her priorities at each moment as we imperfect humans in the perfect Church can’t do everything at once.

[…]

The two views of the Pope

Both views see a key role for the pope, but see him exercising his ministry in different ways.

The role of the pope is expressed in Luke 22:32, addressed to Simon Peter: “I have prayed for you that your faith may not fail; and when you have turned again, strengthen your brethren.” There are many ways that an individual can strengthen others, and both see the pope as key to resolving what they see as the primary problem.

If you see unclear dogma as a big problem, then the pope strengthens the brethren by proclaiming the Gospel clearly. The clearer he is in declaring dogma, the better. (It is worth noting that although clarity is generally charity, the pope has no obligation to be clear all the time, just not to declare heresy.)

If instead you see insularity as a big problem, then the pope needs to step out and show an example of reaching outside the Church towards the peripheries. The goal is to know people and try to reach them where they are. If, in this vision, a few things are said in ways that are unclear or sub-par from the perspective of dogmatic or moral theologians, that’s a small price to pay for stepping out. …




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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by wosbald » Fri Mar 10, 2017 6:52 am

+JMJ+

Rules of thumb for processing the latest papal bombshell
Image
Pope Francis arrives for his weekly general audience in St. Peter's Square, at the Vatican, Wednesday, March 1, 2017. (Credit: AP Photo/Andrew Medichini.)

… First, whatever else these bombshells may be, they are clearly not a formal expression of the pope’s teaching authority. If Francis wanted to declare a new dogma binding on Catholic consciences, he knows how to do it, and a one-off zinger in a press conference isn’t it.

That’s not to say, of course, one should simply disregard whatever the pope says in these informal settings. He’s the pope, and his words always deserve to be received with respect. However, his opinion on the Charlie Hebdo attacks obviously doesn’t have the same standing as, say, declarations in the Creed about the Trinity or about Christ.

At the very beginning, the Vatican spokesman at the time, Jesuit Father Federico Lombardi, said we’re in the presence of a new genre of papal speech - loose, spontaneous, not vetted by teams of theologians, and we’ll have to adjust our modes of interpretation accordingly. That remains as true today as it was when Lombardi said it.

Second, it’s important to remember that these one-liners don’t always capture the pope’s own priorities. Often they’ve come in response to questions other people have asked him, rather than something he brought up himself.

If you want to understand what really drives this pope, it’s wiser to look at the conversations he’s initiated in the first person - his encyclicals and other documents, for instance, or his speeches on trips and to gatherings he takes especially seriously, such as the World Meeting of Popular Movements that he founded three years ago.

While the soundbite may help define Francis from a media point of view, it’s probably not how he himself sees the heart of his papacy.

Third and finally, it’s essential to put these utterances in context in order to grasp what Francis really meant.

The “breeding like rabbits” soundbite, for instance, was initially taken in some circles as a step back from the Church’s opposition to artificial birth control, but in context the pontiff appeared to be talking about Natural Family Planning and other Church-approved strategies for what Francis called “responsible parenthood.”

“In the Church there are matrimonial groups who are experts in this, there are pastors,” he said. “I know many of them, and [they have] many licit solutions that can help.”

Alas, the media business is generally better at firing off the soundbite than at providing the proper context, so people often must seek it for themselves. …




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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by wosbald » Tue Mar 21, 2017 6:36 am

+JMJ+

Theologian says ‘Amoris’ Communion debate is settled in Africa
Image
Father Michael Owusu-Ofori gives communion to members of the congregation during Thursday evening mass at St. Kizito Catholic Parish in Accra, Ghana, November 4, 2015. (Credit: AP.)

ROME – A gathering in Rome this week aims to bring the voices of Africa to the world, and even before it begins the main organizer is doing just that, saying Monday that the debate over Communion for divorced and civilly remarried Catholics unleashed by Amoris Laetitia is already settled in Africa – and that the answer is “no.”

“If you go to the ordinary parishes in most of Africa, you will find that people who are in the situation you’re talking about would not present themselves for Communion because they already accept that these are the rules,” said Father Paulinus Odozor, a Nigerian theologian who teaches at the University of Notre Dame.

“We settled that long ago,” he said, bluntly saying of divorced and civilly remarried Catholics potentially receiving Communion, “They can’t.”

Odozor spoke on “The Crux of the Matter,” the weekly radio program of Crux airing on the Catholic Channel, Sirius XM 129, Mondays at 1:00 p.m. Eastern.

He’s in Rome as the principal organizer of a March 22-25 conference titled “African Christian Theology: Memories and Mission for the 21st Century,” hosted by Notre Dame’s Global Gateway center.

Odozor said he’s been frustrated, even nauseated, at the way Catholic debate over Amoris in the West has focused obsessively on the Communion question.

“The problem with the West is that it narrows things down, stripping down a text like that to one or two issues,” he said. “Reading Amoris Laetitia again, I was struck by its incredible richness. We in Africa sometimes wonder at the way Catholicism in the West takes just one issue and runs with it, without looking at the whole context.”

“It’s terrible,” he said, “and it can be nauseating.” …




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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by Del » Tue Mar 21, 2017 7:19 am

Thanks to Wozzie for sharing these....
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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by Hovannes » Sat Mar 25, 2017 1:24 pm

I went to Confession this morning and the roof didn't cave in. :thumbsup:
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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by wosbald » Fri Apr 07, 2017 8:23 am

+JMJ+

Are Francis and Trump now at odds over Syria too?
Image
In this March 11, 2009 file photo, King Abdullah of Saudi Arabia, right, welcomes Syrian President Bashar Assad upon his arrival in the Saudi capital Riyadh. (Credit: AP Photo/Hassan Ammar, File.)

… Strikingly, Archbishop Paul Gallagher, the Vatican’s top diplomat, took part Wednesday in an EU summit in Brussels on Syria, after reports of the chemical attack had already made the rounds, and never mentioned either the attack or Assad.

Where does the Vatican get that stance? Mostly from its own people on the ground, above all Syria’s Catholic bishops, who have a fairly uniform position. Here’s how Greek Catholic Melkite Archbishop Jean-Clement Jeanbart of Aleppo, Syria, talked about Assad in a 2015 Crux interview.

“If we have to choose between ISIS and Assad, we choose Assad,” Jeanbart said. “It seems sometimes all the countries of the world are against Assad, but we feel we don’t have any other alternative. Honest to God, this is the situation.

“I’ve met Assad a couple of times and all my colleagues, my fellow bishops and the priests and nuns, appreciate him,” Jeanbart said, carefully adding, “but that doesn’t mean he’s an angel.”

Chaldean Catholic Bishop Antoine Audo of Aleppo said in mid-March that if there were an open election in Syria today, Assad would get 80 percent support from the country’s Christians - like Jeanbart, adding, “we will not say he is an angel.”

Obviously, no Christian leader in the region would justify the use of chemical weapons. However, they often have a different perspective on how such reports, assuming they’re confirmed, effect their overall evaluation of Assad.

In general, many Christians in the Middle East feel they can’t afford dreams of a thriving democracy. In reality, they believe, the alternative to a police state is more likely to be an Islamic theocracy, and, in such a situation, they don’t like their odds. For them, the lesson of Iraq looms very large. …




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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by wosbald » Wed Apr 12, 2017 7:33 am

+JMJ+

Faithful storm out of Mass in Italy after priest criticizes Pope Francis
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Pope Francis changes his skull cap as he tours through the crowd in St. Peter's Square for his weekly general audience, at the Vatican, Wednesday, April 5, 2017. (Credit: AP Photo/Alessandra Tarantino.)

ROME - A priest is being asked to take a break from his parish in the small Italian town of Montesilvano after some in his congregation reportedly stormed out of Mass when he openly criticized Pope Francis on Palm Sunday (April 9).

Media reports claimed the congregation shouted “Shame, shame!” at Fr. Edward Pushparaj when he said Pope Francis had only been “bad” for the Catholic Church.

[…]

In an article published on the archdiocesan website, Valentinetti suggested that Pushparaj, an assistant pastor at the church who is also known as Don Edward, may have overstepped the mark during his preaching.

“Preaching is one of the main activities in the ministry of a priest,” Valentinetti said. “It is a service linked to meditation on the Word of the day, the liturgy, and certainly cannot relate to personal judgments, especially when they are not in communion with the pope.”

In his homily Pushparaj, who is from India, reportedly referred to the pope’s dialogue with other faiths and in particular his decision to wash the feet of a Muslim woman at a detention center outside Rome on Holy Thursday in 2013, Francis’s first as pope.

“In four years Pope Francis has only been bad for the church,” the priest reportedly said.

According to Italian media reports, Pushparaj’s parishioners have been complaining about the priest for some weeks and claim he has criticized the pope’s exhortation on the family, Amoris Laetitia, or “The Joy of Love.” …




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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by wosbald » Fri Apr 14, 2017 6:53 am

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On the priesthood, Pope Francis says the devil is in the details
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Pope Francis celebrates a Chrism Mass in St. Peter's Basilica at the Vatican Thursday, April 13, 2017. During the Mass the Pontiff blesses a token amount of oil that will be used to administer the sacraments for the year. (Credit: AP Photo/Alessandra Tarantino.)

… History’s first Latin American pontiff, well-known for his own ardent devotion to the Blessed Virgin Mary, also advised priests that a priesthood without Mary is a non-starter.

“Without the Madonna, we can’t go forward in our priesthood!” Francis said.

In the course of urging priests to be “contagious” in spreading joy, Francis laid out what he described as the three “graces” of the Gospel:
  • Truth, which, he said, is “non-negotiable.”
  • Mercy, which, he said, is “unconditional for all sinners.”
  • Joy, which he described as “intimate and inclusive.”
Francis is renowned for his emphasis on mercy, including the decision last year to stage a special jubilee Holy Year devoted to the theme of mercy. However, the pope’s attitude toward mercy has sometimes been understood, and criticized, as playing down the reality of sin, or attenuating the Church’s capacity to pass judgment on objective evils.

On that front, Francis’s language on mercy Thursday was instructive.

“The mercy of the good news must never be a false accommodation,” Francis said, “which leaves the sinner in his misery because it won’t extend a hand to get him back on his feet and won’t accompany him in making a step forward in his commitment.” …




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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by wosbald » Fri Apr 14, 2017 10:29 am

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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by wosbald » Fri Apr 14, 2017 11:38 am

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Perils facing Christians take no break for Holy Week
Image
Cathedral of the Savior of Zaragoza. (Credit: Wikipedia / Francis Raher CC BY 2.0.)

ROME-This Holy Week, Christians in Egypt will have to do without most of the traditional Easter celebrations, as they’ve been cancelled in various parts of the country due to last weekend’s terrorist attacks that killed 45 people and left many wounded.

Egypt, however, is not the only place where Christians are reeling this week.

With no death toll, but with a government openly hostile to the Catholic Church, faithful in Venezuela also have reasons to fear turning out at centers of worship. And, if a mayor in Spain gets away with it, four churches, including a cathedral, may be celebrating their final Holy Week as the property of the Catholic Church.

All of which illustrates a simple truth: For many Christians around the world, even Holy Week provides no respite from the difficulties of life.

In Venezuela, a Mass for peace was violently interrupted

Animus against the Catholic Church from supporters of the regime of Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro continues to grow, evidenced by the fact that on Wednesday Cardinal Jorge Urosa of Caracas was physically assaulted at the end of Mass.

AFP reports that the prelate was beaten and had to leave the church with a police escort, but he was not the only one attacked by supporters of Maduro.

[…]

In Spain, a mayor wants to expropriate four churches

The leftist mayor of a Spanish city is asking Pope Francis for his help: He wants to expropriate four churches, including a cathedral, and wants the pontiff to promote a “tranquil and respectful dialogue,” with a “spirit of understanding.”

The Cathedral of the Savior of Zaragoza has been a Catholic church since the 12 century. Before then, it was a mosque, but there are archaeological signs that show it might have been a Catholic church since the third century.

Yet according to Pedro Santisteve of the leftist Podemos party, the mayor of Zaragoza, located some 200 miles northeast of Madrid, the cathedral and three other churches are “jewels of the patrimony of our city,” and, as such, they should not belong to the Church.

In his letter to Francis, he does, however, recognize the obvious: They were built by the Church, and have been strictly used for Catholic worship.

According to Spanish paper ABC, the mayor also lets the pope know that his plan could go beyond the four churches, to include not only “houses of prayer, as we could imagine, but to all type of goods: Stores, homes for the priests in the [neighboring] towns, farms, roads, and squares.”

Santisteve believes that his claim over these churches is a matter of respect for “democracy.” Thus, in his letter to Francis, he asks for the pope’s cooperation to maintain the “framework of peace, respect, and trust that a democracy must have.” …




"In the end, My Immaculate Heart will triumph." - Our Lady of Fatima

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