Archaeology in the News

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tuttle
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Re: Archaeology in the News

Post by tuttle » Wed Dec 02, 2015 10:00 am

Seal Impression With King Hezekiah's Name Discovered in Jerusalem (also here if there is a paywall...)
A 2,700-year-old seal impression bearing the name of the bible-era king Hezekiah has been discovered in excavations by Temple Mount in Jerusalem.
Other seals bearing the name of King Hezekiah (727–698 BCE) have been discovered. Not like this, though: "This is the first time that a seal impression of an Israelite or Judean king has ever come to light in a scientific archaeological excavation," stated Eilat Mazar of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem.
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Re: Archaeology in the News

Post by AFRS » Wed Dec 02, 2015 11:39 am

tuttle wrote:Seal Impression With King Hezekiah's Name Discovered in Jerusalem (also here if there is a paywall...)
A 2,700-year-old seal impression bearing the name of the bible-era king Hezekiah has been discovered in excavations by Temple Mount in Jerusalem.
Other seals bearing the name of King Hezekiah (727–698 BCE) have been discovered. Not like this, though: "This is the first time that a seal impression of an Israelite or Judean king has ever come to light in a scientific archaeological excavation," stated Eilat Mazar of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem.
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Yeah. Thats VERY cool.

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Re: Archaeology in the News

Post by Joshoowah » Wed Dec 02, 2015 11:07 pm

AFRS wrote:
tuttle wrote:Seal Impression With King Hezekiah's Name Discovered in Jerusalem (also here if there is a paywall...)
A 2,700-year-old seal impression bearing the name of the bible-era king Hezekiah has been discovered in excavations by Temple Mount in Jerusalem.
Other seals bearing the name of King Hezekiah (727–698 BCE) have been discovered. Not like this, though: "This is the first time that a seal impression of an Israelite or Judean king has ever come to light in a scientific archaeological excavation," stated Eilat Mazar of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem.
Image
Yeah. Thats VERY cool.
The magnitude of this discovery is HUGE for those who are unaware of the archaeological landscape of Israelite history. The influence of this discovery could be tantamount in determining a great deal of things.
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Re: Archaeology in the News

Post by tuttle » Thu Dec 03, 2015 9:08 am

Joshoowah wrote:
AFRS wrote:
tuttle wrote:Seal Impression With King Hezekiah's Name Discovered in Jerusalem (also here if there is a paywall...)
A 2,700-year-old seal impression bearing the name of the bible-era king Hezekiah has been discovered in excavations by Temple Mount in Jerusalem.
Other seals bearing the name of King Hezekiah (727–698 BCE) have been discovered. Not like this, though: "This is the first time that a seal impression of an Israelite or Judean king has ever come to light in a scientific archaeological excavation," stated Eilat Mazar of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem.
Image
Yeah. Thats VERY cool.
The magnitude of this discovery is HUGE for those who are unaware of the archaeological landscape of Israelite history. The influence of this discovery could be tantamount in determining a great deal of things.
I'm found the change in symbolism from the scarab to the winged sun in his later life (highlighting the possibility of it paralleling Hezekiah's divine recovery late in life) to be astoundingly interesting.
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Re: Archaeology in the News

Post by UncleBob » Wed Dec 09, 2015 11:13 am

"One man's theology is another man's belly laugh." - Robert A. Heinlein

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Re: Archaeology in the News

Post by AFRS » Tue Jan 12, 2016 11:00 am


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Re: Archaeology in the News

Post by UncleBob » Wed Apr 13, 2016 2:08 pm

"One man's theology is another man's belly laugh." - Robert A. Heinlein

"Many of the points here, taken to their logical conclusions, don't hold up to logic; they're simply Godded-up ways of saying "I don't like that." - Skip

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Re: Archaeology in the News

Post by OldWorldSwine » Wed Apr 13, 2016 2:25 pm

My thief character is checking for traps and secret doors.
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Re: Archaeology in the News

Post by UncleBob » Thu Apr 21, 2016 9:27 am

"One man's theology is another man's belly laugh." - Robert A. Heinlein

"Many of the points here, taken to their logical conclusions, don't hold up to logic; they're simply Godded-up ways of saying "I don't like that." - Skip

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Re: Archaeology in the News

Post by UncleBob » Mon May 23, 2016 8:52 am

"One man's theology is another man's belly laugh." - Robert A. Heinlein

"Many of the points here, taken to their logical conclusions, don't hold up to logic; they're simply Godded-up ways of saying "I don't like that." - Skip

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Re: Archaeology in the News

Post by UncleBob » Tue May 24, 2016 7:17 am

"One man's theology is another man's belly laugh." - Robert A. Heinlein

"Many of the points here, taken to their logical conclusions, don't hold up to logic; they're simply Godded-up ways of saying "I don't like that." - Skip

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Re: Archaeology in the News

Post by UncleBob » Wed May 25, 2016 2:20 pm

"One man's theology is another man's belly laugh." - Robert A. Heinlein

"Many of the points here, taken to their logical conclusions, don't hold up to logic; they're simply Godded-up ways of saying "I don't like that." - Skip

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Re: Archaeology in the News

Post by UncleBob » Wed May 25, 2016 2:21 pm

"One man's theology is another man's belly laugh." - Robert A. Heinlein

"Many of the points here, taken to their logical conclusions, don't hold up to logic; they're simply Godded-up ways of saying "I don't like that." - Skip

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Re: Archaeology in the News

Post by UncleBob » Fri May 27, 2016 8:21 am

"One man's theology is another man's belly laugh." - Robert A. Heinlein

"Many of the points here, taken to their logical conclusions, don't hold up to logic; they're simply Godded-up ways of saying "I don't like that." - Skip

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Re: Archaeology in the News

Post by tuttle » Fri May 27, 2016 8:57 am

I saw this yesterday. So awesome. (As it is, I've begun to read Aristotle for the very first time this year...Poetics)
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Re: Archaeology in the News

Post by Rusty » Fri May 27, 2016 9:40 am

Interesting to see the way this plays in various press...

Phys.org:Greek archaeologist claims he's found the tomb of Aristotle
A Greek archaeologist who excavated the birthplace of Aristotle in northern Greece in the 1990s says a destroyed structure he discovered may have been the tomb of the ancient philosopher and teacher of Alexander the Great.
Konstantinos Sismanidis concedes that he has "no proof but just strong indications" to back up his theory, presented Thursday at a conference marking the 2,400th anniversary of the philosopher's birth.
...
Sismanidis said the structure unearthed in the ruins of Stageira, 70 kilometers (43 miles) east of Thessaloniki, was once a public monument where Aristotle was honored after his death. No human remains were found there.
Sismanidis also quoted medieval references to Aristotle's ashes being interred in his hometown.
Guardian: Is this Greek hilltop the 2,400-year-old burial place of Aristotle?
Kostas Sismanidis said he was almost sure that a 2,400 year-old domed vault he unearthed in ancient Stagira was the burial place of the man credited with formalising logic.

“I have no hard proof, but strong indications lead me to almost certainty,” said Sismanidis.
CNN: Is this Aristotle's tomb?
(CNN)A Greek archaeologist believes he has discovered the tomb of Aristotle.

Konstantinos Sismanidis, who has been painstakingly excavating the ruins of Stagira since 1990, told CNN his team has very strong evidence the 2,400-year-old tomb belongs to the great philosopher.
The language is all over the map. What evidence does he really have and what confidence should we have in what we're being told?
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Re: Archaeology in the News

Post by gaining_age » Fri May 27, 2016 10:28 am

Rusty wrote:
Interesting to see the way this plays in various press...

Phys.org:Greek archaeologist claims he's found the tomb of Aristotle
A Greek archaeologist who excavated the birthplace of Aristotle in northern Greece in the 1990s says a destroyed structure he discovered may have been the tomb of the ancient philosopher and teacher of Alexander the Great.
Konstantinos Sismanidis concedes that he has "no proof but just strong indications" to back up his theory, presented Thursday at a conference marking the 2,400th anniversary of the philosopher's birth.
...
Sismanidis said the structure unearthed in the ruins of Stageira, 70 kilometers (43 miles) east of Thessaloniki, was once a public monument where Aristotle was honored after his death. No human remains were found there.
Sismanidis also quoted medieval references to Aristotle's ashes being interred in his hometown.
Guardian: Is this Greek hilltop the 2,400-year-old burial place of Aristotle?
Kostas Sismanidis said he was almost sure that a 2,400 year-old domed vault he unearthed in ancient Stagira was the burial place of the man credited with formalising logic.

“I have no hard proof, but strong indications lead me to almost certainty,” said Sismanidis.
CNN: Is this Aristotle's tomb?
(CNN)A Greek archaeologist believes he has discovered the tomb of Aristotle.

Konstantinos Sismanidis, who has been painstakingly excavating the ruins of Stagira since 1990, told CNN his team has very strong evidence the 2,400-year-old tomb belongs to the great philosopher.
The language is all over the map. What evidence does he really have and what confidence should we have in what we're being told?

There's not consensus?
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Re: Archaeology in the News

Post by Rusty » Fri May 27, 2016 10:32 am

gaining_age wrote:
Rusty wrote:
Interesting to see the way this plays in various press...

Phys.org:Greek archaeologist claims he's found the tomb of Aristotle
A Greek archaeologist who excavated the birthplace of Aristotle in northern Greece in the 1990s says a destroyed structure he discovered may have been the tomb of the ancient philosopher and teacher of Alexander the Great.
Konstantinos Sismanidis concedes that he has "no proof but just strong indications" to back up his theory, presented Thursday at a conference marking the 2,400th anniversary of the philosopher's birth.
...
Sismanidis said the structure unearthed in the ruins of Stageira, 70 kilometers (43 miles) east of Thessaloniki, was once a public monument where Aristotle was honored after his death. No human remains were found there.
Sismanidis also quoted medieval references to Aristotle's ashes being interred in his hometown.
Guardian: Is this Greek hilltop the 2,400-year-old burial place of Aristotle?
Kostas Sismanidis said he was almost sure that a 2,400 year-old domed vault he unearthed in ancient Stagira was the burial place of the man credited with formalising logic.

“I have no hard proof, but strong indications lead me to almost certainty,” said Sismanidis.
CNN: Is this Aristotle's tomb?
(CNN)A Greek archaeologist believes he has discovered the tomb of Aristotle.

Konstantinos Sismanidis, who has been painstakingly excavating the ruins of Stagira since 1990, told CNN his team has very strong evidence the 2,400-year-old tomb belongs to the great philosopher.
The language is all over the map. What evidence does he really have and what confidence should we have in what we're being told?

There's not consensus?
Well,what do you think? The Mirror plays as a fact. The others as somewhat uncertain and lacking evidence except CNN that reported they were told of strong evidence that wasn't shown.
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Re: Archaeology in the News

Post by gaining_age » Fri May 27, 2016 10:34 am

Rusty wrote:
gaining_age wrote:
Rusty wrote:
Interesting to see the way this plays in various press...

Phys.org:Greek archaeologist claims he's found the tomb of Aristotle
A Greek archaeologist who excavated the birthplace of Aristotle in northern Greece in the 1990s says a destroyed structure he discovered may have been the tomb of the ancient philosopher and teacher of Alexander the Great.
Konstantinos Sismanidis concedes that he has "no proof but just strong indications" to back up his theory, presented Thursday at a conference marking the 2,400th anniversary of the philosopher's birth.
...
Sismanidis said the structure unearthed in the ruins of Stageira, 70 kilometers (43 miles) east of Thessaloniki, was once a public monument where Aristotle was honored after his death. No human remains were found there.
Sismanidis also quoted medieval references to Aristotle's ashes being interred in his hometown.
Guardian: Is this Greek hilltop the 2,400-year-old burial place of Aristotle?
Kostas Sismanidis said he was almost sure that a 2,400 year-old domed vault he unearthed in ancient Stagira was the burial place of the man credited with formalising logic.

“I have no hard proof, but strong indications lead me to almost certainty,” said Sismanidis.
CNN: Is this Aristotle's tomb?
(CNN)A Greek archaeologist believes he has discovered the tomb of Aristotle.

Konstantinos Sismanidis, who has been painstakingly excavating the ruins of Stagira since 1990, told CNN his team has very strong evidence the 2,400-year-old tomb belongs to the great philosopher.
The language is all over the map. What evidence does he really have and what confidence should we have in what we're being told?

There's not consensus?
Well,what do you think? The Mirror plays as a fact. The others as somewhat uncertain and lacking evidence except CNN that reported they were told of strong evidence that wasn't shown.

That was a reference to the learning science knowledge thread.

It'll be interesting to see how the consensus does progress on the tomb.
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The 6s of 1st John:
2:6 Whoever claims to live in him must walk as Jesus walked
3:6 No one who lives in him keeps on sinning

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Re: Archaeology in the News

Post by bean_counter » Fri May 27, 2016 10:43 am

gaining_age wrote:
Rusty wrote:
gaining_age wrote:
Rusty wrote:
Interesting to see the way this plays in various press...

Phys.org:Greek archaeologist claims he's found the tomb of Aristotle
A Greek archaeologist who excavated the birthplace of Aristotle in northern Greece in the 1990s says a destroyed structure he discovered may have been the tomb of the ancient philosopher and teacher of Alexander the Great.
Konstantinos Sismanidis concedes that he has "no proof but just strong indications" to back up his theory, presented Thursday at a conference marking the 2,400th anniversary of the philosopher's birth.
...
Sismanidis said the structure unearthed in the ruins of Stageira, 70 kilometers (43 miles) east of Thessaloniki, was once a public monument where Aristotle was honored after his death. No human remains were found there.
Sismanidis also quoted medieval references to Aristotle's ashes being interred in his hometown.
Guardian: Is this Greek hilltop the 2,400-year-old burial place of Aristotle?
Kostas Sismanidis said he was almost sure that a 2,400 year-old domed vault he unearthed in ancient Stagira was the burial place of the man credited with formalising logic.

“I have no hard proof, but strong indications lead me to almost certainty,” said Sismanidis.
CNN: Is this Aristotle's tomb?
(CNN)A Greek archaeologist believes he has discovered the tomb of Aristotle.

Konstantinos Sismanidis, who has been painstakingly excavating the ruins of Stagira since 1990, told CNN his team has very strong evidence the 2,400-year-old tomb belongs to the great philosopher.
The language is all over the map. What evidence does he really have and what confidence should we have in what we're being told?

There's not consensus?
Well,what do you think? The Mirror plays as a fact. The others as somewhat uncertain and lacking evidence except CNN that reported they were told of strong evidence that wasn't shown.

That was a reference to the learning science knowledge thread.

It'll be interesting to see how the consensus does progress on the tomb.
If it's anything like "climate change", eventually there will be calls for reeducation camps for Aristotle Tomb Deniers
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