CPS Hunting Tales

Where Fellowship and Camaraderie lives: that place where the CPS membership values fun and good fellowship as the cement of the community
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sweetandsour
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Re: CPS Hunting Tales

Post by sweetandsour » Sat Dec 31, 2016 3:10 am

Long day yesterday. I fell asleep early, and up too early, at the moment, and just reading the posts regarding quail resurgence.
My little 6 month old Setter did very good, and hunted hard all day. We had 8 covey finds, took 11 quail, and also bagged 7 Doves late in the afternoon. There aren't as many birds as last season, but still much better than just a few years ago.
We're South of San Antonio, near Kenedy, now. During the years that Durango spoke of, we hunted near Benevides, which is further south and west of here. And like he said, referring to the rolling plains area, South brush country was brimming with birds.
This morning I'm sore, and our 88 year old partner is very sore. We'll give the dogs a short run this morning, then pack it up and head to Goliad, to a big Whataburger restaurant there. Then it's Hwy 59 back to Houston, probably stopping at bucees for jerky, coffee, and use of good restrooms there. I'll post a pic or two later. Got a party to go to this evening.
As thus we sat in darkness
Each one busy with his prayers,
"We are lost!" the captain shouted,
As he staggered down the stairs.

O love the Lord, all ye His saints: for the Lord preserveth the faithful. Psalm 31:23

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Re: CPS Hunting Tales

Post by durangopipe » Sun Jan 01, 2017 12:57 pm

sweetandsour wrote:Long day yesterday. I fell asleep early, and up too early, at the moment, and just reading the posts regarding quail resurgence.
My little 6 month old Setter did very good, and hunted hard all day. We had 8 covey finds, took 11 quail, and also bagged 7 Doves late in the afternoon. There aren't as many birds as last season, but still much better than just a few years ago.
We're South of San Antonio, near Kenedy, now. During the years that Durango spoke of, we hunted near Benevides, which is further south and west of here. And like he said, referring to the rolling plains area, South brush country was brimming with birds.
This morning I'm sore, and our 88 year old partner is very sore. We'll give the dogs a short run this morning, then pack it up and head to Goliad, to a big Whataburger restaurant there. Then it's Hwy 59 back to Houston, probably stopping at bucees for jerky, coffee, and use of good restrooms there. I'll post a pic or two later. Got a party to go to this evening.
Thanks for the report (and backing me up on the "good old days!").
Sounds like you had some good hunting with good hunting buddies and fine dogs in wild country.

Too few days in life are as filled with such honest, hard-won joy in places of such beauty.
I'm so very happy for you.
The most improper job of any man, even saints, is bossing other men. Not one in a million is fit for it, and least of all those who seek the opportunity.

J.R.R. Tolkien



Wherever we go in the world we find other men speaking the same language...dreaming the same dreams. And one of the big four - brownie, or brookie, cutthroat or rainbow - is the cause of it all.

Roderick Haig-Brown

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Re: CPS Hunting Tales

Post by durangopipe » Thu Jan 05, 2017 2:30 pm

Why cane?

A new rod shows up in the mail. It is a fragile thing, a delicate fabrication of bamboo strips, silk thread, steel wire and rings of cork designed for tiny trout in tiny streams. It is the lightest cane rod you’ve ever purchased. Bad timing. The season is what passes for spring in the high country; namely, still winter. The creeks you want to fish the delicate rod with are buried in feet of snow, and the lowland valley rivers are all cold and roaring. You go fishing anyway, on one of those big, roaring rivers, and you take the fragile new wand. The river is impossible. Impossible to wade. Impossible to fish, except . . .

Except maybe from the shore, casting upstream into tiny, calm eddies that form where protrusions of the grassy bank extend out, blocking the river’s flow. You drop a bushy imitation of a grasshopper into one of those calms. Why? Who knows? The voice whispered, Fish there! And it urged you to choose the hopper when you were pouring over your fly box, even though it’s still too early for any real grasshoppers to be around. A white maw rises from the pocket of still water to grab your artificial. The maw is on the front end of a very large trout. The very large trout races out into the roaring river, and you follow him downstream, panting, stumbling, struggling to keep that heavy fish from getting away, from straightening your hook, from tearing your leader, from splintering your expensive new fly rod. After an eternity of a few minutes, you let go of a three-pound brown trout who wants nothing to do with you. Heart still pounding, you watch him disappear back into the mystery that is a free-flowing natural river.

The next day you write a letter to a man in Michigan named Lew Parks telling him about the first fish you caught with the rod he built for you. He built it, every inch by hand. He planed it to a taper devised over a half century ago by a man named Dickerson. You learned about Dickerson from a writer you devoured in your youth, a man named Bergman. Bergman connected you to Dickerson. Lew Park’s version of Dickerson’s rod connected you to a trout much larger than any trout the frail rod was designed to hold. You fished the river the way Bergman had taught you in his books. All of them—rod maker, rod designer, writer—connected you with your own human history, and the trout made you realize that this human history, rich as it is, is but a small piece of something far bigger.
The most improper job of any man, even saints, is bossing other men. Not one in a million is fit for it, and least of all those who seek the opportunity.

J.R.R. Tolkien



Wherever we go in the world we find other men speaking the same language...dreaming the same dreams. And one of the big four - brownie, or brookie, cutthroat or rainbow - is the cause of it all.

Roderick Haig-Brown

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Re: CPS Hunting Tales

Post by sweetandsour » Sun Jan 29, 2017 8:02 am

From the "useless info no one cares about" thread:
... "It's the final day of the 2016-2017 duck season here also. I went to Mcfaddin NWR with my grandson yesterday and fired only 1 shot, bagging a widgeon drake. But overall it's been a good season. My grandson went this morning to JD Murphree Salt Bayou Unit for a final hunt."

I always battle depression with the end of the hunting seasons. Woodcock season will end Tues, the 31st. The snipe season shortly after that, early Feb. Then quail season at the end of Feb. There's a so-called conservation season for snow geese that goes on through Feb and maybe into March, but I'm not much into that. Late season hunting is very different, and much tougher. Only the veterans are in the field, both hunters and the game. Novices are gone.

I plan to give my pup one more chance to point a woodcock tomorrow and Tues. I know where some are, but the thicket is, well, extremely thick. A thicket in the truest sense of the word. Then next Friday I'll make a short quail hunt with a couple of friends, including an 88 year old retired attorney friend of mine who lost his 14 year-old Brittany last week. And then on Monday morning (post-Super-Bowl), I'm headed to S. Texas with a couple of friends from Louisiana, for a final quail hunt there. Besides my setter, we'll have a 9 yr old GSP, and a 1 yr old Vizsla that I'm anxious to see in the field.

Afterward, there will be stories to write, pics to go through, some birds to mount, and of course some fine meals to be had.
As thus we sat in darkness
Each one busy with his prayers,
"We are lost!" the captain shouted,
As he staggered down the stairs.

O love the Lord, all ye His saints: for the Lord preserveth the faithful. Psalm 31:23

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Re: CPS Hunting Tales

Post by durangopipe » Sun Jan 29, 2017 11:10 am

Thanks for posting your end of season plans, S&S.
I know that end of hunting season sadness all too well.

Here, it has always been tempered somewhat by year-round Trout fishing.
But that was meager consolation for the dogs!
The most improper job of any man, even saints, is bossing other men. Not one in a million is fit for it, and least of all those who seek the opportunity.

J.R.R. Tolkien



Wherever we go in the world we find other men speaking the same language...dreaming the same dreams. And one of the big four - brownie, or brookie, cutthroat or rainbow - is the cause of it all.

Roderick Haig-Brown

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Re: CPS Hunting Tales

Post by sweetandsour » Sun Feb 12, 2017 11:14 am

It was unseasonably warm this week. Temperatures in south Texas where we were set new records. We had 3 dogs, and put them into the field one at a time, which was a good thing anyway because one of the other dogs was aggressive and wanted to fight.

We basically made 3 half-day hunts, Mon afternoon, Tues morning, and Wed morning. All of the dogs did well, and in total, found 10 good coveys, plus a few of the singles, and found/retrieved all of the downed birds. We brought home 26 quail, total.

Probably, this was our last wild quail hunt for this season, which ends in two weeks. Lizzy is 8 months old now, and has had a good start to her career, with ~100 or more birds shot over her this season. She'll be ready for advanced training during the off-season.

Image
As thus we sat in darkness
Each one busy with his prayers,
"We are lost!" the captain shouted,
As he staggered down the stairs.

O love the Lord, all ye His saints: for the Lord preserveth the faithful. Psalm 31:23

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Re: CPS Hunting Tales

Post by durangopipe » Sun Feb 12, 2017 1:02 pm

sweetandsour wrote:
Sun Feb 12, 2017 11:14 am
It was unseasonably warm this week. Temperatures in south Texas where we were set new records. We had 3 dogs, and put them into the field one at a time, which was a good thing anyway because one of the other dogs was aggressive and wanted to fight.

We basically made 3 half-day hunts, Mon afternoon, Tues morning, and Wed morning. All of the dogs did well, and in total, found 10 good coveys, plus a few of the singles, and found/retrieved all of the downed birds. We brought home 26 quail, total.

Probably, this was our last wild quail hunt for this season, which ends in two weeks. Lizzy is 8 months old now, and has had a good start to her career, with ~100 or more birds shot over her this season. She'll be ready for advanced training during the off-season.

Image

Thanks for the report and photo, S&S.

Hunting with your pup in hot weather is always a bit worrisome.
I'm glad it went well.

Sounds like you've got a great bird dog in Lizzy!
The most improper job of any man, even saints, is bossing other men. Not one in a million is fit for it, and least of all those who seek the opportunity.

J.R.R. Tolkien



Wherever we go in the world we find other men speaking the same language...dreaming the same dreams. And one of the big four - brownie, or brookie, cutthroat or rainbow - is the cause of it all.

Roderick Haig-Brown

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Re: CPS Hunting Tales

Post by Thunktank » Sun Feb 12, 2017 1:07 pm

sweetandsour wrote:
Sun Feb 12, 2017 11:14 am
It was unseasonably warm this week. Temperatures in south Texas where we were set new records. We had 3 dogs, and put them into the field one at a time, which was a good thing anyway because one of the other dogs was aggressive and wanted to fight.

We basically made 3 half-day hunts, Mon afternoon, Tues morning, and Wed morning. All of the dogs did well, and in total, found 10 good coveys, plus a few of the singles, and found/retrieved all of the downed birds. We brought home 26 quail, total.

Probably, this was our last wild quail hunt for this season, which ends in two weeks. Lizzy is 8 months old now, and has had a good start to her career, with ~100 or more birds shot over her this season. She'll be ready for advanced training during the off-season.

Image
That sounds like a great season. Truly impressive dog work on your part too. You don't know this, but you have been an inspiration for me to get my own dog trained. I shouldn't have gotten this puppy quite yet, it was a bad time. But you have served to remind me to get my priorities straight!

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Re: CPS Hunting Tales

Post by hugodrax » Sun Feb 12, 2017 1:09 pm

Thunktank wrote:
Sun Feb 12, 2017 1:07 pm
sweetandsour wrote:
Sun Feb 12, 2017 11:14 am
It was unseasonably warm this week. Temperatures in south Texas where we were set new records. We had 3 dogs, and put them into the field one at a time, which was a good thing anyway because one of the other dogs was aggressive and wanted to fight.

We basically made 3 half-day hunts, Mon afternoon, Tues morning, and Wed morning. All of the dogs did well, and in total, found 10 good coveys, plus a few of the singles, and found/retrieved all of the downed birds. We brought home 26 quail, total.

Probably, this was our last wild quail hunt for this season, which ends in two weeks. Lizzy is 8 months old now, and has had a good start to her career, with ~100 or more birds shot over her this season. She'll be ready for advanced training during the off-season.

Image
That sounds like a great season. Truly impressive dog work on your part too. You don't know this, but you have been an inspiration for me to get my own dog trained. I shouldn't have gotten this puppy quite yet, it was a bad time. But you have served to remind me to get my priorities straight!
Love reading sweetandsour hunting stories. If Lizzy doesn't turn out to be one heck of a dog, it sure won't be his fault.

And, I must admit to a bit of jealousy of the friendly kind.
Etiam mihi opinio anserem perirent.

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Re: CPS Hunting Tales

Post by Thunktank » Sun Feb 12, 2017 8:50 pm

I'm actively planning some trips for next season. I'm going to need to travel and make time for it. Work allowing, I'm going to plan at least two week long trips. Mearns quail in southeastern Arizona is top on my list. Chukar in Nevada, California quail/native pheasants in Northern California are also considerations. If I can't make at least half of it work, I'm sellling my shotguns and hanging it up. I will join the thousands of Californians from the last few decades and give hunting up. :(

Less than one percent of Californians buy a hunting license anymore. Our population has expanded exponentially while our hunting license sales have fallen to a small fraction of what it was in the 1970s. There is very little funding in Southern California to improve and protect habitat and access for hunters. Our wildlife is suffering. Waterfowl is a bright spot in Northern California. I just don't know how to do that and don't really want to invest in the extra gear to start. We'll see. At this point I don't even know if I want to teach my sons to do it anymore. Hunting conflicts with school and sports to much. I feel as though a piece of my heritage is going to die with me.

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Re: CPS Hunting Tales

Post by sweetandsour » Mon Feb 13, 2017 9:32 am

Thunktank wrote:
Sun Feb 12, 2017 8:50 pm
I'm actively planning some trips for next season. I'm going to need to travel and make time for it. Work allowing, I'm going to plan at least two week long trips. Mearns quail in southeastern Arizona is top on my list. Chukar in Nevada, California quail/native pheasants in Northern California are also considerations. If I can't make at least half of it work, I'm sellling my shotguns and hanging it up. I will join the thousands of Californians from the last few decades and give hunting up. :(

Less than one percent of Californians buy a hunting license anymore. Our population has expanded exponentially while our hunting license sales have fallen to a small fraction of what it was in the 1970s. There is very little funding in Southern California to improve and protect habitat and access for hunters. Our wildlife is suffering. Waterfowl is a bright spot in Northern California. I just don't know how to do that and don't really want to invest in the extra gear to start. We'll see. At this point I don't even know if I want to teach my sons to do it anymore. Hunting conflicts with school and sports to much. I feel as though a piece of my heritage is going to die with me.
Don't give up. Anyway, you never know, hunting may be something that will just naturally click with at least one of your sons, whether you're actively encouraging it or not. I remember picking up Field and Stream magazine in the school library when I was in 7th grade, and really getting the bug, although I was already knowledgeable about it from my dad.

Too bad about CA; I remember reading stories from there, especially big game and waterfowl, but upland game also.

Mearns is on my bucket list, and also on a good friend of mine's as well. I'm in the planning stages now for next season; trying to talk my nephew into finding some good areas. He's in Phoenix now, but went to school in Tucson.

BTW, thanks everyone, for your kind words and comments about my pup, Lizzy. It's kind-of scary, getting a pup, and seeing how she's going to turn out. And then a source of pride and joy, watching all of her instincts come together.
As thus we sat in darkness
Each one busy with his prayers,
"We are lost!" the captain shouted,
As he staggered down the stairs.

O love the Lord, all ye His saints: for the Lord preserveth the faithful. Psalm 31:23

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Re: CPS Hunting Tales

Post by Irish-Dane » Mon Feb 13, 2017 9:53 am

sweetandsour wrote:
Mon Feb 13, 2017 9:32 am
Thunktank wrote:
Sun Feb 12, 2017 8:50 pm
I'm actively planning some trips for next season. I'm going to need to travel and make time for it. Work allowing, I'm going to plan at least two week long trips. Mearns quail in southeastern Arizona is top on my list. Chukar in Nevada, California quail/native pheasants in Northern California are also considerations. If I can't make at least half of it work, I'm sellling my shotguns and hanging it up. I will join the thousands of Californians from the last few decades and give hunting up. :(

Less than one percent of Californians buy a hunting license anymore. Our population has expanded exponentially while our hunting license sales have fallen to a small fraction of what it was in the 1970s. There is very little funding in Southern California to improve and protect habitat and access for hunters. Our wildlife is suffering. Waterfowl is a bright spot in Northern California. I just don't know how to do that and don't really want to invest in the extra gear to start. We'll see. At this point I don't even know if I want to teach my sons to do it anymore. Hunting conflicts with school and sports to much. I feel as though a piece of my heritage is going to die with me.
Don't give up. Anyway, you never know, hunting may be something that will just naturally click with at least one of your sons, whether you're actively encouraging it or not. I remember picking up Field and Stream magazine in the school library when I was in 7th grade, and really getting the bug, although I was already knowledgeable about it from my dad.

Too bad about CA; I remember reading stories from there, especially big game and waterfowl, but upland game also.

Mearns is on my bucket list, and also on a good friend of mine's as well. I'm in the planning stages now for next season; trying to talk my nephew into finding some good areas. He's in Phoenix now, but went to school in Tucson.

BTW, thanks everyone, for your kind words and comments about my pup, Lizzy. It's kind-of scary, getting a pup, and seeing how she's going to turn out. And then a source of pride and joy, watching all of her instincts come together.
Love these stories.
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Re: CPS Hunting Tales

Post by Thunktank » Mon Feb 13, 2017 11:43 am

sweetandsour wrote:
Mon Feb 13, 2017 9:32 am
Thunktank wrote:
Sun Feb 12, 2017 8:50 pm
I'm actively planning some trips for next season. I'm going to need to travel and make time for it. Work allowing, I'm going to plan at least two week long trips. Mearns quail in southeastern Arizona is top on my list. Chukar in Nevada, California quail/native pheasants in Northern California are also considerations. If I can't make at least half of it work, I'm sellling my shotguns and hanging it up. I will join the thousands of Californians from the last few decades and give hunting up. :(

Less than one percent of Californians buy a hunting license anymore. Our population has expanded exponentially while our hunting license sales have fallen to a small fraction of what it was in the 1970s. There is very little funding in Southern California to improve and protect habitat and access for hunters. Our wildlife is suffering. Waterfowl is a bright spot in Northern California. I just don't know how to do that and don't really want to invest in the extra gear to start. We'll see. At this point I don't even know if I want to teach my sons to do it anymore. Hunting conflicts with school and sports to much. I feel as though a piece of my heritage is going to die with me.
Don't give up. Anyway, you never know, hunting may be something that will just naturally click with at least one of your sons, whether you're actively encouraging it or not. I remember picking up Field and Stream magazine in the school library when I was in 7th grade, and really getting the bug, although I was already knowledgeable about it from my dad.

Too bad about CA; I remember reading stories from there, especially big game and waterfowl, but upland game also.

Mearns is on my bucket list, and also on a good friend of mine's as well. I'm in the planning stages now for next season; trying to talk my nephew into finding some good areas. He's in Phoenix now, but went to school in Tucson.

BTW, thanks everyone, for your kind words and comments about my pup, Lizzy. It's kind-of scary, getting a pup, and seeing how she's going to turn out. And then a source of pride and joy, watching all of her instincts come together.
I don't want to give it up, believe me. Last year it was a major cause of conflict and it lost often. Other responsibilities. Game management and access are major problems here these days as well. Along with the drought, hunting was a waste of time and resources. The politicians in the capital who represent the 80 percent of California's urban population don't seem to understand that when proper game management is implemented there is more and healthier game populations that also benefit non game species. The bureaucracy also tends to funnel most of the money north even though most hunters live in the south. The north runs this state.

I could divorce my wife and live elsewhere, but that doesn't seem like a right choice to me. You know what I mean? I'm thinking about getting a boat since I live where I do. Most outdoorsmen here are saltwater fisherman. I do some of that, it's good too. I won't give up hunting entirely. But I think I need to plan a couple of long trips instead of trying to get out frequently on my days off every week or two which has been how I traditionally did hunting. But I really don't know if teaching my kids to hunt is actually to their benefit here. As is, they catch flack from some of their ignorant peers. It's a financial detriment for them in the long run I fear. Fishing on the other hand is well established in the local culture and it's something we can more easily do on our time off regularly.

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Re: CPS Hunting Tales

Post by venator260 » Tue Feb 14, 2017 7:25 pm

I hunted plenty in my youth and still get out occasionally. It should be more than occasionally, the house I live in is on an 85 acre plot of forested land that my mother owns. If it's not deer season, I can roam about a mile in either direction from here.

I don't know that I have one story that sticks out in my mind. When I was in high school, I hunted just about every mammal that one can in central PA. I was afield from the end of September to the middle of January. But then college took over my time. After that, I moved to Pittsburgh, and just a little squirrel hunt became a trip that had to be planned. Now that I'm back, it seems as though one thing or another prevents me from getting out during the fall.

I do make time for the firearms deer season. But sitting in a treestand smoking pipes and watching for deer, while mentally therapeutic beyond words, does not make for exciting stories.

I have thoroughly enjoyed reading the stories posted here.

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Re: CPS Hunting Tales

Post by hugodrax » Tue Aug 01, 2017 3:59 pm

Just finished rereading this thread. I've been getting really birdy.
Etiam mihi opinio anserem perirent.

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Re: CPS Hunting Tales

Post by JudgeRusty » Tue Aug 01, 2017 4:45 pm

hugodrax wrote:
Tue Aug 01, 2017 3:59 pm
Just finished rereading this thread. I've been getting really birdy.
eeaasssy, caarreffulll, birrd innerre. lookferem!
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Re: CPS Hunting Tales

Post by Bloodhound » Wed Aug 02, 2017 7:55 am

Yup...the last few days I have been checking ammo and gear...season is a month away, so I should still be tying flys and messing with fishing gear. But the birds are calling to me. I love chasing blues in the mountains.
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Re: CPS Hunting Tales

Post by venator260 » Wed Aug 02, 2017 9:08 am

This thread inspired me to purchase a bow target. I don't think that I'll be ready for the archery opener on September 30 after a 12 year hiatus from bow shooting, but we shall see. I was usually pretty good at the nock contests that we used to have in a cousin's basement. This consisted of attempting to shoot the nock off of an arrow in the target at 10 yards. That stopped after folks started to switch to carbon arrows; made things too expensive.

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Re: CPS Hunting Tales

Post by Thunktank » Mon Aug 07, 2017 1:44 pm

Last night I went on line to purchase our second deer tags for the zone I usually hunt. They sold out of available tags already. So, now I'm contemplating trying an additional zone, but it's a very early season. It starts August 12 and continues through September 24th. It's the earliest deer season in the country, hunting deer along California's central coast. The weather is hot, hot, hot and known to be friendly to rattle snakes and poison oak. I don't know. I don't know the area yet, it will take time, probably a few years to get to know it well enough to consistently fill a tag there. I might be able to shorten that time with lots of boot leather and scouting in the heat. My wife really gets unhappy with me if I don't bring home venison, wild game is one of the few meats she can eat without feeling sick, save boneless, skinless chick breast and turkey breast.

Anyway, I am also preparing a few hundred rounds of .260 Remington to train my son to shoot centerfire rifles well. My goal by the time we go deer hunting is for him to be able to hit deer vital sized targets from shooting sticks out to 300 yards consistently. We'll see.

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Re: CPS Hunting Tales

Post by venator260 » Tue Aug 08, 2017 10:20 am

Thunktank wrote:
Mon Aug 07, 2017 1:44 pm

Anyway, I am also preparing a few hundred rounds of .260 Remington to train my son to shoot centerfire rifles well. My goal by the time we go deer hunting is for him to be able to hit deer vital sized targets from shooting sticks out to 300 yards consistently. We'll see.

Hey, good choice of round. The two screen names that I use online were made up when I was 12-14, but more importantly, include 260 because that was my pride and joy at the time. I worked the whole summer between 6th and 7th grade to afford that rifle. Monday thru Thursday I went logging with my grandfather, and Fridays I mowed grass for the company my dad works for.

Remington Model 7 with stainless steel metal and a synthetic stock topped with a Leupold Vari X II. Later I bought a kit to give it a 4 pound trigger. Of course, the first year I had it I fell on a rock and scratched the barrel up. Its otherwise no worse for wear, and all but 2 deer that I'e ever taken have been with this rifle. I don't know that its spent an entire season in the gun cabinet as the other deer rifle that I have (low-end Savage in 30-06) broke on me both seasons that I tried to hunt with it.

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