Feeding your pipes

Pipe and other hardware related discussions
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Cleon
Brother of the Briar
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Re: Feeding your pipes

Post by Cleon » Thu Nov 16, 2017 6:45 am

Rusty wrote:
Wed Nov 15, 2017 12:22 pm
Goose55 wrote:
Wed Nov 15, 2017 11:30 am
Cleon wrote:
Wed Nov 15, 2017 7:28 am
Bump. For Goose.

Dunhill oil curing and shell (sandblast) patent specs for Algerian briar:
Image
Interesting. That old Bartlett & Bickley Piccadilly I found last summer is blasted and is very, very hard. When I tap a Czech tool on the stummel it sounds ceramic or like rock.
Yeah. There are pipes that ring when we tap them with finger nail or pipe tool. I have a couple of French briars that do this and they are blasted. One of them is a superb taster. But I also have some clear finished pipes that do this as well. This is the hunt for interesting briar and it can be more interesting than the hunt for specific models or brands with some.

The old Algerian briar that was prized in the past (and that Dunhill used for Shell Briar pipes & Barling and Charatan air cured them) was actually very soft compared to any other block. But it has a very good taste. I have some modern pipes made from old Algerian briar. You'd be right if you guessed that I hunted for interesting briar.
I just caught this.
It looks like the old Shell Briars were soaked and sandblasted multiple times. That had to add to the cost.
In order to remove the dried out oil uniformly
from the surface of the article, I
submit it to the action of the sand jet or
20 sand blast, which removes the hardened
coating of oil and also has the effect of
cutting away the softer wood between the
grain and leaving the harder portion-the
hardness of which has been intensified by
25 the process of steeping and heating-in
very high relief.
If the article is again steeped in oil, it
will take up a further amount, as the impervious
coating constituting a varnish
30 has been removed, and the treatment by
heat and the sand jet or sand blast may
be repeated; and so on for as many times
as may be required according to the extent
to which it is desired to accentuate the
35' grain or make it stand out in relief
.

The resulting article is extremely hard
and constitutes an admirable tobacco pipe
for the smoker.
Where desired, the surface of the pipe
may be polished, giving a very elegant 40
effect, as the raised portions of the grain
take the high polish while the sunken portions
remain dull or matt.
In some cases the preliminary steeping
may take place before the pipe is shaped 45
from the wood.
Although the sand blast has . been used
previously for the treatment of the surface
of wood, to accentuate the grain, I have
found in practice that this treatment in 50
itself does not give satisfactory results, as
there is a tendency for the wood to become
cracked and injured, a result which does
not occur with my process where it is used
as an auxiliary
"Let the little children come to Me, and do not forbid them; for of such is the kingdom of heaven" - Jesus

"More people need to put their big boy britches on." - JMG

"Dang, a pipe slap." - JimVH

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Rusty
In Memoriam
Posts: 25059
Joined: Thu May 01, 2008 6:00 pm
Location: Beelzebub's Rare Tobacco Emporium

Re: Feeding your pipes

Post by Rusty » Thu Nov 16, 2017 9:52 am

Cleon wrote:
Thu Nov 16, 2017 6:45 am
Rusty wrote:
Wed Nov 15, 2017 12:22 pm
Goose55 wrote:
Wed Nov 15, 2017 11:30 am
Cleon wrote:
Wed Nov 15, 2017 7:28 am
Bump. For Goose.

Dunhill oil curing and shell (sandblast) patent specs for Algerian briar:
Image
Interesting. That old Bartlett & Bickley Piccadilly I found last summer is blasted and is very, very hard. When I tap a Czech tool on the stummel it sounds ceramic or like rock.
Yeah. There are pipes that ring when we tap them with finger nail or pipe tool. I have a couple of French briars that do this and they are blasted. One of them is a superb taster. But I also have some clear finished pipes that do this as well. This is the hunt for interesting briar and it can be more interesting than the hunt for specific models or brands with some.

The old Algerian briar that was prized in the past (and that Dunhill used for Shell Briar pipes & Barling and Charatan air cured them) was actually very soft compared to any other block. But it has a very good taste. I have some modern pipes made from old Algerian briar. You'd be right if you guessed that I hunted for interesting briar.
I just caught this.
It looks like the old Shell Briars were soaked and sandblasted multiple times. That had to add to the cost.
In order to remove the dried out oil uniformly
from the surface of the article, I
submit it to the action of the sand jet or
20 sand blast, which removes the hardened
coating of oil and also has the effect of
cutting away the softer wood between the
grain and leaving the harder portion-the
hardness of which has been intensified by
25 the process of steeping and heating-in
very high relief.
If the article is again steeped in oil, it
will take up a further amount, as the impervious
coating constituting a varnish
30 has been removed, and the treatment by
heat and the sand jet or sand blast may
be repeated; and so on for as many times
as may be required according to the extent
to which it is desired to accentuate the
35' grain or make it stand out in relief
.

The resulting article is extremely hard
and constitutes an admirable tobacco pipe
for the smoker.
Where desired, the surface of the pipe
may be polished, giving a very elegant 40
effect, as the raised portions of the grain
take the high polish while the sunken portions
remain dull or matt.
In some cases the preliminary steeping
may take place before the pipe is shaped 45
from the wood.
Although the sand blast has . been used
previously for the treatment of the surface
of wood, to accentuate the grain, I have
found in practice that this treatment in 50
itself does not give satisfactory results, as
there is a tendency for the wood to become
cracked and injured, a result which does
not occur with my process where it is used
as an auxiliary
Ah but look at item 35. He doesn't have to keep a large stock of briar for years tying up capital as his competitors do. That's a cost reduction and he has overcome the competitive advantage of folks like Barling that held briar aircuring for up to ten years. Plus he can likely get better utilization out of imperfect briar stock. Surface defects may be fine with a bit blasting. And voila his defective misshaped pipes can be sold as premium branded product. There are suckers out there that will buy it for exorbitant prices too. :lol:
You're not going fool Goose with this kind of marketing voodoo. He knows the real Sea Rock.

We've talked about this before. Thank you for that lovely deja vu moment. :lol:
You're out of the woods
You're out of the dark
You're out of the night
Step into the sun
Step into the light

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durangopipe
Under-secretary to the Minister of Pipe Breaking
Under-secretary to the Minister of Pipe Breaking
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Joined: Wed Jan 20, 2016 3:58 pm
Location: Southwest Colorado

Re: Feeding your pipes

Post by durangopipe » Thu Nov 16, 2017 5:12 pm

Not to mention the use of asbestos as an insulator between arrayed pipe shanks.
If you smoke old Dunhills and have breathing problems, you might want to contact the number on your screen . . . :lol:
The most improper job of any man, even saints, is bossing other men. Not one in a million is fit for it, and least of all those who seek the opportunity.. J.R.R. Tolkien

2017 Morley - Outstanding BRATASS of the Year

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Rusty
In Memoriam
Posts: 25059
Joined: Thu May 01, 2008 6:00 pm
Location: Beelzebub's Rare Tobacco Emporium

Re: Feeding your pipes

Post by Rusty » Thu Nov 16, 2017 8:56 pm

durangopipe wrote:
Thu Nov 16, 2017 5:12 pm
Not to mention the use of asbestos as an insulator between arrayed pipe shanks.
If you smoke old Dunhills and have breathing problems, you might want to contact the number on your screen . . . :lol:
You forgot the number. 271-828-1828 ext 459. Breathe.
You're out of the woods
You're out of the dark
You're out of the night
Step into the sun
Step into the light

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