TEXAS in the News

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Rusty
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Re: TEXAS in the News

Post by Rusty » Tue Jun 14, 2016 3:21 pm

JimVH wrote:
hugodrax wrote:
Rusty wrote:
UncleBob wrote:
Rusty wrote:
hugodrax wrote:
JimVH wrote:
UncleBob wrote:Arabic weather term ‘haboob’ is apparently troubling for some Texans
A wall of dust raced toward Lubbock, Tex., on Sunday, and the National Weather Service threw out a word of caution on its Facebook page. “A haboob is rapidly approaching the Lubbock airport and may affect the city as well,” the meteorologists wrote.

The use of the meteorological term “haboob,” a word with Arabic roots, didn’t sit well with some residents.

Reader John Fullbright wrote:

Haboob!?! I’m a Texan. Not a foreigner from Iraq or Afghanistan. They might have haboobs but around here in the Panhandle of TEXAS, we have Dust Storms. So would you mind stating it that way. I’ll find another weather service

Brenda Daffern added:

In Texas, nimrod, this is called a sandstorm. We’ve had them for years! If you would like to move to the Middle East you can call this a haboob. While you reside here, call it a sandstorm. We Texans will appreciate you.
We do pick some odd things to get our panties in a bunch about. Haboob makes me grin because my mind automatically adds 'ies' when I hear it.
Ah, hell. I've loved the word haboob for its sheer linguistic oddity. Now I'm going to start loving haboobies because it makes me giggle like a kid,
Hmm... do Texans also object to the words: Admiral, alfalfa, algebra, alkali, amber, arsenal, assassin, borax, almanac, tuna, zero, etc (and I can serve up a lot of others)? The stars above them, pretty much all , have arabic names - a fact of which Pres. GW Bush was ignorant.
In general, Texans object to anything Yankee.
Well Yankee isn't arabic. And Boston doesn't have haboobs, just snow. I think Texans have demonstrated that they have oil interests in common with arabs but not with Yankees.
Which, of course, are those from New England.
I believe the line is a bit farther south.
Could be, canucks are not Yankees. But would you say that Texans prefer Arab names to Yankee names?
Oh Hillary... You abandon us to this?

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Re: TEXAS in the News

Post by hugodrax » Tue Jun 14, 2016 3:29 pm

JimVH wrote:
hugodrax wrote:
Rusty wrote:
UncleBob wrote:
Rusty wrote:
hugodrax wrote:
JimVH wrote:
UncleBob wrote:Arabic weather term ‘haboob’ is apparently troubling for some Texans
A wall of dust raced toward Lubbock, Tex., on Sunday, and the National Weather Service threw out a word of caution on its Facebook page. “A haboob is rapidly approaching the Lubbock airport and may affect the city as well,” the meteorologists wrote.

The use of the meteorological term “haboob,” a word with Arabic roots, didn’t sit well with some residents.

Reader John Fullbright wrote:

Haboob!?! I’m a Texan. Not a foreigner from Iraq or Afghanistan. They might have haboobs but around here in the Panhandle of TEXAS, we have Dust Storms. So would you mind stating it that way. I’ll find another weather service

Brenda Daffern added:

In Texas, nimrod, this is called a sandstorm. We’ve had them for years! If you would like to move to the Middle East you can call this a haboob. While you reside here, call it a sandstorm. We Texans will appreciate you.
We do pick some odd things to get our panties in a bunch about. Haboob makes me grin because my mind automatically adds 'ies' when I hear it.
Ah, hell. I've loved the word haboob for its sheer linguistic oddity. Now I'm going to start loving haboobies because it makes me giggle like a kid,
Hmm... do Texans also object to the words: Admiral, alfalfa, algebra, alkali, amber, arsenal, assassin, borax, almanac, tuna, zero, etc (and I can serve up a lot of others)? The stars above them, pretty much all , have arabic names - a fact of which Pres. GW Bush was ignorant.
In general, Texans object to anything Yankee.
Well Yankee isn't arabic. And Boston doesn't have haboobs, just snow. I think Texans have demonstrated that they have oil interests in common with arabs but not with Yankees.
Which, of course, are those from New England.
I believe the line is a bit farther south.
Well, you're wrong. First time I've seen it, and it saddens me. Up until this point, you've been unimpeachably right in my eyes.

But I do get the general usage. It's analogous to the Japanese word "gaijin." A shortened form of "y'all ain't ferm 'round 'yer." Makes sense, and everybody does it no mtater where they are from.

Out of curiosity, how is it applied? Bob, by my understanding, is Illinoisian by birth. That was an anti-slavery and U***n state. Yet he consistently and pejoratively refers to Yankees. Now, for all I know, he has truly southern roots (he has an unfeigned accent, for instance). But if he doesn't, despite the fact that he might have been born south of the line, is he, in fact, a Yank because that state was Federal? Is it blood-based or geographically based?

And nobody get offended, please. I'm trying to figure out some of the nuances, not insult anyone.

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Re: TEXAS in the News

Post by UncleBob » Tue Jun 14, 2016 3:39 pm

hugodrax wrote:
JimVH wrote:
hugodrax wrote:
Rusty wrote:
UncleBob wrote:
Rusty wrote:
hugodrax wrote:
JimVH wrote:
UncleBob wrote:Arabic weather term ‘haboob’ is apparently troubling for some Texans
A wall of dust raced toward Lubbock, Tex., on Sunday, and the National Weather Service threw out a word of caution on its Facebook page. “A haboob is rapidly approaching the Lubbock airport and may affect the city as well,” the meteorologists wrote.

The use of the meteorological term “haboob,” a word with Arabic roots, didn’t sit well with some residents.

Reader John Fullbright wrote:

Haboob!?! I’m a Texan. Not a foreigner from Iraq or Afghanistan. They might have haboobs but around here in the Panhandle of TEXAS, we have Dust Storms. So would you mind stating it that way. I’ll find another weather service

Brenda Daffern added:

In Texas, nimrod, this is called a sandstorm. We’ve had them for years! If you would like to move to the Middle East you can call this a haboob. While you reside here, call it a sandstorm. We Texans will appreciate you.
We do pick some odd things to get our panties in a bunch about. Haboob makes me grin because my mind automatically adds 'ies' when I hear it.
Ah, hell. I've loved the word haboob for its sheer linguistic oddity. Now I'm going to start loving haboobies because it makes me giggle like a kid,
Hmm... do Texans also object to the words: Admiral, alfalfa, algebra, alkali, amber, arsenal, assassin, borax, almanac, tuna, zero, etc (and I can serve up a lot of others)? The stars above them, pretty much all , have arabic names - a fact of which Pres. GW Bush was ignorant.
In general, Texans object to anything Yankee.
Well Yankee isn't arabic. And Boston doesn't have haboobs, just snow. I think Texans have demonstrated that they have oil interests in common with arabs but not with Yankees.
Which, of course, are those from New England.
I believe the line is a bit farther south.
Well, you're wrong. First time I've seen it, and it saddens me. Up until this point, you've been unimpeachably right in my eyes.

But I do get the general usage. It's analogous to the Japanese word "gaijin." A shortened form of "y'all ain't ferm 'round 'yer." Makes sense, and everybody does it no mtater where they are from.

Out of curiosity, how is it applied? Bob, by my understanding, is Illinoisian by birth. That was an anti-slavery and U***n state. Yet he consistently and pejoratively refers to Yankees. Now, for all I know, he has truly southern roots (he has an unfeigned accent, for instance). But if he doesn't, despite the fact that he might have been born south of the line, is he, in fact, a Yank because that state was Federal? Is it blood-based or geographically based?

And nobody get offended, please. I'm trying to figure out some of the nuances, not insult anyone.
Technically, I was born in Iowa, lived in Illinois, Missouri, New Hampshire, Missouri (again), Iowa (again), Missouri (again)... see? I moved around a lot. My folk actually come from the Blue Ridge Mountains in West Virginia. Now, I will never be considered Texan by many here because I was not born here. I have assimilated fairly well and I would probably be viewed as Texan (and West Texan, specifically) by most as long as I never mentioned I was born elsewhere. My wife is a native-born Texican and she thought I was too while we first dated.

Still, Yankee is generally used by me as a joke. There are, I am sure, a few folks that hate Yankees but I have never met them. Mostly they, along with Aggies, are just used here as a humorous foil. What really gets people riled 'round these parts is calling someone a democrat.
"One man's theology is another man's belly laugh." - Robert A. Heinlein

"Many of the points here, taken to their logical conclusions, don't hold up to logic; they're simply Godded-up ways of saying "I don't like that." - Skip

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Re: TEXAS in the News

Post by hugodrax » Tue Jun 14, 2016 3:44 pm

UncleBob wrote:
hugodrax wrote:
JimVH wrote:
hugodrax wrote:
Rusty wrote:
UncleBob wrote:
Rusty wrote:
hugodrax wrote:
JimVH wrote:
UncleBob wrote:Arabic weather term ‘haboob’ is apparently troubling for some Texans

[quote]A wall of dust raced toward Lubbock, Tex., on Sunday, and the National Weather Service threw out a word of caution on its Facebook page. “A haboob is rapidly approaching the Lubbock airport and may affect the city as well,” the meteorologists wrote.

The use of the meteorological term “haboob,” a word with Arabic roots, didn’t sit well with some residents.

Reader John Fullbright wrote:

Haboob!?! I’m a Texan. Not a foreigner from Iraq or Afghanistan. They might have haboobs but around here in the Panhandle of TEXAS, we have Dust Storms. So would you mind stating it that way. I’ll find another weather service

Brenda Daffern added:

In Texas, nimrod, this is called a sandstorm. We’ve had them for years! If you would like to move to the Middle East you can call this a haboob. While you reside here, call it a sandstorm. We Texans will appreciate you.
We do pick some odd things to get our panties in a bunch about. Haboob makes me grin because my mind automatically adds 'ies' when I hear it.
Ah, hell. I've loved the word haboob for its sheer linguistic oddity. Now I'm going to start loving haboobies because it makes me giggle like a kid,
Hmm... do Texans also object to the words: Admiral, alfalfa, algebra, alkali, amber, arsenal, assassin, borax, almanac, tuna, zero, etc (and I can serve up a lot of others)? The stars above them, pretty much all , have arabic names - a fact of which Pres. GW Bush was ignorant.
In general, Texans object to anything Yankee.
Well Yankee isn't arabic. And Boston doesn't have haboobs, just snow. I think Texans have demonstrated that they have oil interests in common with arabs but not with Yankees.
Which, of course, are those from New England.
I believe the line is a bit farther south.
Well, you're wrong. First time I've seen it, and it saddens me. Up until this point, you've been unimpeachably right in my eyes.

But I do get the general usage. It's analogous to the Japanese word "gaijin." A shortened form of "y'all ain't ferm 'round 'yer." Makes sense, and everybody does it no mtater where they are from.

Out of curiosity, how is it applied? Bob, by my understanding, is Illinoisian by birth. That was an anti-slavery and U***n state. Yet he consistently and pejoratively refers to Yankees. Now, for all I know, he has truly southern roots (he has an unfeigned accent, for instance). But if he doesn't, despite the fact that he might have been born south of the line, is he, in fact, a Yank because that state was Federal? Is it blood-based or geographically based?

And nobody get offended, please. I'm trying to figure out some of the nuances, not insult anyone.
Technically, I was born in Iowa, lived in Illinois, Missouri, New Hampshire, Missouri (again), Iowa (again), Missouri (again)... see? I moved around a lot. My folk actually come from the Blue Ridge Mountains in West Virginia. Now, I will never be considered Texan by many here because I was not born here. I have assimilated fairly well and I would probably be viewed as Texan (and West Texan, specifically) by most as long as I never mentioned I was born elsewhere. My wife is a native-born Texican and she thought I was too while we first dated.

Still, Yankee is generally used by me as a joke. There are, I am sure, a few folks that hate Yankees but I have never met them. Mostly they, along with Aggies, are just used here as a humorous foil. What really gets people riled 'round these parts is calling someone a democrat.[/quote]

Didn't take offense. I can't think of a single word used up here to refer to southerners as universally as Yankee I'd applied to Northerners.

Didn't realize it was so political. I've met my share of those less intelligent on both sides of the party lines.

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Re: TEXAS in the News

Post by UncleBob » Tue Jun 14, 2016 3:47 pm

hugodrax wrote:
UncleBob wrote:
hugodrax wrote:
JimVH wrote:
hugodrax wrote:
Rusty wrote:
UncleBob wrote:
Rusty wrote:
hugodrax wrote:
JimVH wrote:[quote="UncleBob"]Arabic weather term ‘haboob’ is apparently troubling for some Texans

[quote]A wall of dust raced toward Lubbock, Tex., on Sunday, and the National Weather Service threw out a word of caution on its Facebook page. “A haboob is rapidly approaching the Lubbock airport and may affect the city as well,” the meteorologists wrote.

The use of the meteorological term “haboob,” a word with Arabic roots, didn’t sit well with some residents.

Reader John Fullbright wrote:

Haboob!?! I’m a Texan. Not a foreigner from Iraq or Afghanistan. They might have haboobs but around here in the Panhandle of TEXAS, we have Dust Storms. So would you mind stating it that way. I’ll find another weather service

Brenda Daffern added:

In Texas, nimrod, this is called a sandstorm. We’ve had them for years! If you would like to move to the Middle East you can call this a haboob. While you reside here, call it a sandstorm. We Texans will appreciate you.
We do pick some odd things to get our panties in a bunch about. Haboob makes me grin because my mind automatically adds 'ies' when I hear it.
Ah, hell. I've loved the word haboob for its sheer linguistic oddity. Now I'm going to start loving haboobies because it makes me giggle like a kid,
Hmm... do Texans also object to the words: Admiral, alfalfa, algebra, alkali, amber, arsenal, assassin, borax, almanac, tuna, zero, etc (and I can serve up a lot of others)? The stars above them, pretty much all , have arabic names - a fact of which Pres. GW Bush was ignorant.
In general, Texans object to anything Yankee.
Well Yankee isn't arabic. And Boston doesn't have haboobs, just snow. I think Texans have demonstrated that they have oil interests in common with arabs but not with Yankees.
Which, of course, are those from New England.
I believe the line is a bit farther south.
Well, you're wrong. First time I've seen it, and it saddens me. Up until this point, you've been unimpeachably right in my eyes.

But I do get the general usage. It's analogous to the Japanese word "gaijin." A shortened form of "y'all ain't ferm 'round 'yer." Makes sense, and everybody does it no mtater where they are from.

Out of curiosity, how is it applied? Bob, by my understanding, is Illinoisian by birth. That was an anti-slavery and U***n state. Yet he consistently and pejoratively refers to Yankees. Now, for all I know, he has truly southern roots (he has an unfeigned accent, for instance). But if he doesn't, despite the fact that he might have been born south of the line, is he, in fact, a Yank because that state was Federal? Is it blood-based or geographically based?

And nobody get offended, please. I'm trying to figure out some of the nuances, not insult anyone.
Technically, I was born in Iowa, lived in Illinois, Missouri, New Hampshire, Missouri (again), Iowa (again), Missouri (again)... see? I moved around a lot. My folk actually come from the Blue Ridge Mountains in West Virginia. Now, I will never be considered Texan by many here because I was not born here. I have assimilated fairly well and I would probably be viewed as Texan (and West Texan, specifically) by most as long as I never mentioned I was born elsewhere. My wife is a native-born Texican and she thought I was too while we first dated.

Still, Yankee is generally used by me as a joke. There are, I am sure, a few folks that hate Yankees but I have never met them. Mostly they, along with Aggies, are just used here as a humorous foil. What really gets people riled 'round these parts is calling someone a democrat.[/quote]

Didn't take offense. I can't think of a single word used up here to refer to southerners as universally as Yankee I'd applied to Northerners.

Didn't realize it was so political. I've met my share of those less intelligent on both sides of the party lines.[/quote]
Now, Yankee has a different connotation in the deep South, or Dixie. JudgeRusty, Fain, or coco could better help you with that usage.
"One man's theology is another man's belly laugh." - Robert A. Heinlein

"Many of the points here, taken to their logical conclusions, don't hold up to logic; they're simply Godded-up ways of saying "I don't like that." - Skip

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Re: TEXAS in the News

Post by JimVH » Tue Jun 14, 2016 3:55 pm

UncleBob wrote:
hugodrax wrote:
UncleBob wrote:
hugodrax wrote:
JimVH wrote:
hugodrax wrote:
Rusty wrote:
UncleBob wrote:
Rusty wrote:
hugodrax wrote:[quote="JimVH"][quote="UncleBob"]Arabic weather term ‘haboob’ is apparently troubling for some Texans

[quote]A wall of dust raced toward Lubbock, Tex., on Sunday, and the National Weather Service threw out a word of caution on its Facebook page. “A haboob is rapidly approaching the Lubbock airport and may affect the city as well,” the meteorologists wrote.

The use of the meteorological term “haboob,” a word with Arabic roots, didn’t sit well with some residents.

Reader John Fullbright wrote:

Haboob!?! I’m a Texan. Not a foreigner from Iraq or Afghanistan. They might have haboobs but around here in the Panhandle of TEXAS, we have Dust Storms. So would you mind stating it that way. I’ll find another weather service

Brenda Daffern added:

In Texas, nimrod, this is called a sandstorm. We’ve had them for years! If you would like to move to the Middle East you can call this a haboob. While you reside here, call it a sandstorm. We Texans will appreciate you.
We do pick some odd things to get our panties in a bunch about. Haboob makes me grin because my mind automatically adds 'ies' when I hear it.
Ah, hell. I've loved the word haboob for its sheer linguistic oddity. Now I'm going to start loving haboobies because it makes me giggle like a kid,
Hmm... do Texans also object to the words: Admiral, alfalfa, algebra, alkali, amber, arsenal, assassin, borax, almanac, tuna, zero, etc (and I can serve up a lot of others)? The stars above them, pretty much all , have arabic names - a fact of which Pres. GW Bush was ignorant.
In general, Texans object to anything Yankee.
Well Yankee isn't arabic. And Boston doesn't have haboobs, just snow. I think Texans have demonstrated that they have oil interests in common with arabs but not with Yankees.
Which, of course, are those from New England.
I believe the line is a bit farther south.
Well, you're wrong. First time I've seen it, and it saddens me. Up until this point, you've been unimpeachably right in my eyes.

But I do get the general usage. It's analogous to the Japanese word "gaijin." A shortened form of "y'all ain't ferm 'round 'yer." Makes sense, and everybody does it no mtater where they are from.

Out of curiosity, how is it applied? Bob, by my understanding, is Illinoisian by birth. That was an anti-slavery and U***n state. Yet he consistently and pejoratively refers to Yankees. Now, for all I know, he has truly southern roots (he has an unfeigned accent, for instance). But if he doesn't, despite the fact that he might have been born south of the line, is he, in fact, a Yank because that state was Federal? Is it blood-based or geographically based?

And nobody get offended, please. I'm trying to figure out some of the nuances, not insult anyone.
Technically, I was born in Iowa, lived in Illinois, Missouri, New Hampshire, Missouri (again), Iowa (again), Missouri (again)... see? I moved around a lot. My folk actually come from the Blue Ridge Mountains in West Virginia. Now, I will never be considered Texan by many here because I was not born here. I have assimilated fairly well and I would probably be viewed as Texan (and West Texan, specifically) by most as long as I never mentioned I was born elsewhere. My wife is a native-born Texican and she thought I was too while we first dated.

Still, Yankee is generally used by me as a joke. There are, I am sure, a few folks that hate Yankees but I have never met them. Mostly they, along with Aggies, are just used here as a humorous foil. What really gets people riled 'round these parts is calling someone a democrat.[/quote]

Didn't take offense. I can't think of a single word used up here to refer to southerners as universally as Yankee I'd applied to Northerners.

Didn't realize it was so political. I've met my share of those less intelligent on both sides of the party lines.[/quote]
Now, Yankee has a different connotation in the deep South, or Dixie. JudgeRusty, Fain, or coco could better help you with that usage.[/quote]
Most people who view themselves as Texans think a Yankee is pretty well anyone not from here or the deep south.

For most folks I know, native Texan and otherwise, it's really just used in jest - at least until a yank decides act like an a-hole to us, then we mean it.
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Re: TEXAS in the News

Post by hugodrax » Tue Jun 14, 2016 4:02 pm

JimVH wrote:
UncleBob wrote:
hugodrax wrote:
UncleBob wrote:
hugodrax wrote:
JimVH wrote:
hugodrax wrote:
Rusty wrote:
UncleBob wrote:
Rusty wrote:[quote="hugodrax"][quote="JimVH"][quote="UncleBob"]Arabic weather term ‘haboob’ is apparently troubling for some Texans

[quote]A wall of dust raced toward Lubbock, Tex., on Sunday, and the National Weather Service threw out a word of caution on its Facebook page. “A haboob is rapidly approaching the Lubbock airport and may affect the city as well,” the meteorologists wrote.

The use of the meteorological term “haboob,” a word with Arabic roots, didn’t sit well with some residents.

Reader John Fullbright wrote:

Haboob!?! I’m a Texan. Not a foreigner from Iraq or Afghanistan. They might have haboobs but around here in the Panhandle of TEXAS, we have Dust Storms. So would you mind stating it that way. I’ll find another weather service

Brenda Daffern added:

In Texas, nimrod, this is called a sandstorm. We’ve had them for years! If you would like to move to the Middle East you can call this a haboob. While you reside here, call it a sandstorm. We Texans will appreciate you.
We do pick some odd things to get our panties in a bunch about. Haboob makes me grin because my mind automatically adds 'ies' when I hear it.
Ah, hell. I've loved the word haboob for its sheer linguistic oddity. Now I'm going to start loving haboobies because it makes me giggle like a kid,
Hmm... do Texans also object to the words: Admiral, alfalfa, algebra, alkali, amber, arsenal, assassin, borax, almanac, tuna, zero, etc (and I can serve up a lot of others)? The stars above them, pretty much all , have arabic names - a fact of which Pres. GW Bush was ignorant.
In general, Texans object to anything Yankee.
Well Yankee isn't arabic. And Boston doesn't have haboobs, just snow. I think Texans have demonstrated that they have oil interests in common with arabs but not with Yankees.
Which, of course, are those from New England.
I believe the line is a bit farther south.
Well, you're wrong. First time I've seen it, and it saddens me. Up until this point, you've been unimpeachably right in my eyes.

But I do get the general usage. It's analogous to the Japanese word "gaijin." A shortened form of "y'all ain't ferm 'round 'yer." Makes sense, and everybody does it no mtater where they are from.

Out of curiosity, how is it applied? Bob, by my understanding, is Illinoisian by birth. That was an anti-slavery and U***n state. Yet he consistently and pejoratively refers to Yankees. Now, for all I know, he has truly southern roots (he has an unfeigned accent, for instance). But if he doesn't, despite the fact that he might have been born south of the line, is he, in fact, a Yank because that state was Federal? Is it blood-based or geographically based?

And nobody get offended, please. I'm trying to figure out some of the nuances, not insult anyone.
Technically, I was born in Iowa, lived in Illinois, Missouri, New Hampshire, Missouri (again), Iowa (again), Missouri (again)... see? I moved around a lot. My folk actually come from the Blue Ridge Mountains in West Virginia. Now, I will never be considered Texan by many here because I was not born here. I have assimilated fairly well and I would probably be viewed as Texan (and West Texan, specifically) by most as long as I never mentioned I was born elsewhere. My wife is a native-born Texican and she thought I was too while we first dated.

Still, Yankee is generally used by me as a joke. There are, I am sure, a few folks that hate Yankees but I have never met them. Mostly they, along with Aggies, are just used here as a humorous foil. What really gets people riled 'round these parts is calling someone a democrat.[/quote]

Didn't take offense. I can't think of a single word used up here to refer to southerners as universally as Yankee I'd applied to Northerners.

Didn't realize it was so political. I've met my share of those less intelligent on both sides of the party lines.[/quote]
Now, Yankee has a different connotation in the deep South, or Dixie. JudgeRusty, Fain, or coco could better help you with that usage.[/quote]
Most people who view themselves as Texans think a Yankee is pretty well anyone not from here or the deep south.

For most folks I know, native Texan and otherwise, it's really just used in jest - at least until a yank decides act like an a-hole to us, then we mean it.[/quote]

Fair enough. I know a fair few northerners who pretty much quote Hedley Lamarr when they meet anyone from the south, as if accent is a sign of intelligence. Or as if their own accent isn't as grating on the ears of someone else.

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Re: TEXAS in the News

Post by UncleBob » Thu Jun 16, 2016 7:46 am

"One man's theology is another man's belly laugh." - Robert A. Heinlein

"Many of the points here, taken to their logical conclusions, don't hold up to logic; they're simply Godded-up ways of saying "I don't like that." - Skip

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Re: TEXAS in the News

Post by UncleBob » Tue Jun 21, 2016 10:12 am

"One man's theology is another man's belly laugh." - Robert A. Heinlein

"Many of the points here, taken to their logical conclusions, don't hold up to logic; they're simply Godded-up ways of saying "I don't like that." - Skip

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Re: TEXAS in the News

Post by mont974x4 » Tue Jun 21, 2016 10:23 am

JimVH wrote:
UncleBob wrote:Arabic weather term ‘haboob’ is apparently troubling for some Texans
A wall of dust raced toward Lubbock, Tex., on Sunday, and the National Weather Service threw out a word of caution on its Facebook page. “A haboob is rapidly approaching the Lubbock airport and may affect the city as well,” the meteorologists wrote.

The use of the meteorological term “haboob,” a word with Arabic roots, didn’t sit well with some residents.

Reader John Fullbright wrote:

Haboob!?! I’m a Texan. Not a foreigner from Iraq or Afghanistan. They might have haboobs but around here in the Panhandle of TEXAS, we have Dust Storms. So would you mind stating it that way. I’ll find another weather service

Brenda Daffern added:

In Texas, nimrod, this is called a sandstorm. We’ve had them for years! If you would like to move to the Middle East you can call this a haboob. While you reside here, call it a sandstorm. We Texans will appreciate you.
We do pick some odd things to get our panties in a bunch about. Haboob makes me grin because my mind automatically adds 'ies' when I hear it.
Who doesn't like haboobies?
It sounded better when the voices in my head were saying it.

Ire attracter-at-large and general misanthrope.

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Re: TEXAS in the News

Post by durangopipe » Wed Jun 22, 2016 10:18 pm

As a transplanted Yank who has now lived 42 years in the Rockies, I wouldn't presume to represent myself as an expert on the Texan's or the Southerner's use of the word Yankee.

But years ago I was assured by well educated in-laws born & raised in Mississippi that -yankee is only part of a word. The complete word is Damnyankee.
The most improper job of any man, even saints, is bossing other men. Not one in a million is fit for it, and least of all those who seek the opportunity. J.R.R. Tolkien

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Re: TEXAS in the News

Post by UncleBob » Thu Jun 23, 2016 3:02 pm

"One man's theology is another man's belly laugh." - Robert A. Heinlein

"Many of the points here, taken to their logical conclusions, don't hold up to logic; they're simply Godded-up ways of saying "I don't like that." - Skip

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Re: TEXAS in the News

Post by JimVH » Thu Jun 23, 2016 5:54 pm

Image

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Re: TEXAS in the News

Post by hugodrax » Thu Jun 23, 2016 5:58 pm

JimVH wrote:
Bloody hell!
But she's still in Lubbock.

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Re: TEXAS in the News

Post by JimVH » Thu Jun 23, 2016 6:23 pm

hugodrax wrote:
JimVH wrote:
Bloody hell!
But she's still in Lubbock.
I once had a young adult head injury patient who, when she awakened from her coma, spoke Spanish. She did not know the language before the accident.
Image

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Re: TEXAS in the News

Post by hugodrax » Thu Jun 23, 2016 7:04 pm

JimVH wrote:
hugodrax wrote:
JimVH wrote:
Bloody hell!
But she's still in Lubbock.
I once had a young adult head injury patient who, when she awakened from her coma, spoke Spanish. She did not know the language before the accident.
Isn't it interesting the hidden knowledge our brains store?

Also, are the old looney tunes cartoons correct? Is the best medicine another sharp blow to the head?

I don't care what anyone says, brains are miraculous.

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Re: TEXAS in the News

Post by UncleBob » Mon Jun 27, 2016 2:10 pm

"One man's theology is another man's belly laugh." - Robert A. Heinlein

"Many of the points here, taken to their logical conclusions, don't hold up to logic; they're simply Godded-up ways of saying "I don't like that." - Skip

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Re: TEXAS in the News

Post by hugodrax » Mon Jun 27, 2016 2:55 pm

I assume because Satan? Did they first test whether it would float?

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Re: TEXAS in the News

Post by UncleBob » Mon Jun 27, 2016 3:05 pm

hugodrax wrote:
I assume because Satan? Did they first test whether it would float?
White Settlement Mayor Ron White told the paper that he blames the gray cat’s eviction on pettiness at City Hall because a city employee wasn’t allowed to bring a puppy to work.

“We’ve had that cat five years, and there’s never been a question,” White said.
Big surprise: pettiness.
"One man's theology is another man's belly laugh." - Robert A. Heinlein

"Many of the points here, taken to their logical conclusions, don't hold up to logic; they're simply Godded-up ways of saying "I don't like that." - Skip

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Re: TEXAS in the News

Post by Del » Mon Jun 27, 2016 3:06 pm

Maybe politics and fear of protestors play a part. Probably.

But mostly, nobody goes into the field of medicine hoping to someday become an abortion doctor or nurse.

Medical Students for Life (a branch of Students for Life -- the group that "nobody has heard of") has a significantly larger presence than the comparable club sponsored by Planned Parenthood. I wish I knew the precise numbers.

I know that in general, there are 4 times as many chapters of Students for Life (on 4x campuses) as there are pro-choice student groups.

http://www.thecollegefix.com/post/27947/
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