Faith in the News

For those deep thinkers out there.

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hugodrax
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Re: Faith in the News

Post by hugodrax » Wed Sep 06, 2017 3:11 pm

UncleBob wrote:
Wed Sep 06, 2017 3:03 pm
hugodrax wrote:
Wed Sep 06, 2017 2:59 pm
UncleBob wrote:
Wed Sep 06, 2017 2:41 pm
hugodrax wrote:
Wed Sep 06, 2017 2:21 pm

I dunno, Bob. Once I see what the person is paid to prove, I tend to discount the study accordingly. This might not be entirely fair, but you must admit that it's a logical bias. Lombroso didn't mean to provide biased information; he quite subconsciously managed to pack more seeds into the Caucasian skulls.

It's an interesting subject, of course. I stick to my guns about what value it is asking somebody what religion they are. As a pollster, I suppose you have to take them at their word. As a regular church goer, I don't see a lot of the people checking off "Roman Catholic" on the polls.

It's also interesting to see where it might lead. As a shi'ite Roman Catholic, if somebody called me up and said "Hi, my name is Basil and I'm from the Nat Cen polling organization, mind if I ask you three thousand questions?" my reply would probably be to tell him he was a nice guy but get off the line. Now, if someone called me and said "Hi, my name is Kathryn (You can hear the "y" in these people's voices), I'm from the Nat Cen polling organization, mind if I ask you what religion you are?", my reply would be unprintable.

So who answers the question? Is it the Del's of the world, hellbent on pounding away on homosexuality one more time? Who is so proud of their religion that they are willing to be needlessly annoyed for its sake? Not martyred, mind, but annoyed?

The green ink brigade, that's who.
Religious affiliation is always problematic for at least two reasons: (1) not everyone understands or uses religious terms in the same way (think Evangelical) and (2) religion is often as much a cultural identity as it is a practiced faith. But since the study is really focused on political attitudes, it is unlikely that they will "drill down" further into the minute definitions or subtle nuances that may exist for a believer/sectarian. This is an important distinction within a fractured, contentious community of religious folks. Consider how even on CPS many people (like Olsteen) may be denied the label of "real" or "true" Christian (at least implicitly). However, if someone is participating in the study, just answering "no religion" or "not religious" should be a good gauge for the "nones", although that figure may be less than in practice. In short, one could argue that 53% should be higher.

But I hear you on your qualms in this matter. I deal with this often in my work. I have to remind folks that while what I have is the best picture of what we have, it may not be the actual representation.
It's been an interesting and informative conversation. I just had my opinion denied in order for it to be rephrased and repeated to me to illustrate how I'm wrong. You pulled a Rusty. :chili:
Um, what? I didn't say you were wrong, I was talking about the difficulty of using this religious method for studying religion and this study in particular is all.
Bah. That's all I have to say. BAAAAAH. Also harrumph.
Harrumph, I say, and don't you forget it! :D

We just spent the afternoon wrangling over a Crux Post from their basement correspondent. There are no winners here, only losers. :D
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Re: Faith in the News

Post by UncleBob » Wed Sep 06, 2017 3:16 pm

Rusty wrote:
Wed Sep 06, 2017 3:06 pm
UncleBob wrote:
Wed Sep 06, 2017 2:41 pm
hugodrax wrote:
Wed Sep 06, 2017 2:21 pm

I dunno, Bob. Once I see what the person is paid to prove, I tend to discount the study accordingly. This might not be entirely fair, but you must admit that it's a logical bias. Lombroso didn't mean to provide biased information; he quite subconsciously managed to pack more seeds into the Caucasian skulls.

It's an interesting subject, of course. I stick to my guns about what value it is asking somebody what religion they are. As a pollster, I suppose you have to take them at their word. As a regular church goer, I don't see a lot of the people checking off "Roman Catholic" on the polls.

It's also interesting to see where it might lead. As a shi'ite Roman Catholic, if somebody called me up and said "Hi, my name is Basil and I'm from the Nat Cen polling organization, mind if I ask you three thousand questions?" my reply would probably be to tell him he was a nice guy but get off the line. Now, if someone called me and said "Hi, my name is Kathryn (You can hear the "y" in these people's voices), I'm from the Nat Cen polling organization, mind if I ask you what religion you are?", my reply would be unprintable.

So who answers the question? Is it the Del's of the world, hellbent on pounding away on homosexuality one more time? Who is so proud of their religion that they are willing to be needlessly annoyed for its sake? Not martyred, mind, but annoyed?

The green ink brigade, that's who.
Religious affiliation is always problematic for at least two reasons: (1) not everyone understands or uses religious terms in the same way (think Evangelical) and (2) religion is often as much a cultural identity as it is a practiced faith. But since the study is really focused on political attitudes, it is unlikely that they will "drill down" further into the minute definitions or subtle nuances that may exist for a believer/sectarian. This is an important distinction within a fractured, contentious community of religious folks. Consider how even on CPS many people (like Olsteen) may be denied the label of "real" or "true" Christian (at least implicitly). However, if someone is participating in the study, just answering "no religion" or "not religious" should be a good gauge for the "nones", although that figure may be less than in practice. In short, one could argue that 53% should be higher.

But I hear you on your qualms in this matter. I deal with this often in my work. I have to remind folks that while what I have is the best picture of what we have, it may not be the actual representation.
Is a "none" somebody who does not have a religion? If someone asked me about my religion my answer would be "no religion". I don't think of myself as a "none", which I take to be someone who may have a religion but has stopped going to church. Over the last year or so I've been asking friends & their partner whether they're religious. Most of them say no, some say yes. And I'm often surprised by their answer. You might think I would know by now but I really don't. There are some "no's" that admit they go to church sometimes for the services and some have said they do believe in God or some superior entity. Some "yes' " appear to me to be hostile to religion and actually deny any belief in God. Religiosity, attendance of church, and belief in God don't appear to correlate sometimes.
"Not religious" is sometimes confusing for people--especially if it is a cultural association--because many Christians may go to church regularly and yet still consider themselves to be not religious. In fact, for some Christians, being "religious" is considered a pejorative. Also, "no religion" is sometimes considered a social ill and may be seen as biased towards religion. So many of the metrics will phrase the question like:

What is your religious affiliation?
  • Christan
  • etc.
  • None
The "none" is considered less offensive and should get more honest answers because the person may consider selecting "no religion" as an implicit rejection of all religions or a particular religion. They are sometimes referred to as "Nones".
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Re: Faith in the News

Post by Rusty » Wed Sep 06, 2017 3:45 pm

UncleBob wrote:
Wed Sep 06, 2017 3:16 pm
Rusty wrote:
Wed Sep 06, 2017 3:06 pm
UncleBob wrote:
Wed Sep 06, 2017 2:41 pm
hugodrax wrote:
Wed Sep 06, 2017 2:21 pm

I dunno, Bob. Once I see what the person is paid to prove, I tend to discount the study accordingly. This might not be entirely fair, but you must admit that it's a logical bias. Lombroso didn't mean to provide biased information; he quite subconsciously managed to pack more seeds into the Caucasian skulls.

It's an interesting subject, of course. I stick to my guns about what value it is asking somebody what religion they are. As a pollster, I suppose you have to take them at their word. As a regular church goer, I don't see a lot of the people checking off "Roman Catholic" on the polls.

It's also interesting to see where it might lead. As a shi'ite Roman Catholic, if somebody called me up and said "Hi, my name is Basil and I'm from the Nat Cen polling organization, mind if I ask you three thousand questions?" my reply would probably be to tell him he was a nice guy but get off the line. Now, if someone called me and said "Hi, my name is Kathryn (You can hear the "y" in these people's voices), I'm from the Nat Cen polling organization, mind if I ask you what religion you are?", my reply would be unprintable.

So who answers the question? Is it the Del's of the world, hellbent on pounding away on homosexuality one more time? Who is so proud of their religion that they are willing to be needlessly annoyed for its sake? Not martyred, mind, but annoyed?

The green ink brigade, that's who.
Religious affiliation is always problematic for at least two reasons: (1) not everyone understands or uses religious terms in the same way (think Evangelical) and (2) religion is often as much a cultural identity as it is a practiced faith. But since the study is really focused on political attitudes, it is unlikely that they will "drill down" further into the minute definitions or subtle nuances that may exist for a believer/sectarian. This is an important distinction within a fractured, contentious community of religious folks. Consider how even on CPS many people (like Olsteen) may be denied the label of "real" or "true" Christian (at least implicitly). However, if someone is participating in the study, just answering "no religion" or "not religious" should be a good gauge for the "nones", although that figure may be less than in practice. In short, one could argue that 53% should be higher.

But I hear you on your qualms in this matter. I deal with this often in my work. I have to remind folks that while what I have is the best picture of what we have, it may not be the actual representation.
Is a "none" somebody who does not have a religion? If someone asked me about my religion my answer would be "no religion". I don't think of myself as a "none", which I take to be someone who may have a religion but has stopped going to church. Over the last year or so I've been asking friends & their partner whether they're religious. Most of them say no, some say yes. And I'm often surprised by their answer. You might think I would know by now but I really don't. There are some "no's" that admit they go to church sometimes for the services and some have said they do believe in God or some superior entity. Some "yes' " appear to me to be hostile to religion and actually deny any belief in God. Religiosity, attendance of church, and belief in God don't appear to correlate sometimes.
"Not religious" is sometimes confusing for people--especially if it is a cultural association--because many Christians may go to church regularly and yet still consider themselves to be not religious. In fact, for some Christians, being "religious" is considered a pejorative. Also, "no religion" is sometimes considered a social ill and may be seen as biased towards religion. So many of the metrics will phrase the question like:

What is your religious affiliation?
  • Christan
  • etc.
  • None
The "none" is considered less offensive and should get more honest answers because the person may consider selecting "no religion" as an implicit rejection of all religions or a particular religion. They are sometimes referred to as "Nones".
It seems to be a bit easier with Jews. Secular Jews may not believe in God but yet they will acknowledge that they are part of the Jewish community (that's important to them) and you may encounter them at some special events (eg Passover Seders) and/or going with (and for) another Jew to High Holiday services and other events. They almost always know the local Rabbis. Yet they may self-identify as agnostics or even atheists. This is a clear cultural association to me. The Jewish community sees them as Jews too. Jews do not seem to hammer on a set of beliefs as hard as Christians do.
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Re: Faith in the News

Post by hugodrax » Wed Sep 06, 2017 4:07 pm

Rusty wrote:
Wed Sep 06, 2017 3:45 pm
UncleBob wrote:
Wed Sep 06, 2017 3:16 pm
Rusty wrote:
Wed Sep 06, 2017 3:06 pm
UncleBob wrote:
Wed Sep 06, 2017 2:41 pm
hugodrax wrote:
Wed Sep 06, 2017 2:21 pm

I dunno, Bob. Once I see what the person is paid to prove, I tend to discount the study accordingly. This might not be entirely fair, but you must admit that it's a logical bias. Lombroso didn't mean to provide biased information; he quite subconsciously managed to pack more seeds into the Caucasian skulls.

It's an interesting subject, of course. I stick to my guns about what value it is asking somebody what religion they are. As a pollster, I suppose you have to take them at their word. As a regular church goer, I don't see a lot of the people checking off "Roman Catholic" on the polls.

It's also interesting to see where it might lead. As a shi'ite Roman Catholic, if somebody called me up and said "Hi, my name is Basil and I'm from the Nat Cen polling organization, mind if I ask you three thousand questions?" my reply would probably be to tell him he was a nice guy but get off the line. Now, if someone called me and said "Hi, my name is Kathryn (You can hear the "y" in these people's voices), I'm from the Nat Cen polling organization, mind if I ask you what religion you are?", my reply would be unprintable.

So who answers the question? Is it the Del's of the world, hellbent on pounding away on homosexuality one more time? Who is so proud of their religion that they are willing to be needlessly annoyed for its sake? Not martyred, mind, but annoyed?

The green ink brigade, that's who.
Religious affiliation is always problematic for at least two reasons: (1) not everyone understands or uses religious terms in the same way (think Evangelical) and (2) religion is often as much a cultural identity as it is a practiced faith. But since the study is really focused on political attitudes, it is unlikely that they will "drill down" further into the minute definitions or subtle nuances that may exist for a believer/sectarian. This is an important distinction within a fractured, contentious community of religious folks. Consider how even on CPS many people (like Olsteen) may be denied the label of "real" or "true" Christian (at least implicitly). However, if someone is participating in the study, just answering "no religion" or "not religious" should be a good gauge for the "nones", although that figure may be less than in practice. In short, one could argue that 53% should be higher.

But I hear you on your qualms in this matter. I deal with this often in my work. I have to remind folks that while what I have is the best picture of what we have, it may not be the actual representation.
Is a "none" somebody who does not have a religion? If someone asked me about my religion my answer would be "no religion". I don't think of myself as a "none", which I take to be someone who may have a religion but has stopped going to church. Over the last year or so I've been asking friends & their partner whether they're religious. Most of them say no, some say yes. And I'm often surprised by their answer. You might think I would know by now but I really don't. There are some "no's" that admit they go to church sometimes for the services and some have said they do believe in God or some superior entity. Some "yes' " appear to me to be hostile to religion and actually deny any belief in God. Religiosity, attendance of church, and belief in God don't appear to correlate sometimes.
"Not religious" is sometimes confusing for people--especially if it is a cultural association--because many Christians may go to church regularly and yet still consider themselves to be not religious. In fact, for some Christians, being "religious" is considered a pejorative. Also, "no religion" is sometimes considered a social ill and may be seen as biased towards religion. So many of the metrics will phrase the question like:

What is your religious affiliation?
  • Christan
  • etc.
  • None
The "none" is considered less offensive and should get more honest answers because the person may consider selecting "no religion" as an implicit rejection of all religions or a particular religion. They are sometimes referred to as "Nones".
It seems to be a bit easier with Jews. Secular Jews may not believe in God but yet they will acknowledge that they are part of the Jewish community (that's important to them) and you may encounter them at some special events (eg Passover Seders) and/or going with (and for) another Jew to High Holiday services and other events. They almost always know the local Rabbis. Yet they may self-identify as agnostics or even atheists. This is a clear cultural association to me. The Jewish community sees them as Jews too. Jews do not seem to hammer on a set of beliefs as hard as Christians do.
I think what Bob's trying to tell you is that can be very much the case in the US, too. The number of cultural Catholics is through the roof. Their babies are baptized, confirmed, and married within the church, they attend Christmas and Easter Mass, maybe more, go with their parents on important days, etc.

Many of my male friends attend with their families, believing it's good for the kids, yet never take communion or go to the confessional. Cultural reasons. They don't believe in the least.

I think the Jews are more upfront about it.
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Re: Faith in the News

Post by wosbald » Wed Sep 06, 2017 5:06 pm

+JMJ+

‘Christian America’ Dwindling, Including White Evangelicals, Study Shows
Image
Image via RNS/Sally Morrow

The future of religion in America is young, non-Christian, and technicolor.

Almost every Christian denomination in the U.S. shows signs of growing diversity as white Christians, once the majority in most mainline Protestant and Catholic denominations, give way to younger members, who tend to be of different races, according to a study released Sept. 6 by the Public Religion Research Institute.

And American evangelicals — once seemingly immune to the decline experienced by their Catholic and mainline Protestant neighbors — are losing numbers and losing them quickly. …




"In the end, My Immaculate Heart will triumph." - Our Lady of Fatima

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Re: Faith in the News

Post by hugodrax » Wed Sep 06, 2017 5:16 pm

wosbald wrote:
Wed Sep 06, 2017 5:06 pm
+JMJ+

‘Christian America’ Dwindling, Including White Evangelicals, Study Shows
Image
Image via RNS/Sally Morrow

The future of religion in America is young, non-Christian, and technicolor.

Almost every Christian denomination in the U.S. shows signs of growing diversity as white Christians, once the majority in most mainline Protestant and Catholic denominations, give way to younger members, who tend to be of different races, according to a study released Sept. 6 by the Public Religion Research Institute.

And American evangelicals — once seemingly immune to the decline experienced by their Catholic and mainline Protestant neighbors — are losing numbers and losing them quickly. …
I'd be very curious to know what races comprise the other 8 % of Lutherans. Adopted Asians and Africans? Inuit? The mind boggles, frankly. I've been to Lutheran churches, and all I've ever seen is solid (stolid?) Caucasians in JC Penny blazers. America at its most traditional.
Etiam mihi opinio anserem perirent.

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Re: Faith in the News

Post by John-Boy » Wed Sep 06, 2017 5:27 pm

hugodrax wrote:
Wed Sep 06, 2017 5:16 pm
wosbald wrote:
Wed Sep 06, 2017 5:06 pm
+JMJ+

‘Christian America’ Dwindling, Including White Evangelicals, Study Shows
Image
Image via RNS/Sally Morrow

The future of religion in America is young, non-Christian, and technicolor.

Almost every Christian denomination in the U.S. shows signs of growing diversity as white Christians, once the majority in most mainline Protestant and Catholic denominations, give way to younger members, who tend to be of different races, according to a study released Sept. 6 by the Public Religion Research Institute.

And American evangelicals — once seemingly immune to the decline experienced by their Catholic and mainline Protestant neighbors — are losing numbers and losing them quickly. …
I'd be very curious to know what races comprise the other 8 % of Lutherans. Adopted Asians and Africans? Inuit? The mind boggles, frankly. I've been to Lutheran churches, and all I've ever seen is solid (stolid?) Caucasians in JC Penny blazers. America at its most traditional.
As diverse as I try to be I remain a white evangelical. PLease HELP!!
Praying - coco
Sometimes memes can be helpful as well as humorous - Jocose
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Re: Faith in the News

Post by hugodrax » Wed Sep 06, 2017 5:37 pm

John-Boy wrote:
Wed Sep 06, 2017 5:27 pm
hugodrax wrote:
Wed Sep 06, 2017 5:16 pm
wosbald wrote:
Wed Sep 06, 2017 5:06 pm
+JMJ+

‘Christian America’ Dwindling, Including White Evangelicals, Study Shows
Image
Image via RNS/Sally Morrow

The future of religion in America is young, non-Christian, and technicolor.

Almost every Christian denomination in the U.S. shows signs of growing diversity as white Christians, once the majority in most mainline Protestant and Catholic denominations, give way to younger members, who tend to be of different races, according to a study released Sept. 6 by the Public Religion Research Institute.

And American evangelicals — once seemingly immune to the decline experienced by their Catholic and mainline Protestant neighbors — are losing numbers and losing them quickly. …
I'd be very curious to know what races comprise the other 8 % of Lutherans. Adopted Asians and Africans? Inuit? The mind boggles, frankly. I've been to Lutheran churches, and all I've ever seen is solid (stolid?) Caucasians in JC Penny blazers. America at its most traditional.
As diverse as I try to be I remain a white evangelical. PLease HELP!!
Don't worry, I'm a traditional Catholic. I've been labeled a member of a hate group by the Southern Poverty Law Center.

They might not like you, but I'm targeted for destruction. So you have that.
Etiam mihi opinio anserem perirent.

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Re: Faith in the News

Post by gaining_age » Wed Sep 06, 2017 6:05 pm

hugodrax wrote:
Wed Sep 06, 2017 5:37 pm
John-Boy wrote:
Wed Sep 06, 2017 5:27 pm
hugodrax wrote:
Wed Sep 06, 2017 5:16 pm
wosbald wrote:
Wed Sep 06, 2017 5:06 pm
+JMJ+

‘Christian America’ Dwindling, Including White Evangelicals, Study Shows
Image
Image via RNS/Sally Morrow

The future of religion in America is young, non-Christian, and technicolor.

Almost every Christian denomination in the U.S. shows signs of growing diversity as white Christians, once the majority in most mainline Protestant and Catholic denominations, give way to younger members, who tend to be of different races, according to a study released Sept. 6 by the Public Religion Research Institute.

And American evangelicals — once seemingly immune to the decline experienced by their Catholic and mainline Protestant neighbors — are losing numbers and losing them quickly. …
I'd be very curious to know what races comprise the other 8 % of Lutherans. Adopted Asians and Africans? Inuit? The mind boggles, frankly. I've been to Lutheran churches, and all I've ever seen is solid (stolid?) Caucasians in JC Penny blazers. America at its most traditional.
As diverse as I try to be I remain a white evangelical. PLease HELP!!
Don't worry, I'm a traditional Catholic. I've been labeled a member of a hate group by the Southern Poverty Law Center.

They might not like you, but I'm targeted for destruction. So you have that.
Made me look.... SPLC. The interactive map is fascinating (in a big brother is watching sort of way... and surprising in a <zederated-- not allowed to discuss the various groups on CPS> way).
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Re: Faith in the News

Post by John-Boy » Wed Sep 06, 2017 6:06 pm

hugodrax wrote:
Wed Sep 06, 2017 5:37 pm
John-Boy wrote:
Wed Sep 06, 2017 5:27 pm
hugodrax wrote:
Wed Sep 06, 2017 5:16 pm
wosbald wrote:
Wed Sep 06, 2017 5:06 pm
+JMJ+

‘Christian America’ Dwindling, Including White Evangelicals, Study Shows
Image
Image via RNS/Sally Morrow

The future of religion in America is young, non-Christian, and technicolor.

Almost every Christian denomination in the U.S. shows signs of growing diversity as white Christians, once the majority in most mainline Protestant and Catholic denominations, give way to younger members, who tend to be of different races, according to a study released Sept. 6 by the Public Religion Research Institute.

And American evangelicals — once seemingly immune to the decline experienced by their Catholic and mainline Protestant neighbors — are losing numbers and losing them quickly. …
I'd be very curious to know what races comprise the other 8 % of Lutherans. Adopted Asians and Africans? Inuit? The mind boggles, frankly. I've been to Lutheran churches, and all I've ever seen is solid (stolid?) Caucasians in JC Penny blazers. America at its most traditional.
As diverse as I try to be I remain a white evangelical. PLease HELP!!
Don't worry, I'm a traditional Catholic. I've been labeled a member of a hate group by the Southern Poverty Law Center.

They might not like you, but I'm targeted for destruction. So you have that.
I'm on a youtube kick...
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xKvXz9NdGJ4
Praying - coco
Sometimes memes can be helpful as well as humorous - Jocose
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Re: Faith in the News

Post by Rusty » Wed Sep 06, 2017 6:13 pm

hugodrax wrote:
Wed Sep 06, 2017 5:16 pm
wosbald wrote:
Wed Sep 06, 2017 5:06 pm
+JMJ+

‘Christian America’ Dwindling, Including White Evangelicals, Study Shows
Image
Image via RNS/Sally Morrow

The future of religion in America is young, non-Christian, and technicolor.

Almost every Christian denomination in the U.S. shows signs of growing diversity as white Christians, once the majority in most mainline Protestant and Catholic denominations, give way to younger members, who tend to be of different races, according to a study released Sept. 6 by the Public Religion Research Institute.

And American evangelicals — once seemingly immune to the decline experienced by their Catholic and mainline Protestant neighbors — are losing numbers and losing them quickly. …
I'd be very curious to know what races comprise the other 8 % of Lutherans. Adopted Asians and Africans? Inuit? The mind boggles, frankly. I've been to Lutheran churches, and all I've ever seen is solid (stolid?) Caucasians in JC Penny blazers. America at its most traditional.
Hmmmm.... let me guess.

LATIN AMERICAN LUTHERAN MISSION

Image
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Re: Faith in the News

Post by wosbald » Thu Sep 07, 2017 7:35 am

+JMJ+

Netflix taps Game of Thrones star to play Pope Francis in upcoming drama
Image
British actor Jonathan Pryce, 2007. (Credit: Wikimedia Commons.) Pope Francis (Credit: Casa Rosada; Argentina Presidency of the Nation) [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons.)

A new Netflix drama on the Vatican will see Jonathan Pryce, recently finished with his role in the internationally acclaimed HBO series 'Game of Thrones,' portraying Pope Francis and Anthony Hopkins in the role of Emeritus Pope Benedict XVI.

[…]

The film will revisit the events surrounding the resignation of Pope Benedict XVI, who will be played by Anthony Hopkins (‘The Silence of the Lambs,’ ‘The Bounty’) and the subsequent election of Pope Francis, played by Jonathan Pryce (who recently finished his role in the HBO blockbuster series ‘Game of Thrones.’)

Brazilian filmmaker Fernando Meirelles (who also directed critically acclaimed movies such as ‘City of God’ and ‘The Constant Gardener’) will direct the film, which is based on a screenplay by Anthony McCarten (‘The Theory of Everything.’)

According to reports, the drama will try to portray the humility and dedication to the poor of Francis, who in the film does not want to become pope, and his influence for change within the Catholic Church. …




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Re: Faith in the News

Post by infidel » Mon Sep 11, 2017 1:23 pm

Eat, pray, live: the Lagos megachurches building their very own cities
Redemption Camp has 5,000 houses, roads, rubbish collection, police, supermarkets, banks, a fun fair, a post office – even a 25 megawatt power plant. In Nigeria, the line between church and city is rapidly vanishing
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Re: Faith in the News

Post by hugodrax » Mon Sep 11, 2017 1:37 pm

infidel wrote:
Mon Sep 11, 2017 1:23 pm
Eat, pray, live: the Lagos megachurches building their very own cities
Redemption Camp has 5,000 houses, roads, rubbish collection, police, supermarkets, banks, a fun fair, a post office – even a 25 megawatt power plant. In Nigeria, the line between church and city is rapidly vanishing
Interesting. Old style feudal manor system, rewritten for the churchman to rule instead of the local lord. There might be hope for us disenfranchised types yet.
Etiam mihi opinio anserem perirent.

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Re: Faith in the News

Post by Skip » Mon Sep 11, 2017 1:40 pm

hugodrax wrote:
Mon Sep 11, 2017 1:37 pm
infidel wrote:
Mon Sep 11, 2017 1:23 pm
Eat, pray, live: the Lagos megachurches building their very own cities
Redemption Camp has 5,000 houses, roads, rubbish collection, police, supermarkets, banks, a fun fair, a post office – even a 25 megawatt power plant. In Nigeria, the line between church and city is rapidly vanishing
Interesting. Old style feudal manor system, rewritten for the churchman to rule instead of the local lord. There might be hope for us disenfranchised types yet.
Cue Del rejoicing in 3, 2, 1, ...
2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017 Winner of the CPS Award: "Most Likely to be Found Without Pants at Any Given Moment"

2017 Curmudgeon of the Year

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Re: Faith in the News

Post by infidel » Mon Sep 11, 2017 5:22 pm

Skip wrote:
Mon Sep 11, 2017 1:40 pm
hugodrax wrote:
Mon Sep 11, 2017 1:37 pm
infidel wrote:
Mon Sep 11, 2017 1:23 pm
Eat, pray, live: the Lagos megachurches building their very own cities
Redemption Camp has 5,000 houses, roads, rubbish collection, police, supermarkets, banks, a fun fair, a post office – even a 25 megawatt power plant. In Nigeria, the line between church and city is rapidly vanishing
Interesting. Old style feudal manor system, rewritten for the churchman to rule instead of the local lord. There might be hope for us disenfranchised types yet.
Cue Del rejoicing in 3, 2, 1, ...
I bet you could gather enough of an offering here to buy Del a one way ticket to Lagos. :cheese:
Inadvertently emboldening the cause of naïve Evolutionism since 2016.

"Who the hell ponders placentas? Dude, you're a freak of nature." - DepartedLight

"One man's saint is another man's infidel." - hugodrax

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Re: Faith in the News

Post by wosbald » Mon Sep 11, 2017 5:28 pm

+JMJ+
infidel wrote:
Mon Sep 11, 2017 5:22 pm
Skip wrote:
Mon Sep 11, 2017 1:40 pm
hugodrax wrote:
Mon Sep 11, 2017 1:37 pm
infidel wrote:
Mon Sep 11, 2017 1:23 pm
Eat, pray, live: the Lagos megachurches building their very own cities
Redemption Camp has 5,000 houses, roads, rubbish collection, police, supermarkets, banks, a fun fair, a post office – even a 25 megawatt power plant. In Nigeria, the line between church and city is rapidly vanishing
Interesting. Old style feudal manor system, rewritten for the churchman to rule instead of the local lord. There might be hope for us disenfranchised types yet.
Cue Del rejoicing in 3, 2, 1, ...
I bet you could gather enough of an offering here to buy Del a one way ticket to Lagos. :cheese:
Somehow, I don't think that being governed by Protestant theocrats fits Del's template.




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Re: Faith in the News

Post by Skip » Mon Sep 11, 2017 6:02 pm

wosbald wrote:
Mon Sep 11, 2017 5:28 pm
+JMJ+
infidel wrote:
Mon Sep 11, 2017 5:22 pm
Skip wrote:
Mon Sep 11, 2017 1:40 pm
hugodrax wrote:
Mon Sep 11, 2017 1:37 pm
infidel wrote:
Mon Sep 11, 2017 1:23 pm
Eat, pray, live: the Lagos megachurches building their very own cities
Redemption Camp has 5,000 houses, roads, rubbish collection, police, supermarkets, banks, a fun fair, a post office – even a 25 megawatt power plant. In Nigeria, the line between church and city is rapidly vanishing
Interesting. Old style feudal manor system, rewritten for the churchman to rule instead of the local lord. There might be hope for us disenfranchised types yet.
Cue Del rejoicing in 3, 2, 1, ...
I bet you could gather enough of an offering here to buy Del a one way ticket to Lagos. :cheese:
Somehow, I don't think that being governed by Protestant theocrats fits Del's template.
"Old style feudal manor system, rewritten for the churchman to rule instead of the local lord."
2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017 Winner of the CPS Award: "Most Likely to be Found Without Pants at Any Given Moment"

2017 Curmudgeon of the Year

"No man is peer to Skip, peasant." -A_Morley

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Re: Faith in the News

Post by hugodrax » Mon Sep 11, 2017 6:22 pm

Skip wrote:
Mon Sep 11, 2017 6:02 pm
wosbald wrote:
Mon Sep 11, 2017 5:28 pm
+JMJ+
infidel wrote:
Mon Sep 11, 2017 5:22 pm
Skip wrote:
Mon Sep 11, 2017 1:40 pm
hugodrax wrote:
Mon Sep 11, 2017 1:37 pm
infidel wrote:
Mon Sep 11, 2017 1:23 pm
Eat, pray, live: the Lagos megachurches building their very own cities
Redemption Camp has 5,000 houses, roads, rubbish collection, police, supermarkets, banks, a fun fair, a post office – even a 25 megawatt power plant. In Nigeria, the line between church and city is rapidly vanishing
Interesting. Old style feudal manor system, rewritten for the churchman to rule instead of the local lord. There might be hope for us disenfranchised types yet.
Cue Del rejoicing in 3, 2, 1, ...
I bet you could gather enough of an offering here to buy Del a one way ticket to Lagos. :cheese:
Somehow, I don't think that being governed by Protestant theocrats fits Del's template.
"Old style feudal manor system, rewritten for the churchman to rule instead of the local lord."
You people sell Del short. He'd never be governed by some tribalist convert to prosperity gospel. And he has no problem rejecting churchmen who interfere with his politics.

I'm heartily in favor of a good squireocracy, though.
Etiam mihi opinio anserem perirent.

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Re: Faith in the News

Post by UncleBob » Mon Sep 11, 2017 6:25 pm

Image
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