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gaining_age
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Re: Economics

Post by gaining_age » Thu Apr 16, 2020 11:59 am

durangopipe wrote:
Thu Apr 16, 2020 11:02 am
wosbald wrote:
Thu Apr 16, 2020 10:23 am
+JMJ+
durangopipe wrote:
Thu Apr 16, 2020 10:20 am
hugodrax wrote:
Thu Apr 16, 2020 8:17 am
durangopipe wrote:
Thu Apr 16, 2020 8:01 am
As the virus threatens to concentrate wealth and power even more, there’s likely to be some sort of reckoning, including from the increasingly hard-pressed yeomanry.
The reckoning is The Zombie Apocalypse!

Image

The horror.
The horror.
You do realize that no matter which side wins, the university professors are always the first ones up against the wall, right?

Not by me, of course. I'm apolitical and just want to bind a certain Cleveland machinist to my lands. :D
I hadn’t actually intended that as a political statement - just thought it funny how much this photograph looks like scenes from a zombie apocalypse movie.

But yes, college professors ...

Always lined up against the wall and shot first during any revolution, left-wing revolution, right-wing revolution, both wings, no wings: shot.

It’s why I wear Kevlar underwear whenever I leave the house. That, and a trucker cap that says, “I’m not a real professor. I only play one on campus.”
OTOH, you could always pull a Heidegger.

:chili:
Yeah.
Pathetic, dishonorable - but then, so was the bulk of his philosophy.

I remember trying to convince a good friend, philosophy prof. where I teach (analytic philosopher) that Heidegger should not be dismissedout of hand. He literally screamed at me, “Name one good thing that ever came out of phenomenology!”

I’d never seen him raise his voice before.

I had another dear friend who was a prominent Heidegger scholar (Dr. Michael Zimmerman, then at Tulane) who was in total denial about Heidegger’s Nazi sympathizing and academic opportunism until late in his career when he could no longer escape the truth.

It damn near destroyed him.

Subsequent to that change of heart he wrote, “Heidegger’s Confrontation with Modernity,” where, after decades of defending Heidegger, he finally allowed the philosopher’s feet of clay to show, if only a little.

Nope. Not gonna pull a Heidegger here.
I’d prefer to be shot.
Goodness.

I've used the word "phenomenological" a lot.

From wikipedia (phenomenology (physics)):
In physics, phenomenology is the application of theoretical physics to experimental data by making quantitative predictions based upon known theories. It is in contrast to experimentation in the scientific method, in which the goal of the experiment is to test a scientific hypothesis instead of making predictions. Phenomenology is related to the philosophical notion in that these predictions describe anticipated behaviors for the phenomena in reality.
I'll be slightly cautious in the future on where I'm using the word.
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Del
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Re: Economics

Post by Del » Thu Apr 16, 2020 1:08 pm

gaining_age wrote:
Thu Apr 16, 2020 11:59 am
durangopipe wrote:
Thu Apr 16, 2020 11:02 am
wosbald wrote:
Thu Apr 16, 2020 10:23 am
+JMJ+
durangopipe wrote:
Thu Apr 16, 2020 10:20 am
hugodrax wrote:
Thu Apr 16, 2020 8:17 am
durangopipe wrote:
Thu Apr 16, 2020 8:01 am
As the virus threatens to concentrate wealth and power even more, there’s likely to be some sort of reckoning, including from the increasingly hard-pressed yeomanry.
The reckoning is The Zombie Apocalypse!

Image

The horror.
The horror.
You do realize that no matter which side wins, the university professors are always the first ones up against the wall, right?

Not by me, of course. I'm apolitical and just want to bind a certain Cleveland machinist to my lands. :D
I hadn’t actually intended that as a political statement - just thought it funny how much this photograph looks like scenes from a zombie apocalypse movie.

But yes, college professors ...

Always lined up against the wall and shot first during any revolution, left-wing revolution, right-wing revolution, both wings, no wings: shot.

It’s why I wear Kevlar underwear whenever I leave the house. That, and a trucker cap that says, “I’m not a real professor. I only play one on campus.”
OTOH, you could always pull a Heidegger.

:chili:
Yeah.
Pathetic, dishonorable - but then, so was the bulk of his philosophy.

I remember trying to convince a good friend, philosophy prof. where I teach (analytic philosopher) that Heidegger should not be dismissedout of hand. He literally screamed at me, “Name one good thing that ever came out of phenomenology!”

I’d never seen him raise his voice before.

I had another dear friend who was a prominent Heidegger scholar (Dr. Michael Zimmerman, then at Tulane) who was in total denial about Heidegger’s Nazi sympathizing and academic opportunism until late in his career when he could no longer escape the truth.

It damn near destroyed him.

Subsequent to that change of heart he wrote, “Heidegger’s Confrontation with Modernity,” where, after decades of defending Heidegger, he finally allowed the philosopher’s feet of clay to show, if only a little.

Nope. Not gonna pull a Heidegger here.
I’d prefer to be shot.
Goodness.

I've used the word "phenomenological" a lot.

From wikipedia (phenomenology (physics)):
In physics, phenomenology is the application of theoretical physics to experimental data by making quantitative predictions based upon known theories. It is in contrast to experimentation in the scientific method, in which the goal of the experiment is to test a scientific hypothesis instead of making predictions. Phenomenology is related to the philosophical notion in that these predictions describe anticipated behaviors for the phenomena in reality.
I'll be slightly cautious in the future on where I'm using the word.
Unless someone is posting links to the Fishwrap or the Bitter Pill can calling it "in-depth."

Then you can use all of the words you want, as long as they average four syllables-per-word or more.
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durangopipe
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Re: Economics

Post by durangopipe » Thu Apr 16, 2020 1:19 pm

gaining_age wrote:
Thu Apr 16, 2020 11:59 am

Goodness.

I've used the word "phenomenological" a lot.

From wikipedia (phenomenology (physics)):
In physics, phenomenology is the application of theoretical physics to experimental data by making quantitative predictions based upon known theories. It is in contrast to experimentation in the scientific method, in which the goal of the experiment is to test a scientific hypothesis instead of making predictions. Phenomenology is related to the philosophical notion in that these predictions describe anticipated behaviors for the phenomena in reality.
I'll be slightly cautious in the future on where I'm using the word.
(Precisely what Smolin writes about. I think you'd enjoy him.)

Nah. You're fine.

Like every other word, when serious scholars in the humanities adopt them they cease to have any understandable meaning. :D
Not at all unlike what Freud did to the perfectly respectable word from physics - sublimation.

But maybe I'm just sublimating.

Yeah, in philosophy phenomenology is a school of continental philosophy from which Heideger is descended.
If you're curious, you could look up Husserl. He makes a little more sense than Heidegger.

Heidegger invents his own words for the things he's taking about; sein, for example wasn't good enough for him, no, he needed to invent dasein. And he includes phrases like, worlding the world (in translation). That's what you do as a human, by the way.

Reading phenomenology (in philosophy) is sometimes like reading private code without a key. I learned the code for a few of them. Mostly, "A lot less there than meets the eye."

(That being a direct quote from Dr. J. Claude Evans at Washington University regarding Derrida's critique of Husserl. Claude loves Husserl. You get the picture.)

Wos may disagree. He's young. He came of age intellectually after these guys became pillars of contemporary philosophy. (Unless you're an analytical philosopher, then of course they still suck.) We've had this discussion before - but more as it relates to post-modern critical theory.

I'm old. I agree with Foucault who said of Derrida, "He gives crap a good name." At least Foucault is readable.
And I also agree with Claude regarding Derrida, but not Husserl. I cannot love a man, Husserl, who is always stepping further and further back from the world as it is.

But Claude's a helluva fly fisherman and a decent wingshot. Now those are credentials!
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wosbald
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Re: Economics

Post by wosbald » Mon Apr 20, 2020 8:06 am

+JMJ+



ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Del
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Re: Economics

Post by Del » Mon Apr 20, 2020 8:17 am

wosbald wrote:
Mon Apr 20, 2020 8:06 am
+JMJ+


To be fair, the "Protestantism" of the time was that of mainstream denominations. Methodists, Presbyterians, Episcopalians. They were still huge in the early 20th century, the religion of the upper classes. The outreach of modern Evangelicals to poorer American Christians (mostly Catholic immigrants) was just getting started.

In the South, the Southern Baptists were already strong. But they were not much associated with the northern WASPish factory capitalism that Bishop Fisk spoke of.
"If somebody serves you something to eat, and it don't taste good? -- Then it ain't Cajun!" -- Paul Prudhomme

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Re: Economics

Post by SlowToke » Mon Apr 20, 2020 10:26 am

Image
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Re: Economics

Post by wosbald » Fri May 08, 2020 11:10 am

+JMJ+

Intra-Thread Trackbacks: pg 3


Rural life novena ends on May 15 feast of St. Isidore, farmers’ patron
Image
Erin Roche and Steve Passmore of Stanfordville, N.Y., drive tractors on Sisters Hill Farm in this 2010 file photo. Because of the coronavirus pandemic, a virtual novena for farmers, farmworkers and small towns is scheduled for May 7-15, 2020. (Credit: Courtesy Gregory A. Shemitz/CNS)

WASHINGTON, D.C. — A rural life novena to St. Isidore, patron saint of farmers, begins May 7 and ends May 15, the saint’s feast day.

Four bishops have agreed to participate in the novena, according to Jim Ennis, executive director of Catholic Rural Life, sponsor of the novena - and for whom St. Isidore is also the patron.

“We at Catholic Rural Life were hearing from our chapter leaders about how the pandemic was impacting their respective dioceses and rural communities,” Ennis told Catholic News Service in a May 4 phone interview. “Several of them had to cancel their rural life celebrations” tied to St. Isidore’s feast. “I said, ‘Let’s do a virtual novena together, let’s expand it for the whole country.’”

The novena is for farmers, farmworkers, and all in small rural communities throughout the United States.

Ennis described the situation in rural America.

“Rural is really getting hit by the combination of the coronavirus hitting meatpacking plants and impacting both jobs in rural communities — but also the farmers who supply those meatpacking plants,” he said. “Those are some challenges, and some farmers are really stuck between a rock and a hard place.”

Ennis added, “The food processing facilities had to close down or suspend operations for a number of days. Some folks have lost jobs, Some are afraid to go back because they work so closely together.”

Since the virtual novena was conceived in mid-April, “some dioceses are starting to open up, but not for large gatherings,” Ennis told CNS.

“We’re suffering in solidarity with rural communities be they farmworkers, farmers, people who are dislocated, people who have lost work because of the pandemic,” he said.

[…]

Bishop Brandon J. Cahill of Victoria, Texas, the chairman of Catholic Rural Life’s board of directors, will lead the novena’s opening and closing days, the latter from a farm outside Victoria, according to Ennis. Other bishops slated to participate include Bishops Robert D. Gruse of Saginaw, Michigan, John T. Folda of Fargo, North Dakota, and W. Shawn McKnight of Jefferson City, Missouri.

ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: Economics

Post by wosbald » Sat May 09, 2020 11:01 am

+JMJ+

Former Italian Prime Minister Enrico Letta contemplates a post-Covid-19 multilateral future [In-Depth, Interview]
Image
Pope Francis talks with Italy’s Prime Minister Enrico Letta before boarding a plane at Fiumicino airport in Rome in July 2013 to join more than 300,000 young people for World Youth Day in Brazil. (CNS photo/Giampiero Spo sito, Reuters)

“I believe the world needs a new trans-Atlantic relationship. The pandemic has shown this very clearly and has highlighted the great importance of the Nov. 3 election in the United States,” a former Italian prime minister, Enrico Letta, said in a wide-ranging interview with America.

He spoke with optimism about Italy as it prepares to ease the lockdown caused by the pandemic and discussed the role of Europe, the United States, the United Kingdom, China and Russia today in the building of the post-Covid-19 world. He sees a great need to rebuild multilateralism at a global level.

Mr. Letta, 53, is married to an Italian journalist with whom he has three sons. He has held various ministerial posts in the Italian government, including that of prime minister (2013 to 2014), and also served as an elected member of the European Parliament. He is currently dean of the School of International Affairs at Sciences Po in Paris and the first non-American president of the Association of Professional Schools of International Affairs.

We began by talking about Italy, a nation of 60 million people and the European country that has suffered the most from the coronavirus pandemic, with more than 200,000 people infected and 27,000 dead. Notwithstanding this suffering and Italy’s grave socioeconomic situation, Mr. Letta sees three “signs of optimism and hope” as the country begins to exit its lockdown on May 4.

[…]

He finds a third “key factor for optimism” in the role played by the European Un𝗂on, “which has given important, positive signs” by proposing a recovery fund for member states most affected by the pandemic. But, he cautioned, “we have to wait until May 6 when the Recovery Fund package is presented” to see whether the E.U.’s collective response will be better than it was during the economic crisis of 2008 and the debt shock of 2012.

Pope Francis, in his “Urbi et Orbi” message at Easter, emphasized the need for E.U. member states to rediscover the spirit of solidarity that marked Western Europe at the end of World War II. Asked why it is so difficult to recover that solidarity today, Mr. Letta explained that post-war Europe was composed of a small collective of nations. The contemporary un𝗂on is much bigger, with 27 member states that have “many differences, many cleavages — East and West, North [and] South.” Moreover, the European Un𝗂on has become “too much an intergovernmental Europe,” leaving little room for communitarianism, he said.

[…]

The current crisis has demonstrated how important it is “to give power to the supra-national institutions,” he said, suggesting that E.U. member states “take a step back in favor of the multilateral institutions and in particular the [European] Commission and the Central European Bank.”

Rarely has the world needed solid global leadership as much as it does now, but many find it lacking at precisely this moment. Mr. Letta recognizes this as a problem. “Pope Francis is perhaps the only real leader in the world today,” he said, “and he’s doing a great deal.” Indeed, “I think his leadership has grown a lot in this period in the sense that his great capacity for empathy and communication has been exalted at this moment of confinement, lockdown and great difficulty for people.”

[…]

He added, “Pope Francis, who is a great communicator, has been able to live this entire moment intensely and, in part, that has enabled him in the background to overcome somewhat the negative image that was constructed in these last years due to a wave of scandals linked to pedophilia and church finances. This is greatly fortunate for the church and has brought it back to its moral leadership [role] and that seems to me something positive.”

[…]

Reflecting on the kind of world he sees emerging from this global crisis, Mr. Letta identified three important requisites: the need to build a new trans-Atlantic relationship, re-establish multilateralism at a global level and rethink the current structure of globalization.

He believes a new transatlantic alliance is warranted because of the breakdown in collaboration between the European Un𝗂on, Great Britain and the United States in recent years, culminating in the fact that collaboration was “non-existent” when the Covid-19 pandemic struck, allowing China and Russia to step in.

“This crisis poses a significant challenge: how to reshape the trans-Atlantic community,” he said, “how to bring together the three protagonists of the trans-Atlantic relationship — Brussels, London, Washington — because I believe the world needs a new trans-Atlantic relationship. The pandemic has highlighted this clearly and has shown the great importance of the Nov. 3 election in the United States.”

[…]

Mr. Letta identified a third requisite for the building the post-Covid-19 world in the need “to rethink our future in relation to globalization.” He recalled that the present crisis has touched everyone and provoked “gut reactions” from politicians with calls “to close the frontiers, build walls, return to the nation, have less exchanges,” and “as a result globalization is in crisis.”

But these “gut reactions” have given rise to “all the wrong responses” in places like Hungary, Austria and even the European Un𝗂on, he said, because “this is a crisis that has accelerated globalization. It is a crisis that has risen from the fact that frontiers do not exist for the pandemic, no more than they exist for corruption and the other challenges we face.”

Mr. Letta labeled these reactions as “responses for frightened, weakened people rather than [rational] responses to what’s happening.

“Globalization is not dead,” he said, adding that national borders “exist much more in our heads but much less in reality.”

[…]

ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: Economics

Post by wosbald » Thu May 21, 2020 6:00 am

+JMJ+

Catholic groups convey hopes, concerns about U.S.-British trade talks [In-Depth]
Image
Britain's Prime Minister Boris Johnson, right, meets with US Vice President Mike Pence inside 10 Downing Street in London, Thursday, Sept. 5, 2019. (Credit: Peter Summers/Pool photos via AP)

Catholic organizations have joined labor unions and environmental advocates in an effort to shape the early negotiations of a major new trade deal between the United Kingdom and the United States.

In a letter sent May 4 to the UK Secretary of State for International Trade and the U.S. Trade Representative, sixty-nine organizations, including three Catholic advocacy groups — Maryknoll Office for Global Concerns, the Columban Center for Advocacy and Outreach, and NETWORK Lobby for Catholic Social Justice — called for a transparent, democratic negotiation process based on “ambitious environmental and social aims.”

“The U.S.-U.K. trade deal is an opportunity to acknowledge the cry of the earth and the cry of the poor and to create a new way of living and interacting, with stronger climate and labor standards, and protection of safeguards for consumer health and safety,” Susan Gunn, director of Maryknoll Office for Global Concerns, told Crux.

“We are concerned the U.S.-UK trade deal could privilege corporate profits at the expense of people and the planet, especially poor, marginalized communities,” she added. “A trade deal between two of the most powerful nations in the North would create rules that both countries could use in negotiations with countries in the Global South. We need to get the rules right.”

Image
In this Monday, Sept. 30, 2019 file photo, Liz Truss, Britain’s International Trade Secretary at the Conservative Party Conference in Manchester, England. After a delay caused by the coronavirus pandemic, British and American negotiators have opened negotiations, remotely, on a trade agreement that the U.K. government hopes will bring a post-Brexit economic and diplomatic boost. U.K. International Trade Secretary Liz Truss and U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer held a video conference call on Tuesday May 5, 2020 at the start of two weeks of negotiations. (Credit: Frank Augstein/AP)

The letter argues that any new trade agreement must contribute to the fulfillment of the Paris Climate Agreement — the U.S. formally notified the United Nations of its withdrawal from that pact in November 2019 — and listed demands about labor protections, digital privacy rights, farm policy, and universal access to health care.

Other signers included the Communications Workers of America (CWA), which represents more than 700,000 people, the United Automobile, Aerospace and Agricultural Implement Workers of America (UAW), which includes 400,000 active members, and the Sierra Club, an environmental group with 3.8 million members.

Advocacy coordinator for the Columban Center for Advocacy and Outreach, Rebecca Eastwood, told Crux that the Columbans attend closely to trade policy because their missionaries routinely see how “free trade agreements have real human consequences.”

Active among vulnerable populations in fifteen different countries, the Columbans have witnessed firsthand the human and environmental costs of previous trade agreements that have “happened under the radar,” explained Eastwood.

“You’d think you would include the people who will be most impacted by the negotiations in the process, but rarely does that happen because it’s mostly been corporations and government officials negotiating in a fair amount of secrecy,” she added.

Image
In this Monday, Oct. 7, 2019 file photo, U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer listens as President Donald Trump speaks before signing a trade agreement with Japan in the Roosevelt Room of the White House, in Washington. After a delay caused by the coronavirus pandemic, British and American negotiators have opened negotiations, remotely, on a trade agreement that the U.K. government hopes will bring a post-Brexit economic and diplomatic boost. (Credit: Evan Vucci/AP)

[…]

ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: Economics

Post by wosbald » Fri May 22, 2020 11:13 am

+JMJ+

Vatican vows to help poor and jobless, insisting, ‘That’s not socialism’ [In-Depth]
Image
Fr. Augustin Zampini Davis speaking at the Vatican's Round Table during Davos' World Economic Forum in January 2020. (Credit: courtesy Dicastery for Integral Human Development)

ROME — As the Catholic Church and governments around the world explore different solutions to the the COVID-19 pandemic and its fallout, one Vatican official has said the Church’s priority will be assisting those hurt by rising poverty and unemployment.

And, pointedly, he added, that’s not socialism, it’s Church teaching.

Father Augusto Zampini noted that in the Church’s advocacy for the poor, “some people accuse us of being socialists.”

“Our answer is, hold on a minute: ‘So, some companies are asking for help, and that’s not socialism, but if poor people or informal workers need help, that’s socialism?’” he said, insisting, “This is not about ideology. This is not about socialism or capitalism.”

“All the structures of society are being challenged at the moment. What we are trying to implement is the preferential option for the poor. That’s one of the basic principles, and it is an ethical imperative according to Laudato Si',” Zampini said, who serves as an adjunct secretary in the Vatican’s Dicastery for Promoting Integral Human Development.

While all proposals have complications, including providing a universal basic income, “we need to do something,” he said. “We cannot remain indifferent, and these people cannot be invisible for society.”

Speaking to journalists at during a May 16 press conference titled, “COVID-19, Food Crisis and Integral Ecology: The Action of the Church,” which offered journalists an update on the activities of the Vatican’s coronavirus taskforce, Zampini noted that currently, “Millions of people are losing their jobs.”

[…]

Announced April 15, the Vatican’s coronavirus taskforce is charged with handling the challenges resulting from the COVID-19 coronavirus pandemic. It is led by the Vatican’s development department, headed by Ghanaian Cardinal Peter Turkson, and is divided into five working groups tasked with facing different aspects of the coronavirus fallout, including unemployment and research.

The commission is also coordinating with different organizations and Vatican offices, including Caritas Internationalis, the papal almoner’s office, the Congregation for the Evangelization of Peoples, the Vatican pharmacy, the Pontifical Academy for Life, the Pontifical Academy of Sciences and the Pontifical Academy of Social Sciences, as well as local churches.

Formally called the “Vatican Covid-19 Commission,” the taskforce is expected to last for at least a year, but its mandate could be extended if need be.

[…]

ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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