Great Potato Chips in History

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Re: Great Potato Chips in History

Post by wosbald » Tue Oct 17, 2017 1:16 pm

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Private Selection (Kroger) Sea Salt & Balsamic Vinegar — Thickly cut and marcelled, these flavorsomely earthy spuds pack a hearty wallop, particularly so by virtue of being fabricated by a kettling method. Despite the methodological hazards entailed by this process, there are very few imbricated chips — a tasty testament to the judiciousness of the anonymous masterchipper. The seasoning-profile presented by many salt & vinegar entries can occasionally grate the nerves, the vinegar being so strong as to chemically abrade the tongue's tender squamous after only a few rounds. Here, however, the seasoning is applied with a deft touch. The result is a remarkably eatable salt & vinegar iteration which spares the palate much of the stereotypical aftershock. Undoubtedly, the seasoning's unusually high content of added sugars not only helps ameliorate these residual shocks but also adds further organoleptic complication, though this sugar-content is not so high as to intrude upon the classicality of the experience. A notable chip, this is no meretricious abuse of the Kroger marque, but a studied entry in an already saturated field.

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Re: Great Potato Chips in History

Post by UncleBob » Wed Oct 18, 2017 8:26 am

wosbald wrote:
Tue Oct 17, 2017 1:16 pm
+JMJ+

Image

Private Selection (Kroger) Sea Salt & Balsamic Vinegar — Thickly cut and marcelled, these flavorsomely earthy spuds pack a hearty wallop, particularly so by virtue of being fabricated by a kettling method. Despite the methodological hazards entailed by this process, there are very few imbricated chips — a tasty testament to the judiciousness of the anonymous masterchipper. The seasoning-profile presented by many salt & vinegar entries can occasionally grate the nerves, the vinegar being so strong as to chemically abrade the tongue's tender squamous after only a few rounds. Here, however, the seasoning is applied with a deft touch. The result is a remarkably eatable salt & vinegar iteration which spares the palate much of the stereotypical aftershock. Undoubtedly, the seasoning's unusually high content of added sugars not only helps ameliorate these residual shocks but also adds further organoleptic complication, though this sugar-content is not so high as to intrude upon the classicality of the experience. A notable chip, this is no meretricious abuse of the Kroger marque, but a studied entry in an already saturated field.
Image
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Re: Great Potato Chips in History

Post by wosbald » Wed Oct 18, 2017 8:40 am

+JMJ+
UncleBob wrote:
Wed Oct 18, 2017 8:26 am
wosbald wrote:
Tue Oct 17, 2017 1:16 pm
Image

Private Selection (Kroger) Sea Salt & Balsamic Vinegar — Thickly cut and marcelled, these flavorsomely earthy spuds pack a hearty wallop, particularly so by virtue of being fabricated by a kettling method. Despite the methodological hazards entailed by this process, there are very few imbricated chips — a tasty testament to the judiciousness of the anonymous masterchipper. The seasoning-profile presented by many salt & vinegar entries can occasionally grate the nerves, the vinegar being so strong as to chemically abrade the tongue's tender squamous after only a few rounds. Here, however, the seasoning is applied with a deft touch. The result is a remarkably eatable salt & vinegar iteration which spares the palate much of the stereotypical aftershock. Undoubtedly, the seasoning's unusually high content of added sugars not only helps ameliorate these residual shocks but also adds further organoleptic complication, though this sugar-content is not so high as to intrude upon the classicality of the experience. A notable chip, this is no meretricious abuse of the Kroger marque, but a studied entry in an already saturated field.
Image
Fixed it for ya.

ImageImage

"For this reason, on June 1, 1951 … we did speak of the right of people to migrate, which right is founded in the very nature of land."
— Pope Pius XII, Exsul Familia Nazarethana

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Re: Great Potato Chips in History

Post by infidel » Wed Oct 18, 2017 9:28 am

wosbald wrote:
Wed Oct 18, 2017 8:40 am
+JMJ+
UncleBob wrote:
Wed Oct 18, 2017 8:26 am
wosbald wrote:
Tue Oct 17, 2017 1:16 pm
Image

Private Selection (Kroger) Sea Salt & Balsamic Vinegar — Thickly cut and marcelled, these flavorsomely earthy spuds pack a hearty wallop, particularly so by virtue of being fabricated by a kettling method. Despite the methodological hazards entailed by this process, there are very few imbricated chips — a tasty testament to the judiciousness of the anonymous masterchipper. The seasoning-profile presented by many salt & vinegar entries can occasionally grate the nerves, the vinegar being so strong as to chemically abrade the tongue's tender squamous after only a few rounds. Here, however, the seasoning is applied with a deft touch. The result is a remarkably eatable salt & vinegar iteration which spares the palate much of the stereotypical aftershock. Undoubtedly, the seasoning's unusually high content of added sugars not only helps ameliorate these residual shocks but also adds further organoleptic complication, though this sugar-content is not so high as to intrude upon the classicality of the experience. A notable chip, this is no meretricious abuse of the Kroger marque, but a studied entry in an already saturated field.
Image
Fixed it for ya.
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Re: Great Potato Chips in History

Post by wosbald » Thu Nov 23, 2017 11:59 am

+JMJ+

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Boulder Canyon Turkey & Gravy — With the crisp days of autumn turning the nation's collective heart towards the smell of loam and deep decay, the gustatory appetites of chipmasters are, invariably, similarly piqued. Evidence, you say? Enter the turkey-and-gravy chip courtesy of our fine compatriots at Boulder. This one's a no-brainer, as few foil could better support so prodigious a presentation of gallinaceous savor as that earthy tuber, especially as fabricated by experts in the kettling arts. The first taste is of gravy. Gravy in full-effect. Suffused by the vital juices sweated out that proteinaceous bird. Sage and thyme? They're here, too. And though this eats much like a premium kettle-chip dipped in Heinz jarred gravy, and though one might identify the sad spectacle of a lone and enshadowed figure wanly munching on ever-dwindling crumbs of faux-turkey potato chips on Thanksgiving Day as an infallible mark of a total loser, I wouldn't have it any other way. Na zdrowie!

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"For this reason, on June 1, 1951 … we did speak of the right of people to migrate, which right is founded in the very nature of land."
— Pope Pius XII, Exsul Familia Nazarethana

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Re: Great Potato Chips in History

Post by hugodrax » Thu Nov 23, 2017 7:34 pm

I'm just glad somebody is doing this.
I am also of the opinion that the Jesuits should be suppressed.

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Re: Great Potato Chips in History

Post by wosbald » Mon Jan 22, 2018 5:05 pm

+JMJ+

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Rue Farms Sea Salt & Pepper — Pepper. What more condign stratagem could be devised but the wiving of that aromatically pungent corn to those crisp-fried lamina all right-thinking men adore? Yet for years — aeons, seen in retrospect — this divine scheme remained unrealized, unthought and uneaten. The task fell — whether by blind chance or inscrutable cosmic design, I know not — to those loathsomely mercurial hipsters. Yes, I speak here of chipsters. Quirkily due to a minor trend ascendent amongst their hated kind, Salt & Pepper was finally enshrined as an Immortal in the Flavored Chip Pantheon, being eaten even by those brusque and brooding chipmen of few words. Mysterious ways, indeed. Using only Ohio-grown, non-GMO russets and a judicious smattering of quality spices, these rugged chips — often with bits of skin still adhered — boast an intense flavor and a prodigious crunch. And unlike the more ubiquitous Salt & Pepper presentations which add a melange of tertiary spices — onion or garlic along with sugar and powdered dairy, these chips boast seasonings of austere purity: salt and pepper and nothing else. Both bucolic and cosmopolitan, simultaneously subtle and bitter and sweet, Rue Farms has crafted a winner.

Image

ImageImage

"For this reason, on June 1, 1951 … we did speak of the right of people to migrate, which right is founded in the very nature of land."
— Pope Pius XII, Exsul Familia Nazarethana

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Re: Great Potato Chips in History

Post by wosbald » Tue Mar 27, 2018 8:16 am

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Downey's BBQ — The Irish? And potatoes? Do they mix???

I'm happy to report that, all expectations to the contrary notwithstanding, they do. They do, indeed. Felicitously and deliciously. On the surface, Downey's could be said to be yet-another-iteration of the classical American chip, and aye, it is that. Standard, unpretentious white chipping-potatoes. Partially hydrogenated vegetable oil. This checks all the rote boxes. But is that a bad thing? By now, gentle reader, you know the answer. In addition, the chips are given a slightly thicker cut and, perhaps, fried at a lower temperature, which go a long way toward adding a personal flourish. Further, the BBQ seasoning (not one of my most go-to flavors, BTW) is similarly understated, its mild sweetness supplementing the basic potato-flavor upon which it never obtrudes.

Exhibiting nothing trendy with which to commend itself, this regional find shows that quiet classicism, executed with conviction and constancy, will always be in style. Even if it comes from the most unexpected of corners. Erin go bragh!

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"For this reason, on June 1, 1951 … we did speak of the right of people to migrate, which right is founded in the very nature of land."
— Pope Pius XII, Exsul Familia Nazarethana

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Re: Great Potato Chips in History

Post by wosbald » Fri Mar 30, 2018 11:07 am

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Utz Hots! — This triumverate of tinglingly taterlicious tastes — representing something of a gastronomic experiment — comes to us from Utz, a company from which pushing boundaries implicitly assumed as sacrosanct by the often staid and button-down world of mainstream chipiculture is not something we'd immediately expect. Therefore, all-the-more delighted we were to be hurriedly ushered into Utz's arcane lucubrium — a Wonkaesque, phantasmagorian crucible birthing flavor as lead and gold in the fiery heart of a solar forge — that we might partake of this pack of potatoey piquancy. In short, while these hit all the usual keys which we'd expect from Utz, they are certainly not iterations on the typically Pennsylvanian "Red Hot" theme, and in fact, may well be, even in their most incendiary incarnation, less hot than Utz's production of that Keystone staple. In terms of ranking, though I tended to preference the Scorpion (nicely complimented with the tang of lime, BTW), it was perhaps, the Cayenne which most showcased an unabashed chile flavor, though the overall profile was also the most austere. The Tomatillo was especially joyous and companionable: the sour notes being aptly offset by the sweet, and the complexity never devolving to chaos. Though it might be true that, launched solo, no single entry would justify its existence, this triad is all about the gestalt.

ImageImage

"For this reason, on June 1, 1951 … we did speak of the right of people to migrate, which right is founded in the very nature of land."
— Pope Pius XII, Exsul Familia Nazarethana

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Re: Great Potato Chips in History

Post by Del » Fri Mar 30, 2018 7:10 pm

wosbald wrote:
Fri Mar 30, 2018 11:07 am
+JMJ+

Image

Utz Hots! — This triumverate of tinglingly taterlicious tastes — representing something of a gastronomic experiment — comes to us from Utz, a company from which pushing boundaries implicitly assumed as sacrosanct by the often staid and button-down world of mainstream chipiculture is not something we'd immediately expect. Therefore, all-the-more delighted we were to be hurriedly ushered into Utz's arcane lucubrium — a Wonkaesque, phantasmagorian crucible birthing flavor as lead and gold in the fiery heart of a solar forge — that we might partake of this pack of potatoey piquancy. In short, while these hit all the usual keys which we'd expect from Utz, they are certainly not iterations on the typically Pennsylvanian "Red Hot" theme, and in fact, may well be, even in their most incendiary incarnation, less hot than Utz's production of that Keystone staple. In terms of ranking, though I tended to preference the Scorpion (nicely complimented with the tang of lime, BTW), it was perhaps, the Cayenne which most showcased an unabashed chile flavor, though the overall profile was also the most austere. The Tomatillo was especially joyous and companionable: the sour notes being aptly offset by the sweet, and the complexity never devolving to chaos. Though it might be true that, launched solo, no single entry would justify its existence, this triad is all about the gestalt.
Potato chips on Good Friday?

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Re: Great Potato Chips in History

Post by hugodrax » Fri Mar 30, 2018 9:55 pm

Del wrote:
Fri Mar 30, 2018 7:10 pm
wosbald wrote:
Fri Mar 30, 2018 11:07 am
+JMJ+

Image

Utz Hots! — This triumverate of tinglingly taterlicious tastes — representing something of a gastronomic experiment — comes to us from Utz, a company from which pushing boundaries implicitly assumed as sacrosanct by the often staid and button-down world of mainstream chipiculture is not something we'd immediately expect. Therefore, all-the-more delighted we were to be hurriedly ushered into Utz's arcane lucubrium — a Wonkaesque, phantasmagorian crucible birthing flavor as lead and gold in the fiery heart of a solar forge — that we might partake of this pack of potatoey piquancy. In short, while these hit all the usual keys which we'd expect from Utz, they are certainly not iterations on the typically Pennsylvanian "Red Hot" theme, and in fact, may well be, even in their most incendiary incarnation, less hot than Utz's production of that Keystone staple. In terms of ranking, though I tended to preference the Scorpion (nicely complimented with the tang of lime, BTW), it was perhaps, the Cayenne which most showcased an unabashed chile flavor, though the overall profile was also the most austere. The Tomatillo was especially joyous and companionable: the sour notes being aptly offset by the sweet, and the complexity never devolving to chaos. Though it might be true that, launched solo, no single entry would justify its existence, this triad is all about the gestalt.
Potato chips on Good Friday?

Dude....
His penance shall be posting news articles about the thieving South American bishop.
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Re: Great Potato Chips in History

Post by sweetandsour » Sat Mar 31, 2018 6:08 am

wosbald wrote:
Mon Jan 22, 2018 5:05 pm
+JMJ+

Image

Rue Farms Sea Salt & Pepper — Pepper. What more condign stratagem could be devised but the wiving of that aromatically pungent corn to those crisp-fried lamina all right-thinking men adore? Yet for years — aeons, seen in retrospect — this divine scheme remained unrealized, unthought and uneaten. The task fell — whether by blind chance or inscrutable cosmic design, I know not — to those loathsomely mercurial hipsters. Yes, I speak here of chipsters. Quirkily due to a minor trend ascendent amongst their hated kind, Salt & Pepper was finally enshrined as an Immortal in the Flavored Chip Pantheon, being eaten even by those brusque and brooding chipmen of few words. Mysterious ways, indeed. Using only Ohio-grown, non-GMO russets and a judicious smattering of quality spices, these rugged chips — often with bits of skin still adhered — boast an intense flavor and a prodigious crunch. And unlike the more ubiquitous Salt & Pepper presentations which add a melange of tertiary spices — onion or garlic along with sugar and powdered dairy, these chips boast seasonings of austere purity: salt and pepper and nothing else. Both bucolic and cosmopolitan, simultaneously subtle and bitter and sweet, Rue Farms has crafted a winner.

Image
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Re: Great Potato Chips in History

Post by wosbald » Mon Jul 30, 2018 3:37 pm

+JMJ+

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Utz Carolina Style Barbeque — Two great tastes that taste great together. Reese's, right? Wrong. Instead, take heat, that faintly bitter piquancy contributed by the inestimable chili pepper, and judiciously juxtapose it against salt-&-vinegar. One might very well have the ultimate chip. At least, the ultimate chip for general-purpose, everyday munching. A chip ordinaire, one might say. The placid sky-blue hue which dominates the packaging jauntily hints as the ethereally savorsome mélange enfoiled within. A taste-tantalization firing on all cylinders — bracing but never enervating — this perennial offering from the House of Utz is highly commended.

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Re: Great Potato Chips in History

Post by Goose55 » Mon Jul 30, 2018 7:02 pm

Good to see this thread resurface. Who doesn't like potato chips?
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Re: Great Potato Chips in History

Post by Hovannes » Mon Jul 30, 2018 7:51 pm

I like potato chips, but I'm not supposed to have them :(
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Re: Great Potato Chips in History

Post by Jocose » Tue Jul 31, 2018 5:51 pm

Goose55 wrote:
Mon Jul 30, 2018 7:02 pm
Good to see this thread resurface. Who doesn't like potato chips?
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Re: Great Potato Chips in History

Post by wosbald » Sat Nov 24, 2018 2:39 pm

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Jackson's Honest Coconut Oil Red Heirloom Ripple Cut — Here's something a little different: a Food Science-based chip. The theory behind the brand is that of a gentle, lower-temperature frying in pure saturated oils leads to a chip rich in nutriments. Is that so? Perhaps. But there is no denying that the process results in a gustatorily delightful soupçon of idiosyncratic character and intriguingly subtle flavor range. As to the degree of character imparted by the red heirloom tater, I cannot speculate. The earthy potato flavor is clearly delineated, though this might well be so with a cultivar of lesser pedigree. However, I share no such reticence when it comes to the chosen oil. The coconut aroma is penetrating. The flavor, unctuous. Note well that these chips are very thickly sliced, deeply crevassed by the rippling, and fried slowly. The sum of these preparation choices eventuates in a toothsome chip, indeed. The prodigious crunch of these beauties likely precludes casual munching with burgers or dogs. Though culinary pairing may not be wholly proscribed, mindful munching is — in any event — indicated.

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"For this reason, on June 1, 1951 … we did speak of the right of people to migrate, which right is founded in the very nature of land."
— Pope Pius XII, Exsul Familia Nazarethana

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Re: Great Potato Chips in History

Post by John-Boy » Sat Nov 24, 2018 2:51 pm

We have a bag of these:
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I haven't eaten any out of this bag... yet. Trying to stay keto.
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Re: Great Potato Chips in History

Post by wosbald » Mon Feb 04, 2019 6:25 pm

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Hartville Kettle Cooked — O.K. No, not "Okay" as in "Oll Korrect". "O.K." as in an achingly absent comestible. A delicacy now a memory. You might object, "But O.K. is still made in Michigan." "Hell, no!," I reply. You keep those O.K.s-in-name-only. Those pretenders to the crown. O.K. died in the early 90's, and I'll have no truck with the man who says otherwise. Suffice it to say that O.K. was a quiet-but-crucial footnote haunting the mazedly twisted mists of regional chipping history. A notable local made in Akron, OH., O.K.'s quiet plying of its trade — proving that "silent, but savorsome" is more than just a ridiculously tired trope — made its masticious marque. But then — ah! — it was gone, aped only the the aforementioned Chip Which Shall Not Be Named. Yet the original owners are now back at it, scratching a living at making a product that truly earns the descriptor "unique". Thickly cut, yet with a friable crumb, there are little-to-no shards to pummel scar-weary squamous. These honest, no-frill farm-specfic (check the bag!) potatoes are lightly-salted, allowing them to speak in their own voices. They're back. Maybe not for ever. But for now, at least. And that's just okay by me.

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"For this reason, on June 1, 1951 … we did speak of the right of people to migrate, which right is founded in the very nature of land."
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Re: Great Potato Chips in History

Post by UncleBob » Mon Feb 04, 2019 7:20 pm

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