THE CATHOLIC THREAD

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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by wosbald » Mon Apr 13, 2020 5:23 pm

+JMJ+

Intra-Thread Trackbacks: pg 146


Ushering in Easter, Pope says Holy Saturday means hope in our ‘darkest hour’ [In-Depth]
Image
Pope Francis presides over a solemn Easter vigil ceremony in St. Peter's Basilica empty of the faithful following Italy’s ban on gatherings to contain coronavirus contagion, at the Vatican, Saturday, April 11, 2020. (Credit: Remo Casilli/Pool Photo via AP)

During his Saturday Easter Vigil Mass, Pope Francis likened the despair of Jesus’s followers after his death to that experienced by many due to the coronavirus, saying the Resurrection is a call to let go of fear and embrace hope.

ROME — Celebrating a Vigil Mass initiating the Catholic Church’s great feast of Easter, when Christians believe Christ rose from the dead, Pope Francis compared the silence of the tomb on Holy Saturday to what the world is experiencing due to the COVID-19 coronavirus pandemic.

Speaking to viewers tuning into his livestreamed Easter Vigil Mass, Pope Francis noted that during events Holy Week Saturday is often ignored, as most are eager to pass from the commemoration of Jesus’s death Friday to that of his resurrection on Sunday.

However, this year, Francis said the silence of the tomb on Saturday and the despair of the disciples after Jesus’s death is like the present global health crisis.

Pointing to the women in the day’s Gospel reading who are preparing oils to anoint Jesus’s body at the tomb, Francis said that “They, like us, had before their eyes the drama of suffering, of an unexpected tragedy that happened all too suddenly.”

“They had seen death and it weighed on their hearts,” he said. “Pain was mixed with fear: would they suffer the same fate as the Master? Then too there was fear about the future and all that would need to be rebuilt.”

“For them, as for us, it was the darkest hour,” he said. Yet when they arrived at the tomb and found it already opened, the angel who appeared told them “do not be afraid.”

“This is the message of hope,” the pope said, adding that it is not just for the women in the Gospel, but “It is addressed to us, today. These are the words that God repeats to us this very night.”

With Jesus’s rising from the dead, Christians, “acquire a fundamental right that can never be taken away from us: the right to hope,” he said, insisting that it is not “mere optimism,” a “pat on the back” or encouragement, but is rather “a new and living hope that comes from God.”

[…]

Jesus wants his followers to bring hope others in their everyday lives, he said, noting that Jesus sends his disciples to Galilee, which was not only far away, but home to people of different religions.

“What does this tell us? That the message of hope should not be confined to our sacred places, but should be brought to everyone,” he said, insisting that “everyone is in need of reassurance, and if we, who have touched ‘the Word of life’ do not give it, who will?”

“How beautiful it is to be Christians who offer consolation, who bear the burdens of others and who offer encouragement,” the pope said, urging Christians to be “messengers of life in a time of death!”

“Let us silence the cries of death, no more wars! May we stop the production and trade of weapons, since we need bread, not guns. Let the abortion and killing of innocent lives end,” he said, and prayed that those who live in abundance would be willing to shar with those who can’t afford the bare necessities.

“Today, as pilgrims in search of hope, we cling to you, Risen Jesus,” he said. “We turn our backs on death and open our hearts to you, for you are Life itself.”

ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by wosbald » Tue Apr 14, 2020 7:56 am

+JMJ+

Intra-Thread Trackbacks: pg 146 / pg 147


On an Easter under quarantine, Pope calls resurrection a ‘contagion of hope’ [In-Depth]
Image
The main altar in St. Peter's Basilica is decorated with flowers for Easter Sunday on April 12, 2020. (Credit: Vatican Media)

ROME — Pope Francis Easter Sunday prayed for those suffering due to either global conflict or the coronavirus, saying Christ’s resurrection brings both light and hope to the darkness of an oppressed and suffering world.

“Like a new flame this Good News springs up in the night, the night of a world already faced with epochal challenges and now oppressed by a pandemic severely testing our whole human family,” the pope told viewers of his livestreamed Urbi et Orbi blessing (“to the city and to the world”), speaking of the global COVID-19 outbreak.

Easter, he said, offers humanity “a different ‘contagion,’ a message transmitted from heart to heart — for every human heart awaits this Good News. It is the contagion of hope,” he said, insisting that it’s not a “magic formula” that makes humanity’s problems disappear.

The Urbi et Orbi is generally a policy speech as well as a blessing and Francis held to form, calling for debt relief for impoverished nations, easing of international sanctions, relief for the unemployed, European solidarity, and an end to armed conflicts, all styled both as a response to the pandemic and an expression of the Easter spirit.

“The resurrection of Christ … is the victory of love over the root of evil, a victory that does not ‘by-pass’ suffering and death, but passes through them, opening a path in the abyss, transforming evil into good. This is the unique hallmark of the power of God,” he said.

[…]

Noting how the coronavirus has changed the lives of millions in a few weeks’ time, sparking fear among many about unemployment and the ability to provide for their families, the pope urged political leaders to “work actively for the common good, to provide the means and resources needed to enable everyone to lead a dignified life and, when circumstances allow, to assist them in resuming their normal daily activities.”

With the whole world impacted by the virus, Pope Francis urged both people and nations not to fall into indifference, but to be attentive to the needs of others, especially “those living on the peripheries,” such as homeless, migrants and refugees.

“May these, the most vulnerable of our brothers and sisters living in the cities and peripheries of every part of the world, not be abandoned. Let us ensure that they do not lack basic necessities,” including access to medicine and healthcare, he said.

Francis also called for the relaxing of international sanctions due to the economic crisis caused by the coronavirus, saying the sanctions “make it difficult for countries on which they have been imposed to provide adequate support to their citizens.”

He also urged the reduction or forgiveness of the debts owed by poor nations, so that they will be in a better position to “meet the greatest needs of the moment.”

“This is not a time for self-centeredness, because the challenge we are facing is shared by all, without distinguishing between persons,” he said, pointing to the wave of solidarity that swept through Europe following the Second World War.

Noting that the European U***n now finds itself in the midst of a massive crisis, he said it is more urgent than ever that “these rivalries do not regain force, but that all recognize themselves as part of a single family and support one another.”

In present circumstances, the only alternative to solidarity “is the selfishness of particular interests and the temptation of a return to the past, at the risk of severely damaging the peaceful coexistence and development of future generations,” he said.

[…]

ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by Hovannes » Sat Apr 18, 2020 8:04 pm

When the chillen were little, I hung a swing from the stoutest branch of our olive tree. I also bought a 10" plastic resin statute of the Blessed Virgin, built a little roof for her and hung it up in an adjoining Canary Island pine to oversee the little playground.
That was then, this is now.
The Canary Island went away when it grew tall enough to interfere with the overhead power lines.
The swing was outgrown and the limb it was on is also gone(the olive tree remains however!)
The Blessed Virgin sat on top of Mrs' Hov's potting bench, which became a catch all for a variety of stuff which in turn caught the attention of rats.
Working in the yard and not wanting to throw a Hanta virus monkey wrench in our local Corona virus forward hospital system, I cleaned and disinfected ye old potting bench and rescued the Blessed Virgin.
Now I need to find a place for her to watch over the yard.
Any suggestions?
She looks like this:Image
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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by CodeMonkey » Sat Apr 18, 2020 8:30 pm

Hovannes wrote:
Sat Apr 18, 2020 8:04 pm
When the chillen were little, I hung a swing from the stoutest branch of our olive tree. I also bought a 10" plastic resin statute of the Blessed Virgin, built a little roof for her and hung it up in an adjoining Canary Island pine to oversee the little playground.
That was then, this is now.
The Canary Island went away when it grew tall enough to interfere with the overhead power lines.
The swing was outgrown and the limb it was on is also gone(the olive tree remains however!)
The Blessed Virgin sat on top of Mrs' Hov's potting bench, which became a catch all for a variety of stuff which in turn caught the attention of rats.
Working in the yard and not wanting to throw a Hanta virus monkey wrench in our local Corona virus forward hospital system, I cleaned and disinfected ye old potting bench and rescued the Blessed Virgin.
Now I need to find a place for her to watch over the yard.
Any suggestions?
She looks like this:Image
Plans for backyard statues
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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by Del » Sat Apr 18, 2020 8:48 pm

CodeMonkey wrote:
Sat Apr 18, 2020 8:30 pm
Hovannes wrote:
Sat Apr 18, 2020 8:04 pm
When the chillen were little, I hung a swing from the stoutest branch of our olive tree. I also bought a 10" plastic resin statute of the Blessed Virgin, built a little roof for her and hung it up in an adjoining Canary Island pine to oversee the little playground.
That was then, this is now.
The Canary Island went away when it grew tall enough to interfere with the overhead power lines.
The swing was outgrown and the limb it was on is also gone(the olive tree remains however!)
The Blessed Virgin sat on top of Mrs' Hov's potting bench, which became a catch all for a variety of stuff which in turn caught the attention of rats.
Working in the yard and not wanting to throw a Hanta virus monkey wrench in our local Corona virus forward hospital system, I cleaned and disinfected ye old potting bench and rescued the Blessed Virgin.
Now I need to find a place for her to watch over the yard.
Any suggestions?
She looks like this:Image
Plans for backyard statues
10" Mary is too small for a whole bathtub grotto.

Maybe set her up on a nice 5-gallon pail.
Last edited by Del on Sat Apr 18, 2020 9:13 pm, edited 1 time in total.
"Anyone who knows anything of experts will know one thing for certain; that they will always be disturbing our way of living; and therefore we shall always be disputing their right of governing." - GKC. Feb 11, 1933.

The future is certain; it’s the past that keeps changing. ~ Old Soviet joke

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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by Hovannes » Sat Apr 18, 2020 9:06 pm

CodeMonkey wrote:
Sat Apr 18, 2020 8:30 pm
Hovannes wrote:
Sat Apr 18, 2020 8:04 pm
When the chillen were little, I hung a swing from the stoutest branch of our olive tree. I also bought a 10" plastic resin statute of the Blessed Virgin, built a little roof for her and hung it up in an adjoining Canary Island pine to oversee the little playground.
That was then, this is now.
The Canary Island went away when it grew tall enough to interfere with the overhead power lines.
The swing was outgrown and the limb it was on is also gone(the olive tree remains however!)
The Blessed Virgin sat on top of Mrs' Hov's potting bench, which became a catch all for a variety of stuff which in turn caught the attention of rats.
Working in the yard and not wanting to throw a Hanta virus monkey wrench in our local Corona virus forward hospital system, I cleaned and disinfected ye old potting bench and rescued the Blessed Virgin.
Now I need to find a place for her to watch over the yard.
Any suggestions?
She looks like this:Image
Plans for backyard statues
Neat ideas!
That grotto with Botticelli's Venus left me hankering for lemon juice, Horseradish and Tobasco, though!
DEUS VULT!

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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by Del » Sat Apr 18, 2020 9:15 pm

Hovannes wrote:
Sat Apr 18, 2020 9:06 pm
CodeMonkey wrote:
Sat Apr 18, 2020 8:30 pm
Hovannes wrote:
Sat Apr 18, 2020 8:04 pm
When the chillen were little, I hung a swing from the stoutest branch of our olive tree. I also bought a 10" plastic resin statute of the Blessed Virgin, built a little roof for her and hung it up in an adjoining Canary Island pine to oversee the little playground.
That was then, this is now.
The Canary Island went away when it grew tall enough to interfere with the overhead power lines.
The swing was outgrown and the limb it was on is also gone(the olive tree remains however!)
The Blessed Virgin sat on top of Mrs' Hov's potting bench, which became a catch all for a variety of stuff which in turn caught the attention of rats.
Working in the yard and not wanting to throw a Hanta virus monkey wrench in our local Corona virus forward hospital system, I cleaned and disinfected ye old potting bench and rescued the Blessed Virgin.
Now I need to find a place for her to watch over the yard.
Any suggestions?
She looks like this:Image
Plans for backyard statues
Neat ideas!
That grotto with Botticelli's Venus left me hankering for lemon juice, Horseradish and Tobasco, though!
"Hottie on the Half-Shell."

Mouth-watering... Delicious!




(Please don't tell Mom I said that...)
"Anyone who knows anything of experts will know one thing for certain; that they will always be disturbing our way of living; and therefore we shall always be disputing their right of governing." - GKC. Feb 11, 1933.

The future is certain; it’s the past that keeps changing. ~ Old Soviet joke

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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by Hovannes » Sun Apr 19, 2020 7:22 am

I agree with Del that a grotto really needs a larger statue than 10"
I also fear that a small grotto(micro grotto?) Would once again attract the attention of rats.
The family terrier is old, blind and deaf and can't do her job any more.

I'm thinking of making a place in another tree that overlooks the patio.
I certainly have the time, LOL!

Now if I could just get to the coast and fresh oysters!
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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by hugodrax » Sun Apr 19, 2020 8:30 am

I have a terrible secret...I find Bathtub Mary’s deeply distasteful. In this section of the world, the Irish frequently have one too many, cut a clawfoot tub in half or thirds, and stick a cement Virgin Mary in the recess.

Now I love Mary. She’s the embodiment of motherhood and family and all that we should be but aren’t. But I cannot stand these things, lol. “Hey, I have something left over that I don’t think is good enough to wash my butt in...I know, let’s mangle it and use it to house the Pillar of Ivory, the Virgin Mother of God.” :lol:

I know the devotion is real. But it makes me cringe. On the other hand, I love finding her tucked away as if by accident...roadside shrines made out of timber or stones, tucked in among the flowers, once my father even trailed a zucchini plant around her shoulders to have her decorated by the blossoms, then moved it so the fruits of the vine were at her feet.

I love the idea of her tucked in a tree. Have a ton of fun with this. I’d love to know what you do with her.
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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by Del » Sun Apr 19, 2020 9:16 am

Hovannes wrote:
Sat Apr 18, 2020 8:04 pm
When the chillen were little, I hung a swing from the stoutest branch of our olive tree. I also bought a 10" plastic resin statute of the Blessed Virgin, built a little roof for her and hung it up in an adjoining Canary Island pine to oversee the little playground.
That was then, this is now.
The Canary Island went away when it grew tall enough to interfere with the overhead power lines.
The swing was outgrown and the limb it was on is also gone(the olive tree remains however!)
The Blessed Virgin sat on top of Mrs' Hov's potting bench, which became a catch all for a variety of stuff which in turn caught the attention of rats.
Working in the yard and not wanting to throw a Hanta virus monkey wrench in our local Corona virus forward hospital system, I cleaned and disinfected ye old potting bench and rescued the Blessed Virgin.
Now I need to find a place for her to watch over the yard.
Any suggestions?
She looks like this:Image
I can't quite tell if this image of Mary is more of Lourdes or of Fatima.

But I feel like she would be just as home in a tree as in a grotto.
"Anyone who knows anything of experts will know one thing for certain; that they will always be disturbing our way of living; and therefore we shall always be disputing their right of governing." - GKC. Feb 11, 1933.

The future is certain; it’s the past that keeps changing. ~ Old Soviet joke

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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by wosbald » Sun Apr 19, 2020 9:24 am

+JMJ=
Del wrote:
Sun Apr 19, 2020 9:16 am
Hovannes wrote:
Sat Apr 18, 2020 8:04 pm
She looks like this:

Image
I can't quite tell if this image of Mary is more of Lourdes or of Fatima.

[…]
TTBOMK, it's Our Lady of the Miraculous Medal.

ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by Del » Sun Apr 19, 2020 9:33 am

wosbald wrote:
Sun Apr 19, 2020 9:24 am
+JMJ=
Del wrote:
Sun Apr 19, 2020 9:16 am
Hovannes wrote:
Sat Apr 18, 2020 8:04 pm
She looks like this:

Image
I can't quite tell if this image of Mary is more of Lourdes or of Fatima.

[…]
TTBOMK, it's Our Lady of the Miraculous Medal.
I can see it now.

there are many Miraculous Medals tucked into the bark of trees outside Planned Parenthood.
"Anyone who knows anything of experts will know one thing for certain; that they will always be disturbing our way of living; and therefore we shall always be disputing their right of governing." - GKC. Feb 11, 1933.

The future is certain; it’s the past that keeps changing. ~ Old Soviet joke

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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by wosbald » Thu Apr 23, 2020 7:32 pm

+JMJ+

Forget video games; ‘Pope Simulator’ already the Church’s favorite pastime [In-Depth, Analysis]
Image
A screen capture from a trailer for the new computer game "Pope Simulator." (Credit: Ultimate Games)

ROME — Recently Inés San Martín of Crux brought to my attention a notice in PC Gamer about a Polish software developer who’s announced a new computer game called “Pope Simulator.” Apparently it opens with a conclave in which the player is elected pope, and then presents various scenarios that require decisions.

“Our idea assumes the possibility to use, among others, the pope’s so-called ‘soft power,’ and consequently influence the fate of the world and interfere in international politics,” Ultimate Games CEO Mateusz Zawadzki said announcing the game.

A spokesman for Ultimate Games told me they’ve spent about $72,000 developing the game and that they haven’t set a price yet for it, which is projected to launch in 2021 for PCs and later on consoles such as Xbox and PlayStation, but probably the price tag will be in the range of $9 to $19.

I got a laugh, because my experience over more than 20 years is that a free version of “Pope Simulator” — admittedly without a slick graphics interface — is already the favorite indoor sport of the Catholic Church, and has been ever since I can remember.

Almost every Catholic, it seems, has an opinion about what the pope should do or not do. Especially in the social media age, folks also have ready platforms for expressing those opinions. In addition to reporting on the actual pope, a lot of our time on the Vatican beat is spent covering potential “Pope Simulator” adepts with a following and a cause.

[…]

To be clear, in principle there’s nothing wrong with them. Canon law says Catholics have the right to make their needs known to their pastors, and Civale was less pushy about it than many. He even closed his letter by telling Francis, “we love you and will do everything we can to be witnesses to the Risen Lord.”

At one level, such fascination with how a pope deploys his authority is a tribute both to the papacy itself, which somehow remains keenly relevant despite centuries of secularization, and to modern popes, who’ve offered compelling examples of how inspired use of the office can still move mountains.

(It’s no accident, I suspect, that “Pope Simulator” was developed in Poland, where a whole generation remembers the role of St. John Paul II in the dissolution of the Soviet empire.)

At another level, this popular drive to tell the pope what he should do is also a tribute to the ardor of ordinary Catholics, many of whom are passionate about the Church and feel called to push it to realize the best version of itself, however he or she may understand that.

Since “Pope Simulator” apparently won’t be commercially available for at least a year, we’ll have to wait a while to boot it up and take a virtual spin in the Popemobile. …

[…]

ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by Kerdy » Sun Apr 26, 2020 4:56 pm

It was nice to see some actual dialogue on a Catholic topic for a change. I thought that is what this thread was created for in the first place.
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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by Goose55 » Sun Apr 26, 2020 6:36 pm

wosbald wrote:
Thu Apr 23, 2020 7:32 pm
+JMJ+

Forget video games; ‘Pope Simulator’ already the Church’s favorite pastime [In-Depth, Analysis]
Image
A screen capture from a trailer for the new computer game "Pope Simulator." (Credit: Ultimate Games)

ROME — Recently Inés San Martín of Crux brought to my attention a notice in PC Gamer about a Polish software developer who’s announced a new computer game called “Pope Simulator.” Apparently it opens with a conclave in which the player is elected pope, and then presents various scenarios that require decisions.

“Our idea assumes the possibility to use, among others, the pope’s so-called ‘soft power,’ and consequently influence the fate of the world and interfere in international politics,” Ultimate Games CEO Mateusz Zawadzki said announcing the game.

A spokesman for Ultimate Games told me they’ve spent about $72,000 developing the game and that they haven’t set a price yet for it, which is projected to launch in 2021 for PCs and later on consoles such as Xbox and PlayStation, but probably the price tag will be in the range of $9 to $19.

I got a laugh, because my experience over more than 20 years is that a free version of “Pope Simulator” — admittedly without a slick graphics interface — is already the favorite indoor sport of the Catholic Church, and has been ever since I can remember.

Almost every Catholic, it seems, has an opinion about what the pope should do or not do. Especially in the social media age, folks also have ready platforms for expressing those opinions. In addition to reporting on the actual pope, a lot of our time on the Vatican beat is spent covering potential “Pope Simulator” adepts with a following and a cause.

[…]

To be clear, in principle there’s nothing wrong with them. Canon law says Catholics have the right to make their needs known to their pastors, and Civale was less pushy about it than many. He even closed his letter by telling Francis, “we love you and will do everything we can to be witnesses to the Risen Lord.”

At one level, such fascination with how a pope deploys his authority is a tribute both to the papacy itself, which somehow remains keenly relevant despite centuries of secularization, and to modern popes, who’ve offered compelling examples of how inspired use of the office can still move mountains.

(It’s no accident, I suspect, that “Pope Simulator” was developed in Poland, where a whole generation remembers the role of St. John Paul II in the dissolution of the Soviet empire.)

At another level, this popular drive to tell the pope what he should do is also a tribute to the ardor of ordinary Catholics, many of whom are passionate about the Church and feel called to push it to realize the best version of itself, however he or she may understand that.

Since “Pope Simulator” apparently won’t be commercially available for at least a year, we’ll have to wait a while to boot it up and take a virtual spin in the Popemobile. …

[…]
A Pope simulator? Interesting.
"At present we're on the wrong side of the door. But all the pages of the New Testament are rustling with the rumor that it will not always be so." ~ C.S. Lewis

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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by wosbald » Thu Apr 30, 2020 7:26 am

+JMJ+

Pope Francis designates Savannah Cathedral as minor basilica
Image
The Cathedral of St. John the Baptist in Savannah, Georgia. (Credit: Tim Pierce/Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 4.0))

SAVANNAH, Georgia — Pope Francis has issued a decree granting a Catholic cathedral in Georgia the title of Minor Basilica, which highlights the significance and value of the institution, officials said.

The Cathedral of St. John the Baptist in Savannah will officially be named “The Cathedral Basilica of St. John the Baptist,” news outlets reported.

Cathedral rector The Rev. J. Gerald Schreck said the Cathedral is the first basilica in the Diocese of Savannah. The designation was made through the Vatican’s Congregation for Divine Worship and the Discipline of the Sacraments on Wednesday.

The 143-year-old cathedral was completed in 1896 but was destroyed by fire two years later, The Savannah Morning News reported.

The congregation immediately started to rebuild and the first Mass was held there on Dec. 24, 1899.

In 2000, the Cathedral received $11 million from the diocese and rejuvenated it inside and out, including restoring murals dating to 1912.

[…]

ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by wosbald » Sun May 03, 2020 9:23 am

+JMJ+

Francis creates foundation dedicated to John Paul I, the ‘smiling pope’
Image
Pope John Paul I, the "Smiling Pope," who died in 1978 after just 33 days in office. (Credit: Stock image.)

On Tuesday it was announced that Pope Francis has created a new Vatican foundation dedicated to his predecessor, John Paul I, often a point of reference in the current pontificate when it comes to topics such as mercy and compassion.

ROME — Pope John Paul I, the “smiling pope” of 33 days, will have a foundation dedicated to his memory, the Vatican announced Tuesday, another sign of how much the late pontiff is a point of reference for his successor, Francis.

Called the “Vatican John Paul I Foundation,” the new entity was established by Pope Francis Feb. 10 and is tasked with “the promotion and dissemination of the thought, words and example of John Paul I,” according to an April 28 Vatican communique.

Headquartered in the Vatican’s Secretariat of State, the foundation has five tasks:
  • To protect and preserve the cultural and religious heritage of John Paul I.
  • To promote initiatives dedicated to him and his works such as conferences and seminars.
  • To publish their own studies and research on John Paul I, and those of third parties.
  • To establish awards and scholarships.
  • To be a point of reference, both in Italy and abroad, for those working in the same area.
Pope Francis named the Vatican’s Secretary of State, Italian Cardinal Pietro Parolin, as president of the foundation, and Italian journalist Stefania Falasca, who is vice-postulator of John Paul I’s sainthood cause, as vice president.

Other members include Cardinal Beniamino Stella, prefect of the Vatican Congregation for Clergy; Monsignor Andrea Celli, director of the Legal Office of the Vicariate of Rome; Father Davide Fiocco, who oversees the Pope Luciani Center in Italy; the niece of John Paul I, Lina Petri; and Alfonso Cauteruccio, an official with the Synod of Bishops.

Born as Albino Luciani Oct. 17, 1912, in Italy’s northern Veneto region, Luciani was elected pope at the age of 65, taking the name Pope John Paul in order to honor both of his immediate predecessors, St. John XXIII and St. Paul VI.

He sent shockwaves around the world when he was found dead the morning of Sept. 30, 1978, just 33 days after he was elected pope. The Vatican announced that he died of a heart attack, but since his death there have been decades of speculation and conspiracy theories about his final hours.

In 2017, around the same time Luciani’s cause was advanced by Pope Francis, Falasca published a book titled Pope Luciani, Chronicle of a Death, which laid those rumors to rest using various testimonies, including the two sisters who found him dead, and documents from the Vatican Apostolic Archives.

When Pope Francis was elected in March 2013, his mannerisms struck many Catholics with a long memory as similar to those of Luciani, and comparisons were soon made between the new Argentinian pontiff and the “smiling pope.”

Luciani has often been hailed as an extremely pastoral figure who understood the struggles of ordinary people and used simple language to explain the faith. Pope Francis himself has often cited John Paul I in speeches and interviews, most specifically when talking about mercy and forgiveness.

In 2017 Francis signed the decree of heroic virtue allowing John Paul I, or “Papa Luciani” as he is fondly remembered among Italians, to be referred to as “Venerable.”

In an April 28 article published in Vatican newspaper L’Osservatore Romano, Parolin said John Paul I “a point of reference” in the Catholic Church, saying his importance “is inversely proportional to the duration of his very short pontificate.”

[…]

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"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by wosbald » Tue May 05, 2020 11:35 pm

+JMJ+

On St. Joseph feast day, pope prays for workers, employers
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Pope Francis preaches about the dignity of labor and justice for workers during his morning Mass on the feast of St. Joseph the Worker May 1, 2020, in the chapel of his Vatican residence, the Domus Sanctae Marthae. (Credit: CNS photo/Vatican Media)

ROME — With a statue of St. Joseph, mallet in hand, placed near the altar, Pope Francis dedicated his morning Mass May 1 to workers, especially those paid unjustly or virtually enslaved.

“Today is the feast of St. Joseph the Worker,” celebrated also as International Workers Day and as Labor Day in many countries; “let us pray for all workers. All of them,” the pope said at the beginning of the Mass in the chapel of the Domus Sanctae Marthae.

He prayed that no one would be lacking a job and “that all would be paid justly and may enjoy the dignity of work and the beauty of rest.”

[…]

Unfortunately, he said, the dignity of labor is “often trampled on,” and not just by slavery in the past centuries, which everyone recognizes as “barbaric.”

“Even today there are many slaves, many men and women who are not free to work — they are forced to work to survive and nothing more,” he said. There are those who are forced to work for little or no pay, who are mistreated and even beaten, but have no escape, he added.

Pope Francis said he can imagine someone saying, “‘Yes, Father, it’s true, but because it happens so far away, it’s hard to understand. Because here …’ Yes, even here among us. I’m thinking of day laborers whom you make work for a pittance and not for eight, but for 12, 14 hours a day. This happens today, here.”

“Think about the domestic who is not paid justly, is not guaranteed social assistance, who cannot retire. This doesn’t happen just in Asia. Here,” he said.

“Every injustice done to a person who works is a trampling on human dignity, including on the dignity of the one who commits the injustice,” the pope said.

The vocation God gives, he said, “is so beautiful: to create, re-create, work. But this can be done only when the conditions are fair, and the dignity of the person is respected.”

Pope Francis ended his homily praying for all workers, for all who fight for justice for workers and for all employers who treat their workers fairly, even if it costs them some money.

And pointing to the statue of St. Joseph “with his work tools in hand,” Pope Francis prayed that the saint would “help us fight for the dignity of labor so that there is work for all and that it would be worthy labor, not slave labor. May this be our prayer today.”

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"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by wosbald » Mon May 11, 2020 8:08 am

+JMJ+


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"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by Del » Mon May 11, 2020 9:30 am

wosbald wrote:
Mon May 11, 2020 8:08 am
+JMJ+


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From the era of great Jesuit missionaries.... long before the Troubles.
"Anyone who knows anything of experts will know one thing for certain; that they will always be disturbing our way of living; and therefore we shall always be disputing their right of governing." - GKC. Feb 11, 1933.

The future is certain; it’s the past that keeps changing. ~ Old Soviet joke

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