THE CATHOLIC THREAD

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Hovannes
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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by Hovannes » Sun May 17, 2020 9:00 am

Another Sunday---
NO mass. NO Eucharist. NO sacraments of any kind.
I'm feeling the pain of other Catholics in other times in History who were also denied.
The readings for this Sunday on a computer screen lack gravitas when read to myself as opposed to being read by a priest----even a priest with a thick accent---in person.
And watching the mass on television is like watching one of those flickering electric light bulbs that are supposed to simulate a candle.
I realize my discontent is a product of my own sinful pride complicated by there being no chance of making a confession.

Thanks for letting me vent!
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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by hugodrax » Sun May 17, 2020 9:09 am

Hovannes wrote:
Sun May 17, 2020 9:00 am
Another Sunday---
NO mass. NO Eucharist. NO sacraments of any kind.
I'm feeling the pain of other Catholics in other times in History who were also denied.
The readings for this Sunday on a computer screen lack gravitas when read to myself as opposed to being read by a priest----even a priest with a thick accent---in person.
And watching the mass on television is like watching one of those flickering electric light bulbs that are supposed to simulate a candle.
I realize my discontent is a product of my own sinful pride complicated by there being no chance of making a confession.

Thanks for letting me vent!
I started praying for priests on Sundays for this very reason, Hov. Think about the exquisite torture to a man who was called by God to minister to His people being denied that ability by the men he took an oath to obey. It must be a living Hell to priests not to be able to publicly say Mass or Anoint the Sick or bury the dead. This is the way I’ve shifted my anger at not getting what I want and need into thinking about all those who want to do these things but are prevented from so doing.

Varying levels of success, to be honest. There are good days and bad.
Everything we hear is an opinion, not a fact. Everything we see is a perspective, not the truth
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non nobis, Domine, non nobis, sed nomini tuo da gloriam

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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by Hovannes » Sun May 17, 2020 9:40 am

Yes, even our priests are being tortured. It must be very difficult for them :cry:
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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by Hovannes » Mon May 18, 2020 10:23 pm

During the season of Easter all my rosaries are based on the Glorious Mysteries. It's the way I've always said them since '81.
One thing that's always caused me to ponder are the idea of the Ascension of Christ and Assumption of the Blessed Virgin as the path to Heaven is upwards, into the sky. The Ascension was witnessed by many in Jerusalem according to the Bible and Christ departed in an upward direction into the sky.
So it's not just some literary device and yet I hear many theologians claim it is a literary device.
But the ancient Jews believed the sky was like a giant bubble under a sea of water while by the third century it was already well established that the earth was round as related by St. Augustine of Hippo.
So the giant bubble idea was literary device----a literary device with no witnesses.
What we now know of space is that it doesn't appear that heaven is up there but the accounts of the eye witnesses must remain.
Is the portal to heaven somewhere up there?

When I was a small child I remember funerals at our old cemetery under the departure end of a small airport, my short attention span being captured by small airplanes---usually Cubs or Aeroncas high overhead struggling to gain altitude at the same time a coffin was being lowered into the terra firma.
My imagination since then has always equated souls bound for heaven as passengers in rag wing taildraggers.

I was wonder what the opinions here might be of the pearly gates being ^^^up there^^^
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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by durangopipe » Tue May 19, 2020 5:00 pm

Did not intend to interrupt your question, HOV. But I wanted to post what is below and thought this the most appropriate thread. I hope others will speak to your question. For myself, I do tend to believe our sense of the portal to heaven being "above," is metaphor. I have no idea. Another one of those mysteries.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

I saw a headline that said many Catholic schools that had already been struggling economically had been so badly damaged financially as Church resources have been redirected during the pandemic that they would have to close permanently.

I wanted to know more. I found this:

Can Catholic Schools Be Saved?
Despite a growing Catholic population (from 45 million in 1965 to almost 77 million today, making it the largest Christian denomination in the United States), Catholic school enrollment has plummeted, from 5.2 million students in nearly 13,000 schools in 1960 to 2.5 million in 9,000 schools in 1990. After a promising increase in the late 1990s, enrollment had by 2006 dropped to 2.3 million students in 7,500 schools. And the steep decline would have been even steeper if these sectarian schools had to rely on their own flock for enrollment: almost 14 percent of Catholic school enrollment is now non-Catholic, up from less than 3 percent in 1970 (see Figure 2). When Catholic schools educated 12 percent of all schoolchildren in the United States, in 1965, the proportion of Catholics in the general population was 24 percent. Catholics still make up about one-quarter of the American population, but their schools enroll less than 5 percent of all students (see Figure 3)....


As most educators know, Catholic schools work and have worked for a long time. Sociologist James Coleman and colleagues Thomas Hoffer and Sally Kilgore, in 1982, were among the first to document Catholic schools’ academic successes, in High School Achievement: Public and Private Schools. A variety of studies since, by scholars at the University of Chicago, Northwestern, the Brookings Institution, and Harvard, have all supported the conclusion that Catholic schools do a better job educating children, especially the poor and minorities, than public schools.


Then I went looking for more specific information regarding the current crisis.


Catholic Schools Closing

More Catholic Schools Closing

And sadly even more


I am not Catholic.
Still, I know this is a terrible tragedy.

Count me among, " ... most educators know." Often I discover, after already having initially noticed that a student is extremely well prepared for college, diligent, respectful of others, that they are the product of Catholic private education.

Very often, private Catholic schools are the best schools in a school district. (I know that's true in our school district.)

And in those schools, the students' spiritual education is not seen as something somehow inferior to their "secular" studies. In fact, they are wise in knowing that there's actually no such thing as "secular studies." The understanding of creation, the tools for acquiring knowledge, knowledge itself are all of a piece - and only fully understood through a thorough and sound grounding in faith.

I was heartbroken to see this.
. . . be kind to one another, tenderhearted, forgiving one another, even as God in Christ forgave you. Ephesians 4:32 (NKJV)

The most improper job of any man, even saints, is bossing other men. Not one in a million is fit for it, and least of all those who seek the opportunity.. J.R.R. Tolkien

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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by wosbald » Wed May 27, 2020 8:20 am

+JMJ+

Intra-Thread Trackbacks: pg 146


Bishop reminds seafarers they are ‘not forgotten’ even amid pandemic
Image
Seagulls fly over a fishing boat off the shore of Balikesir, Turkey, March 6, 2020. This year the Apostleship of the Sea celebrated its annual National Day of Prayer in Remembrance for Mariners and People of the Sea online May 22. (Credit: Umit Bektas/Reuters via CNS)

WASHINGTON, D.C. — Some of the victims of the coronavirus are an already unseen group that now has a big role to play in the pandemic.

During a May 22 online prayer service via Zoom, those who work with mariners and other maritime workers via the Apostleship of the Sea ministry praised them, their work and their sacrifice as they keep essential goods moving during the pandemic, even as they or their families have been affected.

“As you all know, during this difficult time, seafarers are essential to the movement of goods, including food and medical supplies,” said Sister Joanna Okereke, national director of the Apostleship of the Sea ministry, reminding those gathered of the importance of those they minister.

Along with Bishop Brendan J. Cahill of Victoria, Texas, the ministry’s bishop promoter, Okereke said she believed it was important to continue this year, even in the midst of a pandemic, the tradition of dedicating the National Day of Prayer and Remembrance for Mariners and People of the Sea — this time via Zoom.

With a virtual background that featured water, Okereke, of the Congregation of the Handmaids of the Holy Child Jesus, urged the continued accompaniment of maritime workers.

“In these challenging times, let us trust that God will protect and provide for us, let us continue to pray for one another, accompany one another, provide spiritual guidance and a listening ear,” she said. “I urge you to find ways and means to stay in touch with each other, reach out and share the love of God; for, together we can bear the burden of each other.”

The bishop, directing his prayer to the maritime workers, urged them to “know that you are not forgotten, know of our love for you each and every day.”

The work of the ministry, which involves offering seafarers rides to errands such as essential shopping when they’re on land, staffing a seafarer center and just easing their loneliness by having a conversation with them, largely came to a halt with arrival of the coronavirus and social-distancing measures.

The ministry, which began in the U.S. in 1976, is part of the Pastoral Care of Migrants, Refugees and Travelers in the Secretariat of Cultural Diversity in the Church at the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, and its work includes caring for the spiritual life of those who work in the seas.

[…]

ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by wosbald » Thu May 28, 2020 11:28 am

+JMJ+

Vatican moves American, European Catholic giants closer to sainthood [In-Depth]
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Pope Francis has approved a miracle attributed to the intercession of Father Michael McGivney, founder of the Knights of Columbus, clearing the way for his beatification. Father McGivney is pictured in an undated portrait. (Credit: CNS file photo)

ROME — On Wednesday, the Vatican announced that it was moving two towering Catholic figures from different corners of the world forward on the path toward sainthood, approving miracles for Venerable Father Michael McGivney, and Blessed Charles de Faucauld.

McGivney, founder of the colossal American charity organization the Knights of Columbus, will now become a “blessed,” meaning there is one more miracle required for his canonization to be green-lighted, whereas Faucauld, a French hermit, will formally be canonized as a saint.

Though they hail from different corners of the world, each is widely considered to have made mammoth contributions to the Catholic Church in terms of charity, Catholic-Muslim relations, evangelization, service to the poor.

Both are also timely spiritual aides as much of the world is reeling from the COVID-19 coronavirus pandemic. McGivney himself is believed to have died as the result of a coronavirus, while Foucauld, whose canonization was approved as large portions of the global population are isolated in quarantine, is widely known for his writings on silence and solitude on one’s journey toward God.

Speaking to Crux, Carl Anderson, Supreme Knight of the Knights of Columbus, said the announcement of McGivney’s beatification is “an incredible moment” for the organization.

“The Church is affirming both Father McGivney’s heroic life and virtue and his miraculous intercession. Part of that heroic life and virtue, in fact, the most well-known part, was his founding of the Knights of Columbus,” he said, insisting that for those who have been living out McGivney’s vision, “this moment had an incredible meaning and is a great affirmation of our work.”

Noting that McGivney’s beatification will happen as the world grapples with a modern coronavirus pandemic, Anderson said the man so often hailed as a model of the “Good Samaritan” could also be seen as “a pandemic patron.”

“He cared for the faith and wellbeing of those on the margins. He became a priest knowing that often meant an early death. Then he died of a pandemic similar to this one — possibly caused by a coronavirus. So I think the timing of his beatification is providential because his connection to the pandemic gives us someone to intercede for us, and because this connection also reminds us of the many other aspects of his life and ministry that remain important today,” Anderson said.

Born in Waterbury, Conn. on Aug. 12, 1852, McGivney is globally recognized as an example of charity, evangelization, and the promotion of laypeople in the American Catholic Church.

[…]

In 1882, McGivney’s dream of establishing a fraternal society came to fruition when he founded the Knights of Columbus.

Primary goals for the organization were to be an antidote to secret anti-Catholic societies which at the time offered social and employment opportunities to men, often at the expense of their faith; to help keep families together when a breadwinner died with financial help through their insurance program; and supporting full American citizenship rights for Catholics.

Named after Christopher Columbus as a means of highlighting the deep Catholic roots in America, the Knights were formally granted a charter establishing them as a legal cooperation March 29, which to this day is celebrated as “Founder’s Day.”

Focused on unity and charity, the Knights later added fraternity and patriotism to their list of core principles. After McGivney refused to be named the head of his new organization, a layman, James Mullen, a Civil War veteran, was elected to the position, while McGivney assumed the role of secretary.

Two years later, once things were solidly up and running, McGivney resigned from his position and became the organization’s chaplain.

After transferring to another parish, he fell ill during a pandemic in 1890, contracting pneumonia. He died Aug. 14 of that year, just two days after his 38th birthday. Recent scientific studies suggest that the pandemic which claimed McGivney’s life, similar to COVID-19, may have been also been caused by a coronavirus.

[…]

ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by wosbald » Fri May 29, 2020 12:31 pm

+JMJ+

Intra-Thread Trackbacks: pg 146 / pg 148


Seafarers — and their chaplains — face unique challenges during COVID-19 pandemic [In-Depth]
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In a Thursday, March 26, 2020 file photo, Carnival Cruise ships are docked at the Port of Tampa in Tampa, Florida. (Credit: Chris O'Meara/AP)

LEICESTER, United Kingdom — Crew on cruise ships are having a hard time disembarking and getting home during the COVID-19 pandemic — just one of many problems seafarers are facing as the coronavirus crisis affects all facets of the shipping industry.

“Because of the pandemic, the crew on board of these vessels are effectively quarantined on board,” said Martin Foley, the Chief Executive Officer of the Apostleship of the Sea — or Stella Maris — the main Catholic charity supporting seafarers and fishermen.

They can’t go off, and we can’t come on, so we have to find creative ways to support the crew on board these vessels, and it’s a very difficult time for the crew because not only are they quarantined on board these vessels but they are also fearful for their jobs,” he told Crux.

Martin said that it’s projected that more than 50,000 Filipino cruise ship workers alone will be jobless by the end of this year; “so it’s a really difficult situation that the cruise industry faces at this time.”

Although frequent customers of the cruise industry may have noticed the presence of a Catholic priests on some ships saying Mass for passengers, the main thrust of the Church’s pastoral work is for the crew: There are not only a large number of Filipinos on board, but Indians from the Catholic areas of Goa and Kerala.

Martin said they are fearing for their jobs, since the work pays better than most in their home countries, seafarers are often the main breadwinners for an extended family.

“They are paying tuition fees, hospital fees. They have outstanding loans, and their concern is their ability to continue to pay these loans if they lose their jobs, or if their contracts are truncated in any way,” he explained.

“The cruise industry has been effectively shut down by the COVID-19 pandemic, and in fairness to the cruise ship companies, they have been confronted with an incredibly challenging situation,” he added.

It’s not just cruise ships. Some industry giants are predicting the shipping industry will drop by 25 percent due to the economic distress caused by the recession. In addition, Martin says the reality of how the industry works has had to adapt to the pandemic, and the various lockdown laws passed by most of the countries in the world.

Image
Carnival’s Holland America cruise ship Rotterdam, left, arrives at Port Everglades as the Zaandam, right, is docked during the new coronavirus pandemic, Thursday, April 2, 2020, in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. (Credit: Lynne Sladky/AP)

[…]

In addition to the fact their work is vital to keeping the world’s economy going, Martin also noted that the nature of life in the shipping industry means that seafarers are little danger for transmitting COVID-19.

“We talk about going into self-isolation or quarantine for seven days or two weeks, but seafarers that are travelling around the world, often they quarantined for two weeks on board their ship,” he said.

This also affects the pastoral work of the Apostleship of the Sea, since the chaplains are generally based in ports — Martin noted in the early days of the pandemic, most crew politely declined visits, since the ships were disease-free, and wanted to stay that way.

Like the shipping industry, he said the chaplains have had to adapt.

“Obviously, we respect the national law regarding social distancing, and we ensure that our chaplains and ship visitors are provided with PPE [Personal Protective Equipment] — which is absolutely critical — and they are given clear guidance about do’s and don’ts,” Martin explained to Crux.

Image
A container ship is docked at Maher Terminals in Elizabeth, N.J., Monday, May 11, 2020. (Credit: Mark Lennihan/AP)

[…]

Martin also said the Catholics in the pews have a part to play, too.

“What we always invite people to do is to pray for seafarers and fisherman and their families, and pray for them now more than ever. We depend on seafarers and fisherman. It’s no exaggeration to say without their good work, without their sacrifices, we would starve.”

ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by wosbald » Tue Jun 02, 2020 5:02 pm

+JMJ+

Intra-Thread Trackbacks: pg 146 / pg 148 / pg 148


In challenging times, ministers find new ways to reach out to seafarers [In-Depth]
Image
Rhonda Cummins, left, a maritime associate with the Apostleship of the Sea, drops off a care package for seafarers with a worker named Lucky at the gangway of the ship Stolt Quetzal at Point Comfort, Texas, May 18, 2020. Since the outbreak of the coronavirus pandemic, those like Cummins, who minister to seafarers, have found creative ways to connect with maritime workers given increasing restrictions. (Credit: CNS photo/courtesy Rhonda Cummings.)

WASHINGTON, D.C. — Until late last year, Rhonda Cummins was one of those who had resisted joining the throngs on Facebook.

But when the coronavirus arrived on the world stage in early 2020, she gave in, looking at it in a different light: as a tool to continue the ministry of helping seafarers and maritime workers in the middle of a pandemic.

“I’ve been on Facebook now for less than three months and it has been an uphill battle,” said Cummins, a maritime associate with the Apostleship of the Sea ministry in Port Comfort, Texas, during the ministry’s May 22 National Day of Prayer and Remembrance for Mariners and People of the Sea hosted via Zoom this year.

But through the social media platform, she’s been able to keep in contact with those she cares for, including giving them information that they now share with others.

Like many volunteers, deacons and others who minister to seafarers and whose work consisted of valuable face-to-face conversations and in-person visits with maritime workers, Cummins could only watch as the spiritual accompaniment she offered was impeded by ships cutting off contact with those on land.

New immigration restrictions and other federal directives prevented the seafarers from leaving the ships and the ministers and volunteers from going onto the ships as they had before.

During the Day of Prayer, Cummins shared challenges she’s faced but also offered some solutions she found to move the ministry forward in a new landscape.

She said that when the visits stopped, she began asking herself: “How do we reach those seafarers when they can’t get off the ships? How do we minister to them when we aren’t giving them rides to the (store), and not having them come to our centers to use our free Wi-Fi?” — referring to some of the services offered by the ministry.

After months of observing and keeping electronic communication going with captains, workers and seafarers following the pandemic, she and other volunteers from the Point Comfort ministry began looking, not so much at the limitations, but at the opportunities.

[…]

“I’m not Catholic, I’m actually Episcopalian, but it’s not about my faith tradition, it’s about serving these guys,” said Cummins, who became involved with the Apostleship of the Sea ministry, or AOS, after talking with Bishop Brendan J. Cahill of Victoria, Texas, the ministry’s bishop promoter.

The ministry, which began in the U.S. in 1976, is part of the Pastoral Care of Migrants, Refugees and Travelers in the Secretariat of Cultural Diversity in the Church at the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, and its work includes caring for the spiritual life of those who work in the seas.

Though the ministry has physical centers in major port cities, where, in addition to its spiritual services, it offers free Wi-Fi or rides to shopping centers for seafarers when they have permission to leave, the Point Comfort Seafarers Center, which Cummins operates with the help of friends who volunteer, doesn’t even have a physical space.

[…]

ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by wosbald » Sun Jun 07, 2020 8:13 am

+JMJ+

Manila’s Basilica of the Black Nazarene holds first public First Friday Mass in 3 months
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Devotees wait for their turn to go inside the Minor Basilica of the Black Nazarene as social distancing measure are placed to prevent the spread of the COVID-19 coronavirus as it slowly reopens its doors in downtown Manila, Philippines on Friday, June 5, 2020. (Credit: Aaron Favila/AP.)

For the first time nearly three months, Filipino faithful were able to attend the Mass of the First Friday devotion at the Basilica of the Black Nazarene in Manila.

However, due to the ongoing social distancing measures imposed to prevent the spread of the COVID-19 coronavirus, attendance was limited to 10 people.

“Every time there is a mass, we allow 10 people only,” Father Douglas Badong, parochial vicar of Quiapo Church told the Manila Bulletin.

The basilica houses the statue of the Black Nazarene, considered to be miraculous by many Filipino faithful.

Image
A devotee wearing a protective mask bearing the face of Jesus Christ waits outside the Minor Basilica of the Black Nazarene as it slowly reopens its doors in downtown Manila, Philippines on Friday, June 5, 2020. (Credit: Aaron Favila/AP.)

Crowned with thorns and bearing a cross, the Nazarene statue is believed to have been brought from Mexico to Manila on a galleon in 1606 by Spanish missionaries. The ship that carried it purportedly caught fire, but the charred statue survived. Some believe the statue’s endurance, from fires and earthquakes through the centuries and intense bombings during World War II, is a testament to its powers.

Every year, up to 4 million people participate in a procession of the statue through the streets of Manila which takes place every January.

[…]

The basilica re-started Masses earlier in the week and is also open for private prayer after the government allowed religious gatherings to re-start in the country.

“Those who want to pray, we will allow them to go inside the church but batch by batch,” Badong said. When Mass is not being celebrated, 50 people at a time are allowed in the church, but they are asked to stay only 15 minutes.

The Church is also enforcing other measures to prevent the spread of COVID-19: Facemasks are required, temperatures are checked at the entrance, and visitors are required to use hand sanitizer. The tradition of kissing the statue has also been suspended.

“The devotees were cooperative. They lined up and did not complain about the procedures,” Badong added.

ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by Hovannes » Sun Jun 07, 2020 3:31 pm

Archbishop Vigano's letter to Trump---
https://www.cfnews.org.uk/united-states ... right-now/
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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by Hovannes » Sat Jun 13, 2020 8:20 am

Curious, the USCCB acts like they approve.
Fake news or no?
https://www.lifesitenews.com/news/us-bi ... -to-police
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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by wosbald » Fri Jun 19, 2020 7:36 am

+JMJ+

Intra-Thread Trackbacks: pg 146 / pg 148 / pg 148 / pg 148


Pope reaches out to seafarers stuck on ships or without work
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Pope Francis offered prayers to seafarers and people who fish for a living during a video message filmed at the Vatican June 17, 2020. (Credit: CNS photo/Vatican Media)

ROME — As travel restrictions continue in the hope of slowing the spread of the coronavirus, Pope Francis offered his prayers and solidarity to those who work at sea and have either been prevented from going ashore or have not been able to work.

In a video message June 17, the pope told seafarers and people who fish for a living that “in these past months, your lives and your work have seen significant changes; you have had to make, and are continuing to make, many sacrifices.”

“Long periods spent aboard ships without being able to disembark, separation from families, friends and native countries, fear of infection — all these things are a heavy burden to bear, now more than ever,” the pope said.

Image
Seafarers who have spent months working onboard vessels during the COVID-19 pandemic arrive June 12, 2020, at Changi Airport in Singapore. (Credit: Edgar Su/Reuters via CNS)

[…]

Due to COVID-related travel restrictions, hundreds of thousands of the world’s 2 million seafarers have been “stranded at sea for months,” Guterres said.

In late April, the International Labor Organization reported that some 90,000 seafarers were stuck on cruise ships — which had no passengers — due to COVID-19 travel restrictions and that in some ports not even seafarers in need of medical attention were allowed to go to onshore hospitals.

Image
Anchored ships are seen miles away from the port of Piraeus, near Athens, Greece, Tuesday, May 26, 2020. During the new coronavirus pandemic, about 150,000 seafarers are stranded at sea in need of crew changes, according to the International Chamber of Shipping. (Credit: Petros Giannakouris/AP)

[…]

“Your work at sea often keeps you apart from others, but you are close to me in my thoughts and prayers and in those of your chaplains and the volunteers of Stella Maris,” the centers around the world run by the Apostleship of the Sea.

“Today I would like to offer you a message and a prayer of hope, comfort and consolation in the face of whatever hardships you have to endure,” the pope said. “I would also offer a word of encouragement to all those who work with you in providing pastoral care for maritime personnel.”

“May the Lord bless each of you, your work and your families,” the pope said, “and may the Virgin Mary, Star of the Sea, protect you always.”

ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by Del » Fri Jun 19, 2020 4:19 pm

Hovannes wrote:
Sat Jun 13, 2020 8:20 am
Curious, the USCCB acts like they approve.
Fake news or no?
https://www.lifesitenews.com/news/us-bi ... -to-police
A couple of angles to this story:

1) CCHD is infested with a bunch of leftist/marxist/socialist ideologues. So some of the money leaks past controls and is given to some groups that don't conform with Catholic morality.

2) The leftists are very sophisticated. They have become adept at procuring grants from churches, charities, and government agencies. They form small organizations that mimic the other "charitable" agencies who "administer" aid to the poor, often taking more than half in admin costs.

At the beginning of this recent outbreak of violence, folks were wondering -- who is funding the instigators of the violence? Where is the money coming from for sophisticated gas masks, video cameras, and com equipment? George Soros?

Turns out that the funding came from taxpayers and from Christian charities like CCHD.

In Madison, the instagation is organized by Freedom Inc. The chubby gal on the front page is paid $112,000 per year. The State of Wisconsin provided grants of $1.5M over the last few years.

Nobody heard much of them, and it seemed like they were doing good works. Until the violence started.

https://freedom-inc.org/index.php?page=news-updates
May 31, 2020
Dear Community,

Yesterday, Freedom, Inc., Urban Tirage Inc., and the Party for Socialism and Liberation (PSL) united for an action to demand an end to racist police terror. We gathered thousands of community members to stand in solidarity with Minnesota and demand justice for George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Tony McDade, Tony Robinson, and all slain Black people throughout the African diaspora. We demanded, and will continue to demand: defund the police, reparations for all Black people, release all incarcerated Black people from jail, get cops out of schools, and community control over the police.
They also led a riot that destroyed several blocks of local shops in downtown Madison. And blocked afternoon traffic on our beltline highway for two hours. Mostly peaceful stuff.
"Anyone who knows anything of experts will know one thing for certain; that they will always be disturbing our way of living; and therefore we shall always be disputing their right of governing." - GKC. Feb 11, 1933.

The future is certain; it’s the past that keeps changing. ~ Old Soviet joke

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Hovannes
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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by Hovannes » Sun Jul 05, 2020 1:06 pm

This week the Archdiocese of San Francisco was shut down by Gov Newsom's Corona Squads.
NO indoor church services, even with social distancing and the 100 person max capacity.
Our Diocese in Fresno has been tipped off to expect the Newsom Corona Squads.
Lots of stress right now!
DEUS VULT!

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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by Del » Sun Jul 05, 2020 5:50 pm

Hovannes wrote:
Sun Jul 05, 2020 1:06 pm
This week the Archdiocese of San Francisco was shut down by Gov Newsom's Corona Squads.
NO indoor church services, even with social distancing and the 100 person max capacity.
Our Diocese in Fresno has been tipped off to expect the Newsom Corona Squads.
Lots of stress right now!
They hate us, and they are winning.

I wish Rusty were still alive, just so I could hear him say, "I told you so."
==============================

Our church was packed this morning. We have every other pew cordoned off, in compliance with the legal requirements. So we just packed in tighter in the open pews. Just in Dane County.... all of the surrounding counties have no specific restrictions or practices.

The whole thing has a very Soviet feel to it. Giving lip-service compliance to absurd regulations, as people go ahead with our lives.

Cigarson's wedding is next weekend! Can't have the reception indoors, so we got an extra-big tent.... so people can distance if they wish. They pared the guest list down to comply with the 100-person limit. Probably just 120 people coming.

On Thursday, the county issued emergency measures. No more than 25 people at an outdoor gathering -- just before 4th of July weekend. (Unless it is a protest, of course.)

We are having our wedding anyway. It feels even more Soviet now.... or perhaps more like Prohibition. Good-hearted, law-abiding folks are no longer respecting the stupid laws. The lawless people are growing bolder too.
"Anyone who knows anything of experts will know one thing for certain; that they will always be disturbing our way of living; and therefore we shall always be disputing their right of governing." - GKC. Feb 11, 1933.

The future is certain; it’s the past that keeps changing. ~ Old Soviet joke

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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by Hovannes » Sun Jul 05, 2020 6:07 pm

Del wrote:
Sun Jul 05, 2020 5:50 pm
Hovannes wrote:
Sun Jul 05, 2020 1:06 pm
This week the Archdiocese of San Francisco was shut down by Gov Newsom's Corona Squads.
NO indoor church services, even with social distancing and the 100 person max capacity.
Our Diocese in Fresno has been tipped off to expect the Newsom Corona Squads.
Lots of stress right now!
They hate us, and they are winning.

I wish Rusty were still alive, just so I could hear him say, "I told you so."
Del, aside from the church difficulties, what is just as alarming is the thinly veiled destruction of local, nonGovernment charities.
Food banks are near empty. Fund raising opportunities are cancelled. We can't even park a truck and collect donations of groceries because of Covid, so we're told--- congregating ist verbotten, mien fuhrer! (but not at Costco and WallyWorld) If you need a hand, look to the government, not your neighbors. The Corona Squads will not approve!
DEUS VULT!

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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by Del » Sun Jul 05, 2020 6:55 pm

Hovannes wrote:
Sun Jul 05, 2020 6:07 pm
Del wrote:
Sun Jul 05, 2020 5:50 pm
Hovannes wrote:
Sun Jul 05, 2020 1:06 pm
This week the Archdiocese of San Francisco was shut down by Gov Newsom's Corona Squads.
NO indoor church services, even with social distancing and the 100 person max capacity.
Our Diocese in Fresno has been tipped off to expect the Newsom Corona Squads.
Lots of stress right now!
They hate us, and they are winning.

I wish Rusty were still alive, just so I could hear him say, "I told you so."
Del, aside from the church difficulties, what is just as alarming is the thinly veiled destruction of local, nonGovernment charities.
Food banks are near empty. Fund raising opportunities are cancelled. We can't even park a truck and collect donations of groceries because of Covid, so we're told--- congregating ist verbotten, mien fuhrer! (but not at Costco and WallyWorld) If you need a hand, look to the government, not your neighbors. The Corona Squads will not approve!
Part of the Benedict Option is figuring out how to do charity when doing charity is illegal. (For example -- How to protect mothers and children when state family limits and forced abortions become part of our welfare system?)

During slavery times, Christians established an illegal Underground Railroad which Democrats sought to destroy.

In the Soviet U***n, doctors and nurses got paid worthless cash and put in their hours seeing poor people who had waited for months for "free" treatment. Then they went home and spent their evenings bartering healthcare services for solid goods. This was illegal, but police looked the other way for a bottle of vodka.

Right now, I have a van full of donations from various sources. Tomorrow, I will deliver these to an African friend who will load up a shipping crate and send them to his home village in The Gambia. There is absolutely nothing legal or registered about this.

Christians have endured persecutions and transformed cultures from underground. We can do it again.
"Anyone who knows anything of experts will know one thing for certain; that they will always be disturbing our way of living; and therefore we shall always be disputing their right of governing." - GKC. Feb 11, 1933.

The future is certain; it’s the past that keeps changing. ~ Old Soviet joke

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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by wosbald » Sun Jul 12, 2020 7:21 pm

+JMJ+

Intra-Thread Trackbacks: pg 146 / pg 148 / pg 148 / pg 148/ pg 148


Vatican: Seafarers deserve ‘esteem and gratitude’ during pandemic
Image
A cargo ship approaches the port of Piraeus as other ships are anchored, near Athens, Greece, Tuesday, May 26, 2020. (Credit: Petros Giannakouris/AP)

ROME — The Vatican is highlighting the plight of maritime workers during the pandemic, saying bans on shore leave are severely stressing crews stuck aboard ship, some to the point of suicide.

Cardinal Peter A. Turkson, who heads a Vatican office dealing with issues of human development, said in a message Sunday that maritime workers “really deserve our esteem and gratitude” for ensuring movement of goods for a “healthy global economy” while much of the world is in lockdown to combat spread of COVID-19 infection.

He said that tens of thousands of seafarers who were due to fly home for leave between long stints at sea were prevented from doing so due to lockdown rules.

Similarly, thousands of seafarers due to head to sea on new tours of duty were stranded in hotels and dormitories.

Turkson lamented that those stranded on board vessels “suffer isolation, severe physical and mental stress that brings many crews on the verge of desperation and, unfortunately” suicide.

The cardinal said Catholics worldwide during August are being encouraged to pray for all those who work and live from the sea, including sailors and fishers and their families.

ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by Hovannes » Sun Jul 12, 2020 7:28 pm

DEUS VULT!

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