THE CATHOLIC THREAD

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wosbald
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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by wosbald » Wed Jul 15, 2020 5:17 pm

+JMJ+

Intra-Thread Trackbacks: pg 97 / pg 98

Intra-Thread Trackbacks:
"Toppled & Tagged": pg 1 / pg 2 / pg 2



California mission founded by St. Junipero Serra gets a papal upgrade
Image
Mission San Buenaventura in Ventura, Calif., is seen in this undated photo. On July 15, 2020, Pope Francis elevated the mission church to the rank of minor basilica. (Credit: Mike Nelson/CNS)

Mission San Buenaventura in California has been named a minor basilica.

VENTURA, California — When Father Tom Elewaut saw the name on his phone’s caller ID the night of June 30, the pastor of Mission San Buenaventura guessed the call had something to do with the recent controversy over whether to remove the statue of St. Junipero Serra in front of Ventura’s City Hall.

He guessed wrong.

“I’ve got some good news,” said Los Angeles Archbishop Jose H. Gomez on the other end of the line. “You’re a minor basilica.”

Elewaut’s voice started to crack with emotion. He had spent the last six years researching, praying and waiting for Pope Francis to decide whether to elevate the 238-year-old parish to the rank of minor basilica.

On July 15, the feast of the mission’s namesake, St. Bonaventure, the pope’s decision became public.

At a special 7:30 a.m. Mass celebrated by Gomez, Elewaut and Los Angeles Auxiliary Bishop Robert E. Barron, Mission San Buenaventura was unveiled as the first basilica in the Archdiocese of Los Angeles and the 88th in the United States.

[…]

Of the nine missions St. Junipero founded in what is today California, Mission San Buenaventura has the distinction of being his last, established on Easter, March 31, 1782. The pursuit of the mission’s elevation began in 1976.

“Today (God) has been kind enough to grant me the consolation, after many years of longing, of witnessing the founding of the Holy Mission of Our Seraphic Doctor San Buenaventura,” Elewaut said. “And the same thing can be said of this founding as the canonization of the saint: ‘Quo tardius, eo solemnius.’ (‘The more slowly, the more solemnly.’)”

In making a church a basilica, the pope declares the church to be one of his own.

There are a little more than 1,800 minor basilicas in the world; 87 are in the U.S. and six in California.

For Barron, the announcement had a special significance. Five years ago, two months after St. Junipero’s canonization, he was installed as episcopal vicar for the Santa Barbara region of the Archdiocese of Los Angeles in a Mass celebrated at Mission San Buenaventura.

In an interview with Angelus, the online news platform of the archdiocese, he said basilicas are a potent symbol of the church’s universality.

“It’s a way of linking churches spread all over the world to the pope,” he said, adding, “We put strength in diversity today, which is great, but we can sometimes overlook the importance of unity, what brings us all together as one community, despite our massive differences in language and culture.”

Now that Mission San Buenaventura is a basilica, it will receive a series of symbolic “upgrades” including a cone-shaped canopy, known as an “ombrellino,” that will now be placed above the church’s lectern; a bell mounted on a pole, known as the “tintinnabulum,” similar to that used during the Middle Ages to signal the pope’s approach, will now be used in parish processions; and the insignia of the Papal Cross Keys will appear in banners, signs and over the mission’s doors.

But for Elewaut the honor is less about pomp and pageantry and more about motivating his parishioners to live and share their faith in a more authentic way.

“This is going to put a greater responsibility on the parish leadership and the people of the parish to discover new ways of evangelization in the spirit of St. Junipero Serra and St. Bonaventure,” he said.

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"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by DepartedLight » Wed Jul 15, 2020 7:50 pm

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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by wosbald » Sun Jul 19, 2020 12:04 pm

+JMJ+

Vatican-recognized exorcists’ group offers guidelines for ‘quality control’
Image
The covers of two publications related to exorcism from the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops are seen in this composite photo. "Exorcisms and Related Supplications" is the first official English translation of the rite of exorcism and is available only to bishops and others designated by them. The booklet "Prayers Against the Powers of Darkness" contains specific prayers from the translation's appendix and is being made available to anyone. (Credit: CNS)

ROME — A Vatican-recognized group of exorcists has issued a new handbook for practitioners of the Church’s ritual to combat demonic possession, among other things insisting that authority to perform exorcisms belongs exclusively to priests assigned by their diocesan bishop and no one else.

According to figures from the group, the move comes in response to a perception that there are too many rogue operators, both clerical and lay, who claim to perform exorcisms but who aren’t authorized to do so.

The handbook, or vademecum, was published in May in Italian and is edited by the International Association of Exorcists, a body founded in 1990 by a group of six priests, including Italian Father Gabriele Amorth, who served from 1986 until his death in 2016 as an exorcist for the Diocese of Rome, and who once said he’d performed over 50,000 exorcisms during the course of his career.

[…]

According to a statement issued by the International Association of Exorcists, while the guidelines are not an official Church document, the contents were reviewed by Vatican departments prior to publication. The decision to make the guidelines public, according to the statement, was motivated by a desire to “bring order to the questions about diabolic action and liberation from it, in order to avoid falling into dangerous deceptions and illusions.”

As part of its insistence that only priests with a specific mandate from their bishop may perform exorcisms, the text provides theological arguments as to why it’s the power of Christ channeled through the Church, and not “more potent exorcistic formula or the individual ‘powers’ of a priest” that determine the efficacy of the ritual.

The guidelines offer three reasons as to why the ministry of exorcism is limited to priests specifically designated for the task:
  • Only priests possess a mandate from the Church to “command demons in the name of God to recede, no longer to harm human creatures for any reason.”
  • The ministry of exorcism isn’t just about the recitation of prayers, but “discernment and accompaniment of faithful tormented by the devil,” pastoral tasks which “occupy a very important and essential place.”
  • If a bishop names an exorcist, he also has a responsibility to make sure that priest has a “specific preparation that renders him more suited than anyone else to discernment of extraordinary diabolic action.”
The guidelines warn that unauthorized priests and laity who attempt to perform exorcisms without authorization actually may open the door to further demonic influence over the people they’re trying to help. They also insist that a legitimate exorcist empowered by the Church must not request any payment for his services.

[…]

Issuance of the guidelines follows several years of mounting concern over what one member of the International Association of Exorcists described in 2017 as “do-it-yourself” exorcisms, which sometimes have been associated with instances of sexual abuse. In that 2017 gathering, members pointed to a case in Palermo in which a priest not authorized to perform exorcisms nonetheless offered them to local women claiming to be possessed and has been accused of abusing them sexually in the process, including, in some instances, minor girls.

That discussion unfolded in the wake of a popular Italian documentary called Liberarmi (translated for English release as “Deliver Us”), which featured a popular Sicilian exorcist named Father Cataldo Migliazzo. The film documented a rising global interest in exorcism, and also raised questions about church efforts to exercise oversight of the practice.

ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by Del » Mon Jul 20, 2020 8:05 am

It has been about 10 days now, and still no report on the cause of the San Gabriel Mission fire.
"Anyone who knows anything of experts will know one thing for certain; that they will always be disturbing our way of living; and therefore we shall always be disputing their right of governing." - GKC. Feb 11, 1933.

The future is certain; it’s the past that keeps changing. ~ Old Soviet joke

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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by Hovannes » Mon Jul 20, 2020 8:24 am

Del wrote:
Mon Jul 20, 2020 8:05 am
It has been about 10 days now, and still no report on the cause of the San Gabriel Mission fire.
It's widely known in CA that perps won't be acknowledged if they fit a known hostile demographic.
DEUS VULT!

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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by hugodrax » Mon Jul 20, 2020 8:27 am

Hovannes wrote:
Mon Jul 20, 2020 8:24 am
Del wrote:
Mon Jul 20, 2020 8:05 am
It has been about 10 days now, and still no report on the cause of the San Gabriel Mission fire.
It's widely known in CA that perps won't be acknowledged if they fit a known hostile demographic.
Shut up. This is where Wosbald's articles go to die. :D
Everything we hear is an opinion, not a fact. Everything we see is a perspective, not the truth
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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by Del » Mon Jul 20, 2020 8:35 am

Hovannes wrote:
Mon Jul 20, 2020 8:24 am
Del wrote:
Mon Jul 20, 2020 8:05 am
It has been about 10 days now, and still no report on the cause of the San Gabriel Mission fire.
It's widely known in CA that perps won't be acknowledged if they fit a known hostile demographic.
Why is that, exactly? Do the press and politicians support the criminals? Or do they hope to suppress terrorism by denying attention?

A national treasure historical site was partly destroyed. Do they reckon that no one will care?
"Anyone who knows anything of experts will know one thing for certain; that they will always be disturbing our way of living; and therefore we shall always be disputing their right of governing." - GKC. Feb 11, 1933.

The future is certain; it’s the past that keeps changing. ~ Old Soviet joke

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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by hugodrax » Mon Jul 20, 2020 8:42 am

Del wrote:
Mon Jul 20, 2020 8:35 am
Hovannes wrote:
Mon Jul 20, 2020 8:24 am
Del wrote:
Mon Jul 20, 2020 8:05 am
It has been about 10 days now, and still no report on the cause of the San Gabriel Mission fire.
It's widely known in CA that perps won't be acknowledged if they fit a known hostile demographic.
Why is that, exactly? Do the press and politicians support the criminals? Or do they hope to suppress terrorism by denying attention?

A national treasure historical site was partly destroyed. Do they reckon that no one will care?
Haven’t you noticed nobody cares???

We’re Christians. The world will hate us.
Everything we hear is an opinion, not a fact. Everything we see is a perspective, not the truth
—Marcus Aurelius

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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by wosbald » Mon Jul 20, 2020 8:51 am

+JMJ+

Padre Kino, declared venerable, known as ‘patron saint of borderlands’ [In-Depth]
Image
In this 2017 file photo, an equine statue of Jesuit Father Eusebio Kino sits along Kino Parkway in Tucson, Ariz. On July 13, 2020, Pope Francis recognized Father Kino's heroic virtues, giving him the title "venerable" and advancing his sainthood cause. (Credit: Nancy Wiechec/CNS)

PHOENIX, Arizona — When Rosie Garcia, a parishioner of St. Augustine Cathedral in Tucson, heard the announcement that Pope Francis had formally recognized the heroic virtues of sainthood candidate Jesuit Father Eusebio Kino, she said she cried tears of joy.

“He was a man who led a virtuous life of love, hope and faith,” said Garcia, who is president of the Kino Heritage Society, a Tucson-based society working to promote the missionary priest’s cause in the United States.

Noting that Padre Kino is considered the “patron saint of the borderlands,” Garcia referred to him as “the voice of the underprivileged.”

An Italian Jesuit missionary, Padre Kino, introduced Christianity to Arizona when he established the San Jose de Tumacacori Mission in January 1691.

On the recommendation of the Vatican Congregation for Saints’ Causes, Pope Francis formally recognized the heroic virtues of Servant of God Father Eusebio Kino July 10, officially elevating him to “Venerable” status, one more step on the road to canonization.

This step recognizes that a candidate heroically lived the theological virtues of faith, hope and charity and the cardinal virtues of prudence, justice, fortitude and temperance, and that he is worthy of public veneration and emulation.

The Archdiocese of Hermosillo in the Mexican state of Sonora, is leading the cause for canonization, with the Diocese of Tucson, and Padre Kino’s native Archdiocese of Trent, Italy, is assisting.

“The history of the Catholic Church in Arizona is synonymous with the growth and history of the state of Arizona, and Padre Kino is one of the foundational figures in that great history,” said Phoenix Bishop Thomas J. Olmsted in a statement. “He remains a wonderful example of the mission of the Church lived in solidarity with the poor and marginalized.”

[…]

Jesuit Father Pete Neeley said the announcement is an affirmation of the work he does at the Kino Border Initiative, a Jesuit-run program named for Padre Kino whose mission is to promote immigration policies along the U.S.-Mexico border that affirm the dignity of the human person. The initiative has locations in both sides of the border in Nogales, Arizona and Nogales, Sonora.

“He wasn’t forcing cultures together with the sword, cannon or musket. He did it with his own spirituality. He tried to reconcile,” said Neeley, associate director of education for at the Kino Border Initiative. “He was concerned about people who didn’t know the Gospel.”

[…]

Because of his defense of the Native people, he made enemies out of many Spanish settlers who would mistreat the Natives and force them to work in mines.

“Kino was able to break laws in order to protect the indigenous people from the Spanish settlers who wanted to use them for slave labor,” Neeley said. “The law allowed them to do it, and Kino said, ‘No, you can’t do that.’ People didn’t like it.”

After a Pima uprising that killed fellow missionary Father Francisco Xavier Saeta in 1695, Padre Kino was able to broker peace. He wrote a biography of the protomartyr and delivered it to his superiors in Mexico City.

“It was more than a biography; it was a defense of the Native people,” said Mark O’Hare, a founding board member of the Kino Heritage Society and a parishioner at Sts. Peter and Paul in Tucson. “He did not pull any punches in saying it was the Spanish who were responsible for the uprising.”

Altogether, Padre Kino established 21 missions in what is now Arizona and Sonora, and helped the Jesuits return to California in 1697. O’Hare said that it was Padre Kino who laid the foundation that allowed St. Junipero Serra to continue north through California almost a century later.

St. Junipero, a Spanish Franciscan, is known for spreading the Gospel in the New World during the 18th century. He landed in Mexico, then made his way on foot up the coast of Mexico and to California, where he established a chain of missions that are now the names of well-known cities such as San Diego, San Francisco and Santa Barbara.

ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by DepartedLight » Tue Jul 21, 2020 5:37 pm

Image

Looking forward to this project. I have a copper Crucifix in mind.
DL Jake

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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by hugodrax » Wed Jul 22, 2020 7:38 am

Del wrote:
Wed Jul 22, 2020 7:21 am
You're the Kanye West of CPS.
Everything we hear is an opinion, not a fact. Everything we see is a perspective, not the truth
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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by Jester » Thu Jul 23, 2020 7:14 am

We are back on. Keep politics in the Opt-In.
FIGHT LAUGH FEAST

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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by wosbald » Thu Jul 23, 2020 7:46 am

+JMJ+

Vatican issues guidelines for parishes in the Pope Francis era [In-Depth]
Image
Cardinal Beniamino Stella, prefect of the Congregation for Clergy, attends a news conference after a session of the Synod of Bishops for the Amazon at the Vatican Oct. 24, 2019. (Credit: CNS photo/Paul Haring)

ROME — Urging parish communities to abandon “outdated” models and to embrace what Pope Francis has styled as a spirit of “missionary evangelization,” the Vatican Monday issued a new instruction on the renewal of parish life.

Among other things, the guidelines caution priests not to “commercialize” the sacraments by charging fees, and they stipulate that financial difficulties within a diocese are not a legitimate reason for closing down parishes.

Titled “The Pastoral Conversion of the parish community in the service of the evangelizing mission of the Church,” the new guidelines were released July 20 and are an “instruction,” meaning they are a set of non-binding suggestions for the renewal of parish life.

Issued by the Vatican’s Congregation for Clergy, the instruction was signed by Italian Cardinal Beniamino Stella, as well as the secretary of the department, French Archbishop Joël Mercier. It also carries the signatures of the congregation’s secretary for seminaries, Mexican Archbishop Jorge Carlos Patrón Wong, and the undersecretary, Italian Monsignor Andrea Ripa. It’s dated June 29, the feast of Saints Peter and Paul.

According to the introduction, the new guidelines “represent a valuable opportunity for pastoral conversion that is essentially missionary.”

“Parish communities,” they say, “will find herein a call to go out of themselves, offering instruments for reform, even structural, in a spirit of communion and collaboration, of encounter and closeness, of mercy and solicitude for the proclamation of the Gospel.”

Referring to the modern context of parish life, the instruction notes that like many other areas of society, the digital world is changing the dynamics of parish life, which is no longer attached to its geographic location, but has increasingly reflected the dynamic of a “community by adoption,” where a person feels welcomed and nourished but did not necessarily grow up or which is not in their immediate area.

As a result, “any pastoral action that is limited to the territory of the parish is outdated, which is something the parishioners themselves observe when their parish appears to be more interested in preserving a nostalgia of former times as opposed to looking to the future with courage.”

[…]

While led by a priest, a parish is a community and as such, any changes made must be done in consultation with the parishioners, the instruction said, insisting that “to remove ourselves from the life of the People of God hastens us to the desolation and to a perversion of ecclesial nature.”

To this end, it underlined the need to avoid the “clericalization of pastoral activity” by allowing laypeople to be “protagonists of evangelization” through different ministries, which should be allowed to mature and grow on their own.

[…]

The instruction also touched on parish groupings when several need to be merged, and on expansions when a large parish might need to be divided into several autonomous entities. Non-legitimate reasons for suppressing a parish, it said, include a priest shortage and financial troubles in the diocese, as well as any other reason that is reversible and will likely be short-lived.

To be legitimate, reasons for suppressing a parish, according to the instruction, must be tied directly to the parish community rather than generic conditions, and they must not be “based solely ‘on principle.’”

[…]

The instruction stressed that the pastor is the head of his parish, and that his tasks cannot be assigned to a group of priests or laypeople, meaning that titles such as “team leader,” which imply joint governance of a parish, “are to be avoided.”

In order to maintain the stability of a parish, it was recommended that the assignment of the pastor be no less than five years.

[…]

ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by DepartedLight » Thu Jul 23, 2020 7:50 am

And we're baaaaa-ACK!

:wavey:
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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by AFRS » Fri Jul 24, 2020 1:09 am

DepartedLight wrote:
Thu Jul 23, 2020 7:50 am
And we're baaaaa-ACK!

:wavey:
We? Got a mouse in your pocket?

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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by wosbald » Sat Jul 25, 2020 9:25 am

+JMJ+

Intra-Thread Trackbacks: pg 97 / pg 98 / pg 149

Intra-Thread Trackbacks:
"Toppled & Tagged": pg 1 / pg 2 / pg 2



Spanish bishop of St. Junipero Serra’s birthplace defends missionary’s legacy
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A statue of St. Junipero Serra in Sacramento, Calif., is seen in this 2015 file photo. It was torn down by a group of demonstrators late July 4, 2020. (Credit: Nancy Wiechec/CNS)

ROSARIO, Argentina — As statues of St. Junipero Serra continue to be vandalized in the United States, a Spanish bishop defended the evangelizer of California in the place where the 18th century Franciscan saint was baptized.

Bishop Sebastià Taltavull of Majorca visited the shrine of Petra on Tuesday, to mark the patronal feast of St. Praxedis, a second century roman martyr. The biography of this woman served as a launching pad for the prelate to speak of the “martyrdom” of the sculptures of St. Junipero Serra and what he sees as an injustice in the undervaluing the legacy of a saint who “can precisely be considered the first activist against the death penalty, so fashionable in the United States today.”

Taltabull regretted that “the media and anonymous blogs” collect so much “bad information,” and said that “suffering persecution is part of the Christian DNA.”

The bishop also spoke in favor of a normalized presence of believers in society and rejected the “movements of professors who aim to remove from the classrooms not only the teaching of religion, but the Catholic culture itself.”

“Can you imagine what would be of Petra without all its religious symbolism?” he asked.

Petra is a town in the Mediterranean island of Majorca, in the Balearic Islands. The world renown travel guide Lonely Planet defines Petra as a “quiet, comely midland town, its former prominence demonstrated by long streets of solid stone houses, and two impressive churches, dating to the 16th and 17th centuries.”

The 3,000-people town is best known for being the birthplace of St. Junipero Serra, who was born in 1713 and died in 1784. He was a Franciscan friar who founded the first nine of 21 Spanish missions in California, from San Diego to San Francisco, reason why some consider this Catholic saint to have been among the founders of the state.

[…]

Taltavull addressed the controversies surrounding the violent toppling of many statues of the saint, regretting the fact that there are authorities who “stimulate the bringing down of the images.”

He also denounced the “the subtlety behind which some persecutions of the Church are hidden” and announced that he’s going to distribute throughout Majorca a letter written by Archbishop Jose Gomez of Los Angeles in which he addresses the “the calumnies to which St. Junipero has been the object of in recent times.”

Those who are attacking St. Junipero Serra’s good name and vandalizing memorials to him “do not know his true character or the actual historical record,” Gomez wrote in the late June letter, adding that decades ago activists started “‘revising’ history to make Junipero the focus of all the abuses committed against California’s indigenous peoples.”

“But the crimes and abuses that our saint is blamed for — slanders that are spread widely today over the internet and sometimes repeated by public figures — actually happened long after his death,” he said, noting that a genocidal war waged against the Native Americans took place in 1851, but the saint died in 1784.

“The real St. Junipero fought a colonial system where natives were regarded as ‘barbarians’ and ‘savages’ whose only value was to serve the appetites of the white man,” Gomez said, yet in online petitions today the saint “is compared to Adolph Hitler, his missions compared to concentration camps.” No serious historian would accept this, he added.

[…]

ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by DepartedLight » Sat Jul 25, 2020 6:35 pm

AFRS wrote:
Fri Jul 24, 2020 1:09 am
DepartedLight wrote:
Thu Jul 23, 2020 7:50 am
And we're baaaaa-ACK!

:wavey:
We? Got a mouse in your pocket?
No. That's a cob.
DL Jake

It’s a little smooshed, but seems to be intact. - Gabriel

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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by AFRS » Sun Jul 26, 2020 6:06 pm

DepartedLight wrote:
Sat Jul 25, 2020 6:35 pm
AFRS wrote:
Fri Jul 24, 2020 1:09 am
DepartedLight wrote:
Thu Jul 23, 2020 7:50 am
And we're baaaaa-ACK!

:wavey:
We? Got a mouse in your pocket?
No. That's a cob.
In case of another covid TP shortage?

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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by wosbald » Fri Jul 31, 2020 5:32 pm

+JMJ+



ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by hugodrax » Fri Jul 31, 2020 6:08 pm

wosbald wrote:
Fri Jul 31, 2020 5:32 pm
+JMJ+


Collaborators?

8O
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