THE CATHOLIC THREAD

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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by Hovannes » Mon Aug 03, 2020 5:42 pm

Pope Benedict reported suffering from facial erysipelas, a bacterial infection.
I'll pray for him.
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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by wosbald » Mon Aug 03, 2020 5:45 pm

+JMJ+
Hovannes wrote:
Mon Aug 03, 2020 5:42 pm
Pope Benedict reported suffering from facial erysipelas, a bacterial infection.
I'll pray for him.
:prayin:

ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by wosbald » Tue Aug 04, 2020 9:32 am

+JMJ+

Finalists chosen for International Prize of Sacred Architecture [Video]
Image


The Frate Sole Foundation has announced the top 10 projects in the running for the International Prize of Sacred Architecture to be awarded this year.

These were chosen among 114 submissions, from 33 countries, who built chapels or churches within the last decade.

This year, Italy had the most number of participating design studios from one country with 21 entries. Followed by Germany and Spain with 14 entries each.

Among this year's finalists, designs focused on creating spaces that emphasized simplicity, a synthesis between nature and the surrounding built environment, inner quietness and a spiritual refuge amidst a world of information overload.

The winner of the International Prize of Sacred Architecture will be selected and announced by the end of this month.

The Frate Sole Foundation aims to become an international benchmark for research on contemporary churches, promoting awareness on the significance of the “built church” and sacred architecture in the context of society and culture.

ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by DepartedLight » Wed Aug 05, 2020 7:23 pm

Image

I'm going to nab this up.

IDing each of the Apostolic Icons on the buds will be great fun.
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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by Hovannes » Wed Aug 05, 2020 8:12 pm

wosbald wrote:
Tue Aug 04, 2020 9:32 am
+JMJ+

Finalists chosen for International Prize of Sacred Architecture [Video]
Image


The Frate Sole Foundation has announced the top 10 projects in the running for the International Prize of Sacred Architecture to be awarded this year.

These were chosen among 114 submissions, from 33 countries, who built chapels or churches within the last decade.

This year, Italy had the most number of participating design studios from one country with 21 entries. Followed by Germany and Spain with 14 entries each.

Among this year's finalists, designs focused on creating spaces that emphasized simplicity, a synthesis between nature and the surrounding built environment, inner quietness and a spiritual refuge amidst a world of information overload.

The winner of the International Prize of Sacred Architecture will be selected and announced by the end of this month.

The Frate Sole Foundation aims to become an international benchmark for research on contemporary churches, promoting awareness on the significance of the “built church” and sacred architecture in the context of society and culture.
If that Christianity thing doesn't work out they'd make dandy bus terminals---nice and squeaky clean with nothing to stick on the walls :D
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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by Del » Thu Aug 06, 2020 7:30 am

Hovannes wrote:
Wed Aug 05, 2020 8:12 pm
wosbald wrote:
Tue Aug 04, 2020 9:32 am
+JMJ+

Finalists chosen for International Prize of Sacred Architecture [Video]
Image


The Frate Sole Foundation has announced the top 10 projects in the running for the International Prize of Sacred Architecture to be awarded this year.

These were chosen among 114 submissions, from 33 countries, who built chapels or churches within the last decade.

This year, Italy had the most number of participating design studios from one country with 21 entries. Followed by Germany and Spain with 14 entries each.

Among this year's finalists, designs focused on creating spaces that emphasized simplicity, a synthesis between nature and the surrounding built environment, inner quietness and a spiritual refuge amidst a world of information overload.

The winner of the International Prize of Sacred Architecture will be selected and announced by the end of this month.

The Frate Sole Foundation aims to become an international benchmark for research on contemporary churches, promoting awareness on the significance of the “built church” and sacred architecture in the context of society and culture.
If that Christianity thing doesn't work out they'd make dandy bus terminals---nice and squeaky clean with nothing to stick on the walls :D
All of those buildings have one thing in common -- They'll need a sign. A big sign that says, "This is a church." So people will know.

Because they don't look like churches.
"Anyone who knows anything of experts will know one thing for certain; that they will always be disturbing our way of living; and therefore we shall always be disputing their right of governing." - GKC. Feb 11, 1933.

The future is certain; it’s the past that keeps changing. ~ Old Soviet joke

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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by Del » Wed Aug 12, 2020 10:54 am

I received an email announcement today:
Attached please see a letter from the Bishop dated yesterday concerning the Sacrament of Confirmation in the Extraordinary Form. Following in Bishop Morlino's footsteps, Bishop Hying will be celebrating the sacrament.

Please see the attached documents for further instructions if you would like your child to receive the sacrament.
Youths from many parishes -- and even from outside the diocese -- have the opportunity to receive the Sacrament under the traditional Latin rite!
"Anyone who knows anything of experts will know one thing for certain; that they will always be disturbing our way of living; and therefore we shall always be disputing their right of governing." - GKC. Feb 11, 1933.

The future is certain; it’s the past that keeps changing. ~ Old Soviet joke

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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by Hovannes » Wed Aug 12, 2020 11:25 am

Del wrote:
Wed Aug 12, 2020 10:54 am
I received an email announcement today:
Attached please see a letter from the Bishop dated yesterday concerning the Sacrament of Confirmation in the Extraordinary Form. Following in Bishop Morlino's footsteps, Bishop Hying will be celebrating the sacrament.

Please see the attached documents for further instructions if you would like your child to receive the sacrament.
Youths from many parishes -- and even from outside the diocese -- have the opportunity to receive the Sacrament under the traditional Latin rite!
That is very cool! :D
I feel cheated that my kids weren't permitted that opportunity by Catholic schools.
DEUS VULT!

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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by wosbald » Wed Sep 02, 2020 10:38 am

+JMJ+

Trump or Biden? What's a Catholic voter to do? [In-Depth]
Image
Pope Francis, flanked by Vice President Joe Biden and House Speaker John Boehner of Ohio, waves to the crowd on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Sept. 24, 2015, as they stand on the Speaker's Balcony on Capitol Hill, after the pope addressed a joint meeting of Congress inside. (AP/Susan Walsh)

With the choice of Joe Biden as the Democratic nominee for president of the United States, American Catholics are fighting over whether Biden can be called a Catholic politician. Connected to this question is another: "Can a Catholic vote for Biden?"

There are at least six ways to define who is a Catholic politician:
  1. A Catholic politician is a politician who happens to be Catholic.
  2. A Catholic politician is a politician who follows the directions of the U.S. bishops on political issues.
  3. A Catholic politician is a politician who follows the directions of the pope on political issues.
  4. A Catholic politician is a politician who embraces the full spectrum of Catholic social teaching.
  5. A Catholic politician is a politician who embraces most of Catholic social teaching, even if he or she supports the legalization of abortion and gay marriage.
  6. A Catholic politician is a politician who is against abortion and gay marriage, even if he or she rejects most of Catholic social teaching.
Joe Biden is clearly a Catholic under the first definition. He was born into a Catholic family, baptized a Catholic, went to Catholic schools, attends church and presents himself to the world as a Catholic.

[…]

Image
Official White House portrait of former president John Kennedy. (Courtesy of Creative Commons)

[…]

If hardly any politicians embrace the full spectrum of Catholic social teaching, what is a voter to do?

Catholic Democrats argue in favor of candidates who embrace most of Catholic social teaching, even if they support the legalization of abortion and gay marriage, definition five. Catholic Republicans argue in favor of candidates who are against abortion and gay marriage, even if they reject most of Catholic social teaching, definition six.

The bishops tried to give guidance to Catholic voters in their statement "Forming Consciences for Faithful Citizenship." In it they acknowledge "Catholics often face difficult choices about how to vote."

In two carefully crafted paragraphs, they give their advice. Activists tend to quote only their favorite lines from these paragraphs, so I give the full text below. Paragraph 34 reads:
34. A Catholic cannot vote for a candidate who favors a policy promoting an intrinsically evil act, such as abortion, euthanasia, assisted suicide, deliberately subjecting workers or the poor to subhuman living conditions, redefining marriage in ways that violate its essential meaning, or racist behavior, if the voter's intent is to support that position. In such cases, a Catholic would be guilty of formal cooperation in grave evil. At the same time, a voter should not use a candidate's opposition to an intrinsic evil to justify indifference or inattentiveness to other important moral issues involving human life and dignity.
First, it is noteworthy that besides abortion, euthanasia, assisted suicide and gay marriage, the bishops also list as "intrinsically evil," policies "deliberately subjecting workers or the poor to subhuman living conditions" as well as policies promoting "racist behavior." A liberal interpretation of this text opens the door to a wider range of Catholic social teaching than just abortion and gay marriage.

Second, the "if" clause is very important. A Catholic is in trouble only "if the voter's intent is to support that position."

So, a Catholic Republican can vote for Trump, even if his policies promote racism or subject immigrants to subhuman living conditions, as long as the voter's intent is not to support those positions.

And a Catholic Democrat can vote for Biden, even if his policies promote abortions and gay marriage, as long as the voter's intent is not to support those positions.

In Catholic theology, intention — why you are doing something — is essential to an understanding of the morality of an action.

Image
In this Monday, June 1, 2020, file photo, Democratic presidential candidate and former Vice President Joe Biden touches his face as he speaks to members of the clergy and community leaders at Bethel AME Church in Wilmington, Del. Democrats are betting on Biden’s evident comfort with faith as a powerful point of contrast in his battle against President Donald Trump. (AP File/Andrew Harnik)

Paragraph 35 of "Faithful Citizenship" acknowledges the messy world of politics, where a candidate may disagree with church teaching on an important issue but a Catholic might still vote for that candidate for other morally grave reasons:
35. There may be times when a Catholic who rejects a candidate's unacceptable position even on policies promoting an intrinsically evil act may reasonably decide to vote for that candidate for other morally grave reasons. Voting in this way would be permissible only for truly grave moral reasons, not to advance narrow interests or partisan preferences or to ignore a fundamental moral evil.
There may be times when a Catholic who rejects a candidate's unacceptable position even on policies promoting an intrinsically evil act may reasonably decide to vote for that candidate for other morally grave reasons. Voting in this way would be permissible only for truly grave moral reasons, not to advance narrow interests or partisan preferences or to ignore a fundamental moral evil.

Thus, a Catholic Republican might feel impelled to vote for Trump despite his policies promoting racism or subjecting immigrants to subhuman living conditions, because of other morally grave reasons, for example, his opposition to abortion.

A Catholic Democrat might feel impelled to vote for Biden despite his position on abortion and gay marriage because of other morally grave reasons, for example, his positions on racism, immigration, global warming and COVID-19.

[…]

ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by hugodrax » Wed Sep 02, 2020 11:20 am

Reading Wosbald's posts over the years is much like reading Siddhartha, if Siddhartha profiled a proponent of the modern Incel School of Catholic Thought.

The parallels are rather striking...the beginnings are orthodox Brahmin for Siddhartha and orthodox LC thought for the Polish Prince.

Casting off the stultifying bonds of orthodoxy, with its shalls and shall nots, Siddhartha went after the harlot, drinking, eating, becoming a merchant before waking up one day sated and disgusted. In an attempt to reject the world by joining it, he ultimately finds he has emptied his soul so completely of any morality that he is capable of achieving enlightenment, which goal he achieves in the simple, mindless role of boatman.

Similarly, our boy Wosbald was seduced by Jesuitry. Now I said Incel before not as an insult to Wos, who is nothing if not a man (and all man, baby!), but as a comparison of errors of thought. The beta male yearns to breed with all his heart, eventually going through the painful process of rejection and anger and before finally concluding "If I cant have a girl, then I'll become the girl and the men will chase after me!"

In a similar vein, the Jesuit has looked at the world and yearned to bring it back to the Church with his whole heart and soul, trying to figure out how to break the attraction of heresy and lure lost souls back. Having run into difficulties during the 20th century, the Catholic Incel decided to create his own version of heresy, cloaked in Catholicsm. "If I can't seduce the heretics, I'll create a heresy and bring everybody to a modified Church!"

One hopes that, like Siddhartha, our boy Wosbald becomes sated with the delights of Samsara and finds a simple enlightenment in the simple love of Christ and His Church. I'd suggest a fast from Catholic news sites. :lol:
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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by AFRS » Wed Sep 02, 2020 7:33 pm

hugodrax wrote:
Wed Sep 02, 2020 11:20 am
Reading Wosbald's posts over the years is much like reading
You're going to publicly admit to reading wosbald's posts?!! 8O :egor:

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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by hugodrax » Wed Sep 02, 2020 8:08 pm

AFRS wrote:
Wed Sep 02, 2020 7:33 pm
hugodrax wrote:
Wed Sep 02, 2020 11:20 am
Reading Wosbald's posts over the years is much like reading
You're going to publicly admit to reading wosbald's posts?!! 8O :egor:
Of course. I like Wosbald!
Everything we hear is an opinion, not a fact. Everything we see is a perspective, not the truth
—Marcus Aurelius

non nobis, Domine, non nobis, sed nomini tuo da gloriam

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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by AFRS » Thu Sep 03, 2020 12:46 am

hugodrax wrote:
Wed Sep 02, 2020 8:08 pm
AFRS wrote:
Wed Sep 02, 2020 7:33 pm
hugodrax wrote:
Wed Sep 02, 2020 11:20 am
Reading Wosbald's posts over the years is much like reading
You're going to publicly admit to reading wosbald's posts?!! 8O :egor:
Of course. I like Wosbald!
I bet you like brussel sprouts too?!

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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by Hovannes » Thu Sep 10, 2020 10:07 pm

Catholic seminarians in a floating Tiki Bar rescue drowning kayak-er in New York
https://www.foxnews.com/us/man-stranded ... of-priests
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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by wosbald » Fri Sep 11, 2020 5:45 pm

+JMJ+

Diocese of La Crosse condemns local priest's message on Democrats
Image

In the aftermath of a video featuring a La Crosse Catholic priest denouncing Democrats, calling them “Godless” and imposters who will go to hell, members of the church are speaking out on the message and calling for civil discourse, including the Diocese of La Crosse.

“His generalization and condemnation of entire groups of people is completely inappropriate and not in keeping with our values or the life of virtue,” the Diocese said in a statement released Wednesday.

On Aug. 30, a far-right media outlet published a video featuring Father James Altman of the St. James the Less Catholic parish in La Crosse, who gave a nearly 10-minute speech denouncing all Democrats who consider themselves practicing Catholics.

“Here’s a memo to clueless baptized Catholics out there: You cannot be Catholic and be a Democrat. Period,” Altman said in the video.

“Their party platform absolutely is against everything the Catholic church teaches. So just quit pretending that you’re Catholic and vote Democrat. Repent of your support of that party and its platform, or face the fires of hell,” he added.


In the video, Altman also called climate change a hoax, and called Planned Parenthood “the most racist organization on the face of this planet,” saying it was founded to “wipe out Black babies,” among other common right-wing messaging.

The Tribune could not reach Altman for comment.

The Diocese said it would work with the priest privately on the issue, calling the message angry, judgmental and scandalous, and would only consider stronger penalties if the issue persisted.

“Most people expect a decisive move from me, one way or another. Many suggest immediate penalties that will utterly silence him; others call for complete and unwavering support of his views,” the statement from the Diocese said. “Canonical penalties are not far away if my attempts at fraternal correction do not work.”

[…]

[Download PDF]
Image

ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by wosbald » Tue Sep 15, 2020 8:05 am

+JMJ+

Subject Header: Consistent Life Ethic/Seamless Garment/Social Magisterium
Intra-Thread Trackbacks: pg 150



Consistent ethic of life is more than a voter checklist [In-Depth, Opinion]
Image
Pro-life advocates are pictured in during the annual March for Life in Washington, Jan. 24. (CNS/Long Island Catholic/Gregory A. Shemitz)

With a Roman Catholic nominated by a major party, the 2020 presidential election cannot help being another fraught moment in the long argument about how to be Catholic in American public life. The tumult has deep roots in American history, but the most recent chapter began with the 1973 Roe v. Wade decision and then-Archbishop Joseph Bernardin's misstep during the first presidential campaign after Roe in 1976.

[…]

The consistent ethic of life is an elegant moral argument built so scrupulously on the foundation of Catholic social teaching that Pope John Paul II incorporated it into the papal magisterium with his 1995 encyclical, Evangelium Vitae (87). The official status of the consistent ethic is reflected by its presence in the U.S. bishops' 1998 document, "Living the Gospel of Life," and even today the consistent ethic is present and actively advanced by the Faithful Citizenship documents produced every four years by the bishops. There is no avoiding the fact that, officially, Catholics believe in the consistent ethic of life.

Yet the consistent ethic of life became controversial very quickly after Bernardin introduced it. Activists like Phyllis Schlafly objected that the consistent ethic threatened to "sabotage the prolife movement" because it introduced other issues that divided opponents of abortion. The controversy has not abated, and in June of this year the consistent ethic was attacked in a National Review essay that repeated an old charge — Bernardin had opened a space "to equivocate between long-standing progressive priorities and the moral urgency of abortion, and [the consistent ethic] was, in effect, used as a cudgel to accuse pro-life activists of hypocrisy, while diluting the unique evil of killing unborn children."

Objections like these point to a problem with the consistent ethic of life that (we should be honest) does really exist. The consistent ethic is official church teaching, and it is an elegant moral argument. But the consistent ethic has trouble with politics — the realm of human action in which it was created to function. I think Bernardin knew this too. He only addressed "the political consequences" of the consistent ethic once in many public lectures he gave on the consistent ethic, and there said only that, "I propose the consistent ethic not as a finished product but a framework in need of development." It is a little disappointing.

The problem we encounter when we try to apply the consistent ethic to our politics has a few dimensions. First, the consistent ethic is complex. It engages a broad range of difficult issues. No one yet has distilled the consistent ethic of life down to a bumper sticker or a tweet, and our politics does not have an attention span that accommodates anything much longer.

We encounter another dimension of the problem when we notice that the consistent ethic defies our partisan divisions. If we are consistent in our defense of human life, we cannot be a comfortable Democrat or Republican. The whole architecture of our political imagination begins to collapse around us. I think that was purposeful: Bernardin was deeply troubled by our polarization as far back as the early 1970s, and he was devoted to disrupting our divisions. But he failed, and the consistent ethic became another hostage in our polarized battle instead of ending it.

Image
Cardinal Joseph L. Bernardin, pictured in a 1995 photo, argued, in those years following Roe v. Wade, that human life always is valuable and it must be respected consistently from conception to natural death. (CNS)

Still I think there is a deeper and more fundamental dimension of the problem. We need moral principles like a consistent ethic to guide us in politics. Yet moral theology is different from politics, and politics is not a philosophy classroom. Abstract principles only go so far in concrete situations. The consistent ethic embraces many complex issues in a slow-moving political system where Catholics do not have the last word. We cannot apply the consistent ethic without surveying the circumstances of the moment and asking, "How can I best defend human life today in the light of the possibilities that exist before me right now, reading the signs of the times we are in?" The prudent response to today's situation can be different from the prudent response to tomorrow's. The moral principle does not change. The moral possibilities of the moment do.

Simply saying there is no issue more important than abortion is not adequate. We have to probe more deeply, think more concretely. It does not diminish abortion's importance to say 11 presidential elections since Roe have not resolved it, a 12th is unlikely to do better, and there are other issues that also claim our moral attention where we may have greater success in 2020. On the other hand, a voter might believe that this election somehow will end abortions and that also is a judgment in line with a consistent ethic. But in both cases, a consistent ethic of life always comes down to how a believer applies it. It depends on prudential judgments made by an informed conscience that values human life highest of all.

[…]

ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by hugodrax » Tue Sep 15, 2020 1:13 pm

wosbald wrote:
Tue Sep 15, 2020 8:05 am
+JMJ+

Subject Header: Consistent Life Ethic/Seamless Garment/Social Magisterium
Intra-Thread Trackbacks: pg 150



Consistent ethic of life is more than a voter checklist [In-Depth, Opinion]
Image
Pro-life advocates are pictured in during the annual March for Life in Washington, Jan. 24. (CNS/Long Island Catholic/Gregory A. Shemitz)

With a Roman Catholic nominated by a major party, the 2020 presidential election cannot help being another fraught moment in the long argument about how to be Catholic in American public life. The tumult has deep roots in American history, but the most recent chapter began with the 1973 Roe v. Wade decision and then-Archbishop Joseph Bernardin's misstep during the first presidential campaign after Roe in 1976.

[…]

The consistent ethic of life is an elegant moral argument built so scrupulously on the foundation of Catholic social teaching that Pope John Paul II incorporated it into the papal magisterium with his 1995 encyclical, Evangelium Vitae (87). The official status of the consistent ethic is reflected by its presence in the U.S. bishops' 1998 document, "Living the Gospel of Life," and even today the consistent ethic is present and actively advanced by the Faithful Citizenship documents produced every four years by the bishops. There is no avoiding the fact that, officially, Catholics believe in the consistent ethic of life.

Yet the consistent ethic of life became controversial very quickly after Bernardin introduced it. Activists like Phyllis Schlafly objected that the consistent ethic threatened to "sabotage the prolife movement" because it introduced other issues that divided opponents of abortion. The controversy has not abated, and in June of this year the consistent ethic was attacked in a National Review essay that repeated an old charge — Bernardin had opened a space "to equivocate between long-standing progressive priorities and the moral urgency of abortion, and [the consistent ethic] was, in effect, used as a cudgel to accuse pro-life activists of hypocrisy, while diluting the unique evil of killing unborn children."

Objections like these point to a problem with the consistent ethic of life that (we should be honest) does really exist. The consistent ethic is official church teaching, and it is an elegant moral argument. But the consistent ethic has trouble with politics — the realm of human action in which it was created to function. I think Bernardin knew this too. He only addressed "the political consequences" of the consistent ethic once in many public lectures he gave on the consistent ethic, and there said only that, "I propose the consistent ethic not as a finished product but a framework in need of development." It is a little disappointing.

The problem we encounter when we try to apply the consistent ethic to our politics has a few dimensions. First, the consistent ethic is complex. It engages a broad range of difficult issues. No one yet has distilled the consistent ethic of life down to a bumper sticker or a tweet, and our politics does not have an attention span that accommodates anything much longer.

We encounter another dimension of the problem when we notice that the consistent ethic defies our partisan divisions. If we are consistent in our defense of human life, we cannot be a comfortable Democrat or Republican. The whole architecture of our political imagination begins to collapse around us. I think that was purposeful: Bernardin was deeply troubled by our polarization as far back as the early 1970s, and he was devoted to disrupting our divisions. But he failed, and the consistent ethic became another hostage in our polarized battle instead of ending it.

Image
Cardinal Joseph L. Bernardin, pictured in a 1995 photo, argued, in those years following Roe v. Wade, that human life always is valuable and it must be respected consistently from conception to natural death. (CNS)

Still I think there is a deeper and more fundamental dimension of the problem. We need moral principles like a consistent ethic to guide us in politics. Yet moral theology is different from politics, and politics is not a philosophy classroom. Abstract principles only go so far in concrete situations. The consistent ethic embraces many complex issues in a slow-moving political system where Catholics do not have the last word. We cannot apply the consistent ethic without surveying the circumstances of the moment and asking, "How can I best defend human life today in the light of the possibilities that exist before me right now, reading the signs of the times we are in?" The prudent response to today's situation can be different from the prudent response to tomorrow's. The moral principle does not change. The moral possibilities of the moment do.

Simply saying there is no issue more important than abortion is not adequate. We have to probe more deeply, think more concretely. It does not diminish abortion's importance to say 11 presidential elections since Roe have not resolved it, a 12th is unlikely to do better, and there are other issues that also claim our moral attention where we may have greater success in 2020. On the other hand, a voter might believe that this election somehow will end abortions and that also is a judgment in line with a consistent ethic. But in both cases, a consistent ethic of life always comes down to how a believer applies it. It depends on prudential judgments made by an informed conscience that values human life highest of all.

[…]
The devil is always polite.
Everything we hear is an opinion, not a fact. Everything we see is a perspective, not the truth
—Marcus Aurelius

non nobis, Domine, non nobis, sed nomini tuo da gloriam

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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by Hovannes » Thu Sep 17, 2020 11:21 am

DEUS VULT!

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wosbald
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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by wosbald » Thu Sep 17, 2020 11:44 am

+JMJ+

Christian-Muslim dialogue ‘backbone’ of Lebanon, cardinal says
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In a file photo, Lebanese Cardinal Bechara Rai, Maronite patriarch, speaks at a news conference at the National Press Club in Washington Oct. 24, 2017, the opening day of an annual three-day In Defense of Christians Summit. (Credit: Jaclyn Lippelmann/Catholic Standard via CNS)

SOUTH BEND, Indiana — Just weeks before Pope Francis is set to sign a new encyclical on human fraternity, the head of the Maronite Church is pointing to his own country of Lebanon as an example of how Christians and Muslims can peacefully live together.

Cardinal Béchara Boutros Rai, the patriarch of the predominately-Lebanese Maronite Catholic rite, emphasized his country’s commitment to religious toleration at a webinar hosted by Fordham University’s Center for Religion and Culture on Thursday.

“For us, dialogue between Christians and Muslims is the backbone of the existence of Lebanon,” Rai said through a translator.

Fostering peace between Christians and Muslims has been a major theme of Pope Francis’s pontificate. The pope traveled to the United Arab Emirates last year to sign “A Document on Human Fraternity for World Peace and Living Together,” and his upcoming encyclical “All Brothers” is expected to echo that resolution.

The 2019 document, which Francis signed in conjunction with Muslim leaders, calls for world leaders to “work strenuously” towards religious toleration, and asserts that “authentic teachings of religions invite us to remain rooted in the values of peace … and harmonious coexistence.”

But Pope Francis’s words about interreligious dialogue are not new for Lebanese Christians, Rai said.

“That declaration was already in existence in Lebanon,” he said. “We were applying that resolution before it was ever made.”

Lebanon has long been perceived as a neutral player amidst the religious and political tensions of the Middle East, and serves as a sanctuary for Middle Eastern Christians fleeing religious violence. The Mediterranean nation protects the legal rights of Christians in its constitution, and elects its legislature in proportion to its religious makeup.

For these reasons, Rai hopes his country can offer hope to Christians under strict Muslim rule across the Middle East.

“We want to maintain this for the sake of the Christians in the whole of the Arab world, because they say, ‘if the Christians of Lebanon are … living on equal basis with the Muslims, then we have some hope,” he said. “This is why the Lebanon formula is so important.”

Still, Rai did not present an image of Lebanon without problems. …

[…]

In his address, Rai appealed to participants for aid in his country’s troubles, suggesting that the fate of Christians in the Middle East could be at stake.

“I would like to urge all our friends, all those who believe in the importance of a culture of freedom, moderation, diversity and inter-religious co-living, not to forget Lebanon at this time of great need,” he said.

Lebanon’s plight had a well-known sympathizer in Cardinal Timothy Dolan. The New York Archbishop, who chairs the Catholic Near East Welfare Association, offered opening remarks for the webinar in which he praised Rai and the patriarch’s country.

“Lebanon is a beautiful laboratory of religious freedom and religious diversity,” he told Rai. “May our company this morning just be a sign to you of our love, our solidarity, our prayer, and our desire to help.”

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"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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GaryInVA
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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by GaryInVA » Thu Sep 17, 2020 11:48 am

I know of this church. Very sad for my hometown.
hugodrax wrote:
Fri Apr 06, 2018 4:19 pm
This, gentlemen, is what it feels like when doves cry.

But it is easier for a Lifted Ford to pass under the beam of a parking garage than it is for a Dodge Ram driver to enter the Kingdom of Heaven.
Y'all crazy

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