THE CATHOLIC THREAD

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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by wosbald » Thu Sep 17, 2020 4:22 pm

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Subject Header: Consistent Life Ethic/Seamless Garment/Social Magisterium
Intra-Thread Trackbacks: pg 150 / pg 150



Diocese of Amarillo Issues Statement Regarding Father Frank Pavone
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September 16, 2020

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Statement: Diocese of Amarillo in regard to Father Frank Pavone.

Recently Father Frank Pavone has posted a variety of messages and statements in regard to the General Elections in November, 2020. These postings on Social Media as videos concern the serious sinfulness of voting for candidates of a particular political party (with refusal of absolution if confessed) and the use of scandalous words not becoming of a Catholic priest. These postings are not consistent with Catholic Church Teachings. Neither the Catholic Church nor the Diocese of Amarillo condone any of these messages. Please disregard them and pray for Father Pavone.

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"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by wosbald » Fri Sep 18, 2020 9:57 am

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SF Archbishop: Catholics’ right to worship ‘unjustly repressed’ by government [In-Depth]
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Archbishop Salvatore J. Cordileone of San Francisco is seen with other bishops in the crypt of St. Peter's Basilica Jan. 27, 2020, during their "ad limina" visit to the Vatican. (Credit: Stefano Dal Pozzolo/CNS)

SAN FRANCISCO — In imposing severe restrictions on indoor worship services because of COVID-19 protocols, the city of San Francisco “is turning a great many faithful away from their houses of prayer,” said San Francisco Archbishop Salvatore J. Cordileone.

“I never expected that the most basic religious freedom, the right to worship — protected so robustly in our Constitution’s First Amendment — would be unjustly repressed by an American government,” he said in an op-ed for The Washington Post. It was posted the evening of Sept. 16 on the daily newspaper’s website.

“But that is exactly what is happening in San Francisco. For months now, the city has limited worship services to just 12 people outdoors. Worship inside our own churches is banned,” he continued.

“The city recently announced it will now allow 50 for outdoor worship, with a goal of permitting indoor services up to a maximum of 25 people by Oct. 1 — less than 1% of the capacity of San Francisco’s St. Mary’s Cathedral.”

“This is not nearly enough to accommodate the hundreds of thousands of Catholics in San Francisco,” he added.

The archbishop’s op-ed came a few days after he issued a memo to all priests of the San Francisco Archdiocese calling on each parish to each gather parishioners to participate in eucharistic processions to U.N. Plaza next to City Hall Sept. 20 “to witness to the city that faith matters.”

Three parishes are each organizing a procession that he said he hopes all parishes will join.

[…]

In the op-ed, he said: “We Catholics are not indifferent to the very real dangers posed by COVID-19. This is one of the reasons Catholic churches have developed rigorous protocols to protect public health in our facilities.”

“We submitted our safety plans to the city in May along with other faith communities, and while indoor retailers had their plans approved and went into operation, we are still waiting to hear back,” he added.

At the same time, “the scientific evidence from other jurisdictions is clear: These safeguards are working,” he said, adding that out of 1 million Masses celebrated in the U.S. in the past several months, there have been no documented outbreaks of COVID-19 linked to church attendance in churches that follow the protocols.

He noted that as San Francisco churches remain closed, “people can freely go to parks here, as long as they stay six feet apart. If they follow proper social distancing and wear masks, people can eat on an outdoor patio with no hard numerical limit. Indoor shopping malls are already open at 25% capacity.”

“Catholics in San Francisco are increasingly noticing the simple unfairness,” he said. “As one of my parishioners asked recently, ‘Why can I spend three hours indoors shopping for shoes at Nordstrom’s but can’t go to Mass?”

[…]

Catholics bear no “hostility toward government” and “respect legitimate authority,” the archbishop said.

“We recognize that the government has a right to impose reasonable public health rules, just as we recognize its right to issue safety codes for our church buildings,” he said. “But when government asserts authority over the church’s very right to worship, it crosses a line.

“Our fundamental rights do not come from the state. As the authors of our Declaration of Independence put it, they are ‘self-evident,’ that is, they come from God,” he added.

“We want to be partners in protecting the public health, but we cannot accept profoundly harmful and unequal treatment without resisting,” Cordileone said.

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"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by wosbald » Mon Sep 28, 2020 1:58 pm

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California’s St. Peter’s Chaldean Catholic Cathedral Vandalized by Confusing Mix of Graffiti [Video]
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Parishioners with power washers and paint rollers worked all afternoon on Sept. 26 at Saint Peter’s Chaldean Cathedral in El Cajon, CA — covering and cleaning a confusing mix of graffiti.

Father Daniel Shaba shared video of swastikas, white power slogans, pentagrams, Black Lives Matter and Biden 2020 — all mixed together on the walls and ground.

‘It was very confusing when I saw the graffiti because it had things that didn’t have to do much with each other,” said Father Shaba.

[…]

“It’s very devastating. We’re a very small minority, Chaldean community. We fled persecution in Iraq and here we are facing it again, in a place where we thought we wouldn’t,” he said.

Word spread fast, and the response from the community came faster.

“I’m very proud of them, because we had an enormous amount of parishioners come and want to help out, see how they could help us in any way shape of form. But to also hold tight to Jesus,” Father Shabba told Currents News.

Father Shaba says the church has surveillance footage of the crime which they’ve shared with law enforcement.

They will seek justice. But they also have a message for the vandals.

“I would say to the people who did this, we will pray for you. We will pray for your conversion and repent,” said Father Shaba.

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"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by wosbald » Wed Oct 07, 2020 12:40 pm

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Subject Header: Consistent Life Ethic/Seamless Garment/Social Magisterium
Inter-Thread Trackbacks: pg 150 / pg 150 / pg 151

Inter-Thread Trackbacks:
"The Statement on Social Justice": pg 6



Catholic Social Teaching called Church's 'best kept secret' in new book [In-Depth, Interview]
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A Catholic Charities' worker places a sandwich in a bin at the St. Ann's Center for Children, Youth and Families facility in Avondale, Md., July 14, 2020, to be packaged in boxed meals for needy residents of the greater Washington area. (Credit: Chaz Muth/CNS)

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[Mark P. Shea is a popular Catholic writer and speaker. His works include Mary, Mother of the Son (Amazon), Salt and Light: The Commandments, the Beatitudes, and a Joyful Life (Servant), The Heart of Catholic Prayer: Rediscovering the Our Father and the Hail Mary (Our Sunday Visitor) and The Work of Mercy: Being the Hands and Heart of Christ (Servant). He is also the author of Making Senses Out of Scripture: Reading the Bible as the First Christians Did (Basilica), By What Authority? An Evangelical Discovers Catholic Tradition (Ignatius), and This is My Body: An Evangelical Discovers the Real Presence (Christendom). An award-winning columnist, he has contributed numerous articles to many magazines. Mark is known nationally for his one minute “Words of Encouragement” on Catholic radio. He also maintains the popular blog Stumbling Toward Heaven. He spoke to Charles Camosy about his new book, The Church’s Best-Kept Secret: A Primer on Catholic Social Teaching (New City).]

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(Credit: New City Press)

Camosy: What does it mean to say, as your new book’s title does, that Catholic Social Teaching is the Church’s best-kept secret?

Shea: Sometimes we cannot see things because we are not looking at them, or they are hidden, or our eyes do not function. Other times, we cannot see things because of the way that we have been taught to see. You are taught to the black and white cubes all facing one way, and then suddenly one day you see them all facing the other way. The cubes didn’t change. The way you saw them did.

Catholic Social Teaching is the Church’s best-kept secret not because the Church hides it, but because the way we have been taught to see keeps us from seeing what is, in fact, in plain view. It is all there, summed up on the Church’s four pillars of the dignity of the human person, the common good, subsidiarity, and solidarity.

The trouble is that we do not get our ideas on how to order our common life from the Church. We get them from our parents, our peers, Sean Hannity, Rachel Maddow, Rush Limbaugh, a host of mini-popes on social media, Netflix, that mouthy guy at the water cooler at work, that thing we read once in a book whose title we can’t recall, our gut, a favorite priest, our brother-in-law, a YouTube conspiracy theory, or a vivid dream we once had.

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Mark Shea. (Courtesy to Crux)

That’s not really surprising. Most people don’t curl up with the Catechism or the Compendium of the Social Doctrine of the Catholic Church on a rainy Saturday afternoon. Nor do average Catholics pore over the social encyclicals of the Church. We tend to listen to trusted tribal elders, not to research tomes. Consequently, our approach to the Church’s teaching tends be backward from the way the Church intends. Whereas the Church wants us to start with the gospel and build out from that to forming a way of life, we tend to start with what we want to believe and then we loot and pillage the Catholic tradition for philosophical baubles with which to accessorize our worldview. So we never really see the Tradition in its fullness. We just see just the bits we like. The rest we throw away as “too liberal” or “too reactionary”, “too modern” or “too medieval.” My book aims to start the process of learning the Church’s social teaching as the Church actually teaches it.

[…]

This may sound like too simple of a question, but what is, in fact, Catholic Social Teaching? Obviously, some encyclicals — like Rerum Novarum — “count.” But others are ambiguous. Is Evangelium Vitae part of Catholic Social Teaching? What about Humane Vitae?

Yes, all of these, and the following as well:

Quadragesimo Anno (After Forty Years) — On Reconstruction of the Social Order

Mater et Magistra (On Christianity and Social Progress)

Pacem in Terris (Peace on Earth)

Populorum Progressio (On the Development of Peoples)

Laborem Exercens (On Human Work)

Sollicitudo Rei Socialis (20th Anniversary of Populorum Progressio)

Centesimus Annus (The Hundredth Year)

Fides et Ratio (Faith and Reason)

Deus Caritas Est (God Is Love)

Caritas in Veritate (Charity in Truth)

Laudato Si’ (On our Common Home)

Catholic social teaching as an organized body of doctrine is barely 130 years old. But its roots, like all developments of doctrine, go right back to apostolic tradition and, indeed, to the Old Testament as well. Its core, like that of all Catholic moral teaching, is the two greatest commandments: Love God and Love Your Neighbor as Yourself. But it is unique in that it is specifically a response of the Church to modernity and post-modernity. It was, if you will, invented by Leo XIII in the extremely late 19th century in response to crisis of industrial civilization and the strain it was placing on the human community.

Then as the 20th century revved up into war, famine, and crisis after crisis, the Church was spurred to delve into its tradition again and again to confront the rapidly developing situation. Consequently, Catholic social teaching always has one foot in eternity and the other foot in very swiftly changing history. No more perfect illustration of this can be found than in the fact that The Church’s Best-Kept Secret, published on Sept. 21, will already be slightly outdated on October 3, when Pope Francis signs a new social encyclical called Fratelli Tutti. On to the revised third printing!

[…]

What implications does this authority have, in your view, for faithful Catholics thinking about the 2020 US elections?

I want to stress that this book is not intended as a political manifesto of any kind, nor as being addressed to current event in American politics. My goal, in fact, was to write a book that will be just as useful for understanding the Church’s social teaching in a century as it is now. So while The Church’s Best-Kept Secret, if it does its work properly, will definitely impact the way you think about this election (and every other election from here on in) it will also impact the way you think about how you shop, and how you view your neighbor, and what you do with your money, and the way you worship, and what you think about your responsibility for the earth, and how you view human reproduction, and what you do about buying chocolate, and a host of other things.

That said, I definitely think that viewing our politics through the lens to Catholic social teaching will have a revolutionary effect on it. Much of Catholic politics has been whittle down to a few slogans and shibboleths that involve scarcely a movement of the gray matter. The use of the unborn as human shields for a host of grave evils is a serious problem. So is the fear of the first, rather than the second, death.

Catholics who are convinced they are forever on the precipice of persecution in the United States are often blind to the fact that they are siding with those who inflict mass hysterectomies on women at the border, or destroy water supplies for refugees in the desert, or kidnap children into ICE rape camps, or send them home unaccompanied by adults to wander alone in gang-infested streets. None of this is “pro-life.” And yet by a weird sleight of hand, many who fancy themselves “pro-life” wind up defending all this, not the unborn, because it becomes their real priority to defend the current administration, not the unborn.

A fully Catholic worldview cannot endure weaponizing the unborn into the opposite of all other forms of human life. In the Catholic picture, the unborn are related to, not the opposite of, all human beings, made in the image and likeness of God. That is Solidarity, the fourth of the pillars of Catholic social teaching. God grant that we overcome our divisions and embrace it.

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"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by wosbald » Tue Oct 20, 2020 10:07 am

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Subject Header: Economic Magisterium/Integral Ecology/Fratelli Tutti
Intra-Thread Trackbacks: pg 119 / pg 119 / pg 119 / pg 119

Inter-Thread Trackbacks:
"I'm Starting to Like This Pope": pg 65 / pg 121 / pg 121 / pg 122 / pg 127 / pg 128 / pg 129 / pg 129 / pg 129 / pg 129 / pg 129 / pg 129 / pg 129 / pg 129



Bishop McElroy: Abortion is a pre-eminent issue for Catholics. But not the only one. [Podcast, Interview]
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Young people take part in a climate change rally in Washington Sept. 20, 2019, one of several taking place across the country and in England and Australia. (CNS photo/Erin Scott, Reuters)

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Bishop Robert W. McElroy is the bishop of the Diocese of San Diego and a longtime contributor to America. Recently, Bishop McElroy spoke with Sebastian Gomes of “Voting Catholic,” a podcast from America Media that helps U.S. Catholics discern their vote in the upcoming presidential election. The bishop tackles the issue of abortion, the political polarization of Catholics and how to vote with a well-formed conscience. This interview has been edited for length and clarity.

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Sebastian Gomes: I want to start with a meeting that took place among the bishops last November. In that meeting, a new introductory letter to “Faithful Citizenship” was presented to the bishops for their approval. The letter included the following statement: “The threat of abortion remains our preeminent priority because it directly attacks life itself.” Can you take us back to that moment and tell us what your concern was about that statement?

Bishop McElroy: In my own view, abortion is a pre-eminent issue for Catholics—one of several.

My concern was that when you say abortion is the pre-eminent issue we face as a nation, you are setting up an election choice. The church’s teaching is that evaluating candidates and deciding who you should choose has to do with certain qualities about the candidates, but it also has to do with their positions on a series of key issues in Catholic moral teaching. The concept that brings them all together is called the common good. The common good is, in Catholic theology, the advancement of the whole series of issues in society, which allow the fullest expression and enhancement and achievement of human life and dignity for all people in our society and in the world.

To say that abortion is the pre-eminent issue in a particular political season is to reduce the common good, in effect, to one issue. And that’s a distortion of Catholic teaching. In fact, the assertion that abortion is “the” pre-eminent issue in this political campaign for Catholics is itself a political statement, not a doctrinal one.

[…]

I’m wondering how a Catholic should engage with the statements from Pope Francis, as well as the statements that they hear from their bishops and read about here in the United States.

I think Pope Francis is pointing to us that broader notion of the common good, that all of those elements need to be taken into account and that it is a mistake to reduce Catholic moral teaching to one issue. That is not faithful to our tradition.

There was an interesting analogy that came out 30 years ago in these discussions, arguing that abortion is the primary moral issue. The analogy is because the issue of life is the foundation of the house of the common good. The common good is built on top of it, but the foundation is life, and thus, among the issues of life, the defense of the unborn [is] so important.

But I would say this: The house itself and the foundation rest on the earth, and the earth is at stake in climate change and in the care for creation. And so you don’t have a house and you don’t have a foundation if you don’t have the earth [or] a habitable place for our humanity.

Could you comment on the politicization of issues and how Catholics can wade through that?

The tragedy for Catholic voters who are believers and take their faith seriously is that, at the present time, the partisan structure of American politics absolutely bifurcates Catholic teaching. There are certain issues where, in general, Republicans far better represent the teaching of the church: abortion being one, euthanasia, many issues of religious liberty. And then there are certain issues where the Democratic Party [represents church teaching]: climate change, issues of poverty and racism.

The problem that voters face is the believer is literally homeless in the party structure of the United States. There is no partisan platform that even begins to approximate what Catholic teaching is.

Some people say that if you vote for one candidate or another, that you’re not a “real” Catholic. What do you make of those statements?

It is a terrible assault on our faith. Catholic faith and identity are not reducible to one’s political stances. Catholic faith is believing in God, having a relationship with God, understanding the life of the church, loving the church, walking in the pilgrimage of [a] life of faith on this earth. That’s what Catholic faith is.

But for people to say that because on a particular political issue you diverge from what the church teaches you are not a Catholic anymore reduces our faith to simply a political creed. Our faith is much more than that.

[…]

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"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by wosbald » Thu Oct 29, 2020 1:45 pm

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The New Integralists [Book Review, In-Depth, Opinion]
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Bernard Picart, the banner of the Goa Inquisition by the Portuguese, 1722 (Wellcome/Wikimedia Commons)

What they get wrong, and why we can’t ignore them.

Just three years after the closing of the Second Vatican Council, in 1968, the prominent French theologian Fr. Louis Bouyer published a searing analysis of the battles already raging over its legacy. Bouyer did not write as an enemy of the council: he had played a key role in its deliberations and remained one of its staunch defenders. But he hoped that The Decomposition of Catholicism would serve as a warning, and in it he disclosed the greatest threat he saw facing the Church: a violent conservative reaction to the sometimes chaotic, flawed implementation of the council’s reforms. Bouyer admonished fellow advocates of those reforms that unless they found more persuasive ways of situating them within the sweep of Catholic history, then well-meaning believers, unable to recognize their Church, would turn to dangerous forms of traditionalism. He labeled this threat “integralism,” highlighting its “absolutization of authority,” “petrifying of tradition,” and nostalgic longing for the Church to wield political power as it did in the Christendom of old.

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Integralism: A Manual of Political Philosophy
Thomas Crean and Alan Fimister
Editiones Scholasticae
$32 | 290 pp.


It’s now undeniable that Bouyer’s warning was prophetic. The most recent confirmation of this came in March with the publication of Integralism: A Manual of Political Philosophy by Fr. Thomas Crean, an English Dominican, and Alan Fimister, who teaches theology and Church history at St. John Vianney Theological Seminary in Colorado. The manual gives systematic, book-length expression to a set of reactionary political and theological ideas that have been promoted by right-wing Catholic intellectuals with growing frequency in recent years — ideas nearly identical, down to the very name “integralism,” to those Bouyer predicted would take hold in the Church.

The book should alert a complacent Catholic theological establishment that ideas once thought dead and buried are resurgent. Integralism clearly breaks with Vatican II’s teaching on religious liberty and expresses a commitment to the political disenfranchisement (or worse) of women, sexual minorities, and non-Catholics. That might tempt some to dismiss the book as hopelessly “illiberal” or “outdated,” confident that others will react with the same justified horror — a response that Bouyer anticipated. “Such a reaction is no threat to us,” he imagined these skeptics saying about integralism. “It has become impossible.” But he insisted that this attitude only plays into the hands of reactionaries. It leaves their claims to represent Catholic tradition unchallenged, and it ignores the appeal integralism has to younger Catholics searching for meaning amid the shallowness of modern life. Instead, integralism can only be defeated on theological grounds — by offering a deeper, more expansive narrative of Catholic political thought to counter integralism’s bold but unjustified claims to authenticity.

[…]

Before getting to Integralism’s startlingly reactionary content, however, the problem of its form needs to be addressed. The book is modeled after the “manual,” the genre favored by authors of nineteenth-century theology textbooks. While this form of organization has its advantages — the summaries in the form of short “theses” at the end of each chapter are quite helpful — it is first and foremost a symbolic act. By adopting the genre, Crean and Fimister reject the style of theology associated with the Second Vatican Council, which famously began as a reaction against the often dry, ahistorical, and rationalist theology of the manuals. But more fundamentally, the archaic language and the return to this older genre is an attempt to channel authority. Neoscholastic manuals are structured around a claim to present a rigorous, deductive “system” that should compel assent. A manual does not set forth the personal views of its authors; it is a synthesis of authoritative magisterial and theological sources. Thus, while Crean and Fimister eschew any claim to originality in the book’s acknowledgements, this ostensible gesture of humility is a subtle power play. It implies that the manual “merely” relays ecclesial authority, which cannot ultimately be questioned.

The choice of genre, then, performs the book’s thesis: that the Catholic Church’s teachings on politics form an organized system — integralism — rooted in principles that are authoritatively promulgated by the magisterium and have remained unchanged through the ages.

This attempt to cut through the messiness of Catholic tradition with the sword of authority conveys a unanimity that never really existed. It can only be sustained by removing the figures Crean and Fimister cite as authorities from the vigorous disputes in which they participated, disputes that sometimes pitted these authorities against one another. For example, Crean and Fimister scarcely acknowledge how the theories of Pope Gregory VII or Robert Bellarmine were shaped by their polemical context, or that the fierce debates among scholastics on political questions were precisely that: debates. They downplay the distinction between patristic and medieval political thought, and minimize the differences between the views of the great Jesuit theorists and the reactionary political statements of nineteenth-century popes.

Crean and Fimister fail to grasp that demonstrating the coherence of the Catholic tradition cannot take the form of a “mere” manual. Accounting for historical context and genuine differences across time is always a creative act, requiring an interpretation of what is essential and what can change. The attempt to find a lowest common denominator shared across the whole Catholic tradition, like Crean and Fimister’s (not so) minimal “integralism,” is itself a private judgment that can be disputed. Moreover, the unity of Catholic history may not lie on the level of explicit theory. The Jesuit John Courtney Murray, who knew Thomas Aquinas and Bellarmine far better than Crean and Fimister, argued that the continuity of Catholic political thought could be found not in some unchanging master theory but in a golden thread running through what can seem like quite different theories: the defense of the libertas ecclesiae (the liberty of the Church). Seemingly opposed proposals, such as the direct power of the papacy over emperors and modern notions of religious liberty, when situated in a larger story, can be read as motivated by a common purpose — the attempt to protect the Church from totalizing temporal powers, using the conceptual tools available at the time.

The deep irony of what Crean and Fimister have attempted is that the manual, like the idea that scholasticism is a “system,” is a thoroughly modern notion. Aquinas did not write manuals; in his greatest works, his preference was for the disputatio, which does not present a timeless, completed system, but rather proceeds by genuinely responding to objections and frankly grappling with conflicting authorities. Nothing could be further from the distinctly modern anxiety found in Integralism about the dialectical nature of tradition, with its conflicts, developments, and even reversals.



Crean and Fimister’s book is best read, then, not as the authoritative channel of tradition that it pretends to be, but as a narrative—one possible story of Catholic political history. Following Augustine, they identify the heart of this drama as the struggle between the City of God and the City of Man. However, whereas Augustine thought this struggle ran through every human heart and every social order, Crean and Fimister largely narrate it as the establishment, and then eclipse, of Christendom. They interpret the “social kingship of Christ” to mean that a just social order cannot exist unless political regimes acknowledge Christ’s authority, place their temporal power at the disposal of the spiritual power, and become provinces of a united Christendom. Christendom is “the temporal aspect” of the Church, given flesh with Constantine’s conversion, a permanently valid norm rather than a contingent set of arrangements. For them, the modern Church, without Christendom and its temporal sword, is like “a soul separated from the body.”

[…]

Later chapters begin to sketch out the contours of a just regime, covering topics ranging from the distribution of power between ecclesial and temporal authorities to the best constitutional configuration to international law and economic theory. Crean and Fimister’s ideal is a hereditary monarch who has declared his kingdom officially Catholic and sworn fealty to the pope, submitting to the Church on spiritual matters while punishing those who violate natural law or disrespect the true religion. Once again, however, the manual often borrows from sources that are far from traditional. For example, Crean and Fimister explicitly disagree with Aquinas and Bellarmine by favoring hereditary over elective monarchy as the best regime, and their idea that the right to private property is “proportionate to” human nature owes more to John Locke than to Aquinas.

This approach to property rights reflects the manual’s odd libertarian streak, smuggled in from modern Anglo-American conservatism. In addition to jarringly positive citations of Ronald Reagan, Roger Scruton, and Robert Nozick, Crean and Fimister show a surprising interest in conservative preoccupations like corporate personhood and immigration restrictions. But those aren’t the only cases of their deference to magisterial authority proving to be mere lip service. They also deny Pope Francis’s authority to declare capital punishment “inadmissable,” and they can only manage to ignore the Second Vatican Council’s teaching on religious liberty through a hermeneutical sleight of hand. In short, Crean and Fimister have produced a deeply personal synthesis, one which often follows Protestant thinkers or early modern political theory rather than mainstream Catholic sources, and one that plays fast and loose with magisterial authority when convenient.

The most disturbing aspect of the story Integralism tells involves the fate of those who are essentially written out of its narrative: non-Catholics, women, and all those who don’t fit the patriarchal family model. Crean and Fimister openly state that Jews, atheists, and all non-Catholics will be denied citizenship and voting rights. They will be forbidden to proselytize, while polytheistic religions will be banned (along with, the manual insinuates, Islam). Protestant ministers will not be tolerated, and heretics can be put to death. Women, unless they are heads of households, will not be allowed to vote and may work outside the home only with the permission of their husbands, by whom they are governed and to whom they must offer sex whenever requested. Sexual minorities fare no better. Cohabiting couples and those born out of wedlock can be disenfranchised, and a footnote implies (with a reference to an obscure Latin text) that the execution of some LGBTQ people may promote the salvation of souls. It should not be totally surprising, then, that the manual also insists that permanent and even hereditary slavery can be “a potentially valid legal relationship” in certain circumstances.



If these conclusions are rightly offensive to our “modern” and “liberal” sensibilities, they are most fundamentally a theological error, a distortion of the Gospel. Integralists have forgotten “the one thing necessary” (Luke 10:42); they ultimately misrepresent the Catholic tradition because they misrepresent Christ, the crucified victim. Abstracting away Christ’s body and his concrete history, they forget that his Lordship is manifest in service, and that his victory is accomplished in the powerlessness of the Cross. Christ is undoubtedly a king, and the Church he founded inevitably manifests as a political presence that challenges all other lords. But Christ’s “form” — the shape of his life, death, and resurrection — must be allowed to reshape our notions of kingship and the political. Integralists, like Christ’s disciples before the Resurrection, think they already know what his reign will and must look like, and this presumption means they fail to truly recognize him, turning him into nothing other than the capstone of another hierarchy, the authorization for one more Inquisition.

The distortions that follow from their failure to recognize Christ’s form are exemplified by their treatment of the Eucharist. Citing a French law that made the desecration of the Eucharist a capital offense, they turn the very embodiment of Christ’s self-giving love into an occasion for coercive power. Similarly, their tendentious interpretation of Luke 22 turns Christ’s final meal with his disciples into a discourse on integralism. Ignoring Christ’s insistence that leadership should take the form of service, not mastery (Luke 22:25–26), and his rebuke of a disciple for wielding a sword (Luke 22:51), they conclude that the Lord “instructed the disciples to obtain the means of temporal coercion.” To buttress this claim, they twist the very temptation in which Christ refused the Devil’s offer of the kingdoms of the world into an argument for confessional states.

These exegetical perversities should serve as a warning: those whose imaginations have not been remolded by Christ’s crucified body will inevitably abuse Scripture and disfigure his ecclesial body, putting them in service of the libido dominandi, the lust for domination that animates the powers of this world.

Not all integralists would go as far as Crean and Fimister and embrace such brutal punishments for non-Catholics and sexual minorities — although it’s disturbing that even those proposals will find a ready audience. But despite potential disagreements about particular claims in the manual, there is still a very real danger that too many young Catholics, genuinely seeking a sense of identity and belonging, will follow a similar trajectory if they are convinced doing so is the price of orthodoxy. For them, integralism fills a void left by homilies and catechesis that are ignorant of Catholic history, or that do little more than put a religious gloss on trendy causes.

This is why Bouyer was right that it’s not enough to merely wave away integralism as retrograde: its appeal lies precisely in the ownership it takes of a centuries-long story of emperors and popes, mystics and saints. The integralists’ claim to be the authentic voice of “tradition” is unwittingly affirmed when the alternatives seem to suggest, as William Cavanaugh has wryly put it, that by “some terrible mistake of the Holy Spirit” Catholic political history took “a long detour in the fourth century,” a dark age that lifted only with the dawn of Vatican II. That kind of story concedes integralism’s monopoly on the past, allowing its selective and ahistorical pastiche of authorities to substitute for real engagement with Catholic tradition in its full depth, breadth, and complexity.

A better approach is to make clear that the integralists’ problem is not too much tradition, but not enough — that they are depriving their followers of the richness and depth of Catholic political thought, not least in their superficial treatments of the Second Vatican Council. To take only one example, there are several theological accounts of recent teaching on religious liberty that are more robust than anything offered by integralists: looking to the patristic period, Joseph Ratzinger sees Dignitatis humanae as a “recovery of the deepest patrimony of the Church”; John Courtney Murray points to precursors in the thought of medieval figures like Aquinas and narrates the council’s teaching as the latest act in the ongoing drama of the libertas ecclesiae; and Cavanaugh sees in Christendom an important reminder of the significance of the Church as a political body, while simultaneously welcoming Vatican II’s clarification that it does not take the same coercive form as worldly powers.

[…]

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"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by DepartedLight » Thu Oct 29, 2020 5:40 pm

Is 2002 the latest rev for the Roman MIssale?

Sometimes the USCCB is slack in updating their page.
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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by hugodrax » Fri Oct 30, 2020 6:41 am

DepartedLight wrote:
Thu Oct 29, 2020 5:40 pm
Is 2002 the latest rev for the Roman MIssale?

Sometimes the USCCB is slack in updating their page.
I believe it is.

Seems weird to post Catholic stuff in Wosbald's shittin' thread.
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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by DepartedLight » Fri Oct 30, 2020 7:06 am

hugodrax wrote:
Fri Oct 30, 2020 6:41 am
DepartedLight wrote:
Thu Oct 29, 2020 5:40 pm
Is 2002 the latest rev for the Roman MIssale?

Sometimes the USCCB is slack in updating their page.
I believe it is.

Seems weird to post Catholic stuff in Wosbald's shittin' thread.
:lol: :lol:
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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by Hovannes » Sun Nov 01, 2020 1:02 pm

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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by wosbald » Sun Nov 01, 2020 1:04 pm

+JMJ+
Hovannes wrote:
Sun Nov 01, 2020 1:02 pm
A Blessed All Saint's to you all!

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Bakatcha, bro!

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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by wosbald » Tue Nov 03, 2020 8:05 am

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Subject Header: Economic Magisterium/Integral Ecology/Fratelli Tutti
Intra-Thread Trackbacks: pg 119 / pg 119 / pg 119 / pg 119 / pg 151

Inter-Thread Trackbacks:
"I'm Starting to Like This Pope": pg 65 / pg 121 / pg 121 / pg 122 / pg 127 / pg 128 / pg 129 / pg 129 / pg 129 / pg 129 / pg 129 / pg 129 / pg 129 / pg 129 / pg 130 / pg 130



Social issues a priority for cardinal-to-be Wilton Gregory
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In this Sunday, June 2, 2019, file photo, Washington D.C. Archbishop Wilton Gregory, left, greets parishioners following Mass at St. Augustine Church in Washington. Pope Francis has named 13 new cardinals, including Washington D.C. Archbishop Wilton Gregory, who would become the first Black U.S. prelate to earn the coveted red cap. In a surprise announcement from his studio window to faithful standing below in St. Peter’s Square, Sunday, Oct. 25, 2020, Francis said the churchmen would be elevated to a cardinal’s rank in a ceremony on Nov. 28. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File)

Washington, D.C. Archbishop Wilton Gregory, soon to become the Roman Catholic Church’s first Black cardinal from the United States, hopes the U.S. hierarchy can broaden its concept of “pro-life” so that other pressing issues can be considered top priorities along with opposition to abortion.

Gregory, in an interview Friday with The Associated Press, also endorsed proposals to include the history of Black Catholics in the U.S. as part of the curriculum in Catholic schools. Earlier this year, amid nationwide demonstrations against racial injustice, some Black Catholics said the curriculum should be more honest about the church’s past links to slavery and segregation, and more detailed in portraying how Black Catholics persevered.

[…]

Gregory’s ascension to cardinal was announced on Sunday by Pope Francis. There is expected to be a ceremony at the Vatican on Nov. 28 formally elevating Gregory and 12 other clerics to the rank of cardinal.

His appointment comes amid a heated U.S. election campaign that has entangled many Catholic leaders. Some are signaling support for President Donald Trump because of the Republican Party’s stance against abortion. Others, citing comments from Pope Francis, argue that other social issues — including racial injustice, poverty, immigration and climate change — also deserve to be emphasized.

A reference point for this debate is language in the official voting guide produced by the U.S. bishops conference, which says “the threat of abortion remains our preeminent priority.”

Gregory was emphatic that “respect for life in the womb” should remain a top priority but said the references to it being the preeminent issue “could benefit from rephrasing.”

The current phasing “implies that other dimensions of human life can be dispensed with – and they can’t,” he said.

Recently, the Rev. James Altman, a priest from Wisconsin, declared in a YouTube video: “You cannot be Catholic and be a Democrat” and warned that Catholics risked “the fires of hell” if they backed a party favoring abortion rights.

Gregory depicted such remarks as “egregious and unhelpful,” and said Catholic voters should base their voting decisions on “the full panoply of the church’s social teaching.”

[…]

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"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by wosbald » Sun Nov 08, 2020 12:58 pm

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► Show Spoiler

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"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by wosbald » Sat Nov 28, 2020 6:13 pm

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Pope tells 13 new cardinals that red hat is not a career advancement [In-Depth]
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Cardinal clothing accessories are seen on display in the window of the Gammarelli clerical clothing shop, in Rome, Thursday, Nov. 26, 2020. The consistory to elevate new cardinals scheduled for Saturday, Nov. 28, in the time of coronavirus is like nothing the Holy See has ever seen. A handful of soon-to-be cardinals are in protective coronavirus quarantine, including African-American, Cardinal-designate Wilton Gregory, archbishop of Washington who explained that a U.S.-based ecclesiastical tailor took his measurements while he was still in Washington and sent them to Gammarelli, which then made them to order and sent them to Santa Marta hotel where he is undergoing the quarantine. (Credit: Andrew Medichini/AP)

Pope Francis created 13 new cardinals Saturday, including nine cardinals eligible to vote for the next pope and the first African-American cardinal in the history of the United States, Cardinal Wilton Gregory of Washington, D.C.

ROME — On the eve of Advent, Pope Francis elevated 13 prelates from around the world to the rank of cardinal Saturday, telling them their new title is not meant to propel them up the next rung on the ecclesial ladder, but is an invitation to follow the path of Jesus.

Speaking during his Nov. 28 consistory, Pope Francis centered his homily on the Gospel passage from Mark in which Jesus, while walking with his disciples on the road to Jerusalem, alludes to his coming crucifixion and death.

After this, the apostles James and John come to Jesus and ask him to “grant us to sit, one at your right hand, and one at your left, in your glory.”

Jesus, the pope said, told his disciples about the nature of his coming death in order “to prepare them for the trials to come, so that they could be with him, now and especially later, when he would no longer be in their midst. So that that they could always be with him, on his road.”

The road Jesus travels is that of the cross, he said. By asking Jesus for privileged seats in the Kingdom of Heaven, James and John “want to take a different road. Not Jesus’ road, but a different one. The road of those who, perhaps even without realizing it, ‘use’ the Lord for their own advancement. Those who — as Saint Paul says — look to their own interests and not those of Christ.”

Yet instead of getting angry at them, Jesus is patient, Francis said, and “excuses them, while at the same time reproaching them,” telling them that “You do not realize that you have gone off the road.”

Noting that this Gospel passage is often used during consistories, Pope Francis cautioned that while everyone getting the red had loves Jesus and wants to follow him, “we must always be careful to remain on the road. For our bodies can be with him, but our hearts can wander far afield and so lead us off the road.”

Saying there are many temptations to corruption in the life of a priest, Francis said “the scarlet of a Cardinal’s robes, which is the color of blood,” can also be a source of this temptation. For “a worldly spirit,” he said, it can become “the color of a secular “‘eminence.’”

Deviating from his prepared text, the pope said that when this happens, the person donning the cardinal’s red is “no longer a priest close to the people, but just ‘your eminence.’”

“Will you also feel this way?” he asked the new red hat recipients, adding that if they do, “You will be off the road.”

[…]

In total, the 13 prelates who got a red hat from Francis Saturday included nine electors eligible to vote in the next conclave and four who are over 80, meaning the title is honorary and they will hold no voting rights:
  • Maltese Bishop Mario Grech, the newly appointed secretary general of the Synod of Bishops
  • Italian Bishop Marcello Semeraro, who was recently named prefect of the Vatican’s Congregation for the Causes of Saints
  • American Archbishop Wilton Gregory of Washington, D.C.
  • Archbishop Antoine Kambanda of Kigali, Rwanda
  • Archbishop Jose Fuerte Advincula of Capiz in the Philippines
  • Archbishop Celestino Aós Braco of Santiago, Chile
  • Archbishop Cornelius Sim of Brunei
  • Archbishop Augusto Paolo Lojudice of Siena and a former auxiliary bishop for the Diocese of Rome
  • Conventual Father Mauro Gambetti, who oversees the Sacred Convent in Assisi.
  • Felipe Arizmendi Esquivel, bishop emeritus of the Diocese of San Cristobal de las Casas in Mexico (non-elector)
  • Archbishop Silvano Maria Tomasi, the Vatican’s former observer to the United Nations in Geneva and a longtime ambassador (non-elector)
  • Father Enrico Feroci, pastor of the Shrine of Holy Mary of Divine Love in Castel di Leva (non-elector)
  • Father Raniero Cantalamessa, a Capuchin who for 40 years has served as the preacher for the Papal Household (non-elector)
[…]

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"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by wosbald » Sun Nov 29, 2020 1:34 pm

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► Show Spoiler
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-->> Cross a gift from Bishop Perry
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In the late 1980s, as Bishop-elect Fernand Cheri was concluding a visit to the home of Bishop Harold Perry, the elder priest excused himself, went to his bedroom and returned with a special gift: a pectoral cross given to Bishop Perry by Father Clarence Rivers, a black priest from Cincinnati and pioneer in the 1950s of bringing African-American expressions of culture into the Roman Catholic liturgy.

As Bishop Perry made the exchange, he said to Father Cheri, then the pastor of St. Francis de Sales Church in New Orleans: “I think you would make better use of this.”

“This (gift) came out of the blue. I wasn’t expecting it. I said, ‘Oh this is a treasure!’ knowing that there were only a few (of these crosses) in existence,” Bishop-elect Cheri recounts of the moment.

Symbolic colors

The vibrant enamel piece, known as the “Freeing the Spirit” cross, features the three “liberation colors.” Red symbolizes love and the blood that was shed through the enslavement of men and women throughout history; black, in the form of the Dove of Peace, represents people of color; and green recalls “the sense of hope that was never lost,” Bishop-elect Cheri said.

The cross’ opposite side is engraved with words taken from Isaiah 61: “The Lord has breathed soul into me/ He has sent me to bring good news to the poor/ To mend broken hearts/ To proclaim freedom for the enslaved/ To seek deliverance for the oppressed.”

[…]

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"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by wosbald » Wed Dec 02, 2020 10:30 am


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"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by wosbald » Sun Dec 06, 2020 10:55 am

+JMJ+

Midnight Mass kerfuffle offers vintage ‘only in Italy’ moment [In-Depth, Analysis]
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An image of Pope Francis celebrating the Vatican's traditional Christmas eve Midnight Mass. (Credit: Associated Press)

[…]

[T]he Italian government recently announced new anti-COVID measures for the period Dec. 20-Jan. 6, meaning the Christmas and New Year’s holidays. As part of the package, a strict curfew will be imposed from 10:00 p.m. to 6:00 a.m. (Curiously enough, the curfew will be extended to 7:00 a.m. on New Year’s Day itself — perhaps because no self-respecting Italian would be out of bed by 6:00 a.m. on New Year’s anyway, so an adjustment was deemed appropriate.)

One implication is that the traditional Midnight Mass on Christmas eve this year will have to be moved up, with most churches planning on holding their services at 8:00 p.m.

For the record, the Italian bishops’ conference is perfectly fine with the adjustment, saying it’s a reasonable measure to protect public health. There’s been no objection from the Vatican either, in part because for years its own “Midnight Mass” actually has begun at 10:00 p.m.

(After all, with octogenarian pontiffs you don’t really want them staying up until 2:00 a.m. when they have to get out of bed just a few hours later to celebrate the Christmas Day Mass.)

Yet as Crux reported yesterday, there is nonetheless pushback to the government-ordered adjustments to Midnight Mass, but it’s not coming from Catholic officialdom.

RELATED: Italy’s new COVID Christmas rules awaken debate about midnight Mass

One voice of resistance has been Matteo Salvini, the feisty leader of the far-right populist Lega party, who complained that the “cancellation” of midnight Mass means “Christmas is being stolen from our children” and compared “moving up” the hour of Christ’s birth to a farcical film by a legendary Italian movie character.

Another critic has been Giole Magaldi, leader of one of a Masonic movement in Italy, who blasted what he called the bishops’ “silence” on the government’s Midnight Mass decree as “scandalous.”

(Just to be clear, as several ecclesiastical types have pointed out this week, midnight on Christmas eve is not the hour of Christ’s birth. Not only do we not know the precise time he was born, we don’t even know the date or the year, and the Church has never officially defined it. As Patriarch Francesco Moraglia of Venice said, therefore, to suggest the government is “moving up” the hour of Christ’s birth is “enough to make you laugh.”)

Here’s what makes an “only in Italy” moment.

Today’s Lega party is a descendent of the Lega Nord, or “Northern League,” founded by legendary Italian politician Umberto Bossi. Its origins are derived from the Padanian nationalist movement, which aspired to the succession of northern Italy and the rejection of Roman rule. At times, some of its leading intellectuals also flirted with the rejection of Catholicism in favor of a revival of Celtic mythology and ritual, with the idea being that northern Italians are ethnically related to the ancient warrior Celts.

In other words, the Lega’s roots are in a worldview that sees the pope and the Church as the problem, not the solution. That’s in addition to the fact that Salvini, the party’s current leader, has done battle with Pope Francis and the Italian church on issues ranging from immigration to European integration and beyond.

As for the Masons, their historical battles with the papacy and the Catholic Church are abundantly well-documented. When Magaldi unfavorably compared today’s crop of prelates to the “lions” of the past, he neglected to mention that several of those lions demonstrated their tenacity in part by aggressively implementing the Vatican’s 1738 ban on membership in Masonic organizations.

In other words, both groups have a history of being explicitly anti-clerical and hostile to the papacy, yet both are now cheerfully rebranding themselves as spokespersons for the “more Catholic than the pope” crowd.

Why? Because despite everything, ultra-Catholic populists do better here than anti-Catholic ones.

Italy’s Radical Party was for decades the bastion of anti-clerical resentments in the country, yet the highest share of the vote it ever obtained was 3.45 percent and it never formed part of a national government. Italy’s Lega, however, is doing just fine, routinely polling around 30 percent, and Salvini has served as the country’s foreign minister and deputy prime minister.

That’s the love/hate relationship in miniature — Italians may grouse endlessly about the church, but they’re still far more likely to respond to someone who postures as its savior than its annihilator.

The irony, of course, is that the Church already has a savior, and the feast of his birth is drawing near — no matter what time it’s celebrated.

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"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by wosbald » Tue Dec 08, 2020 12:11 pm

+JMJ+

Pope declares year of St. Joseph, offering special indulgences [In-Depth]
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A traditional depiction of the Holy Family. (Credit: Wikicommons)

ROME — Pope Francis on Tuesday issued a decree launching a special year dedicated to St. Joseph coinciding the anniversary of his declaration as Patron of the Catholic Church, hailing him as a model of fatherhood and a key intercessor in modern times.

Published Dec. 8, on the 150th anniversary of Quemadmodum Deus by Pope Pius IX which declared St. Joseph patron of the Catholic Church, the decree formally instituted a year for St. Joseph, which will run until Dec. 8, 2021.

The document, signed by the head of the Vatican’s Apostolic Penitentiary, Cardinal Mauro Piacenza, said the year would be an opportunity for faithful to follow St. Joseph’s example and “daily strengthen their life of faith in full fulfillment of God’s will.”

“All faithful will thus have the opportunity to commit themselves, with the help of St. Joseph, head of the heavenly Family of Nazareth, comfort and relief from the serious human and social tribulations which today afflict the contemporary world,” it said.

The decree outlined several instances in which faithful will be able to obtain a plenary indulgence in relation to the Year of St. Joseph, provided they meet the usual conditions of going to confession, receiving the Eucharist, and praying for the intentions of the pope.

According to the document, a plenary indulgence will be available under these conditions:
  • To those who meditate of the Our Father prayer for at least 30 minutes or take part in a spiritual retreat of at least one day that includes a meditation on St. Joseph
  • To those who perform a corporal or spiritual work of mercy
  • To families or engaged couples who recite the rosary together
  • To those who entrust their daily work to St. Joseph and those who ask St. Joseph to intercede for the unemployed
  • To those who recite a prayer to St. Joseph (the litanies of St. Joseph in Latin rite, or Akathistos to St. Joseph in the Byzantine rite, or any other prayer to St. Joseph) for the relief of Christians persecuted both inside and outside of the Church
  • To faithful who recite “any legitimately approved prayer or act of piety in honor of St. Joseph,” with an encouragement to do so on the March 19 and May 1 feasts of St. Joseph, the Feast of the Holy Family of Jesus, Mary and Joseph, the Byzantine celebration of St. Joseph’s Sunday, and on the 19th of every month and on every Wednesday, which has been dedicated to St. Joseph in the Latin rite
  • To the elderly, sick, dying and those legitimately unable to leave the house, who recite an act of piety to St. Joseph under his title of Comfort of the Sick and Patron of a happy death, provided they offer their discomfort to God and fulfill the conditions for the indulgence “as soon as possible”
Piacenza urged all priests with the appropriate faculties to make themselves available to an extra degree to offer confessions and to administer communion to the sick more often.

In an apostolic letter issued Dec. 8 to coincide with the launch of the Year of St. Joseph, Pope Francis recalled Joseph’s actions in the bible, noting that after the Virgin Mary, no other saint has been mentioned as frequently by popes.

Francis said the figure of St. Joseph has been on his mind in a particular way during the coronavirus pandemic, a crisis he said showed how “our lives are woven together and sustained by ordinary people, people often overlooked. People who do not appear in newspaper and magazine headlines, or on the latest television show, yet in these very days are surely shaping the decisive events of our history.”

[…]

Saint Joseph, he said, “reminds us that those who appear hidden or in the shadows can play an incomparable role in the history of salvation. A word of recognition and of gratitude is due to them all.”

[…]

Referring to Joseph’s acceptance of Mary despite her surprise pregnancy, whereas the law would have condemned her, Francis said Joseph’s “nobility” in this act is seen in the fact that “what he learned from the law he made dependent on charity.”

“Today, in our world where psychological, verbal and physical violence towards women is so evident, Joseph appears as the figure of a respectful and sensitive man. Even though he does not understand the bigger picture, he makes a decision to protect Mary’s good name, her dignity and her life.”

[…]

Noting that Joseph was forced to flee to Egypt with Mary and Jesus because of King Herod’s determination to find and kill the newborn messiah, Pope Francis said that because of this, he considers St. Joseph a patron for all those forced to flee their countries “because of war, hatred, persecution and poverty.”

Francis also pointed to the fact that St. Joseph is often associated with work. At a time when so many have lost their jobs due to the coronavirus pandemic, St. Joseph, he said, can be an intercessor amid a crisis which the pope said, “should serve as a summons to review our priorities.”

He also offered a reflection on fatherhood, saying fathers themselves “are not born, but made” by taking on responsibility and caring for the children under their protection.

“Whenever a man accepts responsibility for the life of another, in some way he becomes a father to that person,” he said, insisting that genuine fatherhood is not possessive or overprotective, but allows children to develop in freedom.

“Perhaps for this reason, Joseph is traditionally called a ‘most chaste’ father,” the pope said, noting that the title “is not simply a sign of affection, but the summation of an attitude that is the opposite of possessiveness. Chastity is freedom from possessiveness in every sphere of one’s life. Only when love is chaste, is it truly love.”

“Our world today needs fathers,” he said, insisting there is “no use for tyrants who would domineer others as a means of compensating for their own needs. It rejects those who confuse authority with authoritarianism, service with servility, discussion with oppression, charity with a welfare mentality, power with destruction.”

[…]

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"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by wosbald » Wed Dec 09, 2020 9:26 am

+JMJ+

With census case, Catholic teaching says ‘every person counts’
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A mural in southwest Houston encourages people to participate in the 2020 census. (Credit: James Ramos/Texas Catholic Herald via CNS)

NEW YORK — With time running out and a Supreme Court decision looming, Catholics continue to express disapproval of President Donald Trump’s desire to exclude undocumented immigrants from the 2020 census.

The Supreme Court heard oral arguments for the Trump vs. New York case Monday that stems from Trump’s July memorandum to exclude undocumented immigrants from the census. If allowed, it could affect the number of congressional house seats in certain states.

“From a Catholic social teaching lens, we believe every person counts,” said Ashley Feasley, the director of policy at the U.S. Bishops Conference Office of Migration Policy and Public Affairs. “Regardless of people’s individual status the census is a tool that is used for some very important elements of American life and some very important data metrics to come from it.”

In a conversation with Crux, Feasley highlighted that in addition to political representation, excluding undocumented immigrants from the census affects the amount of federal aid given to a state and local communities as well as demographic representation data for the entire decade.

Neomi De Anda, President for the Academy of Catholic Hispanic Theologians of the United States said these are “major implications” for both citizens and non-citizens of the United States.

“As a natural born citizen, someone living in these districts is being forced to give up rights of citizenship that people that live in other districts have. Things about representation, about finances, about attention to public services,” De Anda told Crux.

She described a hypothetical example of a 100-person district that gets one representative per five people. If you have 95 percent of people counted then you have 19 representatives for that district. If you only have five percent counted because a large percentage is undocumented, then there’s one representative for that entire area.

“In the district where 95 percent of people are counted it’s 18 more representatives than the other district, which is a huge disparity in the kinds of rights I get as a citizen because of where I live,” De Anda said.

Others acknowledge the practical challenges this type of order creates, but also look at the message it sends undocumented immigrants across the country.

“Denying the undocumented and the states in which they reside their rightful representation in Congress is counter to the constitution and makes people feel invisible and not valued as human beings,” Auxiliary Bishop Mario Dorsonville of Washington said in a statement.

Senior immigrant counsel at the Illinois Coalition for Immigrant and Refugee Rights Fred Tsao made similar comments to Crux about the message it sends to undocumented immigrants. He said it dismisses essential workers in American society.

“What they’re saying is you don’t count for political representation purposes no matter how long you’ve been here, even if you have U.S. citizen children or a spouse, or own a home or your own business,” Tsao said.

“Many undocumented immigrants are entrepreneurs, set up a business for themselves, they’re members of a community, they have neighborhoods, yet this administration is saying as far as they’re concerned these individuals do not count and should not be counted,” he continued.

[…]

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"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: THE CATHOLIC THREAD

Post by wosbald » Sun Dec 13, 2020 6:16 pm

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We need to kneel before Our Lady of Guadalupe together [Opinion]
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Today, on the feast of Our Lady of Guadalupe, I was reflecting on Our Lady’s role in bringing us together as a Church, and as a comforter — someone who is with us and reassures us when we are wounded and divided. Today’s rally in Washington, in which many prominent Catholics took part (including Archbishop Carlo Maria Viganò and Texas Bishop Joseph Strickland), was just another example of a Church and society that appears to be tearing apart at the seams.

In his homily today, Pope Francis reminded us that God’s gifts are abundant. “It is we who — by our nature, due to our limits — know the need for convenient ‘doses.’ But He gives Himself in abundance, totally. And where God is, there is abundance.” And these abundant gifts — which includes the gift of his Blessed Mother always exceed our expectations.

Earlier this week I was thinking back to my conversation with the Mexican Catholic scholar Rodrigo Guerra. In the third part of our podcast interview, he spoke about bridging divisions by building communion, and stated that we need to “kneel before Our Lady of Guadalupe together.”

Here’s a partial transcript of his response after I asked him if he had any advice about healing divisions:
I had a meeting with the president of the American bishops four months ago in Florida in a beautiful place — a kind of house for spiritual exercises. At the end of the meeting, I gave a short lecture about the political situation in Latin America and the situation of the Church in North America. And at the end, there was a very similar question and I tried to answer in this way: We have to be closer. The Latin American and the North American Church.

First, because of political reasons —b ecause we are in the same region. We cannot be away from each other. Second, because John Paul II invited us in Ecclesia in America to understand ourselves as one Church: we are the Church of the Americas. One single church, lived in different contexts, through our beautiful continent called America.

This is a good reason — it’s a pope who is a saint who called us to create all the experiences of unity that we can develop. And we have been a little bit disobedient, because the Church in the States on many occasions walks a very different path from the Church in Latin America, and vice-versa. We need to talk. We need to meet, we need to discover the wealth of each other, and we need to kneel before Our Lady of Guadalupe together.

Our Lady of Guadalupe is not an apparition for Mexicans or for Latin Americans. It’s like any other apparition: it’s a message for all of us. And I would say we need to rediscover our common ground and follow what Our Lady of Guadalupe teaches. I would say we need to be always friends and try to keep faithful. Not only in a merely “intellectual” way, but mainly through communion. We need to talk more, to discuss more, to share our experiences and to help each other, if it’s possible.
Rodrigo then recalled what he suggested to Archbishop Gomez:
Why don’t we think of new projects? Maybe unthinkable a few months ago, but now we are facing new, common challenges. For instance, in the field of populism, in the field of migration, in the field of young generations that are in need of hearing the Gospel. Why don’t we create common projects among the Latin American and the Church in Canada and the States? So I invited him very — well, let’s say passionately — to rethink, and I told him it’s better to run the risk to create new projects of communion than to keep to our comfort zones.

I know that it’s less problematic for everyone. To be in different fish tanks. It’s like we are fish, but in different fish tanks: The fish tank of the United States and the fish tank of Latin America. We say hello through the glass of the fish tank. We smile.


[…]
Our Lady of Guadalupe, pray for us.

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"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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