THE CHRISTIAN THREAD

Where Fellowship and Camaraderie lives: that place where the CPS membership values fun and good fellowship as the cement of the community
Post Reply
User avatar
wosbald
Lonergan Fan Club President
Lonergan Fan Club President
Posts: 23421
Joined: Mon Feb 25, 2008 6:00 pm
Location: Cleveland, Ohio
Contact:

Re: THE CHRISTIAN THREAD

Post by wosbald » Wed Sep 30, 2020 8:50 am

+JMJ+

Pope prays for migrants, as 200 more die at sea [In-Depth]
Image
Rescue workers from the Proactiva Open Arms Spanish NGO retrieve the bodies of an adult and a child amid the drifting remains of a destroyed migrant boat off the Libyan coast, on Tuesday July 17, 2018. (Credit: Proactiva Open Arms via AP)

ROME — Pope Francis Sunday marked the World Day of Migrants and Refugees, asking the world to pray for those forced to flee their homes at the close of a deadly week in which around 200 migrants seeking entry into Europe drowned in the Mediterranean.

Speaking during his Sept. 27 Sunday Angelus address, the pope waved and offered a special greeting to a group of migrants and refugees standing next to the “Angels Unaware” statue in a rainy St. Peter’s Square.

A group of around 50 people were standing next to the statue, some of whom were holding banners for the Italian Sant’Egidio community, known for its charitable social work.

Pope Francis, who has made the issue of migration a cornerstone of his papacy, blessed the statue by Timothy Schmalz — which depicts 140 migrants ranging from a Jewish man escaping Nazi Germany to a Syrian refugee fleeing war, as well as Mary and Joseph, the parents of Jesus — during last year’s World Day of Migrants and Refugees.

This year, the day was marked throughout Italy with Masses, photo exhibits, special soup-kitchen lunches, conferences, and prayer events.

In his remarks to pilgrims, Francis noted that like the parents of Jesus, migrants, refugees and the internally displaced are also “forced to flee.”

“This is the same for migrants and the displaced,” he said, adding, “They, and those who assist them, in a special way receive our remembrance and our prayer.

Francis’s remarks come after a particularly deadly week for migrants attempting to cross the Mediterranean, which the pope has often likened to a “cemetery” due to the number of people who drown attempting to escape violence and poverty.

In the past week alone, nearly 200 migrants traveling from Libya to Europe died in five separate incidents at sea. While migrants in distress are often helped by passing boats or NGO rescue vessels, no Italian ships were in the waters to come to their aid at the times the incidents occurred due to restrictions on civil sea rescues.

According to Avvenire, the newspaper of the Italian bishops’ conference, one migrant ship sunk Sept. 21, leading to the death of 111 people. Only nine of the boat’s passengers survived thanks to a fishing boat which found them only after several days at sea and brought them aboard.

[…]

ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

User avatar
wosbald
Lonergan Fan Club President
Lonergan Fan Club President
Posts: 23421
Joined: Mon Feb 25, 2008 6:00 pm
Location: Cleveland, Ohio
Contact:

Re: THE CHRISTIAN THREAD

Post by wosbald » Tue Oct 06, 2020 11:35 am

+JMJ+

Who is like unto Whom?

Image

• Ps 112*:5 Who is like unto the Lord our God, who dwelleth on high?

• Rev 13:4 And they worshipped the dragon which gave power unto the beast: and they worshipped the beast, saying, Who is like unto the beast? who is able to make war with him?










* alt. 113

ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

User avatar
Cleon
Walmart Cargo Short Model
Walmart Cargo Short Model
Posts: 16066
Joined: Thu Sep 03, 2009 6:00 pm
Location: Indiana - South of 40
Contact:

Re: THE CHRISTIAN THREAD

Post by Cleon » Tue Oct 06, 2020 12:21 pm

wosbald wrote:
Tue Oct 06, 2020 11:35 am
+JMJ+

Who is like unto Whom?

Image

• Ps 112*:5 Who is like unto the Lord our God, who dwelleth on high?

• Rev 13:4 And they worshipped the dragon which gave power unto the beast: and they worshipped the beast, saying, Who is like unto the beast? who is able to make war with him?










* alt. 113
Ack! What an unfortunate choice of words Mr. Metaxas used. Maybe he didn't know any better!??? :lol: BTW, he has a funny last name. I keep hearing a pirate complaining about, "What 'A wreck me taxes' are! Argh!".

BTW, your new avatar looks like the Death Star.
"Let the little children come to Me, and do not forbid them; for of such is the kingdom of heaven" - Jesus

"More people need to put their big boy britches on." - JMG

"Dang, a pipe slap." - JimVH

User avatar
wosbald
Lonergan Fan Club President
Lonergan Fan Club President
Posts: 23421
Joined: Mon Feb 25, 2008 6:00 pm
Location: Cleveland, Ohio
Contact:

Re: THE CHRISTIAN THREAD

Post by wosbald » Tue Oct 06, 2020 1:21 pm

+JMJ+
Cleon wrote:
Tue Oct 06, 2020 12:21 pm
[…]

BTW, your new avatar looks like the Death Star.
:yes:

ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

User avatar
wosbald
Lonergan Fan Club President
Lonergan Fan Club President
Posts: 23421
Joined: Mon Feb 25, 2008 6:00 pm
Location: Cleveland, Ohio
Contact:

Re: THE CHRISTIAN THREAD

Post by wosbald » Wed Oct 14, 2020 4:34 pm

+JMJ+

Pope Francis: Prayer and crying out to God is only source of salvation
Image
Pope Francis greets the crowd during his general audience in Paul VI hall at the Vatican Oct. 14, 2020. A few days after four Swiss Guards tested positive for COVID-19, the pope broke from his normal pattern and did not personally greet people in the crowd. (CNS photo/Paul Haring)

VATICAN CITY (CNS) -- The purpose of crying out to the Lord in prayer is not to get used to suffering, but to remember that God, and not humankind, is the only source of salvation and consolation, Pope Francis said.

The Book of Psalms, with its many prayers of supplication, teaches Christians how to ask "God to intervene where all human efforts are in vain. That is why prayer, in and of itself, is the way of salvation and the beginning of salvation," the pope said Oct. 14 during his weekly general audience at the Paul VI audience hall.

"The prayer of the psalms is the testimony of this cry: a multiple cry because in life, pain takes a thousand forms and takes the name of sickness, hatred, war, persecution, distrust; until the supreme 'scandal,' that of death," he said.

Prior to the pope's arrival, participants were told that he would not be greeting them from up close and that they were to maintain proper distance from each other.

[…]

During the audience, the pope continued his series of talks on prayer, reflecting on the Book of Psalms, which "communicates 'knowing how to pray' through the experience of dialogue with God."

"In this book, we do not encounter ethereal, abstract people, those who confuse prayer with an aesthetic or alienating experience," he explained. "The psalms are not texts created on paper, but rather they are invocations, often dramatic, that spring from lived existence."

The Book of Psalms, he continued, is where Christians can "hear the voice of men and women of prayer in flesh and blood, whose life, like that of us all, is fraught with problems, hardships and uncertainties."

In the psalms, the pain, suffering and sorrow are not "meaningless, without purpose," but instead it "becomes a relationship, a cry for help waiting to intercept a listening ear."

"Even the pains we suffer cannot be merely specific cases of a universal law: they are always 'my' tears, which no one has ever shed before me. All human pains for God are sacred," he said.

Departing from his prepared remarks, the pope said he met earlier with the parents of Father Roberto Malgesini, a priest from the Diocese of Como who was stabbed to death Sept. 15 by a mentally ill homeless man he was helping.

"The tears of those parents are 'their' tears and each one of them knows how much they suffered to see their son who gave his life in the service of the poor," the pope said.

"When we want to console someone, we do not find the words. Why? Because we cannot get to 'their' pain, because 'their' pain is theirs, 'their' tears are theirs. The same, with us: the tears, 'my' pain is mine, the tears are 'mine' and with these tears, with this pain, I turn to the Lord," he said.

Pope Francis said that while not all problems are solved in prayer, sometimes, it is enough for one to know that "the Lord listens."

"Those who pray are not deluded," the pope said. "They know that many questions of life down here remain unresolved, with no way out; suffering will accompany us and, after one battle, others will await us. But if we are listened to, everything becomes more bearable."

ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

User avatar
wosbald
Lonergan Fan Club President
Lonergan Fan Club President
Posts: 23421
Joined: Mon Feb 25, 2008 6:00 pm
Location: Cleveland, Ohio
Contact:

Re: THE CHRISTIAN THREAD

Post by wosbald » Thu Oct 15, 2020 10:34 am

+JMJ+

G20 Interfaith Forum urges putting ‘human dignity back at the center’ of global debate [In-Depth]
Image
Vatican Secretary of State Cardinal Pietro Parolin, left, and President of the Pontifical Interreligious Council Cardinal Miguel Angel Ayuso Guixot arrive at a press conference to present the full text of the new Pope Francis encyclical "All Brothers" at the Vatican, Sunday, Oct. 4, 2020. (Credit: Gregorio Borgia/AP)

As leaders from ten different religious traditions “gathered” through Zoom at an interfaith forum hosted in Saudi Arabia, Pope Francis’s latest document on human fraternity had a central place in the discussions.

“We must put human dignity back at the center and on that pillar build the alternative social structures we need,” said Miguel Ángel Moratinos, High Representative for the United Nations Alliance of Civilizations, directly quoting from Fratelli Tutti, the papal encyclical released Oct. 4.

His words came during a high-level summit called the G20 Interfaith Forum ahead of the meeting of the G20 leaders in Riyadh next month, where government leaders from 19 countries and the European Un𝗂on will gather to discuss international economic cooperation.

The Oct. 13-17 interfaith forum was organized online due to the COVID0-19 pandemic.

The line-up of the seventh edition of the forum included Cardinal Miguel Ángel Ayuso Guixot, President of the Vatican’s Council for Interreligious Dialogue; Patriarch Bartholomew of Constantinople; representatives from the United Nations, the International Dialogue Centre (KAICIID), the Organization of Islamic Cooperation, the World Muslim League, and the European Commission.

KAICIID was founded by Saudi Arabia, Spain and Austria with the Holy See as a Founding Observer Member. It is an effort on behalf of the Islamic world to reach out to other faiths in pursuit of transnational, intercultural, and interreligious dialogue.

“The story of this G20 Interfaith Forum does not begin tonight and end in five days’ time however,” said KAICIID Secretary General Faisal bin Muaammar. “The story began in July, with the first consultation between religious leaders, faith-based experts and policy makers in the Arab Region.”

After this first stage, there were consultations that brought together 500 participants, representing 10 faith traditions in 70 countries on five continents.

[…]

During his remarks, Ayuso argued that believers of different religious traditions can offer valuable contributions to universal fraternity wherever they are. Quoting the pope, he said that the voices of the powerful and “experts” shouldn’t be the only ones heard in public debate.

“Room needs to be made for reflections born of religious traditions that are the repository of centuries of experience and wisdom,” the cardinal said.

To address the “very dark moment” humanity is going through, Ayuso said, adequate solutions are needed to address the problems of “our existential life,” with the human family coming together in a spirit of friendship, proposing answers to common problems.

Religious leaders in particular, he said, need to be a “contagion of hope.”

“Let us then witness to our religious communities as well as to our societies in which we live: Unity, solidarity and fraternity, for bettering our ‘common home,’ as Pope Francis is continuously reminding us all,” Ayuso said. “This is our public responsibility be it political, socio-economical or religious.”

In order to find an adequate “therapy” to end the world crisis and to prevent a new one in the future, it’s necessary to answer Pope Francis’s call to “reaffirm that we are members of the one human family.”

ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

User avatar
wosbald
Lonergan Fan Club President
Lonergan Fan Club President
Posts: 23421
Joined: Mon Feb 25, 2008 6:00 pm
Location: Cleveland, Ohio
Contact:

Re: THE CHRISTIAN THREAD

Post by wosbald » Sun Oct 18, 2020 11:34 am

+JMJ+

When looking to future, include most vulnerable, Catholics tell G-20 forum [In-Depth]
Image
Migrants walk with their belongings as they make their way to the Kara Tepe refugee camp on the Greek island of Lesbos Oct. 14, 2020. Religious leaders have an opportunity to make sure that preparation for a post-pandemic world includes the most vulnerable, said Catholic participants in the annual G-20 Interfaith Forum. (Credit: Elias Marcou/Reuters via CNS)

COVID-19 provides an opportunity for people to prepare the future, and religious leaders have an opportunity to make sure that preparation includes the world’s most vulnerable, said Catholic participants in the annual G-20 Interfaith Forum.

Leaders and representatives of major religions and global policy institutions participated in the Oct. 13-17 meeting streamed from Saudi Arabia’s capital, Riyadh.

Father Augusto Zampini Davies, an official at the Vatican Dicastery for Promoting Integral Human Development, told the forum that as well as causing enormous problems, COVID-19 is also worsening existing inequalities and injustices and showing the “inability of the world to face a common problem together.” The Argentine priest said interreligious dialogue and cross-cultural cooperation are crucial in times of crisis.

The world needs reconnection through values such as “fraternity, compassion, care,” as well as friendship and cultural enrichment, he said.

As well as COVID-19, the forum is addressing modern slavery and human trafficking, the needs of migrants and refugees, hate speech and racism, climate change, among others. It is organized by the G-20 Interfaith Forum Association, the KAICIID International Dialogue Centre, the U.N. Alliance of Civilizations and the National Committee for Interreligious and Intercultural Dialogue in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.

Saudi Arabia currently holds the presidency of the Group of 20, made up of representatives of industrial and emerging-market nations.

Zampini told the forum the role religion plays in the world is a choice: It can be turned into “a source of hostility or even war,” or it can serve to connect people through healthy values and “help in the cure of the virus of individualism.”

Zampini said he and other Vatican officials, with their counterparts in other churches and faiths, are listening “to what’s happening on the ground” and providing assistance, as well as working with governments on matters concerning health care, jobs, food security and ecological crises.

[…]

ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

User avatar
gaining_age
Ph.D. of LaTeX
Ph.D. of LaTeX
Posts: 18646
Joined: Tue Mar 16, 2010 6:00 pm
Location: sun soaked Arizona

Re: THE CHRISTIAN THREAD

Post by gaining_age » Sun Oct 18, 2020 11:45 am

Pray for Wos... he seems lost <thread wise>
Out of control odd rare old man (or possibly an hobbyist). -- Label by The Big R.
The 6s of 1st John:
2:6 Whoever claims to live in him must walk as Jesus walked
3:6 No one who lives in him keeps on sinning

User avatar
wosbald
Lonergan Fan Club President
Lonergan Fan Club President
Posts: 23421
Joined: Mon Feb 25, 2008 6:00 pm
Location: Cleveland, Ohio
Contact:

Re: THE CHRISTIAN THREAD

Post by wosbald » Mon Oct 19, 2020 8:03 am

+JMJ+

Catholic Extension, Kino Border Initiative host virtual event along border
Image
A little girl on the Mexican side of the border fence peers into Sunland Park, N.M., on the U.S. side in this April 2019 photo. Catholic Extension and the Kino Border Initiative plan to host a virtual prayer event to show support for asylum-seekers looking to start new life in the U.S. (Credit: CNS photo/Rich Kalonick, courtesy Catholic Extension)

CHICAGO — Days after Pope Francis issued his encyclical “Fratelli Tutti” calling for people of goodwill to care for one another as brothers and sisters and not to erect new borders between people and nations, Catholic Extension announced a 2,000-mile act of prayer along the U.S.-Mexico border.

Chicago-based Catholic Extension is partnering with the Kino Border Initiative, a ministry funded by Catholic Extension in the Diocese of Tucson, Arizona, to host and livestream “The March of the Children Seeking Asylum” Oct. 21 at 1 p.m. (Central Time) at http://www.catholicextension.org/children.

The two organizations are inviting the public to participate in virtually “joining hands and hearts” in prayer to show unity and support for asylum-seekers.

“As Catholics, we affirm the inherent human dignity of every person and the ability of migrants to seek security and safety for themselves and their families in the United States. Catholic Extension respects the right to seek asylum,” said Father Jack Wall, president of Catholic Extension.

Since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, the Kino Border Initiative and other asylum advocates have organized and livestreamed a series of events on the 21st of each month to support migrants affected by current policies blocking all asylum processing at the U.S.-Mexico border. This date was symbolically chosen because the current restrictions renew on the 21st of each month since the pandemic began.

Catholic Extension said in a news release it was honored to collaborate with the Kino Border Initiative “to raise awareness of the issue and the immediate need for a solution to advance humane, just and workable migration.”

Chicago Cardinal Blase J. Cupich, Catholic Extension’s chancellor, along with Sister Norma Pimentel and several other members of Extension-supported parishes will virtually join hands along the 2,000-mile border wall to pray for all asylum-seekers.

[…]

ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

User avatar
wosbald
Lonergan Fan Club President
Lonergan Fan Club President
Posts: 23421
Joined: Mon Feb 25, 2008 6:00 pm
Location: Cleveland, Ohio
Contact:

Re: THE CHRISTIAN THREAD

Post by wosbald » Fri Oct 23, 2020 9:23 pm

+JMJ+

Subject Header: Holy Land Peace
Inter-Thread Trackbacks:
"The Catholic Thread": pg 142 / pg 142 / pg 143
"Something Good": pg 2
"Faith in the News": pg 119 / pg 120 / pg 121 / pg 121 / pg 121 / pg 123
"I'm Starting to Like This Pope": pg 129
"President Trump is a problem...": pg 15 / pg 16 / pg 18 / pg 19 / pg 23



Archbishop Pizzaballa: "Dialogue is not simply a word! Dialogue is something that must be practiced" [In-Depth]
Image

Image
Archbishop Pierbattista Pizzaballa

ROME — The following are some subjects taken from the live conference of Archbishop Pierbattista Pizzaballa, the Apostolic Administrator of the Latin Patriarchate of Jerusalem, addressed to the Knights and Dames of the Holy Sepulcher, from Palazzo della Rovere in Rome, on October 21, 2020.

[…]

COEXISTENCE

[…]

DIALOGUE

[…]

ENCYCLICAL OF POPE FRANCIS: FRATELLI TUTTI

[…]

SITUATION IN THE MIDDLE EAST … PALESTINIANS … CATASTROPHIES … PEACE AGREEMENT … HOW TO EMERGE?

“If I knew how to do this, they would award me the Nobel Prize! But it's not at all simple. These are critical issues that are different from each other. The agreement with the Emirates, promoted by Trump Administration, has isolated the Palestinians even more. The Palestinian issue is no longer on the international agenda; Palestinians have been in isolation for a long time, and even concerning the Arab world, they are even more isolated. So, this is, let's say, the end of a particular era or cycle. We need to think of how to go ahead. The balance of relations in the Middle East are changing, but I am convinced that unless there is a clear solution, a dignified solution to the Palestinian situation, there will not be any stability in the Middle East.

The Palestinian issue, which is no longer on the agenda of the world, still exists. There are millions of persons waiting to know about their future as a people. And to answer your question, despite the impression that now this issue is no longer central, the Palestinian problem is part of a Middle Eastern situation that is continually evolving: Syria, Lebanon, and the presence of Erdogan points out how the situation in the Middle East is changing. The leading players are Turkey, the Emirates with Saudi Arabia, and Iran. Lebanon and Syria and also Iraq are the battlefield of these big players together. Then there is also Iran, Russia, the United States, and even China in the background …”

EUROPِEAN ROLE?

“Well, so far, Europe is so immersed in its problems that it has forgotten the international agenda. It has been on the sidelines for a long time, now and even the interventions in the recent events, it hasn't taken a stance.”

LONG TERM PEACE AND TWO-STATE SOLUTION

“The Two-State solution for Two People is the starting point that cannot be overlooked. In principle, the Two-State for Two People solution is the only possible solution. You can't say to the Palestinians that they don't have a right to their own land and to their own nation! That is something that you can't say. Now, technically, how is this possible given the current political situation? It is very difficult to say the two-state solution is no longer feasible; that is something that you can't say. At the same time, you wonder how you can bring it about. Right now, it is complicated to bring this about; because there isn't any dialogue between Israel and Palestine. There's no confidence; there is no dialogue. The international bodies are not present apart from statements made here and there. Nothing is being done apart from some economical support to the Palestinians. So, the situation is in a way suspended. It's a “wait and see” situation. We don't know how it will evolve. However, the Two-State for Two-People solution ideally is the only possible solution which, however, is not technically feasible right now (…).

We need to look to the future. Today and in this context, speaking about peace between the two sides is utopian. It's not that I don't want peace! Of course, I want peace, but we need first to build up confidence between the two parties, which no longer exists. There is no confidence, no trust. There is a wall that divides them, and it shows that there is no prospect for the future; there is no mutual trust in this territory. We need to reconstruct or reintroduce actions that may build up confidence and trust from both sides, which cannot be done overnight. And it takes vision; it takes leadership, something that we don't have right now. So, we need to start from scratch, bearing in mind and learn from the past and its failures: the Oslo and other various agreements that were not kept. So we need leaders on both sides that have a vision, something that is going to take time. The only thing that we can do now at the local level is to work in schools, hospitals, and cultural centers, even though these may seem little things, niches, but that is where we need to do more. That is what is on the ground and needs to be promoted. We need to create a fabric, a network, and we can't expect changes overnight.”

US ELECTIONS and the ISRAELI-PALESTINIAN CONFLICT

“Reinstating confidence is something that requires work at the local level. Elections in the United States have always had a significant impact on the Holy Land, particularly on Israel and the Israeli and Palestinian governments. I believe that the Trump administration has focused a lot on the Israeli government, and there is a strong coalition. Therefore, there would be an evident and immediate impact on the Israeli government.

Now I think that it would be indispensable, but difficult, to reconstruct the confidence of the Palestinians in the U.S. administration. In recent years, US Administration policies destroyed the trust of the Palestinian Authority, and that of the Palestinian people. So, rebuilding this confidence will take time and decisive actions. There is a difference between the statements made before the elections and what is actually done afterward; so, we will see. But it's not going to be simple.”

[…]

“I'VE COME TO KNOW THE KNIGHTS FROM WITHIN THROUGH THEIR SERVICE IN THE HOLY LAND”

[…]

A SURPRISING APPEAL DURING THE PANDEMIC

[…]

HOW TO LIVE AMONG NON-CHRISTIANS ACCORDING TO SAINT FRANCIS OF ASSISI

[…]

WHAT’S AFTER THE ABU DHABI DECLARATION?

[…]


[…]

ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

User avatar
wosbald
Lonergan Fan Club President
Lonergan Fan Club President
Posts: 23421
Joined: Mon Feb 25, 2008 6:00 pm
Location: Cleveland, Ohio
Contact:

Re: THE CHRISTIAN THREAD

Post by wosbald » Mon Oct 26, 2020 12:34 pm

+JMJ+

'Catholics are like the leaven in the loaf' of U.N.'s work, says Glendon [In-Depth]
Image
Harvard Law School professor Mary Ann Glendon, former U.S. ambassador to the Vatican, speaks during a Dec. 4, 2018, presentation at the United Nations in New York City. Glendon was one of the speakers during an Oct. 22, 2020, virtual event titled "The United Nations at 75: Catholic Perspectives." (Credit: Gregory A. Shemitz/CNS)

RYE, New York — The pillars of the United Nations overlap the tenets of Catholic social teaching and from the inception of the U.N. in 1945, the church has encouraged the international organization while simultaneously reproving it when it drifts from its lofty goals.

Speakers at an Oct. 22 virtual panel discussion addressed the complex relationship between the Catholic Church and the U.N.

Archbishop Gabriele Caccia, Vatican ambassador to the United Nations, said during the Second World War, Pope Pius XII promoted formation of a worldwide institution to foster peace, security, stability and justice by protecting human dignity, defending the family, work and social unity, rehabilitating the judicial order and supporting the concept of states that serve rather than subjugate.

The nuncio said the pope envisioned the organization would adhere to the principles of solidarity, subsidiarity and the common good.

Mary Ann Glendon, former U.S. ambassador to the Holy See, traced the Catholic influence on the U.N.’s central document, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, which was adopted in 1948.

She said the Latin American delegation comprised 22 of the 51 original members of the U.N. and formed the largest single bloc. Latin America was a predominantly Catholic region.

The declaration’s drafters relied on formulations developed for the earlier so-called Bogota Declaration, the first general international human rights instrument. The Bogota Declaration drew heavily on Pope Leo XII’s 1891 encyclical “Rerum Novarum” (“On Capital and Labor”), Glendon said.

[…]

Caccia said the four establishing pillars of the U.N. overlap with Catholic social teaching. There are “deep convergences and sympathies” between the goals of the U.N. and the work of the Catholic Church, he said.

And while the United Nations embodies high ideals that have often been ardently defended by the Holy See, it has not always lived up to its potential to represent the deepest human yearnings for cooperation, he added.

When the U.N. Charter was finalized, Pope Pius XII expressed concern that it continued an unequal wartime alliance, excluded many states from membership and lacked anything beyond persuasion with regard to its resolutions. Caccia said all of the wartime pope’s concerns have been validated over the past 75 years.

[…]

Glendon said the U.N. could benefit from the Catholic understanding of pluralism, in which a small core of principles are brought to life in different ways. “We bear witness to a distinct understanding of the human person,” she said.

There is a tension between moral witness and political pressure at the U.N., she said, and the Catholic contribution is always the most durable when the tension is resolved in favor of moral witness.

“Catholics are like the leaven in the loaf,” Glendon said. They can challenge the status quo and point out that political and economic rights are not at odds with social and human rights, she said.

[…]

The panel was co-sponsored by the Lumen Christi Institute at the University of Chicago, the Permanent Observer Mission of the Holy See to the U.N., America Media and the University of Notre Dame’s Kellogg Institute for International Affairs. It was moderated by Paolo Carozza, director of the Kellogg Institute.

[…]

[At a different virtual event the day before,] Caccia said many of the U.N.’s priorities would not be implemented if it were not for “people on the ground motivated by love of God and of neighbor.”

But this faith-based vision is threatened by attacks on believers around the world and occasionally from within the U.N. system, he said, “as some are attempting to restrict religious freedom in order to promote other so-called ‘human rights’ that are not in the Universal Declaration, do not enjoy consensus and are clearly against the beliefs of most world religions.”

“Some are trying to reduce religious freedom to freedom of worship, intending to limit faith to what one does in private at home or in places of worship rather than letting faith overflow into daily life and into works,” the archbishop said. “People of faith and faith-based organizations must be on guard.”

ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

User avatar
wosbald
Lonergan Fan Club President
Lonergan Fan Club President
Posts: 23421
Joined: Mon Feb 25, 2008 6:00 pm
Location: Cleveland, Ohio
Contact:

Re: THE CHRISTIAN THREAD

Post by wosbald » Sun Nov 01, 2020 12:29 pm

+JMJ+

For many Latinos, virus deaths loom over Day of the Dead [In-Depth]
Image
Ofelia Esparza, 88, from East Los Angles, has brough fresh marigolds, often called "flowers of the dead," and placed them next to pictures of family members who died in 2020, at an altar for Day of the Dead, titled "2020 Memorial to Our Resilience," at Grand Park in Los Angeles, Thursday, Oct. 29, 2020. Day of the Dead, or Dia de los Muertos, the annual Mexican tradition of reminiscing about departed loved ones with colorful altars, or ofrendas, is typically celebrated Sunday through Monday. It will undoubtedly be harder for Latino families in the U.S. torn apart by the coronavirus. (Credit: Damian Dovarganes/AP)

PHOENIX — Matilde Gomez wants her mother, Gume, to know how much she appreciates her love and sacrifices. So, she’s putting her feelings into a letter.

Only Gume Salazar will never get to read it.

Instead, it’s going on a table in Gomez’s home in Arizona that’s dedicated to her mother, who died of COVID-19. It will sit alongside fresh flowers and Salazar’s blouse on Day of the Dead, a holiday that Salazar actually didn’t care for much.

“I would think she would be OK with it,” Gomez said. “She would see this as a way for me to heal.”

Day of the Dead, or Dia de los Muertos, the annual Mexican tradition of reminiscing about departed loved ones with colorful altars, or ofrendas, is typically celebrated Nov. 1-2. It will undoubtedly be harder for Latino families in the U.S. torn apart by the coronavirus. Some are mourning more than one relative, underscoring the pandemic’s disproportionate impact on communities of color. Adding to the misery, people can’t gather for the holiday because of the health risks.

Gomez’s mother and uncle died of the virus a month apart this summer. The siblings in their 50s had no underlying health conditions. Gomez only spoke to her mother on the phone once before she died in a California hospital. On top of that, Gomez, 41, was diagnosed with breast cancer this month. She decided not to schedule surgery until after Day of the Dead because she wanted to honor her mother properly.

“I want to celebrate her memory in my household with Dia de los Muertos,” said Gomez, who lives in the Phoenix suburb of El Mirage. “She’s never going to be forgotten.”

Day of the Dead usually revolves around an altar in the home or at a graveside of photos of the dead, their important belongings and even favorite foods. They often are adorned with marigolds, which are believed to draw the souls of the dead.

Normally, the holiday would bring processions in cities with large Latino communities, and mourners would eat, sing and share memories. COVID-19 has scuttled those plans but hasn’t stopped people from erecting altars to enjoy online or outdoors.

[…]

In Mexico, authorities have mostly closed cemeteries to keep families from congregating. Most U.S. cemeteries and funeral homes weren’t closing but canceled large events. Some, like Perches Funeral Homes in El Paso, Texas, invited people to post altar photos on Facebook.

CEO Salvador Perches said that with a rise of cases in El Paso and neighboring Juarez, Mexico, it’s been hard for grieving families to avoid gathering.

“People can’t celebrate their loved ones, we can’t mourn,” Perches said. “Just like Mother’s Day and Father’s Day this year, this is when people go visit their loved ones.”

Ultimately, some say pageantry isn’t what’s important. An understated ofrenda at home is enough because it’s the bridge between the living and the dead, Ofelia Esparza said. It should remind people to focus on how their loved ones lived.

“When you honor them, you’re not going to talk about how they died,” she said. “You want to remember how you loved them and how they loved you.”

ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

User avatar
AFRS
Darth Floof-Floof
Darth Floof-Floof
Posts: 11280
Joined: Mon Apr 21, 2008 6:00 pm
Location: University of Mars

Re: THE CHRISTIAN THREAD

Post by AFRS » Sun Nov 01, 2020 6:52 pm

Perhaps he should try it; repent & get saved Bergolio.

User avatar
wosbald
Lonergan Fan Club President
Lonergan Fan Club President
Posts: 23421
Joined: Mon Feb 25, 2008 6:00 pm
Location: Cleveland, Ohio
Contact:

Re: THE CHRISTIAN THREAD

Post by wosbald » Mon Nov 02, 2020 10:35 am

+JMJ+

Christian leaders work to save nuclear weapons treaty [In-Depth]
Image
In this file photo taken from undated footage distributed by Russian Defense Ministry Press Service, an intercontinental ballistic missile Avangard lifts off from a truck-mounted launcher somewhere in Russia. Russian Deputy Foreign Minister Sergei Ryabkov said the Avangard can be included in the New START arms reduction treaty with the United States. (Credit: Russian Defense Ministry Press Service via AP)

SOUTH BEND, Indiana — Catholic and Evangelical leaders are banding together to save the nuclear weapons treaty that bars escalation between Russia and the United States, before the agreement expires early next year.

The New Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty (START) limits the number of nuclear weapons each superpower can have ready to use, but its ten-year existence comes to an end in February 2021 unless both sides renew it, something which the Trump administration has expressed a hesitancy to do.

Russian President Vladimir Putin has welcomed a five-year extension of the agreement, which was provided for in the original treaty, but President Trump is not so keen, saying he wants a deal that includes China and stops Russia from multiplying its nuclear reserves.

Russia recently proposed a one-year pact that would halt the stockpiling of reserve weapons, but U.S. officials have yet to respond.

Catholic and Evangelical leaders are decrying the Trump administration’s reluctance to reach an agreement, and see the treaty as an important step towards disarmament. While the treaty does not disarm either nation, it does allow for a country to inspect the other’s arsenal, and keeps the number of active weapons to far below Cold War levels.

The Catholic Church’s stance against nuclear weapons was recently restated by Pope Francis in his encyclical Fratelli Tutti, which called out “the inadequacy of nuclear deterrence as an effective response” to conflict.

Similar arguments against nuclear weapons were made at a virtual panel of faith leaders on Oct. 21, hosted by the University of Notre Dame’s Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies.

Former U.S. Senator Sam Nunn of Georgia, who sponsored landmark disarmament legislation as chair of the Armed Services Committee, advocated for the five-year extension of the START Treaty.

“As I view it, we are in a race between cooperation and catastrophe, and God’s universe is at stake,” he said.

[…]

Representing the Catholic Church was Lucas Koach, director of the Office of International Justice and Peace at the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, who offered an overview of teaching by the American bishops on nuclear ethics.

Starting in the 1990s, that teaching moved from a restrictive approach to nuclear weapons to one that called for their abolition, not as an ideal but a policy goal. Koach said the Bishops’ Conference has continued that message today by consistently advocating for the extension of the New START Treaty, including their request for Congress to adopt it as part of the National Defense Authorization Act.

In a nod to the country’s upcoming election, Koach reminded participants that the Catholic Church views nuclear disarmament as an issue voters should discern when selecting a candidate.

“The Church continues to call the faithful and those of goodwill to pray for peace and advocate for nuclear disarmament, specifically the renewal of New START,” he said.

ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

User avatar
wosbald
Lonergan Fan Club President
Lonergan Fan Club President
Posts: 23421
Joined: Mon Feb 25, 2008 6:00 pm
Location: Cleveland, Ohio
Contact:

Re: THE CHRISTIAN THREAD

Post by wosbald » Wed Nov 04, 2020 2:24 pm

+JMJ+

Bishops condemn terrorist attacks, lament mockery of faith [In-Depth]
Image
Police officers stay in position at stairs named 'Theodor Herzl Stiege' near a synagogue after gunshots were heard, in Vienna, Monday, Nov. 2, 2020 (Credit: Ronald Zak)

ROME — As Europe reels from a new wave of terrorist attacks, leading bishops across the continent and around the world are drawing on Pope Francis’s new encyclical letter Fratelli Tutti to appeal for peace, brotherhood and mutual respect.

Some bishops, however, are also echoing Pope Francis in another sense, objecting to the use of satirical cartoons to mock religious figures, as the pontiff himself did in 2015 shortly after the Charlie Hebdo controversy erupted in France.

“Whatever the background to the attack today, it must be clear that there is no justification for blind violence,” Vienna Archbishop Cardinal Christoph Schönborn said following a Nov. 2 attack in the city left four people dead.

“During these dramatic hours, I pray with many others who follow the tragic events in the heart of our city through the media for the victims, the emergency services, and that there will be no further bloodshed,” he said.

In less than a month, there have been at least five separate instances of Islamic terrorism in a Europe already struggling to contain the coronavirus pandemic as new lockdowns are imposed.

On the night of Nov. 2, as Austria was preparing for new national restrictions meant to contain increasing coronavirus infections — meaning bars and cafes were filled with people enjoying a final night out before a midnight curfew began — a string of six different attacks were carried out at the same time in Vienna, leaving four people dead, including one of the attackers.

Things began near the city’s main synagogue in a pedestrian alley called Seitenstettengasse and continued for nine minutes. Austrian authorities declared three days of national mourning, with flags flying at half-mast. Children will observe a minute of silence at school Wednesday in honor of the victims.

[…]

In a statement following the Nice attack, the French Council of Muslim Worship condemned the incident and asked Muslims to suspend their Oct. 29 celebrations of the birth of Muhammad as an act of solidarity with the victims and their families.

Several bishops, including Pope Francis, have condemned the violence and have urged societal unity and mutual respect.

Following the Nice attack, Pope Francis condemned acts of terror “in the most energetic manner” and asked for unity, assuring of his closeness to the victims and their families.

Responding to the Vienna attacks, the pope expressed his “deep participation” in the suffering of the victims and their families, praying that “violence and hatred cease, and peaceful coexistence is promoted in society.”

In his own statement, Schönborn said he was “deeply affected” by the shootings, saying the fact that the Vienna attacks began in front of the city’s synagogue reminded him of the 1981 assassination attempt at the temple that left two people dead.

Several other Austrian bishops have spoken out in condemnation of the attack, as well as representatives from other Christian denominations.

[…]

Amid the condemnations of violence and the mourning of victims, some bishops, including Bishop Gervas Rozario of Rajshahi, Bangladesh, have also criticized the use of satirical cartoons of the Prophet Muhammad, saying they shouldn’t be tolerated.

“We acknowledge people have the right to freedom of speech, but it should not be devoid of values and ethics,” Rozario said in a Nov. 2 Facebook post, adding, “There are so many topics for caricatures, but we as Christians cannot support what French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo has done.”

Vice-president of the Catholic Bishops’ Conference of Bangladesh (CBCB) and chairman of the CBCB’s Commission for Justice and Peace, Rozario said Charlie Hebdo “has committed an unforgivable injustice by publishing caricatures of Prophet Muhammad, the founder of Islam.”

He also voiced frustration that Macron and several French citizens have supported the cartoons, saying, “We should not attack the religious faith of anyone.”

[…]

ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

User avatar
wosbald
Lonergan Fan Club President
Lonergan Fan Club President
Posts: 23421
Joined: Mon Feb 25, 2008 6:00 pm
Location: Cleveland, Ohio
Contact:

Re: THE CHRISTIAN THREAD

Post by wosbald » Sun Nov 08, 2020 1:36 pm

+JMJ+

Christians, Hindus called to spread hope, pontifical council says
Image
Dancers perform a Ghoomar dance during Diwali celebrations in Trafalgar Square in London Nov. 3, 2019. Christians and Hindus are called to spread hope at a time when many are tempted to despair, said a note from the Pontifical Council for Interreligious Dialogue in its annual message to Hindus celebrating Diwali. (Credit: Yara Nardi/Reuters via CNS)

ROME — In the midst of a pandemic, when so many people are suffering and tempted to despair, the teachings of both Christianity and Hinduism call believers to spread hope through gestures of care and concern, said the top officials of the Pontifical Council for Interreligious Dialogue.

Amid the difficulties of the COVID-19 pandemic, the council expressed hope that the Hindu celebration of Diwali would “dispel every cloud of fear, anxiety and worry, and fill your hearts and minds with the light of friendship, generosity and solidarity!”

Diwali is a festival focusing on the victory of truth over lies, light over darkness, life over death and good over evil. The Vatican released its 2020 message to Hindus Nov. 6 ahead of the festival that begins Nov. 12 in most countries.

Signed by Cardinal Miguel Angel Ayuso, council president, and Msgr. Indunil Janakaratne Kodithuwakku, council secretary, the message for Diwali 2020 was the 25th annual message wishing Hindus well during the festival and proposing themes of common concern for dialogue and action.

With the coronavirus pandemic still raging, the message said, it is appropriate to discuss ways “to encourage a positive spirit and hope for the future, even in the face of apparently insurmountable obstacles; socioeconomic, political and spiritual challenges; and widespread anxiety, uncertainty and fear.”

[…]

“Our respective religious traditions teach us to remain positive and hopeful even amid adversity,” the message said. “In cherishing those religious traditions and teachings, may we strive in the midst of this global crisis to spread what Pope Francis delights in calling ‘the contagion of hope’ through gestures of care, affection, kindness, gentleness and compassion, which are more contagious than the coronavirus itself.”

ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

User avatar
AFRS
Darth Floof-Floof
Darth Floof-Floof
Posts: 11280
Joined: Mon Apr 21, 2008 6:00 pm
Location: University of Mars

Re: THE CHRISTIAN THREAD

Post by AFRS » Sun Nov 08, 2020 11:00 pm

Wos, don't you have a 'Catholic' thread to spam with this dreck?

User avatar
CodeMonkey
A.K.A. Sigmund Freud
A.K.A. Sigmund Freud
Posts: 6659
Joined: Sat Nov 07, 2009 6:00 pm
Location: Dark side of the moon

Re: THE CHRISTIAN THREAD

Post by CodeMonkey » Sun Nov 08, 2020 11:03 pm

AFRS wrote:
Sun Nov 08, 2020 11:00 pm
Wos, don't you have a 'Catholic' thread to spam with this dreck?
AFRS, bless your little heart.
“Other than that, Mrs. Lincoln, how did you enjoy the play” – Newspaper reporter.

"Trying is the first step towards failure" - Homer Simpson

User avatar
wosbald
Lonergan Fan Club President
Lonergan Fan Club President
Posts: 23421
Joined: Mon Feb 25, 2008 6:00 pm
Location: Cleveland, Ohio
Contact:

Re: THE CHRISTIAN THREAD

Post by wosbald » Mon Nov 09, 2020 11:11 am

+JMJ+

Dutch Protestant Church admits failing Jews in World War II
Image
Rene de Reuver, speaking on behalf of the General Synod of the Protestant Church in the Netherlands, reads a statement at the Rav Aron Schuster Synagogue in Amsterdam, Netherlands, Sunday, Nov. 8, 2020.The Dutch Protestant Church made a far-reaching confession of guilt Sunday for its failure to do more to help Jews during and after World War II and even for the church's role in preparing "the ground in which the seeds of anti-Semitism and hatred could grow." The statement came at a solemn ceremony to mark Monday's anniversary of the Nazis' anti-Jewish Kristallnacht, or "Night of Broken Glass," pogrom in Germany and Austria. (Credit: Peter Dejong/AP)

THE HAGUE, Netherlands — The Dutch Protestant Church made a far-reaching recognition of guilt Sunday for its failure to do more to help Jews during and after World War II, and for the church’s role in preparing ”the ground in which the seeds of anti-Semitism and hatred could grow.”

The long-awaited, historic statement came at a solemn ceremony to mark Monday’s anniversary of the Nazis’ anti-Jewish Kristallnacht pogrom, or the “Night of Broken Glass.”

On Nov. 9, 1938, Jews were terrorized throughout Germany and Austria. At least 91 people were killed, hundreds of synagogues burned down, around 7,500 Jewish businesses vandalized, and up to 30,000 Jewish men arrested, many of whom were taken away to concentration camps.

René de Reuver, speaking on behalf of the General Synod of the Protestant Church in the Netherlands, said the church’s role began long before Adolf Hitler came to power in Germany.

“For centuries a rift was maintained that could later isolate the Jews in society in such a way that they could be taken away and murdered,” De Reuver said.

“Also in the war years, the ecclesiastical authorities often lacked the courage to choose a position for the Jewish citizens of our country,” he added.

More than 100,000 Dutch Jews — 70 percent of the Jewish community — didn’t survive World War II. Most were deported, along with Roma and Sinti, and killed in Nazi concentration camps.

In a statement to the Netherlands’ Jewish community, de Reuver ackowledged it had taken far too long for the church to recognize its role, adding: “We hope it is not too late.”

“The church recognizes faults and feels a present responsibility,” he said. “Anti-Semitism is a sin against God and against people. The Protestant Church is also part of this sinful history.”

He acknowledged that the problems didn’t end with the Nazi defeat in 1945, noting problems with restitution of property to the Jewish community when some returned from concentration camps, and the resistance of some Christian families who had taken in Jewish orphans to return them to their Jewish relatives after the war.

A rabbi who survived the Holocaust also took part in Sunday’s ceremony, and recounted his experience.

“I was 5 years old when I was taken away in April 1943. I still see agents standing in the front garden of our house in Rotterdam,” Rabbi Les Vorst said. He and his parents, sister and two brothers were sent to a Dutch concentration camp at Westerbork, then transferred to another camp.

[…]

De Reuver promised that the Protestant Church would work to fight anti-Semitism going forward.

Stressing the importance of educating future generations about racist hatred, the church said, “We undertake to do everything possible to further develop Judeo-Christian relations into a deep friendship of two equal partners, united among others in the fight against contemporary anti-Semitism.”

ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

User avatar
wosbald
Lonergan Fan Club President
Lonergan Fan Club President
Posts: 23421
Joined: Mon Feb 25, 2008 6:00 pm
Location: Cleveland, Ohio
Contact:

Re: THE CHRISTIAN THREAD

Post by wosbald » Fri Nov 20, 2020 11:30 am

+JMJ+

Subject Header: Holy Land Peace
Intra-Thread Trackbacks: pg 7

Inter-Thread Trackbacks:
"The Catholic Thread": pg 142 / pg 142 / pg 143
"Something Good": pg 2
"Faith in the News": pg 119 / pg 120 / pg 121 / pg 121 / pg 121 / pg 123
"I'm Starting to Like This Pope": pg 129
"President Trump is a problem...": pg 15 / pg 16 / pg 18 / pg 19 / pg 23 / pg 23 / pg 23



Correspondence shows Vatican vowed solidarity with Jews 25 years before Holocaust [In-Depth]
Image
Ultra-Orthodox Jews wear face masks and keep social distancing amid concerns over the country's coronavirus outbreak, during a protest to what they say is incitement against the city and country's religious population, in the southern Israel city of Arad, Monday, Oct 19, 2020. (Credit: Oded Balilty/AP)

ROME — At an event at the U.S. embassy to the Holy See responding to a rising tide of anti-Semitism in various parts of the world, the Vatican’s current Cardinal Secretary of State revealed that one of his predecessors, a full 25 years before the Holocaust erupted in Nazi Germany, vowed solidarity with the “children of Israel” in a letter to an influential American Jewish group on the basis of defending human dignity.

Speaking to participants in the online event, Vatican Secretary of State Italian Cardinal Pietro Parolin quoted what he said was a recently discovered correspondence between the American Jewish Committee of New York and Cardinal Pietro Gasparri from 1915-1916 in the Vatican’s archives.

After receiving a letter in December 1915 from the committee asking for the Vatican to intervene on behalf of “the ardor, cruelties and hardship visited upon the Jews in the belligerent countries since the outbreak of the First World War,” Gasparri penned a response offering the Catholic Church’s support.

In his letter, dated Feb. 9, 1916, according to Parolin, Gasparri wrote that “The Supreme Pontiff […], head of the Catholic Church, which — faithful to its divine doctrine and to its most glorious traditions — considers all men as brethren and teaches to love one another, he will not cease to inculcate the observance among individuals, as among nations, of the principles of natural right, and to reprove any violation of them.”

“This right,” the letter goes on, “should be observed and respected in relation to the children of Israel as it should be as for all men, for it would not conform to justice and to religion itself to derogate them solely because of a difference of religious faith.”

In a response published in the weekly Jewish Magazine, The American Hebrew and Jewish Messenger, the committee praised Gasparri’s words, saying his letter was “virtually an encyclical” and that “Among all the papal bulls ever issued with regard to Jews throughout the history of the Vatican, there is no statement that equals this direct, unmistakable plea for equality for the Jews, and against prejudice upon religious grounds.”

“It is gratifying,” they said, “that so powerful a voice, so influential a force, particularly in the regions where the Jewish tragedy is now being enacted, has been raised, calling for equality and for the law of love. It is bound to have a far-reaching, beneficent effect.”

These documents, Parolin said, are “but a small drop into an ocean of murky waters, showing how there is no basis for discriminating against one because of his faith.”

Titled “Never Again: Confronting the Global Rise of Anti-Semitism,” the Nov. 19 panel was organized by the U.S. Embassy to the Holy See and featured prominent voices on Jewish matters, including Vatican and U.S. officials., including U.S. Special Envoy to Monitor and Combat Antisemitism, Elan Carr.

[…]

Parolin in his closing speech said “any form of antisemitism is a rejection of one’s own Christian origins and thus a complete contradiction. Jews are our brothers and sisters, and we are proud to call them as such.”

He echoed the call of Pope Francis’s recent encyclical on human fraternity Fratelli Tutti to build universal brotherhood, at the social, political and institutional level, and spoke of the importance of silent remembrance of those whose lives were lost.

Recalling Pope Francis sitting in silence at Auschwitz in 2016, “Let us too remember the past and have compassion on those who suffered and in this way till the soil of fraternity,” he said.

To fight antisemitism, it is necessary not only to remember and study the past, but “living and faithful common memory” is also needed, as well as interreligious dialogue, he said, calling the latter an “indispensable tool to combat antisemitism.”

“Different religions based on their respect for each human person as a creature called to be a child of God, contribute significantly to building fraternity and defending justice in society,” he said, adding that dialogue among different religions “does not take place simply for the sake of diplomacy, consideration or tolerance.”

“It is my hope,” he said, “that the more Christians and Jews grow in fraternity, social friendships and dialogue, the less antisemitism will be possible because deceit is in the mind of those who plan evil, but those who counsel peace have joy.”

ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

Post Reply