THE CHRISTIAN THREAD

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Tatanka
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Re: THE CHRISTIAN THREAD

Post by Tatanka » Sun Dec 20, 2020 3:47 pm

I scratched Rom. 3:24 at the head of the new sidewalk running on the west side of our house, from the front driveway to the patio. I believe this verse actually in 5 words, sums up the TOTALITY of the Christian Gospel Message. True Christianities Gospel message in 5 words of a single verse of Scripture! Beautiful !
Soli Deo Gloria!

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Re: THE CHRISTIAN THREAD

Post by wosbald » Mon Dec 21, 2020 11:13 am

+JMJ+

Subject Header: Capital Punishment/Death Penalty
Inter-Thread Trackbacks:
"Faith in the News": pg 121 / pg 123 / pg 123
"President Trump is a problem...": pg 27
"I'm Starting to Like This Pope": pg 66 / pg 67 / pg 67 / pg 67 / pg 67 / pg 67 / pg 68 / pg 101 / pg 101 / pg 107 / pg 124 / pg 128 / pg 128 / pg 128 / pg 129 / pg 129 / pg 131 / pg 132 / pg 132 / pg 132 / pg 132



Death penalty hits historic low in U.S. ‘despite federal execution spree,’ says report [In-Depth]
Image
Demonstrators are seen near the Federal Correctional Complex in Terre Haute, Ind., showing their opposition to the death penalty July 13, 2020. (Credit: Bryan Woolston/Reuters via CNS)

WASHINGTON, D.C. — A new report Dec. 16 by the Death Penalty Information Center said the use of capital punishment reached a historic low this year in the United States even with the return of federal executions by the Trump administration.

Seventeen people were executed in 2020, down from 22 in 2019. This lower figure stems in part from the coronavirus pandemic, but the report also notes that before the pandemic struck, the nation was set for a sixth straight year of lower numbers of death sentences and executions.

This year, more prisoners died of COVID-19 than were executed. In July, state executions came to a stop due to public health concerns related to COVID-19. Federal executions resumed in July after a 17-year hiatus.

Also, five people who were on death row were exonerated this year, bringing that total figure up to 172 since 1973.

2020 was the first time the federal government carried out more executions in one year than all of the U.S. states combined. Ten of this year’s executions were conducted by the federal government; the other seven were conducted by five states — Alabama, Georgia, Missouri, Tennessee and Texas. These states, with the exception of Texas, each had one execution.

[…]

“What was happening in the rest of the country showed that the administration’s policies were not just out of step with the historical practices of previous presidents, they were also completely out of step with today’s state practices,” [Robert Dunham, executive director of Death Penalty Information Center and the lead author of the group’s 2020 report,] said.

One figure that didn’t change involved race. Almost half of the inmates executed were people of color, and 76 percent of the executions were for the deaths of white victims.

“Racism has always infected the use of the death penalty and this year is no exception. The death penalty — as the most severe punishment — must be part of the efforts to address racism in the criminal legal system as a whole, ” said Ngozi Ndulue, senior director of research and special projects with the Death Penalty Information Center.

This year, there have been some strides in racial justice legislation, according to the report. The North Carolina Supreme Court reinstated the relief granted under the state’s now-repealed Racial Justice Act and allowed defendants who had filed claims before its repeal to seek relief based on racial bias in their trials. The court’s action reinstated life sentences granted to four death-row prisoners and allowed more than 140 death-row prisoners to pursue claims.

In California, the Legislature passed a wide-ranging Racial Justice Act and legislation strengthening the prohibition against discriminatory jury selection.

This year, Colorado became the 22nd state to no longer use the death penalty. Twelve states that still use it have not executed anyone in at least 10 years, the report found.

[…]

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"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: THE CHRISTIAN THREAD

Post by hugodrax » Mon Dec 21, 2020 11:46 am

ChildOfGod wrote:
Sun Dec 20, 2020 2:19 pm
AFRS wrote:
Sat Dec 19, 2020 4:19 pm
hugodrax wrote:
Mon Dec 14, 2020 10:20 am
This is Wosbald’s other shitting hole.
CPS is ibid
This thread is not going the way of the OP's intent ;)
Neither has the Original Poster, but you don't see anybody getting passive-aggressive about it. :lol:

"Turn the other cheek" does not mean take it like a weakling. For a right-handed man (the vast majority of the population) to smite you on the right cheek, he has to backhand you. Offering the other cheek isn't an invitation to accept a beating. It means "make him fight you like a man, no matter your station in life." It is a foundational basis for the equality found in Christ.

TL;DR. Tell Wosbald to cram it, if you like
Last edited by hugodrax on Mon Dec 21, 2020 11:54 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: THE CHRISTIAN THREAD

Post by gaining_age » Mon Dec 21, 2020 11:51 am

Tatanka wrote:
Sun Dec 20, 2020 3:47 pm
I scratched Rom. 3:24 at the head of the new sidewalk running on the west side of our house, from the front driveway to the patio. I believe this verse actually in 5 words, sums up the TOTALITY of the Christian Gospel Message. True Christianities Gospel message in 5 words of a single verse of Scripture! Beautiful !
Beautiful! Good description!
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The 6s of 1st John:
2:6 Whoever claims to live in him must walk as Jesus walked
3:6 No one who lives in him keeps on sinning

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Re: THE CHRISTIAN THREAD

Post by wosbald » Thu Dec 24, 2020 2:53 pm

+JMJ+

Subject Header: Economic Magisterium/Integral Ecology/Fratelli Tutti
Intra-Thread Trackbacks: pg 8 / pg 8

Inter-Thread Trackbacks:
"THE CATHOLIC THREAD: pg 119 / pg 119 / pg 119 / pg 119 / pg 151 / pg 151
"Pro-life Bills/Laws": pg 15
"The Climate Change Thread": pg 14 / pg 14
"I'm Starting to Like This Pope": pg 65 / pg 121 / pg 121 / pg 122 / pg 127 / pg 128 / pg 129 / pg 129 / pg 129 / pg 129 / pg 129 / pg 129 / pg 129 / pg 129 / pg 130 / pg 130 / pg 131 / pg 131 / pg 131 / pg 131 / pg 131 / pg 132



Pope Francis’ friendship with the Grand Imam of al-Azhar inspired the new International Day of Human Fraternity
Image
Pope Francis accepts a gift from Sheikh Ahmad el-Tayeb, Grand Imam of Egypt's al-Azhar mosque and university, during a private audience at the Vatican Nov. 15, 2019. (CNS photo/Paul Haring)

The United Nations General Assembly decided unanimously that Feb. 4 be observed each year as the International Day of Human Fraternity, starting in 2021. It invited member states, the U.N. system and others to observe the date in a manner each would consider appropriate.

It was on Feb. 4, 2019, that Pope Francis and the Grand Imam of al-Azhar, Sheikh Ahmed al-Tayeb, signed the historic “Document on Human Fraternity” in Abu Dhabi. The General Assembly’s resolution specifically refers to that significant event in Christian-Muslim relations as the inspiration for the date.

“Today marks a great historic achievement in the history of humanity,” Judge Mohamed Mahmoud Abdel Salam told America. Mr. Salam is the secretary general of the Higher Committee for Human Fraternity, the group that spearheaded the initiative. The judge also made history in October 2020 when he became the first Muslim to present a papal encyclical, Fratelli Tutti, at the Vatican.

“This signifies the international acknowledgment of the joint efforts of the Grand Imam of al-Azhar and Pope Francis in fostering interfaith and intercultural dialogue,” Mr. Salam said.

He said the committee’s members met with U.N. Secretary General António Guterres in December 2019, and the judge handed him a letter containing the proposal for the internationally recognized day. But since the committee could not present the proposal to the assembly — only a member state can do that — it asked the United Arab Emirates to present it and coordinated its effort with the U.A.E. to gain the necessary support from U.N. member states.

The request to declare this international day was presented to the General Assembly on Dec. 21 by the U.A.E. on behalf of 34 countries, including Bahrain, Egypt and Saudi Arabia.

Speaking on Dec. 21, Lana Nusseibeh, the ambassador and permanent representative of the U.A.E. to the United Nations, on behalf of the supporting countries, told the U.N. General Assembly that the international community is deeply concerned that in recent years there has been “a dramatic increase in violence, hate speech, xenophobia, religious bigotry and other forms of discrimination.”

“In the face of such transnational threats,” she said, “we need to support initiatives that encourage solidarity and unity among people in the spirit of ‘human fraternity.’”

She underlined the importance of interreligious dialogue and that the resolution approved by the U.N. General Assembly recognizes the valuable contributions of people of all religions and beliefs to humanity. It also emphasizes the important role of education in promoting tolerance and eliminating discrimination based on religion or belief. It commends all international, regional, national and local initiatives by religious leaders to promote interreligious and intercultural dialogue.

[…]

Speaking to America, Mr. Salam emphasized the importance of the personal friendship that has developed over these years between Pope Francis and the Grand Imam of al-Azhar for good relations between Muslims and Christians and for peace in the world. He drew attention to the fact that the leaders had spoken together by phone for over 20 minutes on Nov. 19, and the following day reaffirmed on Twitter their support for “human fraternity as the solution to erase violence, discrimination and hatred in the name of religion.”

He said the approval of this International Day of Human Fraternity by the United Nations is an important result of that friendship.

ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: THE CHRISTIAN THREAD

Post by wosbald » Fri Jan 01, 2021 10:50 am

+JMJ+

Subject Header: Capital Punishment/Death Penalty
Intra-Thread Trackbacks: pg 9

Inter-Thread Trackbacks:
"Faith in the News": pg 121 / pg 123 / pg 123
"President Trump is a problem...": pg 27
"I'm Starting to Like This Pope": pg 66 / pg 67 / pg 67 / pg 67 / pg 67 / pg 67 / pg 68 / pg 101 / pg 101 / pg 107 / pg 124 / pg 128 / pg 128 / pg 128 / pg 129 / pg 129 / pg 131 / pg 132 / pg 132 / pg 132 / pg 132 / pg 132



William Barr, a Catholic, went out of his way to use the death penalty (and defy church teaching) [In-Depth, Opinion]
Image
Attorney General William Barr speaks during a tour of a federal prison in Edgefield, S.C, on July 8, 2019. The Justice Department says it will carry out executions of federal death row inmates for the first time since 2003. The announcement Thursday says five inmates will be executed starting in December. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)

(RNS) — In July of 2019, five months after securing his second stint as U.S. Attorney General, William Barr instructed the Bureau of Prisons to resume executing prisoners sentenced to death in federal court.

The last previous non-military federal execution had been in 2003, and before then, only two others (in 2001) had taken place in 40 years. Since the resumption began five months ago, the United States government has executed 10 people. Three more executions are scheduled before President Trump leaves office Jan. 20.

While President Trump is notorious for advocating the death penalty in certain situations, he did not put capital punishment on his agenda as presidential candidate or president. There’s every reason to believe that the agenda was Barr’s own.

While serving as George H.W. Bush’s attorney general in 1992, Barr pressed strongly for “an effective death penalty” in a set of 24 recommendations titled “Combatting Violent Crime.” Recommendation 5 begins:

“The death penalty has an important role to play in deterring and punishing the most heinous violent crimes … Beyond its deterrent value, the death penalty serves to permanently incapacitate extremely violent offenders who cannot be controlled even in an institutional setting. Finally, the death penalty serves the important societal goal of just retribution. It reaffirms society’s moral outrage at the wanton destruction of innocent human life and assures the family and other survivors of murder victims that society takes their loss seriously.”

Barr issued his recommendations at a time when national panic over violent crime was leading to mandatory minimum sentences; three-strikes-, two-strikes-, and one-strike-and-you’re-out laws, victim impact statements and, yes, additional capital crimes. Over the past quarter century, support for such measures — including the death penalty — has waned for lawmakers and the public alike.

But not, it seems, for Bill Barr, even though, in explaining his July 2019 order, he left out the rationales of deterrence, incapacitation, just retribution and moral outrage. “The Justice Department upholds the rule of law — and we owe it to the victims and their families to carry forward the sentence imposed by our justice system,” he said.

Which brings up his standing in public life as a Catholic — the kind who last year denounced threats to religious liberty and lamented the decline of national morals in a speech at Notre Dame, the kind who this year received the National Catholic Prayer Breakfast’s Christifideles Laici (Christ’s Lay Faithful) Award.

At the very time Barr’s country was ratcheting up its support for the death penalty, his church was dialing it back.

[…]

Under the circumstances, it’s hard to see Barr as doing anything but consciously, defiantly thumbing his nose at Catholic teaching.

Think of it this way. Since Lyndon Johnson assumed the presidency, no administration, Republican or Democratic, with the exception of George W. Bush’s, has felt obliged to carry out a non-military federal death sentence. By leaving well enough alone, Barr would neither have violated his oath of office nor his church’s moral teachings.

Abortion may be an older and more serious offense in Catholic moral theology, but what he’s done is the functional equivalent of going out of his way to require women to abort their fetuses. He leaves office with the blood of 10 people on his hands, and three yet to come.

Merry Christmas, Bill.

ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: THE CHRISTIAN THREAD

Post by Hovannes » Fri Jan 01, 2021 4:02 pm

Del wrote:
Sun Dec 20, 2020 3:05 pm
ChildOfGod wrote:
Sun Dec 20, 2020 2:19 pm
AFRS wrote:
Sat Dec 19, 2020 4:19 pm
hugodrax wrote:
Mon Dec 14, 2020 10:20 am
This is Wosbald’s other shitting hole.
CPS is ibid
This thread is not going the way of the OP's intent ;)
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Re: THE CHRISTIAN THREAD

Post by wosbald » Sat Jan 02, 2021 10:51 am


ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: THE CHRISTIAN THREAD

Post by Del » Sat Jan 02, 2021 12:25 pm

We do cringe every time Biden advertises his "Catholic faith." (Pelosi quit doing this a few years ago, because the back-lash was so strong every time.)

The lefty media often try to shame Christians into following their godless ideology.....

From yesterday's headlines:
(New York Times) Journalist: ‘I Want To Find An Antimasker And Beat Them To Death’; ‘You F***ing Christians’ Are What ‘Jesus Condemns’

And, of course, there is always the execrable Michael Sean Winters.
==========================

We need good Christians in every field, including political leadership.

The world will hate us for having faith, whatever we do.
G.K. Chesterton — 'It is terrible to contemplate how few politicians are hanged.'

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Re: THE CHRISTIAN THREAD

Post by wosbald » Mon Jan 04, 2021 12:45 pm

+JMJ+

We deplore King Herod for his historic cruelty. But we are hardly any better. [In-Depth, Opinion]
Image
Central American migrants are seen inside an enclosure in El Paso, Texas, March 27, 2019.

The plight of holy innocents caught in political crossfires is as old as time. The faces change, the circumstances change and the perpetrators in power are different — but the brutal fight persists. Children pay a steep price that they do not owe. A seemingly old tale is happening now.

My father was a go-getter, a self-made success in the world of finance, but sometimes he forgot he was a dad. At least, that is what it felt like to my 10-year-old self waiting to be picked up from my afterschool ballet class. This happened often enough that, when it got dark and there was still no sign of my ride, the old ladies who ran the parish rectory would call me into the kitchen, hand me a few dried apricots and let me use their phone to call my mother. My mother would then call my father and yell at him to leave work and come get me.

That feeling of being left alone in the street, waiting for my dad, flooded me as I read Separated: Inside an American Tragedy, a blistering report on the Trump administration’s family-separation policies by Jacob Soboroff, an NBC News and MSNBC correspondent,. Without our knowing, children were stolen from their parents at the southern border of the United States.

Worse, this policy of family separation was done in our name.

[…]

On this traditional feast day of the Holy Innocents, we mourn the little boys of Bethlehem executed in place of the baby Jesus by a jealous king. I can almost hear the sound of weeping throughout the land by parents who could not be consoled. The mourning of a parent for a lost child knows no limit, no end. There is no closure.

We, parents, cannot bear the thought, today, of those grieving parents of old. We, mothers, are especially wracked by this grief, imagining our breasts leaking milk without a baby to nurse. But those anguished parents are still with us today, crying out against the violence done to their families by our government.

The church, amid Christmas joy, does not allow us to forget the sacrifice that often accompanies faith.

We commemorate the first Christian martyr, St. Stephen, the day after Christmas, and the slaughtered Holy Innocents of Bethlehem two days after that. We retell the story of the Holy Family’s fraught flight to Egypt, fearing for the life of their newborn son. It’s as though the Church is reminding us that, yes, Jesus is dwelling among us; but there is still much work to be done against injustice, violence and hatred. As people of faith, we are to be about that work. Jesus expects to dwell in us.

On paper, the Trump administration has ended the family separation policy, but we have yet to end the callous and shameful treatment of suffering strangers at our door.

“The U.S. government’s forcible separation of asylum-seeking families constitutes cruel, inhumane, or degrading treatment,” said a 2020 report by Physicians for Human Rights that evaluated Mr. Trump’s ill-conceived and repugnant policy. Reviewing the definition for torture as established in the United Nations Convention Against Torture, the report concluded that “the U.S. government’s treatment of asylum seekers through its policy of family separation constitutes cruel, inhuman, and degrading treatment and constitutes torture in all of the cases documented.”

All this, in our name. And on our watch.

The Holy Innocents of today continue to arrive and ask for our help. They are at our border and in our jails. The way we welcome them or neglect them tells the story of who we are as a nation and lately it is not looking very Christian.

We deplore the despot Herod for his historic cruelty. The blood of the Holy Innocents forever stains him. But we are hardly better.

[…]

ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: THE CHRISTIAN THREAD

Post by wosbald » Wed Jan 06, 2021 9:18 am

+JMJ+

On Epiphany, pope says church needs healthy dose of ‘theological realism’ [In-Depth]
Image
Pope Francis crosses himself in front of a statue of Baby Jesus after celebrating Mass on Christmas eve, at St. Peter's basilica at the Vatican, Thursday, Dec. 24, 2020. (Credit: Vincenzo Pinto/Pool Photo via AP)

ROME — Pope Francis during a Mass for the feast of the Epiphany advocated what he called an attitude of “theological realism,” which, he said, fosters trust in God and looks for deeper meaning rather than getting caught up in one’s own problems.

Speaking during a Jan. 6 livestreamed Mass in St. Peter’s Basilica, the pope said that to worship God, “We need to ‘see’ beyond the veil of things visible, which often prove deceptive.”

Pointing to the biblical figure of King Herod, who sought to kill Jesus, seeing the infant as a threat to his rule, Francis said Herod and the leading citizens of Jerusalem “represent a worldliness enslaved to appearances and immediate attractions. A worldliness that values only the sensational, the things that capture the attention of the masses.”

“In the Magi, however, we see a very different approach, one we can define as theological realism: a way of perceiving the objective reality of things and leads to the realization that God shuns all ostentation.”

This attitude, he said, is a way of viewing reality “that transcends the visible and makes it possible for us to worship the Lord who is often hidden in everyday situations, in the poor and those on the fringes.”

It is a way of seeing things, he said, “that is not impressed by sound and fury, but seeks in every situation the things that truly matter.”

Pope Francis spoke during his Mass for the Jan. 6 feast of the Epiphany, which celebrates the arrival of the three Magi, also called the three Wise Men or the three Kings, to the stable in Bethlehem where Jesus was born after following a star that led the way.

[…]

In his homily, the pope said that worship of God is especially important in modern times, insisting that “if we do not worship God, we will worship idols; instead of becoming believers, we will become idolaters.”

“There is no middle ground; either God or idols,” he said, adding, “whoever doesn’t adore God, adores the devil … We need to learn ever better how to contemplate the Lord,” he said, pointing to the Magi as an example.

Focusing on three phrases from the day’s scripture readings, he stressed the need to “lift up our eyes” in order to take the focus off of oneself.

In the passage from which the phrase is taken, the prophet Isaiah urges the people in Jerusalem stop complaining and “to escape the bottleneck of a narrow way of seeing things, to cast off the dictatorship of the self, the constant temptation to withdraw into ourselves and our own concerns, not to let ourselves be imprisoned by those imaginary specters that stifle hope, not to make our problems and difficulties the center of our lives,” he said.

This does not mean “denying reality” deluding oneself into thinking that everything is fine, he said, but is rather “a matter of viewing problems and anxieties in a new way, knowing that the Lord is aware of our troubles, attentive to our prayers and not indifferent to the tears we shed.”

This attitude leads to a sense of gratitude, he said, insisting that by focusing only on one’s problems without looking to God, “fear and confusion creep into our hearts, giving rise to anger, bewilderment, anxiety and depression.”

“Then it becomes difficult to worship the Lord,” he said, adding, “Once this happens, we need to find the courage to break out of the circle of our foregone conclusions and to recognize that reality is much greater than we imagine.”

[…]

“Those who let themselves be shaped by grace usually improve with time: on the outside, we grow older — so Saint Paul tells us — while our inner nature is being renewed each day, as we grow in our understanding of how best to worship the Lord,” he said.

From this perspective, failures, crises, and mistakes “can become learning experiences,” Francis said, noting that these experiences can often “help us to be more aware that the Lord alone is worthy of our worship, for only he can satisfy our innermost desire for life and eternity.”

“With the passage of time, life’s trials and difficulties — experienced in faith — help to purify our hearts, making them humbler and thus more and more open to God,” he said, adding, “We cannot let our weariness, our falls and our failings discourage us.”

“Instead, by humbly acknowledging them, we should make them opportunities to progress towards the Lord Jesus,” he said, stressing the need to see beyond the things that are visible, which “often prove deceptive,” and focus on something deeper, like the Magi did.

Pope Francis closed his homily praying that God would “make us true worshipers, capable of showing by our lives his loving plan for all humanity.”

ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: THE CHRISTIAN THREAD

Post by wosbald » Fri Jan 08, 2021 12:58 pm

+JMJ+

If Biden is to heal America, he’ll need his Church [In-Depth, Opinion]
Image
Supporters of President Donald Trump climb the west wall of the the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday, Jan. 6, 2021, in Washington. (Credit: Jose Luis Magana/AP)

ROME — By all accounts, President-elect Joe Biden is a sincere Catholic. He’s spoken openly about how his beliefs have sustained him through personal pain and loss, and while there may be debate in some circles about how coherent his politics are with his faith, few contest whether he has faith in the first place.

In the wake of Wednesday’s chaos at the capitol, Biden may need that faith more than ever.

Yes, the mob that stormed the Capitol Building was turned back, as were challenges to the outcome of the 2020 election. In two weeks — on my birthday, as it happens — Biden will become the second Roman Catholic president of the United States, with a joint session of the Senate and Congress having certified his victory at around 4:00 a.m. in Washington.

But it would be naïve to think those results mark “closure” or “finality” in anything other than an electoral sense. Arguably, not since Lincoln’s first inauguration in 1861 has an incoming American president taken office facing such a divided nation. If Biden is to govern, he’ll need to find a way to begin putting the pieces back together, and drawing on the resources of the Catholic Church may be among his better options.

Let’s not underestimate the magnitude of the challenge.

Not only did the rampage at the capitol yesterday capture the rage of some Trump supporters, but it’s also generated a baying for blood among members of Biden’s own party, many of whom now seem to be engaged in a contest to see how much retribution they can demand be imposed on Trump and his enablers. Once Trump leaves office, in all likelihood there will be calls for criminal sanctions. However warranted, such moves also will certainly further exacerbate the divides.

Somehow, America has to work out a new modus vivendi.

On the left, there needs to be an acknowledgment that one can support much of the Trump policy agenda, and can share Trump’s skepticism of elites and establishments, without being an enemy of democracy or a racist bigot. On the right, there has to be a willingness to accept that “American” and “pro-Trump” don’t mean the same thing, and, for that matter, that “God-fearing” and “Republican” aren’t identical concepts either.

[…]

Inevitably, Biden will have to lead the way in this national reconciliation project. His greatest asset in doing so may turn out to be his Church — having seen him through personal tragedy, Catholicism may be poised to aid him in his defining public test.

To begin with, Catholicism is the lone major religious group in America where both sides of the nation’s political divide are roughly evenly represented. Overall, exit polls from the November election show that Catholics were almost evenly split between Biden and Trump, and those realities are readily apparent on Catholic social media platforms as well as traditional Catholic media outlets.

[…]

Imagine if the Catholic Church in America took on as a national pastoral priority to promote a campaign of healing – not “dialogue,” in the sense of fostering political debate, but the pursuit of friendship across tribal lines. Catholics are one-quarter of the national population, and when Catholicism in America moves with unity and purpose, the cultural landscape can shift.

[…]

Cardinal Wilton Gregory of Washington, D.C., seemed to hint in that direction in his comment on yesterday’s events, reminding believers they’re called to “acknowledge the human dignity of those with whom we disagree and seek to work with them to ensure the common good for all.”

[…]

Among other things, Catholic “influencers” out there — those with large Twitter followings, or TV audiences, or who help shape the conversation in other ways — would need to accept that yesterday was a reductio ad absurdum on a culture of acrimony, and that coming up with the best zinger of one’s ideological opponent in 280 characters is not a manifestation of virtue. Ordinary Catholics also would have to stop rewarding such displays with their eyeballs and their pocketbooks.

Can all that happen? Maybe, maybe not, but if it proves impossible in the Church, where our very identity is supposed to be rooted in being “catholic,” i.e., universal, what hope is there for the broader culture?

Maybe it’s providential that America is getting a Catholic president at a moment in which the ability to embrace diversity without division is especially crucial. In any event, if ever there was a potential “Catholic moment” in America, this would seem to be it.

Let’s hope we make the most of it.

ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: THE CHRISTIAN THREAD

Post by wosbald » Sun Jan 17, 2021 11:58 am

+JMJ+


► Show Spoiler
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"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: THE CHRISTIAN THREAD

Post by wosbald » Tue Jan 19, 2021 10:28 am

+JMJ+

‘9 Days for Life’ novena for the protection of human life set for Jan. 21-29
Image
Pro-life advocates gather near the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington Jan. 19, 2018. (Credit: Tyler Orsburn/CNS)

WASHINGTON, D.C. — Catholics across the country are invited to take part in the “9 Days for Life” novena Jan. 21-29 for the protection of human life.

Each day’s intercession is accompanied by prayers, a short reflection and one or more suggested actions for novena participants to take to help build a culture of life, such as pledging to participate in a parish-based program called Walking With Moms in Need.

Participants can go to the website www.9daysforlife.com to sign up for emails or texts about each day’s intercession, in English and Spanish. The site also has a link to materials for the novena as well as resources for parishes.

The pro-life novena, sponsored by the Committee on Pro-Life Activities of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, encompasses the annual Day of Prayer for the Legal Protection of Unborn Children Jan. 22, the day the Supreme Court handed down its decision in Roe and its companion case, Doe v. Bolton.

[…]

ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: THE CHRISTIAN THREAD

Post by Jester » Tue Jan 19, 2021 10:31 am

wosbald wrote:
Tue Jan 19, 2021 10:28 am
+JMJ+

‘9 Days for Life’ novena for the protection of human life set for Jan. 21-29
Image
Pro-life advocates gather near the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington Jan. 19, 2018. (Credit: Tyler Orsburn/CNS)

WASHINGTON, D.C. — Catholics across the country are invited to take part in the “9 Days for Life” novena Jan. 21-29 for the protection of human life.

Each day’s intercession is accompanied by prayers, a short reflection and one or more suggested actions for novena participants to take to help build a culture of life, such as pledging to participate in a parish-based program called Walking With Moms in Need.

Participants can go to the website www.9daysforlife.com to sign up for emails or texts about each day’s intercession, in English and Spanish. The site also has a link to materials for the novena as well as resources for parishes.

The pro-life novena, sponsored by the Committee on Pro-Life Activities of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, encompasses the annual Day of Prayer for the Legal Protection of Unborn Children Jan. 22, the day the Supreme Court handed down its decision in Roe and its companion case, Doe v. Bolton.

[…]
Sounds like Catholic Integralism to me.
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Re: THE CHRISTIAN THREAD

Post by Jester » Tue Jan 19, 2021 10:31 am

wosbald wrote:
Fri Jan 08, 2021 12:58 pm
+JMJ+

If Biden is to heal America, he’ll need his Church [In-Depth, Opinion]
Image
Supporters of President Donald Trump climb the west wall of the the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday, Jan. 6, 2021, in Washington. (Credit: Jose Luis Magana/AP)

ROME — By all accounts, President-elect Joe Biden is a sincere Catholic. He’s spoken openly about how his beliefs have sustained him through personal pain and loss, and while there may be debate in some circles about how coherent his politics are with his faith, few contest whether he has faith in the first place.

In the wake of Wednesday’s chaos at the capitol, Biden may need that faith more than ever.

Yes, the mob that stormed the Capitol Building was turned back, as were challenges to the outcome of the 2020 election. In two weeks — on my birthday, as it happens — Biden will become the second Roman Catholic president of the United States, with a joint session of the Senate and Congress having certified his victory at around 4:00 a.m. in Washington.

But it would be naïve to think those results mark “closure” or “finality” in anything other than an electoral sense. Arguably, not since Lincoln’s first inauguration in 1861 has an incoming American president taken office facing such a divided nation. If Biden is to govern, he’ll need to find a way to begin putting the pieces back together, and drawing on the resources of the Catholic Church may be among his better options.

Let’s not underestimate the magnitude of the challenge.

Not only did the rampage at the capitol yesterday capture the rage of some Trump supporters, but it’s also generated a baying for blood among members of Biden’s own party, many of whom now seem to be engaged in a contest to see how much retribution they can demand be imposed on Trump and his enablers. Once Trump leaves office, in all likelihood there will be calls for criminal sanctions. However warranted, such moves also will certainly further exacerbate the divides.

Somehow, America has to work out a new modus vivendi.

On the left, there needs to be an acknowledgment that one can support much of the Trump policy agenda, and can share Trump’s skepticism of elites and establishments, without being an enemy of democracy or a racist bigot. On the right, there has to be a willingness to accept that “American” and “pro-Trump” don’t mean the same thing, and, for that matter, that “God-fearing” and “Republican” aren’t identical concepts either.

[…]

Inevitably, Biden will have to lead the way in this national reconciliation project. His greatest asset in doing so may turn out to be his Church — having seen him through personal tragedy, Catholicism may be poised to aid him in his defining public test.

To begin with, Catholicism is the lone major religious group in America where both sides of the nation’s political divide are roughly evenly represented. Overall, exit polls from the November election show that Catholics were almost evenly split between Biden and Trump, and those realities are readily apparent on Catholic social media platforms as well as traditional Catholic media outlets.

[…]

Imagine if the Catholic Church in America took on as a national pastoral priority to promote a campaign of healing – not “dialogue,” in the sense of fostering political debate, but the pursuit of friendship across tribal lines. Catholics are one-quarter of the national population, and when Catholicism in America moves with unity and purpose, the cultural landscape can shift.

[…]

Cardinal Wilton Gregory of Washington, D.C., seemed to hint in that direction in his comment on yesterday’s events, reminding believers they’re called to “acknowledge the human dignity of those with whom we disagree and seek to work with them to ensure the common good for all.”

[…]

Among other things, Catholic “influencers” out there — those with large Twitter followings, or TV audiences, or who help shape the conversation in other ways — would need to accept that yesterday was a reductio ad absurdum on a culture of acrimony, and that coming up with the best zinger of one’s ideological opponent in 280 characters is not a manifestation of virtue. Ordinary Catholics also would have to stop rewarding such displays with their eyeballs and their pocketbooks.

Can all that happen? Maybe, maybe not, but if it proves impossible in the Church, where our very identity is supposed to be rooted in being “catholic,” i.e., universal, what hope is there for the broader culture?

Maybe it’s providential that America is getting a Catholic president at a moment in which the ability to embrace diversity without division is especially crucial. In any event, if ever there was a potential “Catholic moment” in America, this would seem to be it.

Let’s hope we make the most of it.
Sounds like Catholic Integralism to me.
FIGHT LAUGH FEAST

“Liberal Christianity” may be more appealing to the masses than “conservative Christianity,” -TNLawPiper

I am become meme,
Destroyer of shorts -Elon

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Re: THE CHRISTIAN THREAD

Post by wosbald » Wed Jan 20, 2021 3:57 pm

+JMJ+

Subject Header: Economic Magisterium/Integral Ecology/Seamless Garment/Fratelli Tutti
Intra-Thread Trackbacks: pg 8 / pg 8 / pg 9

Inter-Thread Trackbacks:
"THE CATHOLIC THREAD: pg 119 / pg 119 / pg 119 / pg 119 / pg 150 / pg 150 / pg 151 / pg 151 / pg 151 / pg 151
"The Statement on Social Justice": pg 6
"Pro-life Bills/Laws": pg 15
"I'm Starting to Like This Pope": pg 65 / pg 121 / pg 121 / pg 122 / pg 127 / pg 128 / pg 129 / pg 129 / pg 129 / pg 129 / pg 129 / pg 129 / pg 129 / pg 129 / pg 130 / pg 130 / pg 131 / pg 131 / pg 131 / pg 131 / pg 131 / pg 132
"The Climate Change Thread": pg 14 / pg 14 / pg 15




► Show Spoiler
Image

ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: THE CHRISTIAN THREAD

Post by Del » Wed Jan 20, 2021 6:53 pm

wosbald wrote:
Mon Jan 04, 2021 12:45 pm
+JMJ+

We deplore King Herod for his historic cruelty. But we are hardly any better. [In-Depth, Opinion]
The Holy Innocents of today continue to arrive and ask for our help. They are at our border and in our jails. The way we welcome them or neglect them tells the story of who we are as a nation and lately it is not looking very Christian.

We deplore the despot Herod for his historic cruelty. The blood of the Holy Innocents forever stains him. But we are hardly better.

[…]

Tell your Jesuits that the Holy Innocents of today are mostly in medical waste bags, garbage disposal grinders and dumpsters.
G.K. Chesterton — 'It is terrible to contemplate how few politicians are hanged.'

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Re: THE CHRISTIAN THREAD

Post by Del » Wed Jan 20, 2021 7:16 pm

Jester wrote:
Tue Jan 19, 2021 10:31 am
wosbald wrote:
Fri Jan 08, 2021 12:58 pm
+JMJ+

If Biden is to heal America, he’ll need his Church [In-Depth, Opinion]
Image
Supporters of President Donald Trump climb the west wall of the the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday, Jan. 6, 2021, in Washington. (Credit: Jose Luis Magana/AP)

ROME — By all accounts, President-elect Joe Biden is a sincere Catholic. He’s spoken openly about how his beliefs have sustained him through personal pain and loss, and while there may be debate in some circles about how coherent his politics are with his faith, few contest whether he has faith in the first place.

In the wake of Wednesday’s chaos at the capitol, Biden may need that faith more than ever.

Yes, the mob that stormed the Capitol Building was turned back, as were challenges to the outcome of the 2020 election. In two weeks — on my birthday, as it happens — Biden will become the second Roman Catholic president of the United States, with a joint session of the Senate and Congress having certified his victory at around 4:00 a.m. in Washington.

But it would be naïve to think those results mark “closure” or “finality” in anything other than an electoral sense. Arguably, not since Lincoln’s first inauguration in 1861 has an incoming American president taken office facing such a divided nation. If Biden is to govern, he’ll need to find a way to begin putting the pieces back together, and drawing on the resources of the Catholic Church may be among his better options.

Let’s not underestimate the magnitude of the challenge.

Not only did the rampage at the capitol yesterday capture the rage of some Trump supporters, but it’s also generated a baying for blood among members of Biden’s own party, many of whom now seem to be engaged in a contest to see how much retribution they can demand be imposed on Trump and his enablers. Once Trump leaves office, in all likelihood there will be calls for criminal sanctions. However warranted, such moves also will certainly further exacerbate the divides.

Somehow, America has to work out a new modus vivendi.

On the left, there needs to be an acknowledgment that one can support much of the Trump policy agenda, and can share Trump’s skepticism of elites and establishments, without being an enemy of democracy or a racist bigot. On the right, there has to be a willingness to accept that “American” and “pro-Trump” don’t mean the same thing, and, for that matter, that “God-fearing” and “Republican” aren’t identical concepts either.

[…]

Inevitably, Biden will have to lead the way in this national reconciliation project. His greatest asset in doing so may turn out to be his Church — having seen him through personal tragedy, Catholicism may be poised to aid him in his defining public test.

To begin with, Catholicism is the lone major religious group in America where both sides of the nation’s political divide are roughly evenly represented. Overall, exit polls from the November election show that Catholics were almost evenly split between Biden and Trump, and those realities are readily apparent on Catholic social media platforms as well as traditional Catholic media outlets.

[…]

Imagine if the Catholic Church in America took on as a national pastoral priority to promote a campaign of healing – not “dialogue,” in the sense of fostering political debate, but the pursuit of friendship across tribal lines. Catholics are one-quarter of the national population, and when Catholicism in America moves with unity and purpose, the cultural landscape can shift.

[…]

Cardinal Wilton Gregory of Washington, D.C., seemed to hint in that direction in his comment on yesterday’s events, reminding believers they’re called to “acknowledge the human dignity of those with whom we disagree and seek to work with them to ensure the common good for all.”

[…]

Among other things, Catholic “influencers” out there — those with large Twitter followings, or TV audiences, or who help shape the conversation in other ways — would need to accept that yesterday was a reductio ad absurdum on a culture of acrimony, and that coming up with the best zinger of one’s ideological opponent in 280 characters is not a manifestation of virtue. Ordinary Catholics also would have to stop rewarding such displays with their eyeballs and their pocketbooks.

Can all that happen? Maybe, maybe not, but if it proves impossible in the Church, where our very identity is supposed to be rooted in being “catholic,” i.e., universal, what hope is there for the broader culture?

Maybe it’s providential that America is getting a Catholic president at a moment in which the ability to embrace diversity without division is especially crucial. In any event, if ever there was a potential “Catholic moment” in America, this would seem to be it.

Let’s hope we make the most of it.
Sounds like Catholic Integralism to me.
As Screwtape advised (in paraphrase)-- "Don't let your patient ask whether Christian faith is True. Encourage him consider how much Christianity is useful toward more practical matters."
G.K. Chesterton — 'It is terrible to contemplate how few politicians are hanged.'

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Re: THE CHRISTIAN THREAD

Post by wosbald » Sun Jan 24, 2021 10:24 am

+JMJ+

Subject Header: Holy Land Peace
Intra-Thread Trackbacks: pg 7 / pg 7

Inter-Thread Trackbacks:
"THE CATHOLIC THREAD": pg 142 / pg 142 / pg 143
"Something Good": pg 2
"Faith in the News": pg 119 / pg 120 / pg 121 / pg 121 / pg 121 / pg 123
"I'm Starting to Like This Pope": pg 129
"Purely Politics II": pg 107
"President Trump is a problem...": pg 15 / pg 16 / pg 18 / pg 19 / pg 23 / pg 23 / pg 23 / pg 23 / pg 29 / pg 33 / pg 33 / pg 43
"Biden has done a good job so far": pg 7



Bishops, visiting Holy Land virtually, see ‘less cause for optimism’
Image

Image
Bishop William Nolan of Galloway, Scotland, delivers the homily during Mass with other members of the Holy Land Coordination in St. Jerome’s Cave in the Church of the Nativity in Bethlehem, West Bank, March 5, 2012. In a final statement after their 2021 virtual visit, the bishops said “there is today less cause for optimism than at any time in recent history.” (CNS photo/courtesy Marcin Mazur via catholicnews.org.uk)

By Judith Sudilovsky — Bishops who spent six days visiting virtually with Christians in the Holy Land said “it has become painfully clear that there is today less cause for optimism than at any time in recent history.”
The bishops from the US, Europe and South Africa also said the international community should “hold Israel accountable for its moral, legal and humanitarian responsibility” to make COVID-19 vaccines accessible for Palestinians in the West Bank and Gaza, and countries should encourage cooperation by the Palestinian Authority.
They also noted the lack of political progress and the continuing expansion of Israeli settlements in the West Bank along with the impact of Israel’s Nation-State law, which establishes “Jewish settlement as a national value” and the Jewish nature and character of the state without mention of democracy or human rights, as “eroding any prospect of a peaceful two-state solution.”

Although the Palestinian Authority appears to not want to be seen as abdicating its health care responsibility toward the Palestinians as stipulated in the Oslo Accords agreement, officials have yet to publicly ask Israel to take responsibility for providing the vaccines. The Palestinian Authority has given conflicting reports on when they expect to receive vaccines following agreements with pharmaceutical companies and the World Health Organisation.
Health challenges such as the pandemic, the lack of international pilgrims, continued conflict, occupation and blockages have exacerbated economic hardships and compounded the situation in the Holy Land during the pandemic, the bishops of the Holy Land Coordination said in their final statement.
“This is the first time we have been prevented from meeting physically in the Holy Land,” said the bishops, who have visited each year since 2000. “Yet we remain resolutely committed to supporting our sisters and brothers in the homeland of Christ. Over the past week we have been privileged and moved to hear from Christians across the West Bank, Gaza and Israel about their mission, resilience and witness in these unprecedented circumstances.”

Stressing the importance of Israeli and Palestinian leadership recommitting themselves to direct negotiations, they called on their governments to renew their active participation in a “search for a just peace supporting dialogue between all sides, upholding international law, and reaffirming the plurality of Jerusalem, given its unique significance for Jews, Christians and Muslims.”

Lauding the work of Christian institutions — including schools, clinics, hospitals and charity organisations such as Caritas — the bishops said they were “models of charity, justice and peace.”

[…]

ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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