The Catholic Church in Australia

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UncleBob
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Re: The Catholic Church in Australia

Post by UncleBob » Wed Apr 04, 2018 12:01 pm

hugodrax wrote:
Wed Apr 04, 2018 11:52 am
UncleBob wrote:
Wed Apr 04, 2018 10:25 am
hugodrax wrote:
Wed Apr 04, 2018 10:12 am
UncleBob wrote:
Wed Apr 04, 2018 10:05 am
hugodrax wrote:
Wed Apr 04, 2018 9:47 am
UncleBob wrote:
Wed Apr 04, 2018 9:08 am
hugodrax wrote:
Wed Apr 04, 2018 8:40 am
I didn't know Australians confessed. I'd always thought they'd simply been found guilty.
IKR?

Seriously, though, I like how they are already playing the martyr card.
So you and wosbald are both flying at half chub. Interesting.
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Re: The Catholic Church in Australia

Post by wosbald » Mon May 14, 2018 7:16 am

+JMJ+

Confessional seal not ‘linchpin of culture of secrecy,’ Aussie prelate says
Image
Archbishop Mark Coleridge of Brisbane, Australia, is seen at the Vatican Oct. 14, 2015. (Credit: CNS.)

In recent months, the Australian Catholic Church has been in the spotlight, primarily due to news that the former Archbishop of Sydney and the pope’s current finance minister, Cardinal George Pell, will stand trial for “historical sexual offenses” amid continuing fallout from the Church’s clerical abuse crisis.

As the Church attempts to change the narrative about its role in public life, Archbishop Mark Coleridge of Brisbane has been elected as the new head of the Australian Catholic Bishops’ Conference. Serving as his vice-president will be Archbishop Anthony Fisher of Sydney.

Soon after their election, Bishop Richard Umbers, an auxiliary bishop of Sydney, tweeted that with the election of Coleridge and Fisher, the Australian bishops had “put forward the two most articulate bishops in the conference.”

In an interview with Crux, Coleridge describes how he intends to navigate the tensions between the Church and various political and ecclesial battles in Australia — and in a way that puts Jesus Christ at the center of his work.

Among other points, Coleridge said it’s critical to pursue dialogue with the Australian government about recent calls to eliminate the seal of the confessional in the wake of the abuse crisis, because the Church has to explain that while cover-ups undeniably happened, the Sacrament of Penance is not “the linchpin of a whole culture of secrecy.”

[…]

You were a delegate to the 2015 Synod on the Family in Rome. What do you believe to have been the fruits of it? And do you believe there are legitimate questions of doctrine at stake (as raised by the so-called “dubia cardinals”), or are these debates an unhelpful distraction?

One fruit of that Synod was the decision of the Australian bishops to move to a Plenary Council. For me, the Synod was the most powerful experience of discernment I have ever known. It was on Oct. 17, 2015, during the pope’s memorable address on the synodality of the Church that it came to me almost as a flash of inspiration that now was the time, finally, for the Australian bishops to decide for a Plenary Council.

Halfway through that synod, it seemed impossible that we’d produce anything worthwhile by the synod’s end. It was all over the place and seemed to be going nowhere. But by the end we did produce something worthwhile, and that led to Amoris Laetitia. Neither the final document of the synod nor the apostolic exhortation was the last word, but both were milestones on the journey that had begun once the Holy Father announced two synods on marriage and the family.

Pope Francis moved from synod as event to synod as process, which continues still. That process is essentially pastoral in the way that Vatican II was pastoral, on which Jesuit Father John O’Malley is most helpful. The synod, like the council, was not at odds with doctrine, but it sought to speak to people in ways they understood and to address the often-messy reality of their lives, in the thick of which they’re searching for God who’s searching for them.

That meant moving from a static view to a more dynamic view typical of the Bible, and to a different understanding of the relationship between objective and subjective, act and person. Questions of the relationship between the doctrinal and the pastoral, static and dynamic, objective and subjective, act and person have been with us at least since Vatican II. The synod and, I hope, the Plenary Council in Australia will help us get the balance right in new and creative ways.

[…]

The Royal Commission called for an end to the seal of the confessional and the New South Wales premier has called for a national discussion on this. Do you believe there are any negotiations that can be had on this matter between the Church and the state?

Those discussions have to happen — first, to explain what the seal (or priest-penitent privilege) is all about and why it matters as it does in the Catholic Church, and second, what its abolition might mean for religious freedom and the rights of conscience.

The Royal Commission seemed to regard the seal as the linchpin of a whole culture of secrecy and cover-up, and therefore as something that had to go. That there were cover-ups and that there can be a culture of secrecy in the Church is certain; but to regard the seal as the linchpin of that is a failure to understand what the Sacrament of Penance is all about.

A blunt instrument like a Royal Commission can’t be expected to understand that, but in shaping legislation governments have to make some attempt, and the Church has to help in that, defending the faith without raising our voice or stamping our foot. For the Church, the seal is non-negotiable, which is why negotiations with government are important.




"In the end, My Immaculate Heart will triumph." - Our Lady of Fatima

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Re: The Catholic Church in Australia

Post by wosbald » Fri Jun 08, 2018 10:06 am

+JMJ+

Australian law mandates reporting abuse admissions made in confessional
Image
In this file photo, a priest stands in his confessional in St. Peter's Basilica. (Credit: Paul Haring/CNS.)

Laws requiring Catholic priests to break the seal of confession in some cases passed the Australian Capital Territory's Legislative Assembly in Canberra June 7.

SYDNEY, Australia — Laws requiring Catholic priests to break the seal of confession in some cases passed the Australian Capital Territory’s Legislative Assembly in Canberra June 7.

The purpose of the Ombudsman Amendment Bill 2018 was to expand the Reportable Conduct Scheme governing allegations of child abuse and misconduct to include religious organizations.

The legislation passed without amendment. The Archdiocese of Canberra and Goulburn has nine months to negotiate with the government on how it will work before the start of reportable conduct requirements.

Writing in The Canberra Times June 7, Archbishop Christopher Prowse of Canberra and Goulburn said he supported the revised scheme, but would not support a requirement to break the seal of confession. He said such a requirement would neither help prevent abuse nor efforts to improve the safety of children in Catholic organizations.

Apart from the fact that child abusers do not confess their crimes to police or priests, such legislation would also threaten Catholics’ religious freedom, he wrote.

“The government threatens religious freedom by appointing itself an expert on religious practices and by attempting to change the sacrament of confession while delivering no improvement in the safety of children,” he said.

[…]




"In the end, My Immaculate Heart will triumph." - Our Lady of Fatima

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Re: The Catholic Church in Australia

Post by Thunktank » Fri Jun 08, 2018 10:17 am

wosbald wrote:
Fri Jun 08, 2018 10:06 am
+JMJ+

Australian law mandates reporting abuse admissions made in confessional
Image
In this file photo, a priest stands in his confessional in St. Peter's Basilica. (Credit: Paul Haring/CNS.)

Laws requiring Catholic priests to break the seal of confession in some cases passed the Australian Capital Territory's Legislative Assembly in Canberra June 7.

SYDNEY, Australia — Laws requiring Catholic priests to break the seal of confession in some cases passed the Australian Capital Territory’s Legislative Assembly in Canberra June 7.

The purpose of the Ombudsman Amendment Bill 2018 was to expand the Reportable Conduct Scheme governing allegations of child abuse and misconduct to include religious organizations.

The legislation passed without amendment. The Archdiocese of Canberra and Goulburn has nine months to negotiate with the government on how it will work before the start of reportable conduct requirements.

Writing in The Canberra Times June 7, Archbishop Christopher Prowse of Canberra and Goulburn said he supported the revised scheme, but would not support a requirement to break the seal of confession. He said such a requirement would neither help prevent abuse nor efforts to improve the safety of children in Catholic organizations.

Apart from the fact that child abusers do not confess their crimes to police or priests, such legislation would also threaten Catholics’ religious freedom, he wrote.

“The government threatens religious freedom by appointing itself an expert on religious practices and by attempting to change the sacrament of confession while delivering no improvement in the safety of children,” he said.

[…]
If child abusers don’t confess their sins of child abuse to priests anyway, than what’s all the fuss about? All the state is doing is making sure that they don’t. Hmmm.

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Re: The Catholic Church in Australia

Post by Del » Fri Jun 08, 2018 11:02 am

Thunktank wrote:
Fri Jun 08, 2018 10:17 am
wosbald wrote:
Fri Jun 08, 2018 10:06 am
+JMJ+

Australian law mandates reporting abuse admissions made in confessional
Image
In this file photo, a priest stands in his confessional in St. Peter's Basilica. (Credit: Paul Haring/CNS.)

Laws requiring Catholic priests to break the seal of confession in some cases passed the Australian Capital Territory's Legislative Assembly in Canberra June 7.

SYDNEY, Australia — Laws requiring Catholic priests to break the seal of confession in some cases passed the Australian Capital Territory’s Legislative Assembly in Canberra June 7.

The purpose of the Ombudsman Amendment Bill 2018 was to expand the Reportable Conduct Scheme governing allegations of child abuse and misconduct to include religious organizations.

The legislation passed without amendment. The Archdiocese of Canberra and Goulburn has nine months to negotiate with the government on how it will work before the start of reportable conduct requirements.

Writing in The Canberra Times June 7, Archbishop Christopher Prowse of Canberra and Goulburn said he supported the revised scheme, but would not support a requirement to break the seal of confession. He said such a requirement would neither help prevent abuse nor efforts to improve the safety of children in Catholic organizations.

Apart from the fact that child abusers do not confess their crimes to police or priests, such legislation would also threaten Catholics’ religious freedom, he wrote.

“The government threatens religious freedom by appointing itself an expert on religious practices and by attempting to change the sacrament of confession while delivering no improvement in the safety of children,” he said.

[…]
If child abusers don’t confess their sins of child abuse to priests anyway, than what’s all the fuss about? All the state is doing is making sure that they don’t. Hmmm.
In America, healthcare professionals are mandated by law to report suspected instances of child abuse. Planned Parenthood was the subject of sting investigations, in which young girls posed as victims. Then real victims came forward with stories of being treated and released back into the hand of their abusers. PP paid out lawsuits. Yet the problem is on-going. Yesterday, a whole bunch of Congressmen and ladies requested that HHS do an investigation into PP's compliance of child safety reporting.
http://www.lifenews.com/2018/06/07/56-m ... l-assault/

Which makes me wonder how long it will take some anti-Catholic activists to record fake confessions and post the highlights on YouTube.
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Re: The Catholic Church in Australia

Post by Thunktank » Fri Jun 08, 2018 12:31 pm

Del wrote:
Fri Jun 08, 2018 11:02 am
Thunktank wrote:
Fri Jun 08, 2018 10:17 am
wosbald wrote:
Fri Jun 08, 2018 10:06 am
+JMJ+

Australian law mandates reporting abuse admissions made in confessional
Image
In this file photo, a priest stands in his confessional in St. Peter's Basilica. (Credit: Paul Haring/CNS.)

Laws requiring Catholic priests to break the seal of confession in some cases passed the Australian Capital Territory's Legislative Assembly in Canberra June 7.

SYDNEY, Australia — Laws requiring Catholic priests to break the seal of confession in some cases passed the Australian Capital Territory’s Legislative Assembly in Canberra June 7.

The purpose of the Ombudsman Amendment Bill 2018 was to expand the Reportable Conduct Scheme governing allegations of child abuse and misconduct to include religious organizations.

The legislation passed without amendment. The Archdiocese of Canberra and Goulburn has nine months to negotiate with the government on how it will work before the start of reportable conduct requirements.

Writing in The Canberra Times June 7, Archbishop Christopher Prowse of Canberra and Goulburn said he supported the revised scheme, but would not support a requirement to break the seal of confession. He said such a requirement would neither help prevent abuse nor efforts to improve the safety of children in Catholic organizations.

Apart from the fact that child abusers do not confess their crimes to police or priests, such legislation would also threaten Catholics’ religious freedom, he wrote.

“The government threatens religious freedom by appointing itself an expert on religious practices and by attempting to change the sacrament of confession while delivering no improvement in the safety of children,” he said.

[…]
If child abusers don’t confess their sins of child abuse to priests anyway, than what’s all the fuss about? All the state is doing is making sure that they don’t. Hmmm.
In America, healthcare professionals are mandated by law to report suspected instances of child abuse. Planned Parenthood was the subject of sting investigations, in which young girls posed as victims. Then real victims came forward with stories of being treated and released back into the hand of their abusers. PP paid out lawsuits. Yet the problem is on-going. Yesterday, a whole bunch of Congressmen and ladies requested that HHS do an investigation into PP's compliance of child safety reporting.
http://www.lifenews.com/2018/06/07/56-m ... l-assault/

Which makes me wonder how long it will take some anti-Catholic activists to record fake confessions and post the highlights on YouTube.
Well, you never know! Just maybe real confessions will come forward then. Karma baby!

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Re: The Catholic Church in Australia

Post by wosbald » Fri Jun 15, 2018 10:28 am

+JMJ+

Australian bishop: Seal of confession cannot be ended by ‘law of politicians’
Image
A line of confessionals in a Catholic Church. (Credit: Pixabay.)

Politicians can change the law, but priests won’t violate the confessional, said the administrator of the Archdiocese of Adelaide.

A new law says religious ministers in the state of South Australia will have to report anyone who admits to child abuse, even if it’s in the confessional.

[…]

The law was passed last year, but [Bishop] O’Kelly said he was not aware that it would apply to sacramental confessons until Thursday.

“We have an understanding of the seal of confession that is in the area of the sacred. Politicians can change the law, but we can’t change the nature of the confessional, which is a sacred encounter between a penitent and someone seeking forgiveness and a priest representing Christ,” the bishop told ABC Radio Adelaide on Friday.

Under Church law, any priest who violates the seal of confession is excommunicated.

“That does not change by the law of politicians,” O’Kelly said.

“My obligation would be to try to urge that person to go to somewhere where he can get help or whatever, to do whatever he can to change this dreadful behavior,” the bishop said when asked how he would respond if someone confessed abusing a child.

“You urge it, you go down on your knees and beg him to, but I can’t break the seal of a confession,” he told the radio station.

O’Kelly said the Church is doing all it can to ensure the safety of children but said breaking the seal of confession would not help.

“Can you imagine the situation of a pedophile coming to confession knowing that the priest is going to immediately ring the police?” he asked.

He said if a child told a priest about being abused in the confessional, the priest would urge the child to report it outside of confession to “somewhere that was safe, someone that they could talk to.”

[…]

Anglican Archbishop Geoffrey Smith of Adelaide said he supported the government’s position and said the Anglican Church had already given an exemption to the seal of confession in cases of child sexual abuse.




"In the end, My Immaculate Heart will triumph." - Our Lady of Fatima

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Re: The Catholic Church in Australia

Post by wosbald » Fri Jul 13, 2018 6:22 pm

+JMJ+

Australian state hesitates to require priests to break seal of confession
Image
(Credit: romana klee via Flickr (CC BY-SA 2.0) via CNA)

MELBOURNE, Australia — The Australian state of Victoria has said a recommendation by the royal commission that it pass a law requiring priests to break the confessional seal to report cases of child sex abuse requires further consideration.

Victoria attorney general Martin Pakula said July 11 that the government needs to further consider 24 of the 317 recommendations made to the state by the Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse.

Pakula said the state government accepted 128 recommendations, and another 165 in principle, according to The Guardian.

He told ABC radio that the proposal to require the breaking of the seal of confession “needs a degree of national agreement.”

The Australian Capital Territory, South Australia, and Tasmania have already adopted laws making it illegal for priests to fail to report the confession of a child sex abuse crime.

In South Australia, priests who fail to report child sex abuse which they learned of while hearing a confession will face a $7,400 fine beginning Oct. 1.

Like Victoria, New South Wales is subjecting that recommendation to further consideration, though it accepted 336 of the royal commission’s recommendations.

The New South Wales government said last month that “whether or how the offence will apply to members of the clergy where the information about an offence was gathered through religious confessions is a complex issue that has been referred to the Council of Attorney’s-General for national consideration.”

[…]




"In the end, My Immaculate Heart will triumph." - Our Lady of Fatima

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