Birders

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LushMojo
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Birders

Post by LushMojo » Tue Apr 30, 2013 9:40 am

Any other CPS birders here? I found only a couple of threads via search (one really old and one from Gabriel about the hawk).

My wife and I took up birding last year and it's become our favorite "together" hobby. We each bought Nikon Monarch 3 8x42 binocs and a Sibley field guide. We've been logging birds to our "life list" every early Saturday that we can get away. Audubon Park and City Park have some exceptional areas (City Park being larger than Central Park in NYC). There are local colonies of wild parrots and parakeets and we get some interesting birds that blow in with the various coastal storms here.

The interesting thing to me is that I've found strong parallels between identifying some type of warbler and identifying various pathologies. Maybe birding can make one a better diagnostician.

Oh, and the Audubon Birds field guide app for iOS is outstanding. The local sightings feature has set us off in pursuit of several birds that we really wanted to add to our list. It makes cross-referencing similar birds and looking up by shape or song very easy.

We've enjoyed the following two films on the topic as well:

The Big Year
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1053810/?ref_=sr_1

Birders: The Central Park Effect
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt2310157/?ref_=fn_al_tt_3

If you've seen the latter you may or may not know that Starr Saphir recently passed away. She was a funny old bird herself. RIP, Starr.


http://www.nytimes.com/2013/02/10/nyreg ... .html?_r=0

My current most wanted bird is a painted bunting.

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LushMojo
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Post by LushMojo » Tue Apr 30, 2013 9:43 am

The Painted Bunting (Passerina ciris):

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Post by coco » Tue Apr 30, 2013 10:03 am

ThunkTank is a birder. I think he uses a 16 gauge.
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Post by Hovannes » Tue Apr 30, 2013 10:09 am

I enjoy watching the egrets that come through this time of year, as well as the mexican spotted doves later in the summer. We had quite a few turkey vultures on the farm that were always good for a show. I kind of miss that place.

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Post by Thunktank » Tue Apr 30, 2013 11:30 am

coco wrote:ThunkTank is a birder. I think he uses a 16 gauge.
Yes, he also uses Leupold 8x42 Windriver binoculars. I go "birding" more than bird hunting. I live next to a nature preserve which itself is near the coast. Of course, I like to watch birds everywhere. I even have a pet parrotlet. Lots of different kinds of birds to watch.

There's a broad range of species I enjoy watching from Buntings to Eagles to a Tern Colony that nests on the beach. I've actively lobbied for the protection of local habitat against developers (mind you, I work in Real Estate). There's a annual nesting pair of Coopers Hawks where I typically walk the dogs. I also enjoy watching the White Tailed Kites that visit.

In fact, I'm quite lucky at the very broad range of habitats that I can go birding in within walking distance of my front door. There's coastal grasslands, marshes, beaches and woodlands that provide many possibilities.
:D
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LushMojo
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Post by LushMojo » Tue Apr 30, 2013 11:54 am

Thunktank wrote:
coco wrote:ThunkTank is a birder. I think he uses a 16 gauge.
Yes, he also uses Leupold 8x42 Windriver binoculars. I go "birding" more than bird hunting. I live next to a nature preserve which itself is near the coast. Of course, I like to watch birds everywhere. I even have a pet parrotlet. Lots of different kinds of birds to watch.

There's a broad range of species I enjoy watching from Buntings to Eagles to a Tern Colony that nests on the beach. I've actively lobbied for the protection of local habitat against developers (mind you, I work in Real Estate). There's a annual nesting pair of Coopers Hawks where I typically walk the dogs. I also enjoy watching the White Tailed Kites that visit.

In fact, I'm quite lucky at the very broad range of habitats that I can go birding in within walking distance of my front door. There's coastal grasslands, marshes, beaches and woodlands that provide many possibilities.
:D
Excellent! We're fortunate to have a variety of habitats as well - woodland, coastal, marshes and wetlands.

Just bought my wife The Bedside Book of Birds by Graeme Gibson. Pick it up if you're interested in a gorgeous book of illustrations and essays on an exceptionally fine paper and binding. She's been thoroughly enjoying it.

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Post by Thunktank » Tue Apr 30, 2013 3:26 pm

LushMojo wrote:
Thunktank wrote:
coco wrote:ThunkTank is a birder. I think he uses a 16 gauge.
Yes, he also uses Leupold 8x42 Windriver binoculars. I go "birding" more than bird hunting. I live next to a nature preserve which itself is near the coast. Of course, I like to watch birds everywhere. I even have a pet parrotlet. Lots of different kinds of birds to watch.

There's a broad range of species I enjoy watching from Buntings to Eagles to a Tern Colony that nests on the beach. I've actively lobbied for the protection of local habitat against developers (mind you, I work in Real Estate). There's a annual nesting pair of Coopers Hawks where I typically walk the dogs. I also enjoy watching the White Tailed Kites that visit.

In fact, I'm quite lucky at the very broad range of habitats that I can go birding in within walking distance of my front door. There's coastal grasslands, marshes, beaches and woodlands that provide many possibilities.
:D
Excellent! We're fortunate to have a variety of habitats as well - woodland, coastal, marshes and wetlands.

Just bought my wife The Bedside Book of Birds by Graeme Gibson. Pick it up if you're interested in a gorgeous book of illustrations and essays on an exceptionally fine paper and binding. She's been thoroughly enjoying it.
That does look like a good book. I just ordered it. It would make a good table book too.

I think we should post pics of our local birding areas. I need to take some pictures with the good camera that captures the birdiness of these places. It's Holy Week for me so I probably don't have the time this week but next week I'll go on a photo shoot and birding hike.
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Post by MrPiper » Wed May 01, 2013 3:48 pm

xxxxx
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Post by LushMojo » Thu May 02, 2013 9:49 am

Thunktank wrote:
LushMojo wrote:
Thunktank wrote:
coco wrote:ThunkTank is a birder. I think he uses a 16 gauge.
Yes, he also uses Leupold 8x42 Windriver binoculars. I go "birding" more than bird hunting. I live next to a nature preserve which itself is near the coast. Of course, I like to watch birds everywhere. I even have a pet parrotlet. Lots of different kinds of birds to watch.

There's a broad range of species I enjoy watching from Buntings to Eagles to a Tern Colony that nests on the beach. I've actively lobbied for the protection of local habitat against developers (mind you, I work in Real Estate). There's a annual nesting pair of Coopers Hawks where I typically walk the dogs. I also enjoy watching the White Tailed Kites that visit.

In fact, I'm quite lucky at the very broad range of habitats that I can go birding in within walking distance of my front door. There's coastal grasslands, marshes, beaches and woodlands that provide many possibilities.
:D
Excellent! We're fortunate to have a variety of habitats as well - woodland, coastal, marshes and wetlands.

Just bought my wife The Bedside Book of Birds by Graeme Gibson. Pick it up if you're interested in a gorgeous book of illustrations and essays on an exceptionally fine paper and binding. She's been thoroughly enjoying it.
That does look like a good book. I just ordered it. It would make a good table book too.

I think we should post pics of our local birding areas. I need to take some pictures with the good camera that captures the birdiness of these places. It's Holy Week for me so I probably don't have the time this week but next week I'll go on a photo shoot and birding hike.
We only have iPhones for cameras, so I'm posting a few pics found online of City Park and Couturie Forest which are the main two places we go.

City Park is over 1300 acres (like 5 square km); you can get absolutely lost in there and find it hard to believe you're in the middle of a city. So. Many. Birds.

Couturie Forest is part of City Park and the best spot for birding.

Audubon Park is great as well, but it's a little more sedate. The zoo, Tulane campus and the golf course are all surrounding it. Gorgeous spot.

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Post by LushMojo » Thu May 02, 2013 9:52 am

MrPiper wrote:Hey Lush,

TinyPiper is a birder. She can identify about 100 species by call!

Here is a link to a live cam to a Bald Eagle's nest at Berry College in Rome Ga. We went and watched them a couple of weekends ago. AMAZING to see a nest of them back up in the Georgia mountains.
http://www.berry.edu/eaglecam/

There is also a nest on Jekyll Island on the coast we found 2 years ago.

Have Barred and Horned owls in the forest behind our home. We also have red shouldered hawks nesting back there. They keep an eye on the snakes in the yard.

On the feeders on our deck we have had piliated and red headed wood peckers, indigo buntings, red wings, grosbeaks, titmice, in the ground feeders we get brown thrashers, mourning doves, and even the occasional Blue Jay. Of course, tons of cardinals et al.
That's excellent. Owls are some of our favorite birds; haven't seen nearly enough. We get lots of cardinals as well and a great number of Jays (my oldest daughter's favorite bird).

I'm working more and more on being able to identify by call; I still find it difficult. I thought being a musician would help, but there's just so many calls and even so many calls for some of the same birds.

Really glad to see some folks here who share this hobby.

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Post by LushMojo » Thu May 02, 2013 9:55 am

Nota bene: in that first pic I posted of City Park you'll see how a live oak branch in the distance dips to the ground. You can literally walk up into many of the trees in the forest because of that. Some even grown into the ground and back out.

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Post by MrPiper » Thu May 02, 2013 4:07 pm

xxxxx
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Post by CaptainMathias » Thu May 02, 2013 4:57 pm

I hunt nuisance birds that get in buildings does that count?
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Post by Briarpatch » Fri May 03, 2013 9:00 pm

I am an interested "birder." Have been all my life. I have participated in the Cornell University backyard bird census program though I had to drop it.
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Post by Thunktank » Fri May 03, 2013 9:34 pm

Great pics, LM!

Birds got me into a life long interest in nature. When I was a young boy I memorized every bird in field guide and drew a good many of them. So it was a means for me to express my artistic side and captivated my interest enough to encourage me to practice reading all the bird behavior books she would buy for me.
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Post by nuance910 » Sat May 04, 2013 5:55 pm

Okay, I'm not really a birder. But I do enjoy the sound of song birds in the morning--especially in the springtime, like right now. Recently, I've taken an interest in some starlings. I used to hate starlings. As a kid growing up on the farm starlings were one of a couple varieties of birds that I was allowed to shoot with my BB gun (along with blackbirds and sparrows). But recently a family of starlings took up residence in an unused air vent in my office building. I often seen them perching on the power line that runs nearby. And I can hear them chirping in the vent when I pass through a utility room downstairs. I think I might set up a feeder to help them feed their young. Maybe, in some small way, it will help make amends for the dozen or so starlings I shot during my boyhood. (Something I feel a twinge of guilt over.)
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Post by Thunktank » Sat May 04, 2013 7:19 pm

nuance910 wrote:Okay, I'm not really a birder. But I do enjoy the sound of song birds in the morning--especially in the springtime, like right now. Recently, I've taken an interest in some starlings. I used to hate starlings. As a kid growing up on the farm starlings were one of a couple varieties of birds that I was allowed to shoot with my BB gun (along with blackbirds and sparrows). But recently a family of starlings took up residence in an unused air vent in my office building. I often seen them perching on the power line that runs nearby. And I can hear them chirping in the vent when I pass through a utility room downstairs. I think I might set up a feeder to help them feed their young. Maybe, in some small way, it will help make amends for the dozen or so starlings I shot during my boyhood. (Something I feel a twinge of guilt over.)
Don't feel guilty about killing Sarlings! They're hard on native song birds because they will kill their young and take the eggs. They aren't native to North America and happen to be quite destructive. Now the blackbirds are another matter and for that you may do penance.

Seriously, Starlings are legal to kill at all times in nearly every state for the reasons stated above. Then there are cats. . .
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Post by Irish-Dane » Sun May 05, 2013 6:23 am

Growing up, my Mom was the classic Midwest birder with multiple bird feeders in the back yard and a bird book on the kitchen table at all times. I like the appreciation for birds that she taught us kids, and I have enjoyed trying to identify as many of the bird species down here in NC that we don't have in Ohio.

One of the coolest things I've experienced is that we are in a direct path of the annual Robin migration. Something about how the mountians come down into the valley where I live... it's all above my understanding but I did enjoy the hundreds of robins all over every yard around here for almost a week.

And I really enjoyed The Big Year.
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Re: Birders

Post by sweetandsour » Mon Feb 12, 2018 12:53 pm

Seems like a paradox, but I'm an avid bird watcher as much as I'm a bird hunter. And there's a warbler or two in my back yard this winter that I haven't identified yet.
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