The Climate Change Thread

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Re: The Climate Change Thread

Post by Del » Thu Apr 22, 2021 6:41 pm

You get your science news from National catholic Fishwrap?
G.K. Chesterton — 'It is terrible to contemplate how few politicians are hanged.'

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Re: The Climate Change Thread

Post by wosbald » Fri Apr 23, 2021 8:07 am

+JMJ+

Pope Francis, in Earth Day messages, warns 'we are at the edge' on climate change [In-Depth]
Image

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Pope Francis delivers a pre-recorded message for Earth Day Live, organized April 22, 2021 by the Earth Day Network. (EarthBeat screenshot)

=========================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================

Editor's note: This story was updated at 3:30 p.m. Central Time with additional reporting.

=========================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================

In twin Earth Day messages, Pope Francis warned a gathering of world leaders and the global community at large that "we are at the edge" with climate change, and the time to take action is now.

The pope made appearances minutes apart April 22 during two virtual events marking Earth Day: the international leaders summit on climate organized by U.S. President Joe Biden, and the Earth Day Live livestream organized by the Earth Day Network. In both, Francis urged presidents and prime ministers to act courageously in addressing climate change, and to learn from the coronavirus pandemic the need to create "a just, equitable, environmentally safe planet."

"Both the global catastrophes, Covid and climate change, prove that we do not have time to wait," Francis said in a pre-recorded video for Earth Day Live. "Time urges us, and as COVID-19 demonstrated, we do have the tools to face the loss. We have the instruments. This is the moment to act. We are at the edge."

"We need to ensure that the environment is cleaner, purer and that it is conserved. We must care for nature so that nature may care for us," Francis said.

The pope was one of more than three dozen heads of state — from countries that together represent more than 80% of total global greenhouse gas emissions — who took part in the virtual climate summit convened by Biden.

Francis called the gathering "a happy occasion" and said it was an initiative that puts all of humanity on a path toward better stewardship of nature and accomplishing goals of the Paris Agreement at the next United Nations climate conference, COP 26, scheduled for Glasgow, Scotland, in November.

"It is a challenge we face in this post-pandemic time. It has not yet ended, but we will, we must, look ahead, because it is a crisis," Francis told the world leaders. "We know that one does not emerge from a crisis the same: We emerge either better or worse."

Image
U.S. President Joe Biden, left, talks to China President Xi Jinping on screen, right, during the first day of the U.S. State Department's Leaders Summit on Climate April 22, 2021. (EarthBeat screenshot)

The two-day Biden climate summit was intended to signal the U.S. return to a leadership position in international climate change diplomacy. To that end, Biden announced a new U.S. target under the Paris Agreement, committing the country — the largest historic emitter — to cutting its greenhouse gas emissions by 50% to 52% from 2005 levels by 2030.

The pledge nearly doubles the first U.S. climate target under the Paris accord, made in 2015, and puts the U.S. on a par with the European Un𝗂on and United Kingdom for the most stringent targets. Nevertheless, scientists and climate activists say they are still not enough to meet the higher Paris goal of limiting average global temperature rise to 1.5 degrees Celsius, a shortcoming that several leaders, including U.S. climate envoy John Kerry, acknowledged during the summit.


Tweet from @climateactiontr on April 22, 2021
[…]

Efforts are also under way to ramp up action within the global Catholic Church. Next month, the Vatican's Dicastery for Promoting Integral Human Development is expected to launch its Laudato Si' Action Platform, which aims to catalyze Catholic parishes, dioceses, schools, hospitals and religious orders to put into action the messages of Francis' 2015 encyclical "Laudato Si', on Care for Our Common Home."

In introducing Francis at the summit, Kerry said, "Few have used their voice in more profound fashion to shape the global climate movement than His Holiness, Pope Francis," adding that "he not only helped make the Paris Agreement possible, but has continued to bring his humble message of justice and solidarity to so many of the world leaders gathered here today."

During his Earth Day Live message, Francis said, "We are becoming more and more aware that nature deserves to be protected … with the utmost care and respect" for the planet's biodiversity. Once the destruction of nature is triggered, he added, it becomes difficult to stop.

"But we still have time," he added, urging people and countries to work together toward innovations and new pathways to make the world a better place than before the pandemic.

"This is the challenge," Francis said. "And if we do not emerge better, we will start on a path of self-destruction."

ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: The Climate Change Thread

Post by wosbald » Thu Apr 29, 2021 9:15 am

+JMJ+

Conservative legal experts take up Apache Oak Flat religious freedom case [In-Depth]
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Children play in the Oak Flat Campground near Globe, Arizona, Feb. 22, 2020. (Newscom/Reuters/Stephanie Keith)

As the Apache people have sought to protect and preserve the Oak Flat area in Arizona from a potential copper mine, they have drawn support from other Native American tribes, conservation organizations like the Sierra Club and Center for Biological Diversity, progressive faith groups, and politicians, including U.S. Sens. Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren.

Recently, their struggle has also attracted the attention of conservative religious liberty scholars.

In the past three months, more than a dozen experts on religious freedom, including prominent Catholic scholars like Helen Alvaré, Robert George and Richard Garnett, have joined several amicus briefs supporting the Apache's legal case.

And in February, the Becket Fund for Religious Liberty became counsel in a federal appeal for the Apache Stronghold, the nonprofit community organization working to defend Chi'chil Biłdagoteel, the Apache name for Oak Flat, and other sites considered sacred by the Apache people and other Native Americans.

The case is one of a growing number in which Native American and Alaskan tribes assert that extractive and construction projects on land they view as sacred amount to violations of religious freedom.

The struggle over Oak Flat began in 2014, when Arizona legislators, including Sens. John McCain and Jeff Flake, attached a land-swap rider to the annual National Defense Authorization Act that approved the transfer of 2,400 acres in the Tonto National Forest, which includes Oak Flat, to Resolution Copper, an Australian mining company.

The San Carlos Apache Tribe and its backers say the copper mine will create a 2-mile-long, 1,000-foot-deep crater that will destroy Oak Flat and make it impossible for tribal members to pray and conduct ceremonial rituals on the land.

Joining the case

Legal action picked up earlier this year, after the outgoing Trump administration fast-tracked the federally required environmental impact statement. That document, published in January, triggered the clock on the 60-day period to complete the transfer.

On March 1, days before the transfer was set to finalize, the Biden administration withdrew the environmental impact statement, a move that postponed the transfer for months, but did little to alleviate the Apache's fears that it will ultimately occur.

Image
Apache Stronghold leader Wendsler Nosie Sr., a former San Carlos Apache tribal chairman, at the Oak Flat Campground Feb. 23, 2020 (Newscom/Reuters/Stephanie Keith)

Becket, which joined the case at the request of Apache Stronghold, argues that the Apache people and their access to Oak Flat are protected under the Religious Freedom Restoration Act, or RFRA, the 1993 law that prohibits the federal government from imposing a substantial burden on the practice of religion guaranteed under the First Amendment.

"The government has historically done a number of terrible things to suppress Native American religious practices. And even today, the government will unfortunately, often carelessly, or in this case intentionally, allow the destruction of Native American sacred sites," said Luke Goodrich, vice president and senior counsel at Becket who is representing Apache Stronghold.

Interest in protecting Native American sacred sites, which often are located on land that the federal government took from tribes by force, is one reason Becket took the case, Goodrich told EarthBeat. Another is the precedent that permitting the land transfer could set for other religious communities.

"If the government can take land from the Apaches and destroy a sacred site and cut off their religious practices forever, that's obviously a severe harm to the Apaches, and it also poses a threat to all other religious groups," he said. "So it's important to take a stand, both for the sake of the Apaches themselves and for the sake of other religious groups that may face similar threats."

Overriding legal precedents

[…]

Before Oak Flat, Becket has taken on other cases involving Native American religious practices. In 2016, it reached a settlement with the federal government to protect Native Americans' use of eagle feathers in religious ceremonies. And the firm continues to represent members of the Klickitat and Cascade Tribes of Yakima Nation in Slockish v. U.S. Federal Highway Administration, which seeks financial relief after the government in 2008 bulldozed sacred sites, including a sacred altar, burial ground and old-growth trees, as part of a highway expansion near Mount Hood in Oregon.

The Slockish case has been on the radar of religious liberty scholars for years, and has also sparked their interest in Oak Flat.

[…]

In a recent article in the Harvard Law Review, [Stephanie Barclay, director of the Religious Liberty Initiative at the University of Notre Dame] and co-author Michalyn Steele critiqued the district court's decision in Slockish that the destruction of sacred sites did not interfere with Indigenous religious beliefs.

"The government in these cases is trying to argue that it should be able to destroy sacred sites with impunity, as long as they're on government property," she told EarthBeat.

"There's a lot of religious groups that would be affected by that if that were really the rule," she added, such as Catholic missions on federal property in the West or churches located at the Grand Canyon.

[…]

Image
At the Oak Flat Campground on June 13, 2017, a map shows the area of subsidence that could occur if Resolution Copper Mining goes forward with its plan to extract an enormous ore deposit from deep within the earth a few miles outside Superior, Arizona. (Newscom/Reuters/Nancy Wiechec)

[…]

All eyes on Oak Flat

[…]

One reason [why Oak Flat has drawn such widespread support from religious liberty advocates] is the certainty of destruction, and with it the impossibility for future religious practices, associated with Oak Flat, according to religious liberty scholars who spoke with EarthBeat. They pointed to the U.S. Forest Service's environmental impact statement, which states that the impact of mining on tribal sacred sites, plants and cultural landscapes would be "immediate, permanent, and large in scale."

Thomas Berg, a law professor at the University of St. Thomas in St. Paul, Minnesota, who signed onto the amicus brief, said the physical destruction of sacred sites, in a case like Oak Flat, "is a step beyond" other situations, where the threat — such as interference with the integrity of the land or the potential for an oil spill — may be less certain.

Image
A view of Oak Flat in the Tonto National Forest in Arizona (Wikimedia Commons/Elias Butler)

"Those other claims deserve more weight than courts have given them; but physical destruction is still a step beyond," he said.

Another reason for the scholars' involvement is more straightforward: They were asked.

"[Becket] does an excellent job seeking supporting amicus briefs," Berg said.

[…]

ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: The Climate Change Thread

Post by wosbald » Fri May 07, 2021 11:12 am

+JMJ+

In Bangladesh, Catholics plant Laudato Si' trees to buffer against storms [In-Depth]
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Image
A child climbs on a royal poinciana tree to pluck new blossoms on Earth Day, April 22, 2020, in Dhaka, Bangladesh. (CNS/Reuters/Mohammad Ponir Hossain)

Dhaka, Bangladesh — Titu Gain, who lives in Satkhira, in southern Bangladesh, knows firsthand how deadly and dangerous a cyclone can be.

"Almost every year, cyclones damage my house," said the 55-year-old Catholic father of three. "I lost my brother during a cyclone in 2007," a year when storms killed more than 3,000 people.

Like almost all of his neighbors, Gain is a farmer who also works as a day laborer to make ends meet. The region is known for producing prawns and mangoes, but its location on the coast makes it especially vulnerable to storms.

Families like Gain's live in tin-roofed houses made of wood, bamboo and straw, which are unable to withstand the strong winds.

"We are poor — we cannot [afford to] build our homes from brick. When a strong cyclone damaged our flimsy house, we lived in inhumane conditions under the open sky," he said.

When disaster strikes, people who lose their homes, as Gain and his family did, receive assistance from the government and local aid agencies. But it's a never-ending battle, as cyclones occur every year.

The impact of those disasters is compounded by COVID-19. While 20% of the population lived in poverty before the pandemic, that figure had increased to 42% by the end of 2020, according to a household survey by the South Asian Network on Economic Modeling.

Crisscrossed by rivers that flow into the Bay of Bengal, low-lying Bangladesh is one of the countries most vulnerable to the increasingly fierce storms and rising sea levels that scientists predict will worsen because of global warming.

Image
Catholics plant trees in Dhaka, Bangladesh. (Sumon Corraya)

Forests provide a natural buffer against severe weather, but deforestation — spurred by illegal logging, unregulated settlement and clearing of land for industrial agriculture — has decreased this protection. More than half a million people have died because of cyclones since 1970.

Now the Catholic Church is trying to change that, with a goal of planting 700,000 trees to celebrate the fifth anniversary of Pope Francis' 2015 encyclical ‘Laudato Si'’: on Care for our Common Home.

The effort, launched in August, also marks the 50th anniversary of the creation of Bangladesh — a Muslim-majority country of 165 million people, which has only about 400,000 Catholics.

Each Catholic is asked to plant at least one tree, Bishop Gervas Rozario of Rajshahi, who is vice president of the Catholic Bishops' Conference of Bangladesh, told EarthBeat, with special emphasis on coastal areas, where storm risk is great, and along rivers, where erosion jeopardizes villages.

Rozario is also president of Caritas Bangladesh, which has joined the effort with a pledge to plant 300,000 trees in the areas where it works.

Image
Bishop Gervas Rozario speaks about the tree planting program at the premises of the Catholic Bishops' Conference of Bangladesh in Dhaka Aug. 14, 2020. (Sumon Corraya)

Gain is enthusiastic about the effort. He got one young tree from his parish and planted 10 more mango saplings on his own. He said he also inspired his Muslim neighbors to plant trees.

"With the encyclical Laudato Si', Pope Francis inspired us to take care of our environment," Rozario said. "We Catholic bishops discussed how we can contribute to the environment, and we saw that we could plant trees to care for the Earth. Trees can protect us from natural disasters."

The tree planting also marks the country's golden jubilee, as Bangladesh celebrated its independence on March 26.

Disaster-prone lowland

Besides helping to mitigate climate change, trees offer crucial protection in Bangladesh, where floods, cyclones, drought and river erosion claim lives every year. The South Asian country is located in the floodplain of the world's largest delta, where the Ganges and Brahmaputra river systems empty into the Bay of Bengal.

That location makes the country particularly vulnerable to weather-related disasters, including cyclones, flooding and storm surges, as well as the erosion and landslides that accompany heavy rains.

[…]

Scientists predict that climate change will cause increasingly severe storms. They also warn that by 2050, some 300 million coastal residents worldwide could live below the elevation of average annual flooding.

The stakes are particularly high for low-lying countries like Bangladesh, where it is feared that about 20 million people could be displaced, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.

Four out of every 10 people in Bangladesh live in areas that are fewer than 10 meters above sea level, according to a recent study. That study modeled likely migration due to sea level rise and predicted that the districts of Shariatpur, Munshiganj and Narayanganj, just south of the capital of Dhaka, would be most affected.

While past studies have predicted strong migration from rural areas to cities, the authors of the new study say the effect is more likely to be a cascade, with flooding forcing people to move first to neighboring districts. That could cause residents of those areas to migrate in turn, or it might trigger conflicts over local resources.

The authors project that 1.3 million people across Bangladesh could be affected over the next three decades.

Added to the threat of sea-level rise is damage from severe storms. In 1970, cyclones are estimated to have killed 500,000 people. Death tolls have been lower since then, but are still high.

Image
A woman moves debris at the site of her house, demolished by Cyclone Amphan, in Satkhira, Bangladesh, May 21, 2020. (CNS/Reuters/Km Asad)

To help save lives, the government and aid agencies, including Caritas Bangladesh, have equipped some buildings, including churches and schools, to serve as temporary cyclone shelters.

Trees 'save lives'

[…]

Image
Lay leaders distribute trees in Savar, in the Dhaka district of Bangladesh. (Sumon Corraya)

[…]

ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: The Climate Change Thread

Post by wosbald » Thu May 20, 2021 9:51 am

+JMJ+

New study suggests the climate crisis has actually shifted the Earth's axis
Image

The melting of glaciers contributes to the movement of the North and South poles.

  • Since 2002, researchers have been able to study the causes of polar drift thanks to satellite data.
  • Researchers from the American Geophysical Un𝗂on analyzed measurements of ice loss and estimates of groundwater use in the '90s along with studies on the pole’s movements.
  • They found that in 1995, the direction of the polar drift shifted from southward to eastward, and the average speed of drift from 1995 to 2020 increased about 17 times from the average speed recorded from 1981 to 1995.


New research suggests glacial melting due to global warming has caused shifts in the Earth’s axis of rotation since the 1990s.

The locations of the North and South poles are not fixed as factors such as ocean currents, molten rock inside the Earth and other factors contribute to the shift of the poles. How water is distributed on the surface of Earth is a factor that drives the shift.

Since 2002, researchers have been able to study the causes of polar drift thanks to data from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellites and have linked glacial melting and groundwater pumping to movements of the poles since then.

But the new study published in Geophysical Research Letters aimed to explain changes in the poles that occurred during the '90s, before the satellite data existed.

Researchers from the American Geophysical Un𝗂on analyzed measurements of ice loss and estimates of groundwater use in the '90s along with studies on the pole’s movements.

They found that in 1995, the direction of the polar drift shifted from southward to eastward, and the average drift speed from 1995-2020 increased roughly 17 times from the average speed recorded from 1981-1995.

Researchers said most of the pole movement was prompted by ice melting off land and flowing into the oceans.

“The faster ice melting under global warming was the most likely cause of the directional change of the polar drift in the 1990s,” Shanshan Deng, author of the study and researcher at the Institute of Geographic Sciences and Natural Resources Research at the Chinese Academy of Sciences, said.

[…]

ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: The Climate Change Thread

Post by Jester » Thu May 20, 2021 10:14 am

wosbald wrote:
Thu May 20, 2021 9:51 am
+JMJ+

New study suggests the climate crisis has actually shifted the Earth's axis
Image

The melting of glaciers contributes to the movement of the North and South poles.

  • Since 2002, researchers have been able to study the causes of polar drift thanks to satellite data.
  • Researchers from the American Geophysical Un𝗂on analyzed measurements of ice loss and estimates of groundwater use in the '90s along with studies on the pole’s movements.
  • They found that in 1995, the direction of the polar drift shifted from southward to eastward, and the average speed of drift from 1995 to 2020 increased about 17 times from the average speed recorded from 1981 to 1995.


New research suggests glacial melting due to global warming has caused shifts in the Earth’s axis of rotation since the 1990s.

The locations of the North and South poles are not fixed as factors such as ocean currents, molten rock inside the Earth and other factors contribute to the shift of the poles. How water is distributed on the surface of Earth is a factor that drives the shift.

Since 2002, researchers have been able to study the causes of polar drift thanks to data from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellites and have linked glacial melting and groundwater pumping to movements of the poles since then.

But the new study published in Geophysical Research Letters aimed to explain changes in the poles that occurred during the '90s, before the satellite data existed.

Researchers from the American Geophysical Un𝗂on analyzed measurements of ice loss and estimates of groundwater use in the '90s along with studies on the pole’s movements.

They found that in 1995, the direction of the polar drift shifted from southward to eastward, and the average drift speed from 1995-2020 increased roughly 17 times from the average speed recorded from 1981-1995.

Researchers said most of the pole movement was prompted by ice melting off land and flowing into the oceans.

“The faster ice melting under global warming was the most likely cause of the directional change of the polar drift in the 1990s,” Shanshan Deng, author of the study and researcher at the Institute of Geographic Sciences and Natural Resources Research at the Chinese Academy of Sciences, said.

[…]
A) Pachamama will kill us all.

B) The Lord decreed this.
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Re: The Climate Change Thread

Post by wosbald » Thu May 20, 2021 10:52 am

+JMJ+
Jester wrote:
Thu May 20, 2021 10:14 am
wosbald wrote:
Thu May 20, 2021 9:51 am
New study suggests the climate crisis has actually shifted the Earth's axis
Image

The melting of glaciers contributes to the movement of the North and South poles.

  • Since 2002, researchers have been able to study the causes of polar drift thanks to satellite data.
  • Researchers from the American Geophysical Un𝗂on analyzed measurements of ice loss and estimates of groundwater use in the '90s along with studies on the pole’s movements.
  • They found that in 1995, the direction of the polar drift shifted from southward to eastward, and the average speed of drift from 1995 to 2020 increased about 17 times from the average speed recorded from 1981 to 1995.


New research suggests glacial melting due to global warming has caused shifts in the Earth’s axis of rotation since the 1990s.

The locations of the North and South poles are not fixed as factors such as ocean currents, molten rock inside the Earth and other factors contribute to the shift of the poles. How water is distributed on the surface of Earth is a factor that drives the shift.

Since 2002, researchers have been able to study the causes of polar drift thanks to data from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellites and have linked glacial melting and groundwater pumping to movements of the poles since then.

But the new study published in Geophysical Research Letters aimed to explain changes in the poles that occurred during the '90s, before the satellite data existed.

Researchers from the American Geophysical Un𝗂on analyzed measurements of ice loss and estimates of groundwater use in the '90s along with studies on the pole’s movements.

They found that in 1995, the direction of the polar drift shifted from southward to eastward, and the average drift speed from 1995-2020 increased roughly 17 times from the average speed recorded from 1981-1995.

Researchers said most of the pole movement was prompted by ice melting off land and flowing into the oceans.

“The faster ice melting under global warming was the most likely cause of the directional change of the polar drift in the 1990s,” Shanshan Deng, author of the study and researcher at the Institute of Geographic Sciences and Natural Resources Research at the Chinese Academy of Sciences, said.

[…]
A) Pachamama will kill us all.

B) The Lord decreed this.
Unless there's a hidden "Option C" to be uncovered with my Captain Midnight Secret Decoder Ring, then — based on the limited options you're offering — there doesn't seem to be much effectual distinction between Option A and Option B.

IOW, for all practical intents and purposes, "the Lord" in your scenario is lookin' a helluva lot like "the Pachamama" and the Pachamama is lookin' a helluva lot like the Lord.

Image

ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: The Climate Change Thread

Post by Jester » Thu May 20, 2021 11:47 am

wosbald wrote:
Thu May 20, 2021 10:52 am
+JMJ+
Jester wrote:
Thu May 20, 2021 10:14 am
wosbald wrote:
Thu May 20, 2021 9:51 am
New study suggests the climate crisis has actually shifted the Earth's axis
Image

The melting of glaciers contributes to the movement of the North and South poles.

  • Since 2002, researchers have been able to study the causes of polar drift thanks to satellite data.
  • Researchers from the American Geophysical Un𝗂on analyzed measurements of ice loss and estimates of groundwater use in the '90s along with studies on the pole’s movements.
  • They found that in 1995, the direction of the polar drift shifted from southward to eastward, and the average speed of drift from 1995 to 2020 increased about 17 times from the average speed recorded from 1981 to 1995.


New research suggests glacial melting due to global warming has caused shifts in the Earth’s axis of rotation since the 1990s.

The locations of the North and South poles are not fixed as factors such as ocean currents, molten rock inside the Earth and other factors contribute to the shift of the poles. How water is distributed on the surface of Earth is a factor that drives the shift.

Since 2002, researchers have been able to study the causes of polar drift thanks to data from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellites and have linked glacial melting and groundwater pumping to movements of the poles since then.

But the new study published in Geophysical Research Letters aimed to explain changes in the poles that occurred during the '90s, before the satellite data existed.

Researchers from the American Geophysical Un𝗂on analyzed measurements of ice loss and estimates of groundwater use in the '90s along with studies on the pole’s movements.

They found that in 1995, the direction of the polar drift shifted from southward to eastward, and the average drift speed from 1995-2020 increased roughly 17 times from the average speed recorded from 1981-1995.

Researchers said most of the pole movement was prompted by ice melting off land and flowing into the oceans.

“The faster ice melting under global warming was the most likely cause of the directional change of the polar drift in the 1990s,” Shanshan Deng, author of the study and researcher at the Institute of Geographic Sciences and Natural Resources Research at the Chinese Academy of Sciences, said.

[…]
A) Pachamama will kill us all.

B) The Lord decreed this.
Unless there's a hidden "Option C" to be uncovered with my Captain Midnight Secret Decoder Ring, then — based on the limited options you're offering — there doesn't seem to be much effectual distinction between Option A and Option B.

IOW, for all practical intents and purposes, "the Lord" in your scenario is lookin' a helluva lot like "the Pachamama" and the Pachamama is lookin' a helluva lot like the Lord.

Image
I can see how you would assume that if you believe my option "B" has the Lord intending destruction upon His creation. Forgive my limited options for causing the confusion.

Option A says, this is bad, the earth is angry and will destroy us. Mommy earth is angry at the sins of her people.

Option B says, that the Lord is orchestrating this and it is suppose to happen for earths good, not destruction. He is doing this for His glory.
FIGHT LAUGH FEAST

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If you can't say “amen” you gotta say “ouch.” -Voddie Baucham

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Re: The Climate Change Thread

Post by tuttle » Fri May 21, 2021 7:32 am

Jester wrote:
Thu May 20, 2021 11:47 am
wosbald wrote:
Thu May 20, 2021 10:52 am
+JMJ+
Jester wrote:
Thu May 20, 2021 10:14 am
wosbald wrote:
Thu May 20, 2021 9:51 am
New study suggests the climate crisis has actually shifted the Earth's axis
Image

The melting of glaciers contributes to the movement of the North and South poles.

  • Since 2002, researchers have been able to study the causes of polar drift thanks to satellite data.
  • Researchers from the American Geophysical Un𝗂on analyzed measurements of ice loss and estimates of groundwater use in the '90s along with studies on the pole’s movements.
  • They found that in 1995, the direction of the polar drift shifted from southward to eastward, and the average speed of drift from 1995 to 2020 increased about 17 times from the average speed recorded from 1981 to 1995.


New research suggests glacial melting due to global warming has caused shifts in the Earth’s axis of rotation since the 1990s.

The locations of the North and South poles are not fixed as factors such as ocean currents, molten rock inside the Earth and other factors contribute to the shift of the poles. How water is distributed on the surface of Earth is a factor that drives the shift.

Since 2002, researchers have been able to study the causes of polar drift thanks to data from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellites and have linked glacial melting and groundwater pumping to movements of the poles since then.

But the new study published in Geophysical Research Letters aimed to explain changes in the poles that occurred during the '90s, before the satellite data existed.

Researchers from the American Geophysical Un𝗂on analyzed measurements of ice loss and estimates of groundwater use in the '90s along with studies on the pole’s movements.

They found that in 1995, the direction of the polar drift shifted from southward to eastward, and the average drift speed from 1995-2020 increased roughly 17 times from the average speed recorded from 1981-1995.

Researchers said most of the pole movement was prompted by ice melting off land and flowing into the oceans.

“The faster ice melting under global warming was the most likely cause of the directional change of the polar drift in the 1990s,” Shanshan Deng, author of the study and researcher at the Institute of Geographic Sciences and Natural Resources Research at the Chinese Academy of Sciences, said.

[…]
A) Pachamama will kill us all.

B) The Lord decreed this.
Unless there's a hidden "Option C" to be uncovered with my Captain Midnight Secret Decoder Ring, then — based on the limited options you're offering — there doesn't seem to be much effectual distinction between Option A and Option B.

IOW, for all practical intents and purposes, "the Lord" in your scenario is lookin' a helluva lot like "the Pachamama" and the Pachamama is lookin' a helluva lot like the Lord.

Image
I can see how you would assume that if you believe my option "B" has the Lord intending destruction upon His creation. Forgive my limited options for causing the confusion.

Option A says, this is bad, the earth is angry and will destroy us. Mommy earth is angry at the sins of her people.

Option B says, that the Lord is orchestrating this and it is suppose to happen for earths good, not destruction. He is doing this for His glory.
Option C might be that the observations made by the scientists aren't as dire as they presume. A sub-category of C might include the idea that their science is shoddy and/or their presuppositions are faulty.
"The Evangelium has not abrogated legends; it has hallowed them" -JRR Tolkien

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Re: The Climate Change Thread

Post by Jester » Fri May 21, 2021 8:35 am

tuttle wrote:
Fri May 21, 2021 7:32 am
Jester wrote:
Thu May 20, 2021 11:47 am
wosbald wrote:
Thu May 20, 2021 10:52 am
+JMJ+
Jester wrote:
Thu May 20, 2021 10:14 am
wosbald wrote:
Thu May 20, 2021 9:51 am
New study suggests the climate crisis has actually shifted the Earth's axis
Image

The melting of glaciers contributes to the movement of the North and South poles.

  • Since 2002, researchers have been able to study the causes of polar drift thanks to satellite data.
  • Researchers from the American Geophysical Un𝗂on analyzed measurements of ice loss and estimates of groundwater use in the '90s along with studies on the pole’s movements.
  • They found that in 1995, the direction of the polar drift shifted from southward to eastward, and the average speed of drift from 1995 to 2020 increased about 17 times from the average speed recorded from 1981 to 1995.


New research suggests glacial melting due to global warming has caused shifts in the Earth’s axis of rotation since the 1990s.

The locations of the North and South poles are not fixed as factors such as ocean currents, molten rock inside the Earth and other factors contribute to the shift of the poles. How water is distributed on the surface of Earth is a factor that drives the shift.

Since 2002, researchers have been able to study the causes of polar drift thanks to data from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellites and have linked glacial melting and groundwater pumping to movements of the poles since then.

But the new study published in Geophysical Research Letters aimed to explain changes in the poles that occurred during the '90s, before the satellite data existed.

Researchers from the American Geophysical Un𝗂on analyzed measurements of ice loss and estimates of groundwater use in the '90s along with studies on the pole’s movements.

They found that in 1995, the direction of the polar drift shifted from southward to eastward, and the average drift speed from 1995-2020 increased roughly 17 times from the average speed recorded from 1981-1995.

Researchers said most of the pole movement was prompted by ice melting off land and flowing into the oceans.

“The faster ice melting under global warming was the most likely cause of the directional change of the polar drift in the 1990s,” Shanshan Deng, author of the study and researcher at the Institute of Geographic Sciences and Natural Resources Research at the Chinese Academy of Sciences, said.

[…]
A) Pachamama will kill us all.

B) The Lord decreed this.
Unless there's a hidden "Option C" to be uncovered with my Captain Midnight Secret Decoder Ring, then — based on the limited options you're offering — there doesn't seem to be much effectual distinction between Option A and Option B.

IOW, for all practical intents and purposes, "the Lord" in your scenario is lookin' a helluva lot like "the Pachamama" and the Pachamama is lookin' a helluva lot like the Lord.

Image
I can see how you would assume that if you believe my option "B" has the Lord intending destruction upon His creation. Forgive my limited options for causing the confusion.

Option A says, this is bad, the earth is angry and will destroy us. Mommy earth is angry at the sins of her people.

Option B says, that the Lord is orchestrating this and it is suppose to happen for earths good, not destruction. He is doing this for His glory.
Option C might be that the observations made by the scientists aren't as dire as they presume. A sub-category of C might include the idea that their science is shoddy and/or their presuppositions are faulty.
Depends on your eschatology :lol:
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Re: The Climate Change Thread

Post by tuttle » Fri May 21, 2021 8:47 am

Jester wrote:
Fri May 21, 2021 8:35 am
tuttle wrote:
Fri May 21, 2021 7:32 am
Jester wrote:
Thu May 20, 2021 11:47 am
wosbald wrote:
Thu May 20, 2021 10:52 am
+JMJ+
Jester wrote:
Thu May 20, 2021 10:14 am
wosbald wrote:
Thu May 20, 2021 9:51 am
New study suggests the climate crisis has actually shifted the Earth's axis
Image

The melting of glaciers contributes to the movement of the North and South poles.

  • Since 2002, researchers have been able to study the causes of polar drift thanks to satellite data.
  • Researchers from the American Geophysical Un𝗂on analyzed measurements of ice loss and estimates of groundwater use in the '90s along with studies on the pole’s movements.
  • They found that in 1995, the direction of the polar drift shifted from southward to eastward, and the average speed of drift from 1995 to 2020 increased about 17 times from the average speed recorded from 1981 to 1995.


New research suggests glacial melting due to global warming has caused shifts in the Earth’s axis of rotation since the 1990s.

The locations of the North and South poles are not fixed as factors such as ocean currents, molten rock inside the Earth and other factors contribute to the shift of the poles. How water is distributed on the surface of Earth is a factor that drives the shift.

Since 2002, researchers have been able to study the causes of polar drift thanks to data from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellites and have linked glacial melting and groundwater pumping to movements of the poles since then.

But the new study published in Geophysical Research Letters aimed to explain changes in the poles that occurred during the '90s, before the satellite data existed.

Researchers from the American Geophysical Un𝗂on analyzed measurements of ice loss and estimates of groundwater use in the '90s along with studies on the pole’s movements.

They found that in 1995, the direction of the polar drift shifted from southward to eastward, and the average drift speed from 1995-2020 increased roughly 17 times from the average speed recorded from 1981-1995.

Researchers said most of the pole movement was prompted by ice melting off land and flowing into the oceans.

“The faster ice melting under global warming was the most likely cause of the directional change of the polar drift in the 1990s,” Shanshan Deng, author of the study and researcher at the Institute of Geographic Sciences and Natural Resources Research at the Chinese Academy of Sciences, said.

[…]
A) Pachamama will kill us all.

B) The Lord decreed this.
Unless there's a hidden "Option C" to be uncovered with my Captain Midnight Secret Decoder Ring, then — based on the limited options you're offering — there doesn't seem to be much effectual distinction between Option A and Option B.

IOW, for all practical intents and purposes, "the Lord" in your scenario is lookin' a helluva lot like "the Pachamama" and the Pachamama is lookin' a helluva lot like the Lord.

Image
I can see how you would assume that if you believe my option "B" has the Lord intending destruction upon His creation. Forgive my limited options for causing the confusion.

Option A says, this is bad, the earth is angry and will destroy us. Mommy earth is angry at the sins of her people.

Option B says, that the Lord is orchestrating this and it is suppose to happen for earths good, not destruction. He is doing this for His glory.
Option C might be that the observations made by the scientists aren't as dire as they presume. A sub-category of C might include the idea that their science is shoddy and/or their presuppositions are faulty.
Depends on your eschatology :lol:
I suppose eschatology would be a sub-category of Option B (and presumably why wos assumed there was no difference between 1 & 2?)
"The Evangelium has not abrogated legends; it has hallowed them" -JRR Tolkien

"Better to die cheerfully with the aid of a little tobacco, than to live disagreeably and remorseful without." -CS Lewis

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Re: The Climate Change Thread

Post by wosbald » Fri May 21, 2021 1:08 pm

+JMJ+

Creation Care Prayer Network launches to spur ecological conversion worldwide [In-Depth]
Image

Image
Colorful wildflowers frame the peak of Byron Glacier near Girwood, Alaska, July 3, 2019. (CNS/Sam Lucero, The Compass)

A newly launched network hopes to channel the power of prayer to heal the planet in the face of rising global temperatures and declining biodiversity. The goal is to inspire a conversion among people of faith to work to reverse both problems and better care for the environment.

The Creation Care Prayer Network debuted May 20 during a webinar as part of the Vatican's Laudato Si' Week. The 10-day event marks the sixth anniversary of Pope Francis' encyclical "Laudato Si': On Care for Our Common Home," and closes the Laudato Si' Anniversary Year that began in May 2020.

The new prayer network seeks to bring together religious and lay contemplative communities in their commitment to heal God's creation, amid increasing climate change, deforestation and other threats to biodiversity, through prayer and Eucharistic adoration.

Christina Leaño, associate director of the Global Catholic Climate Movement, said the goal of the network is "helping more people care for creation and undergo the needed ecological conversion through prayer." Ecological conversion is one of the group's three focus areas, Leaño said, along with sustainability and advocacy.

Image
Christina Leaño, associate director of the Global Catholic Climate Movement, speaks during a webinar that introduced the Creation Care Prayer Network May 20. (NCR screenshot)

"Can you imagine if we're involved in a prayer network, the difference that this could make?" asked Franciscan Sr. Sheila Kinsey, executive co-secretary of the Justice, Peace and Integrity of Creation Commission of the International Un𝗂on of Superiors General, or UISG, one of the main sponsors of the Creation Care Prayer Network.

Other sponsors include the justice and peace commission of the Franciscans of the Order of Friars Minor, the Order of Cistercians of the Strict Observance (more commonly known as Trappists) and the Global Catholic Climate Movement. Communities interested in joining or becoming co-sponsors can learn more at laudatosipray.org.

Already, more than 200 communities in 34 countries across five continents have joined the Creation Care Prayer Network. The network will provide monthly resources, but for the most part, groups are left to determine how they choose to pray.

An inaugural prayer states, "Loving Creator, give us the grace to be faithful co-creators to care for our common home. Fill us with Your Spirit who renews the face of the earth. And inspire us that we may always sing as we go."

The Creation Care Prayer Network has also put forward three primary intentions for participants to center in their prayer:
  • Pray in communion with the most vulnerable to the ecological crisis, such as island nations facing rising seas, farmers experiencing irregular rain seasons, people leaving their homes because of climate change, environmental defenders and the estimated 1 million species at risk of extinction this century.
  • Pray for ecological conversion of the people of God and all communities, from individuals to government leaders and societies, to act boldly on the ecological crises facing the planet.
  • Pray for the fruits of Catholic institutions in their work for our common home, especially those that will take part in the Vatican's Laudato Si' Action Platform, which is set to be introduced on May 25.
Leaño said prayer is essential so that "transformative action can really take place. And we know that without this dimension, our apostolate could turn into mere activism without meaning."

In Laudato Si', Francis offered two new prayers on creation. He has also recommended that caring for our common home be included among both the corporal and spiritual works of mercy, and indicated that the concept of ecological sin would be added to the Catechism of the Catholic Church.

[…]

Earlier in the webinar, members of religious orders shared the ways their communities live out creation care and the pope's encyclical in their work. Several of the examples grew out of the UISG's Sowing Hope for the Planet campaign.

The Wheaton Franciscan Sisters, of Wheaton, Illinois, have held Earth Day events at their motherhouse since 1980. In that time, the sisters have converted portions of their land back to native prairie and planted a pine grove and butterfly and vegetable gardens. They also have switched to hybrid vehicles, installed solar panels and created peace and cosmic walk paths for contemplating creation in nature.

Image
Fr. Edwin Borlasa of the Missionaries of the Sacred Heart speaks during the May 20 webinar, showing how disguarded plastics are turned into "eco-bricks" for the missionaries' seminary in the Philippines. (NCR screenshot)

In the Philippines, the Missionaries of the Sacred Heart have established plastic banks where people can exchange change discarded plastic items for food. The collected plastics, which can take thousands of years to decompose, are then turned into "eco-bricks" that the priests and brothers use to build barriers in vegetable gardens, landscaping and even altars at their seminary.

"Prayer is integral to this whole process" of taking action on behalf of the environment, Kinsey said, because it "enables us to be in a sacred action for change."

ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: The Climate Change Thread

Post by wosbald » Thu May 27, 2021 8:15 am

+JMJ+

Vatican launches seven-year Laudato Si’ action plan
Image
Pope Francis delivers a recorded video message during a news conference to unveil a new platform for action based on his 2015 encyclical, Laudato Si', at the Vatican May 25, 2021. The Vatican Dicastery for Promoting Integral Human Development helped close the special year dedicated to Laudato Si' by unveiling initiatives to promote the message and concrete action called for by the encyclical. (Credit: Paul Haring/CNS)

ROME — As the Vatican’s special year dedicated to papal eco-encyclical Laudato Si’ comes to a close, they have launched a seven-year action plan designed to encourage strategic actors to commit to achieving total sustainability with Pope Francis’s environmental advocacy as a guide.

In a May 25 video message, Pope Francis called the action plan, called the “Laudato Si’ Action Platform,” a journey “that will see our communities committed in different ways to becoming totally sustainable, in the spirit of integral ecology.”

“For a long time now, this house that hosts us suffers as a result of wounds that we cause by our predatory attitude, which makes us feel that we are masters of the planet and its resources, and authorizes us to make irresponsible use of the goods God has given us,” the pope said, arguing that this attitude has caused an “ecological crisis without precedent.”

[…]

Pope Francis said humanity has a duty to future generations to overcome selfishness, indifference, and “irresponsible” habits, asking faithful to respect creation and “inaugurate a lifestyle and a society that is finally eco-sustainable.”

“We have the opportunity to prepare a better tomorrow for all,” he said, and asked that Catholics around the world get involved in the action plan at seven different levels: the family; parishes and dioceses; schools and universities; hospitals; businesses and farms; organizations, groups, and movements; and religious institutes.

He also outlined seven different goals for the action plan based on Laudato Si’, which he said were “the response to the cry of the Earth, the response to the cry of the poor, the ecological economy, the adoption of a simple way of life, ecological education, ecological spirituality and community engagement.”

Urging people active in all sectors of society to “work together,” the pope insisted that “Only in this way will we be able to create the future we want: a more inclusive, fraternal, peaceful and sustainable world.”

Father Joshtrom Isaac Kureethadam, coordinator of the “Ecology and Creation” office of the Vatican department for Integral Human Development, outlined the different stages in the implementation process, which he said will be a “synodal process.”

Kureethadam said the reason for a 7-year plan is based on the biblical significance of the number seven.

Year one, he said, will be dedicated to planning through community building, resource sharing, and drafting local action plans. The next five years will be dedicated to concrete action, while the last year will be a “sabbatical” year dedicated to “praise and thanking God,” he said.

This process can only be achieved through partnership in the spirit of the “the synodal path to which Pope Francis is inviting the whole of humanity,” Kureethadam said, saying the next seven years “will be a synodal journey, working together.”

In his video message, Pope Francis said “there is hope” for the environment despite the damage being done.

“We can all collaborate, each one with his own culture and experience, each one with her own initiatives and capacities, so that our mother Earth may be restored to her original beauty and creation may once again shine according to God’s plan,” he said.

Asked whether Pope Francis plans to attend the United Nations COP26 summit on climate, scheduled to take place in Glasgow in November, Ghanaian Cardinal Peter Turkson, head of the Vatican’s office for Integral Human Development, said “We are hoping and we are keeping our fingers crossed.”

[…]

ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: The Climate Change Thread

Post by wosbald » Mon Jun 07, 2021 10:16 am

+JMJ+

Working groups help Vatican prepare Laudato Si' Action Platform for launch [In-Depth]
Image

Image
Hikers walk past a field of wild narcissi flowers in the Eifel region close to the German-Belgian border, April 16, near Höfen, Germany. The Vatican has consulted with many people around the world for its Laudato Si' Action Platform, which launches in October. (CNS/Wolfgang Rattay, Reuters)

The months leading up to the Vatican's unveiling of its Laudato Si' Action Platform in late May were filled with meetings among many people around the world.

In assembling the ambitious initiative to make the global church a beacon of faith-fueled sustainability, the Vatican consulted far and wide and assembled a web of working groups to offer feedback and fine-tune the massive undertaking.

Matthew Worsham, the energy efficiency and renewable energy manager at the University of Dayton, was among those called into service.

"I mean, how often do you get a letter inviting you to join a project that the Vatican is doing?" he told EarthBeat.

More work is yet to come for Worsham and the hundreds of people and Catholic organizations tapped by the Dicastery for Promoting Integral Human Development as part of its broad consultation to refine the action platform before its full launch, set for Oct. 4, the feast of St. Francis of Assisi and the end of the annual ecumenical Season of Creation.

The Laudato Si' Action Platform is an effort to move the global church to sustainability by inviting all types of church institutions to embark on seven-year, action-oriented journeys to combat climate change and address environmental issues in the spirit of Pope Francis' encyclical "Laudato Si': on Care for Our Common Home."

[…]

Catholics can join the inaugural wave by registering their organizations on the Laudato Si' Action Platform website between now and October. In the meantime, the working groups are focused on adapting the platform's seven overarching Laudato Si' goals to the context of each sector and varying circumstances.

Image
A woman uses a hand pump to fill up a container with drinking water in Chennai, India, in this June 25, 2019, file photo. Water protection is one of the Laudato Si' Action Platform's seven overarching goals. (CNS/P. Ravikumar, Reuters)

Adapting goals to local needs

The seven sets of goals cover areas like responding to cry of the Earth and the cry of the poor, ecological economics, ecological education and spirituality and adopting simple lifestyles.

Each goal is broken down into several outcomes — for instance, under cry of the Earth are climate change mitigation, biodiversity protection, water protection and distribution and care of the land. Each of those outcomes are then broken into specific actions, or footsteps in the jargon of the platform's seven-year journey. In the case of biodiversity protection, suggested activities include planting native trees and grasses and protecting pollinators.

The dicastery has outlined a general roadmap for the seven years, with the first spent developing plans and gathering resources, followed by five years of concrete efforts toward the goals, through the roughly 90 suggested actions. The final year will be a "sabbatical" to celebrate accomplishments.

[…]

Catholics 'hungry' for sustainability guides

Like other sectors, the university working group will spend the coming months gathering resources and examples of actions from around the world that fit each of the goals. Separate pages on the main Laudato Si' Action Platform website will house guides for each sector.

[…]

The university working group categorized goals into beginning, mid-range and advanced steps. That's a recognition that schools will be joining the platform with varying levels of work in sustainability and ecological education, and what appears simple in one geographic region may be a significant challenge in another. For example, it is easier to start a recycling program at a U.S. college or parish than in India, where trash management is a major problem, Schuck said.

"The expectations for universities in these different areas have got to be very different," he said.

The working group has devised a step-by-step guide to help a university organize itself and get key leaders on board before it even begins setting goals.

[…]

In the area of energy use, Worsham sees much "low-hanging fruit" for Catholic facilities, especially in increasing efficiency. He hopes the platform will accelerate such actions, which can save money while also affecting the larger energy market.

"There's a huge footprint that the church has, and I do think that investment on behalf of the church in these renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies will make a substantial impact," he said.

Image
Wind turbines operate at sunrise in the Permian Basin oil and natural gas production area in Big Spring, Texas, Feb. 12, 2019. The message of Pope Francis' encyclical, "Laudato Si', on Care for Our Common Home," continues to be prophetic for a pandemic-hit and post-pandemic world, according to the Vatican office responsible for environmental concerns. (CNS photo/Nick Oxford, Reuters)

Momentum, bishops' backing will be crucial

For all its ambition, the Laudato Si' Action Platform still faces challenges.

One is getting institutions to take part, with the dicastery envisioning the number doubling each year. And once church groups are in the program, maintaining interest and momentum over seven years will be crucial.

It may also be difficult for organizations to know where to start on sustainability. Worsham said one goal of the action platform is to provide that map and help "lower the barrier of entry for organizations of all different sizes."

[…]

And then there's a question familiar to Catholics involved in environmental work: Will bishops be on board?

[Paz Artaza-Regan, the program manager coordinating creation care teams for the Catholic Climate Covenant and a member of the working group on parishes and dioceses] said the bishops' role is crucial not just for parishes and dioceses, but for organizations in all sectors.

"The moment the bishop's office says this is an important ministry of the church, it's usually followed by priests that go, 'Oh, I see my bishop's OK with this,' " she said. "It's got that synergy that diocesan efforts spur parish-based efforts."

Bishops and other church people in the Global South often show greater interest than those in the U.S. in connecting the cry of the Earth and the cry of the poor, partly because they "see these issues day in and day out," she said.

She hopes the platform will help bridge different experiences around the world, helping to bring about an ecological conversion that will lead to more actions by the church.

The goal, she added, is that "at the end of this journey … we can truly say that the global Catholic Church has stepped up and has said that this is an important thing … [and] as a global church, see the global issue, address it locally and help those that don't have the resources to do it themselves."

ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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