The Climate Change Thread

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Re: The Climate Change Thread

Post by wosbald » Tue Apr 14, 2020 8:15 am

+JMJ+

'Apocalyptical hope' is essential for living in the heart of a pandemic [In-Depth, Opinion]
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Archbishop Bernard Hebda of St. Paul and Minneapolis prays in front of the Blessed Sacrament at the Cathedral of St. Paul in St. Paul March 27. Earlier he blessed the city off in the background. (CNS/The Catholic Spirit/Dave Hrbacek)

Martin Buber, an existential philosopher, asks us a question that seems inescapable in these times of pandemic:
We ask ourselves about hope for this moment. With this, those of us who question ourselves perceive it not only as extremely distressing, but also as a moment where no different perspectives appear, where the future is not presented to us as a time of clarity and elevation. And yet, precisely because we seek a better perspective, we speak of hope.
With his first letter, Peter reminded the early Christians in Asia Minor to "always be ready to give an explanation to anyone who asks you for a reason for your hope" (3:15). So in the face of this current coronavirus outbreak, what reason for hope do we give as believers in Jesus?

[…]

The perspective of hope must be the essential element of any look at our situation of living in the heart of this pandemic. That doesn't mean naivety or an idealized view of a non-existent reality. Instead, it's hope in the certainty of knowing we're called to be participants in providing a firm and consistent response toward conversion, and according to times, places and persons — each key to discernment in the tradition of St. Ignatius of Loyola. We are called to make ourselves aware that our actions will be part of the journey to overcome this crisis in a communitarian way, and with an unavoidable option for the most vulnerable and excluded of our societies in the time of this pandemic and beyond it.

We must associate our hope with the discontent and denouncing of situations of structural sin that become more visible in this growing crisis: in the midst of obscene planetary inequality, and in the poverty and opportunism of many supposed civil servants at so many levels and in so many spaces. Hope for these times must be strengthened by the ability to overcome the predominant throwaway culture, which is sustained by an individualistic vision for one's own benefit and well-being. If we are to get out of this situation, and we have no doubt that we will, it will be together and by opening new unseen pathways.

Above all, our hope cannot be naive, sustained by a childish faith that puts everything in the hands of a quasi-magical God, or a God who acts as a cruel judge who's alien to our passage through the valley of death, saving some while discarding others.

Rather, our hope must be rooted on the certainty of the mystery of a God who is acting and present in our reality, despite our inability to understand or perceive it. A God whose presence comes to life in the smallest and most unexpected gestures of solidarity and encounter. A God whose presence makes the difference between life and death every day: in the daily honest expressions of love that emerge in spite of uncertainty, in the decisions that make a difference for those who most need a presence or a comforting word, in the ability to recognize the need to stay at home so as not to be the cause of further spread of the virus, and from there to the most transcendental structural actions for the care of life of all, and especially the most vulnerable.

At the end of this journey, each of us must ask ourselves how this experience has transformed us from within, and in the depths of our being, to be new women and men in so many explicit and credible ways. With that, we must also assume the task of reconfiguring our lives and societies in coherence with this call to profound conversion, so that how we live has a meaning beyond simply surviving. A way of living that is more than predominance of the strongest or remaining in the sensation of failure due to so many irrecoverable and irremediable losses that result from injustice, inequality, violence and a lack of fraternity so often naturalized in us.

God's promise assures that evil and unjustified death will never have the last word, no matter how much it seems to have reached the top. God's promise in the apocalypse is the culmination of the Gospel in which the commitment of an all-loving Father assures us that he is with us until the end of time, and that we will encounter light and hope, so by no means can this be an end.

The coronavirus pandemic is an invitation to believe irremediably in this creator God, and in his promise to accompany us as we assume our own role as co-creators until we come out of this situation through and with hope.

[…]

ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: The Climate Change Thread

Post by hugodrax » Tue Apr 14, 2020 9:18 am

wosbald wrote:
Tue Apr 14, 2020 8:15 am
+JMJ+

'Apocalyptical hope' is essential for living in the heart of a pandemic [In-Depth, Opinion]
Image

Image
Archbishop Bernard Hebda of St. Paul and Minneapolis prays in front of the Blessed Sacrament at the Cathedral of St. Paul in St. Paul March 27. Earlier he blessed the city off in the background. (CNS/The Catholic Spirit/Dave Hrbacek)

Martin Buber, an existential philosopher, asks us a question that seems inescapable in these times of pandemic:
We ask ourselves about hope for this moment. With this, those of us who question ourselves perceive it not only as extremely distressing, but also as a moment where no different perspectives appear, where the future is not presented to us as a time of clarity and elevation. And yet, precisely because we seek a better perspective, we speak of hope.
With his first letter, Peter reminded the early Christians in Asia Minor to "always be ready to give an explanation to anyone who asks you for a reason for your hope" (3:15). So in the face of this current coronavirus outbreak, what reason for hope do we give as believers in Jesus?

[…]

The perspective of hope must be the essential element of any look at our situation of living in the heart of this pandemic. That doesn't mean naivety or an idealized view of a non-existent reality. Instead, it's hope in the certainty of knowing we're called to be participants in providing a firm and consistent response toward conversion, and according to times, places and persons — each key to discernment in the tradition of St. Ignatius of Loyola. We are called to make ourselves aware that our actions will be part of the journey to overcome this crisis in a communitarian way, and with an unavoidable option for the most vulnerable and excluded of our societies in the time of this pandemic and beyond it.

We must associate our hope with the discontent and denouncing of situations of structural sin that become more visible in this growing crisis: in the midst of obscene planetary inequality, and in the poverty and opportunism of many supposed civil servants at so many levels and in so many spaces. Hope for these times must be strengthened by the ability to overcome the predominant throwaway culture, which is sustained by an individualistic vision for one's own benefit and well-being. If we are to get out of this situation, and we have no doubt that we will, it will be together and by opening new unseen pathways.

Above all, our hope cannot be naive, sustained by a childish faith that puts everything in the hands of a quasi-magical God, or a God who acts as a cruel judge who's alien to our passage through the valley of death, saving some while discarding others.

Rather, our hope must be rooted on the certainty of the mystery of a God who is acting and present in our reality, despite our inability to understand or perceive it. A God whose presence comes to life in the smallest and most unexpected gestures of solidarity and encounter. A God whose presence makes the difference between life and death every day: in the daily honest expressions of love that emerge in spite of uncertainty, in the decisions that make a difference for those who most need a presence or a comforting word, in the ability to recognize the need to stay at home so as not to be the cause of further spread of the virus, and from there to the most transcendental structural actions for the care of life of all, and especially the most vulnerable.

At the end of this journey, each of us must ask ourselves how this experience has transformed us from within, and in the depths of our being, to be new women and men in so many explicit and credible ways. With that, we must also assume the task of reconfiguring our lives and societies in coherence with this call to profound conversion, so that how we live has a meaning beyond simply surviving. A way of living that is more than predominance of the strongest or remaining in the sensation of failure due to so many irrecoverable and irremediable losses that result from injustice, inequality, violence and a lack of fraternity so often naturalized in us.

God's promise assures that evil and unjustified death will never have the last word, no matter how much it seems to have reached the top. God's promise in the apocalypse is the culmination of the Gospel in which the commitment of an all-loving Father assures us that he is with us until the end of time, and that we will encounter light and hope, so by no means can this be an end.

The coronavirus pandemic is an invitation to believe irremediably in this creator God, and in his promise to accompany us as we assume our own role as co-creators until we come out of this situation through and with hope.

[…]
Planetary inequality?

Poverty of civil servants?

Pathways?

Give that man a guitar.
Everything we hear is an opinion, not a fact. Everything we see is a perspective, not the truth
—Marcus Aurelius

non nobis, Domine, non nobis, sed nomini tuo da gloriam

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Re: The Climate Change Thread

Post by wosbald » Mon Apr 20, 2020 11:42 pm

+JMJ+

Advocates call attention to pandemic's wrath on 'essential' farmworkers [In-Depth]
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Migrant workers clean fields near Salinas, California, March 30. (CNS/Reuters/Shannon Stapleton)

Washington — As those working from home escalated their complaints or jokes on Twitter about Zoom meetings, the United Farm Workers of America offered a reality check March 20 in the form of tweet: "You can't pick strawberries remotely."

"The people who put food on our table do not get to telecommute," the labor organization said in a mid-March statement calling attention to the plight of the country's more than 2 million farmworkers.

There may be toilet paper shortages in U.S. supermarkets, but the country's supply of fruit and vegetables and other staples such as meats and dairy produced by the labor of farmworkers — many of them migrants — remains steady thanks to those essential workers. Yet many of them toil without basic protections, their supporters say.

Even while facing lack of access to adequate health care or wages and immigration woes stemming from the H-2A visa program that allows some of them to work legally in the U.S., the largely unseen workers have kept, until now, the country's food supply moving.

"The irony is that (now) they're saying they are essential. They've always been essential," said Carlos Marentes, founder and director of the Border Agricultural Workers Center in El Paso, Texas, in an April 14 interview with Catholic News Service.

They're considered so essential that on April 15, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security announced a temporary easing of immigration regulations to allow businesses to employ them faster and for longer periods of time than before — an unusual move for an administration that has sought to curtail immigration.

In a statement, the U.S. Department of Agriculture said the temporary changes would help U.S. farmers who employ foreign farmworkers "avoid disruptions" in employment and "protect the nation's food supply chain."

No matter how important they are to the nation, however, there's always been a "historical abandonment" of farmworkers, Marentes said, and this is a time to go beyond "sentimental blackmail" — offering praise for what farmworkers do, without also calling for protection for their rights.

Even though they're considered essential workers, a looming threat some farmworkers are facing are efforts to lower their salaries at this critical time. Last year, the Trump administration proposed changes in how wages are calculated for those who use the H-2A visa program, essentially lowering their pay.

The H-2A program is a guest worker program, which allows agricultural employers to bring workers from other countries — primarily Mexico — to the U.S. to work on their farms, said Ashley Feasley, director of policy for Migration and Refugee Services at the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops.

"The workers who produce our food are essential workers (roughly 2.5 million agricultural laborers total), and they have been declared so. Yet there are announcements from the White House about reducing the wages of guest workers," she said in an April 14 email to CNS. "This is unjust to further exploit a population that is working to put food on people's tables at this time."

[…]

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Agricultural workers labor in a Marina, California, field March 30. (CNS/Reuters/Shannon Stapleton)

[…]

ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: The Climate Change Thread

Post by wosbald » Mon Apr 27, 2020 11:44 pm

+JMJ+

Creation is sacred gift deserving respect, care, pope says on Earth Day [In-Depth]
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Pope Francis holds his weekly general audience April 22, 2020, in the papal library in the Apostolic Palace. Marking the celebration of Earth Day, the pope dedicated his audience talk to urging people to protect the earth and its inhabitants. (CNS/Vatican Media)

Vatican City — Humanity has failed to take care of the earth and its inhabitants, sinning against God and his gift of creation, Pope Francis said.

Celebrating Earth Day, which fell during the "Easter season of renewal, let us pledge to love and esteem the beautiful gift of the earth, our common home, and to care for all members of our human family," he said during his livestreamed weekly general audience from the Vatican.

The pope dedicated his catechesis April 22 to a reflection on the human and Christian responsibility to care for the earth, humanity's common home. The day marked the 50th Earth Day, which was established in 1970 to raise public awareness and concern for the environment and its impact on people's health and all life. This year also marks the fifth anniversary of the pope's encyclical, "Laudato Si', on Care for Our Common Home."

In his catechesis, the pope said Earth Day was "an occasion for renewing our commitment to love and care for our common home and for the weaker members of our human family."

"As the tragic coronavirus pandemic has taught us, we can overcome global challenges only by showing solidarity with one another and embracing the most vulnerable in our midst," he said.

[…]

"We have failed to care for the earth, our garden-home; we have failed to care for our brothers and sisters. We have sinned against the earth, against our neighbors and ultimately against the Creator, the benevolent father who provides for everyone and desires us to live in communion and flourish together," he said.

It is imperative that people restore "a harmonious relationship" with the earth and with the rest of humanity, he said.

It requires a new way of looking at the earth, not as a "storehouse of resources for us to exploit," but as a sacred gift for sustaining all of humanity.

The pope said so many natural tragedies "are the earth's response to our mistreatment."

"If I ask the Lord now what he thinks, I don't think he will tell me something very good. We are the ones who have ruined the work of the Lord!" the pope said.

"In today's celebration of Earth Day, we are called to renew our sense of sacred respect for the earth, for it is not just our home but also God's home. This should make us all the more aware that we stand on holy ground!" Francis said.

An "ecological conversion," which stems from a loving and respectful contemplation of the earth's beauty and leads to concrete action is needed, he said.

Because the world and all its people are interdependent, the pope said, the whole international community must cooperate in the protection "of our common home."

For this reason, the pope urged leaders to "guide the preparations for two important international conferences" — the COP15 on biological diversity to be held in Kunming, China, and the COP26 on climate change in Glasgow, Scotland, both of which have been postponed because of the coronavirus pandemic.

The pope said he supported the many forms of cooperative action on national and local levels.

"It will help if people at all levels of society come together to create a popular movement" from the grassroots, much the same way Earth Day was founded, he said.

[…]

ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: The Climate Change Thread

Post by wosbald » Thu Apr 30, 2020 10:52 am

+JMJ+

Climate crisis will deepen the pandemic; A green stimulus plan can tackle both [In-Depth, Opinion]
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Solar panels on the roof of SunPower Corporation in Richmond, California, seen March 18, 2010 (Reuters/Kim White)

[This story, originally published by The Guardian, is a part of Covering Climate Now's week of coverage focused on climate solutions, to mark the 50th anniversary of Earth Day. Covering Climate Now is a global journalism collaboration committed to strengthening coverage of the climate story.]

==============================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================

[…]

Climate change is about to supercharge the coronavirus emergency. In April, California's wildfire season will start. Restrictions on work caused by the pandemic will make it harder for firefighters to conduct controlled burns that steer fires — and smoke — from homes. Californians' lungs could face COVID-19 and unusually intense smoke at the same time. A third of the country also faces serious flood risk through the spring. And in summer and fall, forecasters predict "above average probability for major hurricanes making landfall along the continental United States". We're already seeing this catastrophic convergence elsewhere: In Ecuador, a muted government response to flooding in indigenous communities, for fear of spreading the virus; in Fiji, devastated by Cyclone Harold this week, 19 confirmed coronavirus cases are casting doubt on how to rebuild.

Here too, we will need to find ways to do the needed relief work without deepening the pandemic. Amid all this suffering, the case for bold moves to tackle the miseries of inequality, COVID-19, and climate at once will get clearer.

Image

Moreover, green stimulus is the only option for a smooth transition to the 21st century green economy. The era of dirty energy is ending. Even the conservative CBNC analyst Jim Cramer has warned investors that oil stocks are no longer safe investments, as society is increasingly repudiating fossil fuels. Giant investors like Blackrock are gradually winding down their investments in carbon. And at the European level, and in countries like Germany and South Korea, a green stimulus-based recovery is becoming the consensus choice, with investments in efficiency and clean energy seen as obvious drivers of economic reconstruction.

Here in the US, green stimulus is easily the best way to create good jobs through public investment. According to a 2011 World Bank study, $1 million invested in the oil and gas in the United States creates just five jobs, compared to 17 jobs per million dollars invested in energy-saving building retrofits, 22 jobs for mass transit, 13 for wind, and 14 for solar. Kammen's research and that of other institutes all concur that investment in a modern green economy is a more efficient job creator than the fossil sector.

The longer-term vision of the green stimulus is a more rewarding, lifelong career of dignified green work. We should also invest in STEM education for all children and create apprenticeship programs in vulnerable communities, matched with new careers for workers to enter. And by directly investing in frontline communities, following best practices in California, we can bring technologies like solar and battery storage to neighborhoods that have been scandalously left out of the clean energy boom so far. Plus, these same nimble, local solutions make neighborhoods more resilient to extreme weather. Local storage and nested microgrids make the power system, including healthcare facilities, more reliable during disasters. We'd be making environmental, economic, and social improvements in the same places, at the same time.

[…]

It seems counterintuitive, but the timing for such a Green Stimulus is perfect. Bridge-loans and advance payments on public green purchases of goods like solar panels and electric vehicles for public use would stabilize firms' and workers' finances. Announcing initiatives like a Climate Conservation Corps would give young people eager to work jobs to apply for, and plan to start. And desk workers across the economy could get on Zoom and do paperwork to make green projects shovel-ready the minute it's safe to break ground. (Indeed, a major reason the 2009 Obama stimulus faltered was months wasted on paperwork.)

Each of us has lived through climate-fueled disasters — in Cohen's case, Hurricane Sandy, and in Kammen's, last year's devastating wildfires. We agree with the environmental justice advocates who argued then that disaster recovery shouldn't be about trying to bounce back to how things were before the disaster. We don't want to bounce back to a January 2020 economy when half the country lived paycheck to paycheck; unchecked carbon pollution endangered our future; and racial inequalities made people of color so vulnerable to disease. Rather, by deploying a Green Stimulus that centers workers and communities, we can bounce forward together.

ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: The Climate Change Thread

Post by wosbald » Sun May 03, 2020 11:18 pm

+JMJ+

Laudato Si’ at five: Dioceses embrace pope’s call for care of the earth [In-Depth]
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A cormorant is seen on the Anacostia River April 26, 2020, near Bladensburg, MD. Dioceses and other organizations around the world are planning to mark the fifth anniversary of Pope Francis's encyclical on care for creation with online events and prayers during Laudato Si' Week May 16-24, 2020. (Credit: Chaz Muth/CNS.)

CLEVELAND, Ohio — The Catholic Church in the Archdiocese of Indianapolis is “greening.”

So are the dioceses of Stockton, California; Joliet, Illinois; and others across the United States.

Participants in diocesan environmental ministries credit Pope Francis’ 2015 encyclical, “Laudato Si’, on Care for Our Common Home,” for raising awareness and motivating Catholics and others to act in countless ways to protect creation.

“The pope’s encyclical lays out the scene very well and is something we can have an impact with,” said John Mundell, an environmental consultant and a member of Our Lady of Lourdes Parish in Indianapolis, who is a leader in the archdiocese’s creation care ministry.

“Besides the environment being part of our faith, there’s a resurrection (in the encyclical) of some of the core values we should have. It is living the Gospel, living simply, loving your neighbor. It’s all part of Catholic social teaching. That’s the core,” he told Catholic News Service as the encyclical’s fifth anniversary neared.

A weeklong church-wide observance is planned to mark Pope Francis’ signing of the encyclical May 24, 2015. Laudato Si’ Week, set for May 16-24, will include a number of online workshops. The week, sponsored by the Vatican Dicastery for Integral Human Development, ends with a day of prayer May 24, a Sunday, at noon local time.

“It’s a time for Catholics around the world to pray, reflect and prepare to build a better world together,” said Anna Wagner, director of network engagement for the Global Catholic Climate Movement, which is working with RENOVA+, an Argentine Catholic organization promoting the encyclical, to facilitate the week with the dicastery.

A website — laudatosiweek.org/ — includes a video message from the pope and other resources for observing the week.

[…]

Despite the stay-at-home orders and social-distancing guidelines around the world, the pandemic has not halted plans to celebrate the encyclical’s anniversary.

Laudato Si’ Week is perhaps the highest-profile church-sponsored event. The week “launches a yearlong journey of transformation, as we grow through the crisis of the current moment by praying, reflecting and preparing together for a better world to come tomorrow,” the dicastery said.

The May 24 day of prayer will allow Catholics around the globe to be united in spirit, said Wagner of the Global Catholic Climate Movement. “That’s a really special opportunity to pray together for a more just future, to pray for our shared home and be united in a wave of prayer,” she said.

The daily online workshops will discuss ecological spirituality, sustainability and social justice advocacy, Wagner added.

“We hope this moment can be a time for reflection and remembering what’s important, which is our humanity and our common home, and that we can be a part of creating a more just future and creating more care for our common home coming out of Laudato Si’ Week.”

Joining the effort is the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops and the Catholic Climate Covenant.

[…]

ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: The Climate Change Thread

Post by wosbald » Mon May 04, 2020 10:46 pm

+JMJ+

Amazon’s indigenous peoples getting coronavirus from illegal miners [In-Depth]
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Yanomami Indians follow agents of Brazil's environmental agency during an operation against illegal gold mining on indigenous land in the heart of the Amazon rainforest. The Brazilian bishops' conference has established a commission to assist dioceses and prelatures in areas where mining operations are harming communities and the environment. (Credit: Bruno Kelly/Reuters via CNS)

ROSARIO, Argentina — According to the Pan-Amazon Ecclesial Network (REPAM), the people of the Amazon region are more at risk to COVID-19 coronavirus pandemic, due to the lack of proper educational system and to the inaccessibility to adequate hygienic and sanitary services.

By April 29, over 967 people in the Amazon region had died of COVID-19, with 16.498 having tested positive for the coronavirus.

Mauricio Lopez, REPAM’S executive secretary, also told Crux some local governments “have been unable to implement adequate measures to care for the most vulnerable communities.”

He pointed to many communities in the nine-country Amazon region that live in semi-isolation or in voluntary isolation.

“The mandatory lockdown and its enforcement in the cities has left the region more vulnerable to illegal extractivist industries, that are responsible not only for the destruction they’re causing to the ecosystem, but are also to blame for importing the virus to the region, to communities that have an immune system that is very different to ours,” he said.

According to Lopez, who played a key role helping organize last October’s Synod of Bishops on the Amazon region, some of the communities are speaking of a “potential genocide.”

“These are communities that face a greater vulnerability because they have a very precarious health structure,” he said. “And you also have to take into account that the lives of these communities make it really hard to follow some of the measures suggested, such as isolation, because most of these people live day-to-day, with an economy of subsistence.”

Caritas, the international charitable arm of the Church, has played a “key role” in providing humanitarian aid such as food and basic health assistance.

Lopez said the gravity of the pandemic is so large that his aid might prove insufficient, but proves the Church is present “where no one else cares to go.”

“We’re living an option of a Church that goes out, that cooperates with local authorities respecting the protocols, but assisting, caring for, accompanying and looking for ways to answer to the needs of the population,” he told Crux.

An article published April 11 in National Geographic, says that despite the fact many tribes in Brazil’s Amazon region have gone back into isolation, for some it might be too late if they have been exposed to the coronavirus.

[…]

ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: The Climate Change Thread

Post by wosbald » Sun May 10, 2020 10:58 pm

+JMJ+

Land conflicts have grown under Bolsonaro, according to Brazilian Church report [In-Depth]
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Indigenous women demonstrate in Brasilia in defense of their rights in August 2019. (Credit Tiago Miotto/CIMI, courtesy to Crux)

SÃO PAULO, Brazil — Land conflicts grew in Brazil in 2019, which was President Jair Bolsonaro’s first year in office. According to the Bishops’ Conference’s Land Pastoral Commission (known as the CPT), there were 1,254 incidents in the country last year, an increase of eleven percent compared with 2018.

The CPT’s annual Conflicts in the Countryside report, published since 1985, showed that the number of murders grew from 28 in 2018 to 32 in 2019 and death threats went from 165 to 201.

Among nine indigenous persons that were killed in land conflicts in 2019, seven were community leaders — the highest rate of leaders killed in 11 years. About one fifth of the total number of land conflicts involved indigenous groups.

“We consider as land conflicts all occurrences in which companies or ranchers dispute the possession of federal lands that had already been occupied by peasants, indigenous peoples, and other traditional groups,” explained Paulo Cesar Moreira, a member of the CPT’s national coordination committee.

“Violence is inherent to such conflicts. Since colonial times, land has been an object of dispute in Brazil,” he told Crux.

According to the U.S.-born Sister Jean Ann Bellini, who is also a member of the CPT’s national coordination committee, land conflicts in Brazil are related to the existence of large portions of public lands owned by the government, which are the continuous focus of land grabbing.

[…]

“Since Bolsonaro’s election in October of 2018, there had been a rising violence in the countryside. He established a strong alliance with ranchers and they soon confirmed their stance, with an exponential growth in the actions against indigenous groups,” he said.

Bolsonaro many times expressed his opposition to the demarcation of lands for indigenous and quilombola [descendants of slaves who fled captivity during the colonial and imperial times and settled in rural or forest regions] communities. In August of 2019, he declared that there’s “too much land for so few Indians” and that he didn’t intend to give out new land grants, even though there are about 500 new requests waiting for the government’s approval.

He also implied that there were irregularities in previous demarcation processes and that indigenous peoples were selling their reservation lands to foreigners.

“In his administration, the government’s policies for the rural poor became even more precarious. Agribusiness became a force with direct political presence in the Executive, with high officials who come from that sector,” Moreira claimed.

[…]

“There’s a growing consciousness of the need to organize among rural and forest communities. In the past few years, many times we heard traditional peoples and peasants saying that knowing their rights is not enough, given that the State doesn’t respect the law,” Bellini said.

Moreira said he believes the Brazilian Church’s support to the rural and forest peoples has intensified since Pope Francis published the 2015 encyclical Laudato Si’ and called last year’s Amazon synod.

“The Synod for the Pan-Amazon region was an illuminating process, which invigorated the work of our pastoral agents,” Moreira said.

ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: The Climate Change Thread

Post by Del » Mon May 11, 2020 7:55 am

No comment.
"Anyone who knows anything of experts will know one thing for certain; that they will always be disturbing our way of living; and therefore we shall always be disputing their right of governing." - GKC. Feb 11, 1933.

The future is certain; it’s the past that keeps changing. ~ Old Soviet joke

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Re: The Climate Change Thread

Post by wosbald » Thu May 14, 2020 7:50 am

+JMJ+

The Green New Deal can empower the Catholic principle of subsidiarity [In-Depth, Opinion]
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The Mueller neighborhood, in Austin, Tex., was designed to increase the use of solar power. (iStock/JamesBrey)

[…]

First defined by Pope Pius XI in 1931, the principle of subsidiarity discourages higher levels of society from assuming tasks that can be effectively achieved by lower levels, such as families, businesses, labor unions, civic groups and local governments. At the same time, the principle requires that higher levels of society assist the work of lower levels as needed to achieve essential goals. The ideal of subsidiarity is a society where local groups have the freedom and support to make well-ordered decisions that affect them, leading to a flourishing of enterprise, initiative and solidarity. Some spheres of life, like education, can be largely managed at the family and local level, while others, like national defense, must by their nature take place at higher levels of society.

Climate change is an issue that requires a high degree of social coordination yet intimately affects family and community life. It is a singular challenge for subsidiarity. As cities and towns across the country switch to wind and solar energy, create high-speed rail and bus lines, upgrade homes, farms and factories, and provide help to affected workers, lower levels of society need the freedom to make choices that are sensitive to local conditions. At the same time, support from the federal government is also needed — to research new technology, to coordinate larger tasks, to ensure that each community does its part and to fund projects, especially in areas that will bear the highest costs of a climate transition.

While the Green New Deal would be a federal initiative, it would not be a set of top-down rules rigidly imposed on local communities.

[…]

For example, imagine a town switching from fossil fuels to wind and solar power. A top-down approach that violates subsidiarity might involve federal bureaucrats imposing this change on the community in a way that neglects local values and conditions. In contrast, the Green New Deal calls for inclusive, democratic decision-making at the local level — families, businesses, labor unions, civic groups and local leaders from each neighborhood working in dialogue to reach Green New Deal goals. For example, communities would decide where to place wind turbines and solar panels, and they would work out details of how they will be operated. This method would be designed to increase public support for the Green New Deal and would at the same time respect the values of human dignity and community as affirmed in Catholic thought.

The Green New Deal is sometimes associated with socialism and, in fact, draws political support from both democratic socialists and defenders of progressive capitalism. But the Green New Deal paradigm is very different from the type of socialism that has been condemned in Catholic social ethics. In church teaching, socialism is typically viewed as a political system that eliminates private property and subsumes human freedom under the power of an all-encompassing totalitarian state — see Pope John Paul II’s 1991 encyclical “Centesimus Annus,” in which he writes that under socialism, “the concept of the person as the autonomous subject of moral decision disappears” (No. 12). In contrast, the Green New Deal seeks to preserve subsidiarity and to empower local action in the face of climate change, leaving space for individuals and families to pursue their own well-being while providing needed federal coordination in response to this challenge.

Any climate transition will be a daunting task, including one that respects local initiative. And there are remaining questions about the Green New Deal, such as how subsidiarity will be embodied in specific laws as they are written, how expansive Green New Deal programs should be and how the framework might support climate action in other countries beyond the United States. Still, with the cost of inaction growing ever higher, there are strong reasons to act.

As Pope Francis noted five years ago in his environmental encyclical “‘Laudato Si’,” “Attempts to resolve all problems through uniform regulations or technical interventions can lead to overlooking the complexities of local problems which demand the active participation of all members of the community.” At times, climate proposals have tended toward the top-down focus Pope Francis warns against. In this context, the Green New Deal’s emphasis on local action and decision-making is well-worth considering. It could be the key to addressing climate change while also strengthening the bonds of community in a way that promotes human dignity and flourishing.

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"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: The Climate Change Thread

Post by Jester » Thu May 14, 2020 2:30 pm

FIGHT LAUGH FEAST

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Re: The Climate Change Thread

Post by Del » Thu May 14, 2020 3:26 pm

Marxist communism is also a 'green new deal' and conforms the Catholic principle of subsidiarity, if you look at it just the right way.

And solidarity, too. That's why the Polish labor U***n under communism was named SOLIDARITY.
"Anyone who knows anything of experts will know one thing for certain; that they will always be disturbing our way of living; and therefore we shall always be disputing their right of governing." - GKC. Feb 11, 1933.

The future is certain; it’s the past that keeps changing. ~ Old Soviet joke

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Re: The Climate Change Thread

Post by Del » Thu May 14, 2020 4:20 pm

Jester wrote:
Thu May 14, 2020 2:30 pm
Let's put aside the question as to whether climate change is a real concern, or just another phantom fear that politicians have found to exploit. We can still agree that fossil fuels are not going to last forever, and that there is an external cost of some sort to consuming them. Like the whale oil industry, it is time to evolve into the next level of energy technology.

Let's talk about what can work for us now, in the way of reduced carbon emissions:

A) Electrical Energy

1) Hydroelectric. Dams are basically solar energy, using the solar/water cycle to lift water up high enough to drop it through generators, producing millions of megawatt-hours that are reliably available. Dams also create recreational areas, and reservoirs for agriculture.

2) Nuclear. Nuclear plants are another carbonless way to produce lots of electrical power. France was a major leader in the Paris Accord because they had already invested a great deal into nuke plants, as a way to both reduce carbon and achieve energy independence. Japan and other nations too.

We can't take the American advocates for "Green Energy" seriously until they are willing to consider the utility of nuclear plants. If they aren't reaching for this low-hanging fruit, then they must have some other agenda hidden under their rhetoric.

3) Electric vehicles. These don't help us at all, if the electricity comes from coal. In fact, they probably produce more net carbon than a hybrid car or even a regular gasoline engine. But if we have an excess of carbonless electricity, we can use it to reduce other causes of CO2.

B) Vehicles

1) Biodiesel. We have the agri-tech to develop high-producing oil crops that don't have to be food grade. This is a renewable source that uses last years CO2 to make this year's fuel, achieving zero-net carbon while allowing us to continue using our current machines.

We could even develop sea algae to produce fuel oil, so we don't have to waste valuable farm land or irrigate deserts.

2) Hybrid vehicles. These reduce our CO2 output by 50% for our common vehicular needs. Plus less toxic to build than battery-powered cars. Even if biodiesel costs twice as much as fossil fuel, we are still at the same consumer cost.

3) Mass Transit. Americans have never taken much to mass transit. And the pandemic Dempanic has made that worse. But a number of urban areas could benefit from improved transit systems, if America were ever motivated to reduce our reliance on personal vehicles. Also, lots of parking lots could be developed for more valuable purposes.

C) Home energy.

1) Solar heat. I am surprised that this has not received more attention. It is easy to retrofit an existing home with a system that will heat lots of water by solar radiation. The thermal momentum can heat a Wisconsin home comfortably for many days of deep cold and cloud cover. The dramatic reduction of natural gas used by furnace and water heater will pay for investment in a solar water system within a decade or so.

2) Home windmills and/or solar-electric panels. These supplement electric power from the main utility. I reckon that a little windmill is more effective, less expensive, and less toxic than an array of solar panels, but the technologies are worth exploring.

3) Continued development of energy-efficient devices. Light bulbs have advanced from incandescent to fluorescent to LED. TV screens are much larger and use much less energy than a generation ago. Microwaves and other appliances are ripe for advancement.

We can do much to reduce our consumption of fossil fuels while enjoying improvements to our lives. We don't need a bigger government crisis and an economic shut-down to get there.
"Anyone who knows anything of experts will know one thing for certain; that they will always be disturbing our way of living; and therefore we shall always be disputing their right of governing." - GKC. Feb 11, 1933.

The future is certain; it’s the past that keeps changing. ~ Old Soviet joke

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Re: The Climate Change Thread

Post by hugodrax » Thu May 14, 2020 5:55 pm

I would like to take this opportunity to state that I belong to almost none of the groups Del refers to when he uses the word "we."

Furthermore, to the extent that I do belong to some of the groups Del references when he uses the all-inclusive first person plural pronoun, this does not indicate an acceptance of nor concurrence with his stated opinion as to the general consensus within that group or groups as to any fact or facts under discussion, nor agreement on my part as to any group political response to which Del might propound as a foregone conclusion.

In short, if Del expresses the collective opinion of any group or groups to which you know that I belong or to which you suspect my membership, please understand that I specifically disavow such expression of collective opinion as a sweeping generalization if not outright dissimulation, no doubt the product of a rather provincial outlook on the world, unless and until I specifically concur in writing.

Personally, I blame the public schools.


Thank you.
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Re: The Climate Change Thread

Post by Del » Thu May 14, 2020 6:21 pm

hugodrax wrote:
Thu May 14, 2020 5:55 pm
I would like to take this opportunity to state that I belong to almost none of the groups Del refers to when he uses the word "we."

Furthermore, to the extent that I do belong to some of the groups Del references when he uses the all-inclusive first person plural pronoun, this does not indicate an acceptance of nor concurrence with his stated opinion as to the general consensus within that group or groups as to any fact or facts under discussion, nor agreement on my part as to any group political response to which Del might propound as a foregone conclusion.

In short, if Del expresses the collective opinion of any group or groups to which you know that I belong or to which you suspect my membership, please understand that I specifically disavow such expression of collective opinion as a sweeping generalization if not outright dissimulation, no doubt the product of a rather provincial outlook on the world, unless and until I specifically concur in writing.

Personally, I blame the public schools.


Thank you.
We all thank you for your input.
"Anyone who knows anything of experts will know one thing for certain; that they will always be disturbing our way of living; and therefore we shall always be disputing their right of governing." - GKC. Feb 11, 1933.

The future is certain; it’s the past that keeps changing. ~ Old Soviet joke

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Re: The Climate Change Thread

Post by hugodrax » Thu May 14, 2020 7:02 pm

Del wrote:
Thu May 14, 2020 6:21 pm
hugodrax wrote:
Thu May 14, 2020 5:55 pm
I would like to take this opportunity to state that I belong to almost none of the groups Del refers to when he uses the word "we."

Furthermore, to the extent that I do belong to some of the groups Del references when he uses the all-inclusive first person plural pronoun, this does not indicate an acceptance of nor concurrence with his stated opinion as to the general consensus within that group or groups as to any fact or facts under discussion, nor agreement on my part as to any group political response to which Del might propound as a foregone conclusion.

In short, if Del expresses the collective opinion of any group or groups to which you know that I belong or to which you suspect my membership, please understand that I specifically disavow such expression of collective opinion as a sweeping generalization if not outright dissimulation, no doubt the product of a rather provincial outlook on the world, unless and until I specifically concur in writing.

Personally, I blame the public schools.


Thank you.
We all thank you for your input.
You make it so necessary. While it is bad manners to constantly use the first person singular pronoun, it is surely worse to assume a consensus which might not exist.
Everything we hear is an opinion, not a fact. Everything we see is a perspective, not the truth
—Marcus Aurelius

non nobis, Domine, non nobis, sed nomini tuo da gloriam

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Re: The Climate Change Thread

Post by gaining_age » Thu May 14, 2020 7:07 pm

hugodrax wrote:
Thu May 14, 2020 5:55 pm
I would like to take this opportunity to state that I belong to almost none of the groups Del refers to when he uses the word "we."

Furthermore, to the extent that I do belong to some of the groups Del references when he uses the all-inclusive first person plural pronoun, this does not indicate an acceptance of nor concurrence with his stated opinion as to the general consensus within that group or groups as to any fact or facts under discussion, nor agreement on my part as to any group political response to which Del might propound as a foregone conclusion.

In short, if Del expresses the collective opinion of any group or groups to which you know that I belong or to which you suspect my membership, please understand that I specifically disavow such expression of collective opinion as a sweeping generalization if not outright dissimulation, no doubt the product of a rather provincial outlook on the world, unless and until I specifically concur in writing.

Personally, I blame the public schools.


Thank you.
ooooooh... I should copy and paste that as appropriate. I've had that sense that "I'm not in that 'we'". Mr. Del uses the collective "we" quite generously such that the occasional disclaimer, as such is so well composed by Mr. Drax, is necessary.
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Re: The Climate Change Thread

Post by durangopipe » Thu May 14, 2020 7:42 pm

pandemic Dempanic
Last edited by durangopipe on Thu May 14, 2020 7:56 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: The Climate Change Thread

Post by Del » Thu May 14, 2020 7:48 pm

hugodrax wrote:
Thu May 14, 2020 7:02 pm
Del wrote:
Thu May 14, 2020 6:21 pm
hugodrax wrote:
Thu May 14, 2020 5:55 pm
I would like to take this opportunity to state that I belong to almost none of the groups Del refers to when he uses the word "we."

Furthermore, to the extent that I do belong to some of the groups Del references when he uses the all-inclusive first person plural pronoun, this does not indicate an acceptance of nor concurrence with his stated opinion as to the general consensus within that group or groups as to any fact or facts under discussion, nor agreement on my part as to any group political response to which Del might propound as a foregone conclusion.

In short, if Del expresses the collective opinion of any group or groups to which you know that I belong or to which you suspect my membership, please understand that I specifically disavow such expression of collective opinion as a sweeping generalization if not outright dissimulation, no doubt the product of a rather provincial outlook on the world, unless and until I specifically concur in writing.

Personally, I blame the public schools.


Thank you.
We all thank you for your input.
You make it so necessary. While it is bad manners to constantly use the first person singular pronoun, it is surely worse to assume a consensus which might not exist.
Meh. When I am repeating the blathering of so many right-wing pundits, I am content with the "we." This is the opinion of a sizable minority, perhaps even a whole silent majority.

When I (rarely) have a personal opinion to share, something original to moi, I always use the singular. I don't dare to presume that anyone else already agrees with me.

Either way, it's fun to see how those who disagree express their sides. As long as no one is disagreeable.
"Anyone who knows anything of experts will know one thing for certain; that they will always be disturbing our way of living; and therefore we shall always be disputing their right of governing." - GKC. Feb 11, 1933.

The future is certain; it’s the past that keeps changing. ~ Old Soviet joke

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Re: The Climate Change Thread

Post by Del » Thu May 14, 2020 7:49 pm

durangopipe wrote:
Thu May 14, 2020 7:42 pm
pandemic Dempanic
Sometimes, quoting Del is helpful.
To wit: “No comment.”
:twisted:
"Anyone who knows anything of experts will know one thing for certain; that they will always be disturbing our way of living; and therefore we shall always be disputing their right of governing." - GKC. Feb 11, 1933.

The future is certain; it’s the past that keeps changing. ~ Old Soviet joke

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