I'm Starting to Like This Pope

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Re: I'm Starting to Like This Pope

Post by wosbald » Tue Jan 01, 2019 12:37 pm

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Intra-Thread Trackback: pg 83 / pg 83 / pg 84


AP Exclusive: Vatican letter undermines US cardinal on abuse [In-Depth]
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Pope Francis leaves after celebrating a new year Mass in St. Peter's Basilica at the Vatican, Tuesday, Jan. 1, 2019. Francis celebrated Mass Tuesday in St. Peter's Basilica to formally open 2019. In his homily Francis urged Catholics to allow themselves to be led again as children are led by their mothers. (AP Photo/Andrew Medichini)

VATICAN CITY (AP) — The Vatican blocked U.S. bishops from taking measures to address the clergy sex abuse scandal because U.S. church leaders didn’t discuss the legally problematic proposals with the Holy See enough beforehand, according to a letter obtained by The Associated Press.

The Nov. 11 letter from the Vatican’s Cardinal Marc Ouellet provides the primary reason that Rome balked at the measures that were to be voted on by the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops at its Nov. 12-14 assembly. The blocked vote stunned abuse survivors and other Catholics who were demanding action from U.S. bishops to address clergy sex abuse and cover-up.

Ouellet’s letter undermines the version of events provided by the conference president, Cardinal Daniel DiNardo. It could also provide fodder for questions this week during a spiritual retreat of U.S. bishops, dedicated to the abuse crisis, that opens Wednesday in Chicago.

They may want to know why the draft proposals from the U.S. only arrived at the Vatican on Nov. 8, four days before the U.S. bishops’ meeting began. While the Vatican is known for its slow pace, even the speediest bureaucracy would have found it difficult to review and approve sensitive legal documents over a long weekend.

“Considering the nature and scope of the documents being proposed by the (conference), I believe it would have been beneficial to have allowed for more time to consult with this and other congregations with competence over the ministry and discipline of bishops,” Ouellet wrote to DiNardo. Such back-and-forth, he wrote, would have allowed the documents to “properly mature.”

The main goal of the U.S. bishops’ fall meeting had been to approve a code of conduct for bishops and create a lay-led commission to receive complaints against them. The measures were a crisis response to the scandal over ex-Cardinal Theodore McCarrick, once a senior American cleric who is now accused of molesting minors and adults, and new revelations of old sex abuse cases and their cover-up in Pennsylvania.

DiNardo stunned the bishops when he opened the assembly Nov. 12 by announcing that “at the insistence of the Holy See” the bishops would not be voting on the measures after all. He said the Vatican wanted them to delay a vote until after Francis hosts a global summit in February on preventing sex abuse by priests.

While DiNardo blamed the Vatican, the letter from Ouellet suggests that the Vatican felt that DiNardo had tried to pull a fast one by intentionally withholding legally problematic texts until the last minute. That the Vatican would have wanted a say in crafting the texts is not surprising, given the Holy See alone has exclusive authority to investigate and discipline problem bishops.

“While fully aware that a bishops’ conference enjoys a rightful autonomy ... to discuss and eventually approve measures that are within the conference’s powers, the conference’s work must always be integrated within the hierarchical structure and universal law of the church,” Ouellet wrote.

In a statement Tuesday to The Associated Press, DiNardo characterized the disconnect as a misunderstanding. He said he assumed the Vatican would have had a chance to “review and offer adjustments” to the measures after the U.S. bishops approved them, not before. He insisted that U.S. bishops were not trying to appropriate Vatican powers for themselves.

[…]
"In the end, My Immaculate Heart will triumph." - Our Lady of Fatima

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Re: I'm Starting to Like This Pope

Post by wosbald » Tue Jan 08, 2019 12:25 am

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Pope warns about fragility of international order in annual address to diplomats [In-Depth]
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Pope Francis leads an annual meeting to exchange greetings for the new year with diplomats accredited to the Holy See, at the Vatican Jan. 7. (CNS photo/Ettore Ferrari, pool via Reuters)

Vatican City — Pope Francis issued a stark warning about the fragility of the international order Jan. 7, saying in an annual address to the Vatican's diplomatic corps that "the same attitudes" that led to the failure of the League of Nations now endanger the system of diplomacy set up after World War II.

The pontiff told the some 180 ambassadors accredited to the Holy See that the success of the diplomatic order rests on three foundations: good will among nations, their ability to deal fairly with one another, and openness to compromise.

"Whenever even one of these elements is missing, the result is a search for unilateral solutions and, in the end, the domination of the powerful over the weak," said the pope.

"The League of Nations failed for these very reasons, and one notes with regret that the same attitudes are presently threatening the stability of the major international organizations," he warned, before adding: "It is clear … that relationships within the international community, and the multilateral system as a whole, are experiencing a period of difficulty."

Francis was speaking Jan. 7 in an annual event in which he gives what is often called his "State of the World" address.

[…]

Among the issues the pontiff identified: "nationalistic tendencies," "policies determined more by the search for a quick partisan consensus than by the patient pursuit of the common good," and "a gradual marginalization of the most vulnerable members of the family of nations."

Francis likewise criticized a kind of globalization that he said had "developed in too rapid and disorderly a manner, resulting in a tension between global and local realities."

"The global dimension has to be considered without ever losing sight of the local," said the pontiff. "As a reaction to a 'spherical' notion of globalization, one that levels differences and smoothes out particularities, it is easy for forms of nationalism to reemerge."

"Yet globalization can prove promising to the extent that it can be 'polyhedric,' favoring a positive interplay between the identity of individual peoples and countries and globalization itself, in accordance with the principle that the whole is greater than the part," he said.

Returning to his warning, the pontiff said that some of the issues he was highlighting "go back to the period between the two World Wars, when populist and nationalist demands proved more forceful than the activity of the League of Nations."

"The reappearance of these impulses today is progressively weakening the multilateral system, resulting in a general lack of trust, a crisis of credibility in international political life, and a gradual marginalization of the most vulnerable members of the family of nations," the pope reiterated.

After warning about the overall shape of the international order, Francis spoke to the ambassadors about four "points of contact" he sees between the work of multilateral diplomacy and the Vatican's spiritual mission: the primacy of justice and law, defense of the vulnerable, working to build bridges, and "rethinking our common destiny."

Francis began his reflection on each point by citing from Pope Paul VI's 1965 address to the United Nations, which was the first such speech given by a pontiff.

[…]
"In the end, My Immaculate Heart will triumph." - Our Lady of Fatima

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Re: I'm Starting to Like This Pope

Post by UncleBob » Tue Jan 08, 2019 9:20 am

Pope: Vatican meeting aims to 'shed full light' on sex abuse
Pope Francis says next month's meeting of bishops from around the world aims to "shed full light" on clergy sex abuse and covers-ups.

Speaking to diplomats Monday at the Vatican, Francis called the abuse of minors "one of the vilest and most heinous crimes conceivable." He said the church was working to combat and prevent abuse and its concealment, to uncover church hierarchy's involvement and to deliver justice to minors who have "suffered sexual violence aggravated by the abuse of power and conscience."
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Re: I'm Starting to Like This Pope

Post by wosbald » Tue Jan 15, 2019 4:35 pm

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Pope says recovering humanity a remedy to global indifference [In-Depth]
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Archbishop Vincenzo Paglia, President of the Pontifical Academy for Life. (Credit: Fotos Presidencia El Salvador [CC0], via Wikimedia Commons)

ROME — Pope Francis in a letter to his top body on life issues said the world must recover its sense of humanity in the face of global challenges such as war, conflict and a loss of human dignity and rights, proposing the use of new technologies as a means of developing a response aimed at the common good.

The letter, titled Humana Communitas, or “The Human Community,” was published Jan. 15 and marks the 25th anniversary of the foundation of the Pontifical Academy for Life, which was launched by St. John Paul II in 1994 and is currently headed by Archbishop Vincenzo Paglia.

It was presented to journalists the same day along with the theme of the academy’s coming Feb. 25-27 general assembly, which will focus on “Robotics: People, machines and health.”

In the letter, Francis said the human family was “God’s dream even from before the creation of the world,” and spoke of the need to overcome indifference with fraternity, while promoting the good of the human person through advances in new technologies, while also being aware of the risks.

He reaffirmed Church teaching of marriage between a man and a woman, saying the relationship between a man and a woman “is the primary place where all creation speaks with God and bears witness to his love.”

Francis also told the academy to continue promoting life at every stage, saying that in a world scarred by war and conflict, their task is to “welcome and defend human life.”

Pointing to John Paul II’s defense of the unborn, his opposition to the death penalty and his concern for the quality of human life, Francis said the academy’s work from its inception has been “to promote and protect human life at every stage of its development,” and he urged the body to reaffirm its condemnation of abortion and euthanasia “as extremely grave evils that contradict the Spirit of life and plunge us into the anti-culture of death.”

[…]

“The ever-quickening pace of technological and scientific innovation, and the phenomenon of globalization have multiplied interactions between cultures, religions and different fields of study, and among the many dimensions of our human family and the earth, our common home,” the pope said in his letter, adding that the emphasis on a new humanism is a remedy for current obstacles the human family faces.

Among these obstacles, he said, is the fact that at the moment, the quality of family relationships and social coexistence “appear seriously diminished. Mutual distrust between individuals and peoples is being fed by an inordinate pursuit of self-interest and intense competition that can even turn violent.”

Prosperity is being placed over wellbeing, and sensitivity to tragedies caused by war and violence is diminishing, he said, noting that there is an “anti-culture” of indifference growing in the global community which is “hostile to men and women and in league with the arrogance of wealth.”

“How could it happen that, at the very moment of history when available economic and technological resources make it possible for us to care suitably for our common home and our human family, in obedience to God’s command, those same economic and technological resources are creating our most bitter divisions and our worst nightmares?” he asked, adding that people are increasingly aware of “the spiritual dejection, or even nihilism, that subordinates life itself to a world and a society dominated by this paradox.”

[…]
"In the end, My Immaculate Heart will triumph." - Our Lady of Fatima

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Re: I'm Starting to Like This Pope

Post by wosbald » Wed Jan 16, 2019 9:31 am

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Intra-Thread Trackbacks: pg 79 / pg 79 / pg 79 / pg 79


German prelate says papal enemies want ‘a new conclave’
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Cardinal Walter Kasper, former president of the Pontifical Council for Promoting Christian Unity, leaves a session of the Synod of Bishops on the family at the Vatican in this Oct. 6, 2015, file photo. (Credit: Paul Haring/CNS)

ROME — A German prelate widely considered to be one of Pope Francis’s closest allies has said the current clerical abuse crisis is being used by papal opponents as a platform to expel Francis from the papacy and to elect a new pontiff that suits their agenda.

“There are people who simply don’t like this pontificate. They want it to end as soon as possible to then have, so to say, a new conclave. They also want it to go in their favor, so to it will have a result that suits their ideas,” said German Cardinal Walter Kasper in a new interview.

Kasper, president emeritus of the Pontifical Council for Promoting Christian Unity, spoke of Pope Francis and the current clerical sexual abuse crisis in a recent edition of the “Report München” program, broadcast by German state broadcaster ARD.

In the episode, which also features interviews with American Cardinal Raymond Burke and Irish abuse survivor Marie Collins, Kasper argued that there are some camps in the Church that are taking advantage of the abuse crisis as a platform for expelling Francis from the papacy.

[…]

In his comments on ARD, Kasper said papal opponents are using an “inappropriate” strategy of turning the discussion on the abuse issue “into a discussion about Pope Francis,” which he said amounts to “an abuse of abuse.”

“This diverts attention from the real problem, and this is the bad part of it,” Kapser said, adding that to turn the discussion into one on the Francis pontificate “is distracting us” from focusing on more important matters, such as developing better “means of prevention” when it comes to protecting minors from abuse.
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Re: I'm Starting to Like This Pope

Post by wosbald » Thu Jan 17, 2019 8:19 am

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Catholics must continue seeking pardon for anti-Judaism, pope says
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Rabbi Abraham Skorka of Buenos Aires and Pope Francis embrace after visiting the Western Wall in Jerusalem May 26, 2014. The pope has written the introduction to "The Bible of Friendship," an Italian book of Christian and Jewish commentaries on the first five books of the Bible. Rabbi Skorka wrote one of the commentaries. (Credit: Paul Haring/CNS)

ROME - A few decades of respectful Catholic-Jewish dialogue pale in comparison to “19 centuries of Christian anti-Judaism,” Pope Francis said, so Catholics must continue to ask forgiveness and forge new bonds of respect and friendship with the Jewish community.

“We must work with greater intensity to ask pardon and repair the damage,” the pope said in an introduction to a new Italian book of Christian and Jewish commentaries on passages from the first five books of the Bible, which are known collectively as the Torah or Pentateuch.

Francis said the volume of commentaries, The Bible of Friendship, is an important tool for helping Catholics recognize the Jewish roots of their faith and for promoting concrete Catholic-Jewish cooperation in helping others.

“It is of vital importance for Christians to discover and foster knowledge of the Jewish tradition in order to understand themselves more authentically,” the pope said, and studying the Bible is an essential part of that effort.

Reading the Hebrew Scriptures together, he said, helps people discover the richness of the word of God. “The common objective will be to witness together to the love of the Father throughout the world.”

“The values, traditions and great ideas that characterize Judaism and Christianity must be placed at the service of humanity without ever forgetting the sacredness and authenticity of friendship,” he said.

“For Jews as for Christians there is no doubt that love of God and love for one’s neighbor summarize all the commandments,” he said. “Therefore, Jews and Christians must feel like brothers and sisters, united by the same God and by a rich, common spiritual patrimony on which to base and continue to build the future.”
"In the end, My Immaculate Heart will triumph." - Our Lady of Fatima

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