I'm Starting to Like This Pope

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Re: I'm Starting to Like This Pope

Post by wosbald » Tue Feb 25, 2020 10:37 am

+JMJ+

Intra-Thread Trackbacks: pg 118 / pg 118


On the CNA/Martin Affair [In-Depth, Opinion]
Image

[…]

The standard to which many on the Catholic right hold Fr. Martin is astounding. It’s difficult to believe that he would receive the same kind of suspicion and heightened scrutiny if his apostolate was perceived to be lacking on almost any other social or moral issue facing the Church. It’s next to impossible to imagine somebody like George Weigel or another conservative or libertarian Catholic in the “mater si, magistra no” tradition coming in for this kind of treatment from a purportedly orthodox, mainstream Catholic outlet like CNA. It would be one thing if Father Martin were perceived to be shaky on abortion or euthanasia; there is precedent in the teachings of recent Popes for holding Catholic public figures to a higher standard for orthodoxy on those issues. But the pastoral care of LGBT people — the only subject on which Father Martin claims expertise; he has explicitly denied that he is seeking to challenge actual Catholic doctrine — is not the same kind of non-negotiable. Father Martin (like Weigel) is a Catholic public figure in good standing whose work has been endorsed by multiple bishops and cardinals. He is also (unlike Weigel) a priest who has been appointed to a position in the Vatican’s Dicastery for Communications.

[…]

It’s certainly possible that Father Martin from time to time speaks and acts imprudently in a way that leads other Catholics to have “difficulties” with his message. If this is the case, others might legitimately draw attention to such issues. Personally speaking, I don’t pore over every word Martin says or writes, so I couldn’t say for sure. But he’s been extremely clear that he does not intend to speak or write in a way that challenges Church doctrine. Distrusting and disbelieving his assertions of this rises to a level of suspicion and subjective interpretation that ought itself to be held to a higher standard.

To [JD] Flynn’s credit, his First Things article does cite Martin’s assertion that he does not challenge doctrine on homosexuality, and Flynn says that he is willing to take Martin at his word on this. But this is a sleight of hand; the article immediately pivots to claiming that Martin is undermining Church teaching on a far more fundamental issue, i.e. what it means to be a human person. Unfortunately, Flynn produces absolutely no hard evidence that Martin is undermining anything other than a series of narratives and talking points that people on the Catholic right frequently claim are Church teaching when talking about homosexuality. These are theological and psychosociological fanfictions and increasingly shopworn old chestnuts that purport to dictate — in unapologetically prescriptive terms — how LGBT people must and must not be spoken to or about. For example, Flynn provides no specific, dispositive rationale for his belief that “lavender graduations” affirm “the world’s lies about who [the participants] are.” He, and other partisans of the “appetities aren’t identity” perspective on homosexuality, seem completely unaware of even the possibility that a gay person might find that being gay affects his or her sense of self in ways ranging beyond his or her sexual proclivities. If there is any actual evidence that Church teaching mandates this lack of awareness, Flynn doesn’t provide it.

Even if Martin was not a priest in good standing with the backing of powerful figures within the Church (most of us are not so lucky, and many of us are better people and better Catholics than many who are so lucky) he is owed the basic respect of not being repeatedly slandered like this. The relentless public attacks on his orthodoxy and faithfulness to the Church are gravely unjust and violate the Eighth Commandment. Nobody deserves to have their reputation run over like this. This is a form of Catholic McCarthyism, in which merely the perception of disagreement with Church teaching justifies almost any personal attack in the name of heresy-hunting.

[…]

ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: I'm Starting to Like This Pope

Post by hugodrax » Tue Feb 25, 2020 12:56 pm

Holy s***, that's golden. Guess it isnt actually the Pope wherepeteris.com stands up for, is it. It's the agenda and that delightful narrative of theirs.

I am entranced. Out of one breath, it's "c'mon guys, Martin's a priest and entitled to respect. After all, he's said he's not trying to cause any trouble and specifically denies arguing that the Church or the pope is wrong."

Oh, but out of the other side, it's "Cardinals Burke and Sarah are heretics and schismatics. Of course they said they're not trying to cause any trouble and specifically deny arguing that the Church is wrong. That's what false priests, heretics and schismatics do! Burn em before they hurt anybody's feelings!"

Is anyone here a reformed gay? What's the amazing pull? Why does it seem to pull in and entrance folks who arent so inclined to admire and support it so much? People seem to consciously choose it over salvation. And it clearly screws the logical side of one's brain.
Notre Dame de Paris, priez pour nous y comprise les Jesuites.

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Re: I'm Starting to Like This Pope

Post by tuttle » Tue Feb 25, 2020 1:10 pm

hugodrax wrote:
Tue Feb 25, 2020 12:56 pm
What's the amazing pull? Why does it seem to pull in and entrance folks who arent so inclined to admire and support it so much? People seem to consciously choose it over salvation. And it clearly screws the logical side of one's brain.
That's the devastating and deceitful power of sin, my friend.
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Re: I'm Starting to Like This Pope

Post by hugodrax » Tue Feb 25, 2020 1:39 pm

Every Queer Is Sacred
-by James Martin, LGBTQSJ

(Scene: the Meatpacking District)

There are incels in the world,
There are volcels,
There are people who arent that interested, but
I've never been one of them.

No, I'm a roamin' catholic,
Sexuality just fascinates me,
Quite particularly if it happens to be gay.

You don't have to be a six footer,
Though you shouldnt have a great brain,
It doesnt matter to me what you look like,
As long as your sex is the same.

Because

Every queer is sacred,
Every queer is great,
If a queer gets married,
The Church must celebrate!

Every sperm is sacred,
Every sperm is great
Not a sperm will be wasted,
As long as I'm a Jes-ewww-aate!

Let the faithful bree-eeed
Like animals with their sluts.
All the pretty fellows,
Come stay rent free with jesuits!

No rules are still sacred,
Francis has defeated Shaitan,
All these days we have wasted,
Not me, my sheets are satin!

Every bishop refused me,
I roam whe'er I can go,
Magisterium still eludes me,
I AM a Jesuit, you know.

Every queer is sacred,
Every queer is great,
If a queer you frustrate,
It's ok if he mates.
Notre Dame de Paris, priez pour nous y comprise les Jesuites.

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Re: I'm Starting to Like This Pope

Post by Jocose » Tue Feb 25, 2020 1:53 pm

Image
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Re: I'm Starting to Like This Pope

Post by wosbald » Sat Feb 29, 2020 11:28 am

+JMJ+

Intra-Thread Trackbacks: pg 118


The New Americanism: Conclusions [Opinion]
Image

[This is the sixth and final installment of our series on the New Americanism. To read part one, click here. To read part two, click here. To read part three, click here. To read part four, click here. To read part five, click here.]

We have come to the final part of this reflection. In the first five installments, we examined the tendencies that constitute what Pope Leo XIII called Americanism. While we should not conclude that holding only one or two of these tendencies constitutes Americanism (a single tendency could apply to many other errors and heresies); to possess all of them at once is the definition of Americanism.

We have already examined the ways American Traditionalists display each of these tendencies. Notice how they align with Pope Leo’s observations.:

  • Americanists censor magisterial teaching to better conform to both the spirit of the age and American Protestantism.
    • American Traditionalists censor magisterial teaching to better conform to the spirit of the age in the form of American conservatism and the Republican Party, and to the American Evangelicals and Fundamentalists who shape America’s conservative culture.

  • Americanists disregard the Church’s guidance on matters of evangelization.
    • American Traditionalists disregard the Church’s call to the New Evangelization.

  • Americanists confound license with liberty and show “passion for discussing and pouring contempt upon any possible subject, the assumed right to hold whatever opinions one pleases upon any subject and to set them forth in print to the world…”[1]
    • American Traditionalists have displayed similar passion in critiquing the pontificate of Pope Francis.

  • Americanists disregard the necessity of the external teaching authority of the pope and the Church, and they are overconfident in their ability to discern the movement of the Holy Spirit.
    • American Traditionalists show disregard for the teaching authority of the living Magisterium and discern for themselves what they believe is true doctrine and the will of God.

  • Americanists hold contempt for religious vows, because they believe “they limit the bounds of human liberty” and “are more suitable to weak than to strong minds.”[2]
    • American Traditionalists hold contempt for religious submission to the pope for the same reasons.

  • Americanists exhibit a Pelagian attitude toward activity, elevating it above contemplation.
    • American Traditionalists exhibit the New Pelagianism defined by Pope Francis.[3]

This comparison would not be compelling if American Traditionalists shared only some of the Americanist tendencies. After all, some Americanist tendencies apply to Traditionalists in general, not only to those in America. In Europe, especially, it is not hard to find opponents of the pope. But resistance to Pope Francis has taken on different characteristics in different nations, and Traditionalism has found fertile ground abroad for very different reasons than it has in America. What is remarkable, is that, in the U.S., there is no tendency of Americanism which American Traditionalists do not also possess in their own fashion.

Traditionalism has been able to flourish in America precisely because there was already strong compatibility between Traditionalism and Americanism. Traditionalism in America has also been infused with peculiarly Americanist tendencies that are not common to all Traditionalists, such as concessions to American Protestantism. Only in the U.S. do Traditionalists display all of the Americanist tendencies simultaneously.

Therefore, the striking similarities between Americanism as described by Pope Leo XIII and contemporary Traditionalism shed light on American Traditionalism. American Traditionalism, though not all Traditionalism, is, undoubtedly, a new form of the old Americanist heresy: the marriage of Americanism and Traditionalism.

The Remedy is Unity with Rome

Throughout Testem benevolentiae, Pope Leo XIII repeatedly and forcefully encourages unity with Rome as the alternative to Americanism.

[…]

ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: I'm Starting to Like This Pope

Post by hugodrax » Sat Feb 29, 2020 12:37 pm

wosbald wrote:
Sat Feb 29, 2020 11:28 am
+JMJ+

Intra-Thread Trackbacks: pg 118


The New Americanism: Conclusions [Opinion]
Image

[This is the sixth and final installment of our series on the New Americanism. To read part one, click here. To read part two, click here. To read part three, click here. To read part four, click here. To read part five, click here.]

We have come to the final part of this reflection. In the first five installments, we examined the tendencies that constitute what Pope Leo XIII called Americanism. While we should not conclude that holding only one or two of these tendencies constitutes Americanism (a single tendency could apply to many other errors and heresies); to possess all of them at once is the definition of Americanism.

We have already examined the ways American Traditionalists display each of these tendencies. Notice how they align with Pope Leo’s observations.:

  • Americanists censor magisterial teaching to better conform to both the spirit of the age and American Protestantism.
    • American Traditionalists censor magisterial teaching to better conform to the spirit of the age in the form of American conservatism and the Republican Party, and to the American Evangelicals and Fundamentalists who shape America’s conservative culture.

  • Americanists disregard the Church’s guidance on matters of evangelization.
    • American Traditionalists disregard the Church’s call to the New Evangelization.

  • Americanists confound license with liberty and show “passion for discussing and pouring contempt upon any possible subject, the assumed right to hold whatever opinions one pleases upon any subject and to set them forth in print to the world…”[1]
    • American Traditionalists have displayed similar passion in critiquing the pontificate of Pope Francis.

  • Americanists disregard the necessity of the external teaching authority of the pope and the Church, and they are overconfident in their ability to discern the movement of the Holy Spirit.
    • American Traditionalists show disregard for the teaching authority of the living Magisterium and discern for themselves what they believe is true doctrine and the will of God.

  • Americanists hold contempt for religious vows, because they believe “they limit the bounds of human liberty” and “are more suitable to weak than to strong minds.”[2]
    • American Traditionalists hold contempt for religious submission to the pope for the same reasons.

  • Americanists exhibit a Pelagian attitude toward activity, elevating it above contemplation.
    • American Traditionalists exhibit the New Pelagianism defined by Pope Francis.[3]

This comparison would not be compelling if American Traditionalists shared only some of the Americanist tendencies. After all, some Americanist tendencies apply to Traditionalists in general, not only to those in America. In Europe, especially, it is not hard to find opponents of the pope. But resistance to Pope Francis has taken on different characteristics in different nations, and Traditionalism has found fertile ground abroad for very different reasons than it has in America. What is remarkable, is that, in the U.S., there is no tendency of Americanism which American Traditionalists do not also possess in their own fashion.

Traditionalism has been able to flourish in America precisely because there was already strong compatibility between Traditionalism and Americanism. Traditionalism in America has also been infused with peculiarly Americanist tendencies that are not common to all Traditionalists, such as concessions to American Protestantism. Only in the U.S. do Traditionalists display all of the Americanist tendencies simultaneously.

Therefore, the striking similarities between Americanism as described by Pope Leo XIII and contemporary Traditionalism shed light on American Traditionalism. American Traditionalism, though not all Traditionalism, is, undoubtedly, a new form of the old Americanist heresy: the marriage of Americanism and Traditionalism.

The Remedy is Unity with Rome

Throughout Testem benevolentiae, Pope Leo XIII repeatedly and forcefully encourages unity with Rome as the alternative to Americanism.

[…]
Lol. Everybody's a heretic except the Jesuits. Although it is a possibility, statistically it's very, very improbable.

Wonder what Leo XIII would make out of Father Martin?
Notre Dame de Paris, priez pour nous y comprise les Jesuites.

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Re: I'm Starting to Like This Pope

Post by wosbald » Mon Mar 02, 2020 8:08 am

+JMJ+

Retired archbishop in Poland says he won’t keep quiet about pope as ‘heretic’
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Archbishop Jan Lenga. (Credit: Kamczadałka/Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 3.0))

WARSAW, Poland — A Catholic archbishop has rejected a church instruction barring him from public appearances and vowed to go on denouncing “heresy and sectarianism.”

“Christ gave me authority through the church to proclaim the truth, and I’ll do so as long as I live,” said retired Archbishop Jan Lenga, 69, who lives in Lichen, Poland, after serving in Kazakhstan.

“I won’t yield to degradation by those whose own statements and actions are entangled with heresy and sectarianism,” he said. “What right do they have to recall what pertains to the church when they themselves have never upheld it?”

Bishop Wieslaw Mering of Wloclawek ordered Lenga to stop preaching, celebrating Mass or speaking to the media, after the archbishop accused Pope Francis of “spreading untruths” and refused to include the pope in prayers.

In a Feb. 25 interview with the internet-based Gloria TV, the archbishop said Mering’s order would have “no effect,” since no one in the Polish church had authority to prevent him from speaking out.

He added that he had no wish “to belong to a church run by Protestants, Islamists and Jews,” and believed his critics should “form their own church, rather than usurping power in the Catholic Church.”

Meanwhile, a senior member of Lenga’s Marian order said bishops were empowered by canon law to decide who could conduct services in their dioceses, but added that the archbishop had left the order’s jurisdiction after his 1991 consecration as bishop.

“Archbishop Lenga is living at Lichen as our guest, at his own request and that of the Vatican, with a monastic roof over his head,” Father Piotr Kieniewicz, secretary of the Congregation of Marians of the Immaculate Conception Warsaw-based province, told Catholic News Service Feb. 27.

“He is subject solely to the Holy Father, and if Bishop Mering was licensed by the nuncio to take some decision about him, that is their business.”

[…]

In a Feb. 22 open letter, Mering said he had tried “to ease growing tension” in two unsuccessful meetings with the archbishop and would leave a “final decision” on his fate to the Holy See.

“I’m acting in the name of the church, which has a hierarchical structure — we cannot tolerate a situation in which this archbishop omits the Holy Father’s name from the canon of the Holy Mass,” the bishop said.

“My request that he stop speaking to the media is to prevent an evil sensation. Some will praise the archbishop, while others will be scandalized by the divisions he’s initiated.”

ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: I'm Starting to Like This Pope

Post by AFRS » Mon Mar 02, 2020 12:24 pm

He seems to be ill. Corona Pope?

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Re: I'm Starting to Like This Pope

Post by wosbald » Fri Mar 06, 2020 10:48 am

+JMJ+

Intra-Thread Trackbacks: pg 78 / pg 78 / pg 79 / pg 79 / pg 88 / pg 89 / pg 89 / pg 118 / pg 118


Vatican-China deal conceived under JPII, expert says [In-Depth]
Image
In this March 6, 2013, file photo, Cardinal Joseph Zen prays in St. Peter’s Basilica during a vespers celebration at the Vatican. (Credit: Gregorio Borgia/AP)

ROME — After two top prelates recently butted heads over the legitimacy of the Vatican’s 2018 agreement with China on the appointment of bishops, one expert on Chinese affairs stepped in insisting that the deal was not only good, but a product of more than 30 years of Vatican diplomacy.

Paolo Affatato, head of the Asia desk for Fides News, told Crux that Pope Francis’s agreement with China on the appointment of bishops “is a fruit of 30 years of work, it wasn’t born yesterday.”

“It was born under John Paul II, who was the first to begin the process of closeness and communion of the bishops in China who were considered illicit,” he said, calling the agreement a “point of arrival” for not only Francis, but also St. John Paul II and Benedict XVI.

Over time “a series of problems caused a brake, but the conclusion arrived,” Affatato said, comparing the deal to the building of a palace. The foundation is laid first, he said, and little by little the rest of the structure is built up, reaching completion with the opening of the palace doors.

“It is no longer the time of the clandestine, the clandestine phase cannot last for forever,” he explained, referring to the so-called “underground” Catholics in China, who have maintained faithfulness to Rome and shunned the state-sponsored Church at odds with the Holy See.

“China has changed, it’s no longer the China of Mao,” Affatato added, noting that leadership, markets, global trends and politics have all changed in the time since China fell under communist rule. “The cultural revolution today is not the same today as it was 60 years ago,” he said.

Affatato spoke after a recent riff between Italian Cardinal Giovanni Battista Re, dean of the College of Cardinals, and Chinese Cardinal Joseph Zen, bishop emeritus of Hong Kong and one of the most vocal critics of Pope Francis’s approach to China.

[…]

ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: I'm Starting to Like This Pope

Post by tuttle » Fri Mar 06, 2020 11:22 am

wosbald wrote:
Fri Mar 06, 2020 10:48 am
+JMJ+

Intra-Thread Trackbacks: pg 78 / pg 78 / pg 79 / pg 79 / pg 88 / pg 89 / pg 89 / pg 118 / pg 118


Vatican-China deal conceived under JPII, expert says [In-Depth]
Image
In this March 6, 2013, file photo, Cardinal Joseph Zen prays in St. Peter’s Basilica during a vespers celebration at the Vatican. (Credit: Gregorio Borgia/AP)

ROME — After two top prelates recently butted heads over the legitimacy of the Vatican’s 2018 agreement with China on the appointment of bishops, one expert on Chinese affairs stepped in insisting that the deal was not only good, but a product of more than 30 years of Vatican diplomacy.

Paolo Affatato, head of the Asia desk for Fides News, told Crux that Pope Francis’s agreement with China on the appointment of bishops “is a fruit of 30 years of work, it wasn’t born yesterday.”

“It was born under John Paul II, who was the first to begin the process of closeness and communion of the bishops in China who were considered illicit,” he said, calling the agreement a “point of arrival” for not only Francis, but also St. John Paul II and Benedict XVI.

Over time “a series of problems caused a brake, but the conclusion arrived,” Affatato said, comparing the deal to the building of a palace. The foundation is laid first, he said, and little by little the rest of the structure is built up, reaching completion with the opening of the palace doors.

“It is no longer the time of the clandestine, the clandestine phase cannot last for forever,” he explained, referring to the so-called “underground” Catholics in China, who have maintained faithfulness to Rome and shunned the state-sponsored Church at odds with the Holy See.

“China has changed, it’s no longer the China of Mao,” Affatato added, noting that leadership, markets, global trends and politics have all changed in the time since China fell under communist rule. “The cultural revolution today is not the same today as it was 60 years ago,” he said.

Affatato spoke after a recent riff between Italian Cardinal Giovanni Battista Re, dean of the College of Cardinals, and Chinese Cardinal Joseph Zen, bishop emeritus of Hong Kong and one of the most vocal critics of Pope Francis’s approach to China.

[…]
So JPII laid the foundation, Benny16 contributed little by little, and Frank brought it to completion.

I wonder if JPII would concur with how it was completed. I wonder what he would think about the cross emblazoned on one palace door and the hammer and sickle on the other.

China is certainly no longer the China of Mao, where religious freedom was nonexistent, as opposed to today where religious freedom is only extended to those who attend State run churches that are only allowed to practice and preach State approved doctrines.
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Re: I'm Starting to Like This Pope

Post by wosbald » Sat Mar 07, 2020 11:36 am

+JMJ+

Intra-Thread Trackbacks: pg 118 / pg 118 / 119


Father Martin vs the Anonymous Bishops [In-Depth, Opinion]
Image
Image: Adobe Stock

[…]

Since the original story broke, two bishops have come forward to publicly challenge the account of the meeting given by CNA. For his part, Fr. Martin denied that he was ever given a “talking-to” by his superiors, or that he was aware of any complaints from the Vatican about his work.

In addition, CNA produced an article with quotes from a third bishop present at the meeting, Denver Archbishop Samuel Aquila. Many commentators have expressed that they suspect Aquila was one of the anonymous sources in the original article. Rather than stating if he was one of the sources or endorsing either narrative, he decided to change the subject. His quotes don’t quite qualify as a “statement,” as they are scattered throughout the article and include sentence fragments, but here they are all in one place (actual quotes in bold):
[Aquila said] it was a “privilege” to meet with the pope and his fellow bishops … adding that “the meeting was a grace.”

“The Holy Father spoke very openly and freely with us regarding many topics,” … acknowledging that the meeting “has now become a source of some controversy.”



Aquila told CNA that Pope Francis expressed his personal frustration with the way his meeting with Martin was interpreted and framed by some journalists in a way that was clear, Aquila said, especially for “those who understand Italian.”



“I think it is reasonable that some remarks from the Holy Father would have been interpreted in different ways by different bishops.”



“all of us present at the meeting were making an effort to receive the pope in good faith”



“The most important part of the meeting was, of course, our unity with Pope Francis, the Vicar of Christ on Earth.”
The only actual quote from Aquila that might be described as even close to a defense of the original CNA narrative is, “I think it is reasonable that some remarks from the Holy Father would have been interpreted in different ways by different bishops.” That this was the most that any of the bishops present have been willing to say publicly to CNA about the meeting greatly hurts the credibility of the original story.

Additionally, the line about “those who understand Italian” has been interpreted as a dig at Bishop Stephen Biegler (one of the bishops who publicly challenged CNA’s original narrative), who mentioned in his response that the bishops were provided with an “excellent translation” of Pope Francis’s Italian. I don’t know that Biegler speaks Italian, but according to his official biography, he lived in Rome as a seminarian from 1989-1993, and again from 2003-2007 as a member of the faculty of North American College and for additional studies. He might have been in a position to judge the quality of the translation.

Because his statements left so many questions unanswered, I tried to contact Archbishop Aquila and his spokesman several times, asking whether he was one of the anonymous bishops, and whether he endorsed the original CNA report. Finally, I received an email from his spokesman directing me to the CNA story along with the comment, “He does not have anything further to add on the issue.”

What to make of all this? There’s one thing I want to state clearly: I don’t think JD Flynn was trying to intentionally deceive anyone when he wrote the story. That said, I believe he made an egregious error in judgement in deciding to go forward with a story based upon accounts from bishops who were unwilling to stand by their words. There were 15 bishops in the room. Their names are a matter of public record. If he really wanted to publish a report on this, he should have called them one by one, until he found somebody willing to put their name behind the narrative. And if he didn’t find one, the story should have died there.

Secondly, the anonymous bishops (whoever they are) have demonstrated a lack of character by not coming forward and owning their statements. Journalistic ethics require Flynn not to name his anonymous sources (whether he should have relied on them in the first place is another question). If they care at all about the reputation of JD Flynn or Catholic News Agency, they should come forward and admit that they provided the quotes.

I know JD, and I have no doubt that he believed he was being told the truth by whichever bishops he spoke to. Unfortunately, it is clear that he was too trusting and too ready to publish a story that conformed to an ideological narrative. If you are going to publish an article — especially if the story is based on someone’s personal recollection of a conversation and will clearly harm the reputation of another — you need to do your due diligence. As Pope Francis said last year,
To be a humble journalist does not mean to be a mediocre one, but rather to be aware that through an article, a tweet, or a live television or radio broadcast you can do good but also, if you are not careful and scrupulous, you can do harm to others and sometimes to entire communities.
We all make mistakes, but we should take responsibility for them when we do. Fr. Martin is owed an apology, and the story should be retracted with an explanation and correction.

It appears we are now at an impasse. Unless CNA retracts the story (or one of the anonymous bishops comes forward to defend their report), I suppose the story will eventually fade into the past. But the damage was done. This is yet another crack in an increasingly fractured Church.

ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: I'm Starting to Like This Pope

Post by wosbald » Fri Mar 13, 2020 6:02 pm

+JMJ+

Cardinal Burke’s Poisoned Well [In-Depth, Opinion]
Image

In a recent interview with the National Catholic Register, Cardinal Raymond Burke once again criticizes an apostolic exhortation from Pope Francis. Querida Amazonia, the result of the most recent synod on the Amazon, summarizes Pope Francis’s vision of the Amazonian church.

Cardinal Burke particularly disapproves of paragraph 74 of Querida Amazonia, which says:
Similarly, a relationship with Jesus Christ, true God and true man, liberator and redeemer, is not inimical to the markedly cosmic worldview that characterizes the indigenous peoples, since he is also the Risen Lord who permeates all things.[105] In Christian experience, “all the creatures of the material universe find their true meaning in the incarnate Word, for the Son of God has incorporated in his person part of the material world, planting in it a seed of definitive transformation”.[106] He is present in a glorious and mysterious way in the river, the trees, the fish and the wind, as the Lord who reigns in creation without ever losing his transfigured wounds, while in the Eucharist he takes up the elements of this world and confers on all things the meaning of the paschal gift.
Burke claims to find here grave contradictions of theological truths. He says “there’s a very poetic passage in which, seemingly, the Pope is underlining the Lordship of Christ, but then he says that Christ is in the river and in the trees and so forth. This is classical animism, paganism, and it’s simply not true.” He recognizes that footnote 105 cites St. Thomas Aquinas, but he just repeats that it “can’t be true.” But since when has anything in Catholic theology been “simply” untrue? Certainly nothing in the work of Aquinas can be described as simply true or untrue. The great scholastic saint is famous for his subtle distinctions and his generous and charitable readings of the arguments of his opponents. If only the same could be said of Cardinal Burke. Anyone who knows anything about Aquinas knows that he taught that God is present in all things by his power. And of course we have it on the authority of St. John the Evangelist that nothing exists except in and through the Word.

Burke complains that he doesn’t “know what it means to say that he [Christ] ‘incorporated part of the material world’ into his person.” The footnote behind this quotation (footnote 106) that Burke claims not to understand is a reference to a passage in Laudato Si’, which says, “The Sacraments are a privileged way in which nature is taken up by God to become a means of mediating supernatural life”. One has to wonder if Cardinal Burke has ever read the Church Fathers like Maximos the Confessor or St. John of the Cross, or Ratzinger’s Spirit of the Liturgy. Because if he has, he should know that for Ratzinger as well, “the sacrament, as the fundamental form of the Christian liturgy, embraces both matter and word, that is, it gives religion both a cosmic and historical dimension and points to cosmos and history as the place of our encounter with God.” Burke cites anecdotes about something cringey someone told him in the seventies about fulfilling their Sunday obligation by meeting God in the forest and the rivers. Would he also dismiss Ratzinger’s statement that in the cosmic liturgy, “we join in with the praise rendered by the sun and the stars” as pantheism or animism?

What about any of this is “simply” true or untrue? To see these ideas as orthodox Catholic theology or as terrible heresy is a complicated matter that requires an understanding of the context and historical background, as well as precision in determining intentions and meaning. For all his championing of clarity of thought, when it comes to Pope Francis, Burke simply refuses to exercise any thought at all.

Likewise, in the face of Querida Amazonia’s defense of the process of enculturation, Burke doubles down on the Pachamama nonsense. …

[…]

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"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
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Re: I'm Starting to Like This Pope

Post by hugodrax » Fri Mar 13, 2020 7:11 pm

wosbald wrote:
Fri Mar 13, 2020 6:02 pm
+JMJ+

Cardinal Burke’s Poisoned Well [In-Depth, Opinion]
Image

In a recent interview with the National Catholic Register, Cardinal Raymond Burke once again criticizes an apostolic exhortation from Pope Francis. Querida Amazonia, the result of the most recent synod on the Amazon, summarizes Pope Francis’s vision of the Amazonian church.

Cardinal Burke particularly disapproves of paragraph 74 of Querida Amazonia, which says:
Similarly, a relationship with Jesus Christ, true God and true man, liberator and redeemer, is not inimical to the markedly cosmic worldview that characterizes the indigenous peoples, since he is also the Risen Lord who permeates all things.[105] In Christian experience, “all the creatures of the material universe find their true meaning in the incarnate Word, for the Son of God has incorporated in his person part of the material world, planting in it a seed of definitive transformation”.[106] He is present in a glorious and mysterious way in the river, the trees, the fish and the wind, as the Lord who reigns in creation without ever losing his transfigured wounds, while in the Eucharist he takes up the elements of this world and confers on all things the meaning of the paschal gift.
Burke claims to find here grave contradictions of theological truths. He says “there’s a very poetic passage in which, seemingly, the Pope is underlining the Lordship of Christ, but then he says that Christ is in the river and in the trees and so forth. This is classical animism, paganism, and it’s simply not true.” He recognizes that footnote 105 cites St. Thomas Aquinas, but he just repeats that it “can’t be true.” But since when has anything in Catholic theology been “simply” untrue? Certainly nothing in the work of Aquinas can be described as simply true or untrue. The great scholastic saint is famous for his subtle distinctions and his generous and charitable readings of the arguments of his opponents. If only the same could be said of Cardinal Burke. Anyone who knows anything about Aquinas knows that he taught that God is present in all things by his power. And of course we have it on the authority of St. John the Evangelist that nothing exists except in and through the Word.

Burke complains that he doesn’t “know what it means to say that he [Christ] ‘incorporated part of the material world’ into his person.” The footnote behind this quotation (footnote 106) that Burke claims not to understand is a reference to a passage in Laudato Si’, which says, “The Sacraments are a privileged way in which nature is taken up by God to become a means of mediating supernatural life”. One has to wonder if Cardinal Burke has ever read the Church Fathers like Maximos the Confessor or St. John of the Cross, or Ratzinger’s Spirit of the Liturgy. Because if he has, he should know that for Ratzinger as well, “the sacrament, as the fundamental form of the Christian liturgy, embraces both matter and word, that is, it gives religion both a cosmic and historical dimension and points to cosmos and history as the place of our encounter with God.” Burke cites anecdotes about something cringey someone told him in the seventies about fulfilling their Sunday obligation by meeting God in the forest and the rivers. Would he also dismiss Ratzinger’s statement that in the cosmic liturgy, “we join in with the praise rendered by the sun and the stars” as pantheism or animism?

What about any of this is “simply” true or untrue? To see these ideas as orthodox Catholic theology or as terrible heresy is a complicated matter that requires an understanding of the context and historical background, as well as precision in determining intentions and meaning. For all his championing of clarity of thought, when it comes to Pope Francis, Burke simply refuses to exercise any thought at all.

Likewise, in the face of Querida Amazonia’s defense of the process of enculturation, Burke doubles down on the Pachamama nonsense. …

[…]
Lesson of last two articles: Wos prefers queer clergy.
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Re:

Post by Hovannes » Sat Mar 14, 2020 10:09 pm

Del wrote:
Thu Oct 03, 2013 10:00 am
tuttle wrote:From the same interview:
“Everyone has his own idea of good and evil and must choose to follow the good and fight evil as he conceives them. That would be enough to make the world a better place.”
What? :youcrazy:

1) Everyone has his own idea of good and evil (yep.)
2) and must choose to follow the good and fight the evil (ok.)
3) as he conceives them (uh...)
4) That would be enough to make the world a better place ( :huh: )

I get that the Pope is talking to a secular journalist. I get the argument that the Pope is being sly or clever in his answers to an unbeliever, yadda yadda yadda

But this stuff is wrong. To say, even coyly, that everyone should follow the good that they have conceived, based on their own idea of what good and evil is, is rather unnerving is it not?

No doubt jihadists have their own idea of good and evil. They choose to follow their good and fight their evil as they conceive it. Is that enough to make the world a better place?
Francis has an unfailing confidence in people.

He believes that if every person followed the good and combatted the evil with some passion, there would be a net improvement for the world.

To be sure, there will always be some jihadists and many pro-choicers who believe that killing is a good thing to pursue -- But even these would be overcome if only the vast mass of lukewarm persons would rise up and do something charitable.

And -- if a great many people wake up and search for something good to do, most will find their way into vibrant Christian communities where we have been practicing good works for 2000 years.
They choose to follow their good and fight their evil as they conceive it.
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
But Del, didn't Francis then basically give the thumbs up to Moral Relativism?
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Re: Re:

Post by Del » Sat Mar 14, 2020 10:45 pm

Hovannes wrote:
Sat Mar 14, 2020 10:09 pm
Del wrote:
Thu Oct 03, 2013 10:00 am
tuttle wrote:From the same interview:
“Everyone has his own idea of good and evil and must choose to follow the good and fight evil as he conceives them. That would be enough to make the world a better place.”
What? :youcrazy:

1) Everyone has his own idea of good and evil (yep.)
2) and must choose to follow the good and fight the evil (ok.)
3) as he conceives them (uh...)
4) That would be enough to make the world a better place ( :huh: )

I get that the Pope is talking to a secular journalist. I get the argument that the Pope is being sly or clever in his answers to an unbeliever, yadda yadda yadda

But this stuff is wrong. To say, even coyly, that everyone should follow the good that they have conceived, based on their own idea of what good and evil is, is rather unnerving is it not?

No doubt jihadists have their own idea of good and evil. They choose to follow their good and fight their evil as they conceive it. Is that enough to make the world a better place?
Francis has an unfailing confidence in people.

He believes that if every person followed the good and combatted the evil with some passion, there would be a net improvement for the world.

To be sure, there will always be some jihadists and many pro-choicers who believe that killing is a good thing to pursue -- But even these would be overcome if only the vast mass of lukewarm persons would rise up and do something charitable.

And -- if a great many people wake up and search for something good to do, most will find their way into vibrant Christian communities where we have been practicing good works for 2000 years.
They choose to follow their good and fight their evil as they conceive it.
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
But Del, didn't Francis then basically give the thumbs up to Moral Relativism?
I wrote that post back in 2013. Jeez.

I quit paying attention to Francis, several years ago. He's not a bad fellow, but he's not that bright as a spiritual leader. It seems that he's comfortable with that modern Jesuit relativism.

It would be nice "to make the world a better place," of course. But this is not our goal..... Our first duty as Christians is to become saints.

The world will be naturally be as good as this world can be when we all live as saints.
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Re: I'm Starting to Like This Pope

Post by wosbald » Sun Mar 15, 2020 7:13 am

+JMJ+

Intra-Thread Trackbacks: pg 119


Christ is present in creation, Cardinal Burke [In-Depth, Opinion]
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Image: John Briody, via Flickr Creative Commons / License: Attribution-NoDerivs 2.0 Generic (CC BY-ND 2.0)

Cardinal Raymond Burke, the titular head of the online resistance to Pope Francis, has given an interview about Querida Amazonia. It contains several eyebrow-raising lines, but what really stands out is his denial of Christ’s presence in creation. His eminence is perturbed by this statement:
Christ is present in a glorious and mysterious way in the river, the trees, the fish and the wind, as the Lord who reigns in creation without ever losing his transfigured wounds, while in the Eucharist he takes up the elements of this world and confers on all things the meaning of the paschal gift. (QA 74)
This, in his estimation, is “animism” and “paganism.” Animism is a term coined by scholars to refer to the common belief held by many people around the world (it’s not a particular religion) that everything, even things Westerners call “inanimate,” is imbued with spirit (animus being a Latin word for spirit). Burke interprets Francis’s words, as well as the synod’s Final Document, to mean that Christians should worship rivers, trees, fish, etc. This is a widespread right-wing talking point against the synod. (I have already written a little about this when rebutting criticism of the term “ecological conversion.”) Neither the synod of bishops nor the Bishop of Rome has suggested Christians start worshiping creatures instead of the Creator! Christians, regardless of ideology or denomination, worship Father, Son, and Holy Spirit alone — one God in three divine Persons. (We’ll leave aside for now the question of the cult of the saints!)

In a previous post, Brian Killian took Burke to task for this. He noted that the question of God’s presence in creation is a “complicated matter that requires an understanding of the context and historical background, as well as precision in determining intentions and meaning.” I would like to offer a beginning into this matter.

[…]

His eminence urges Catholics to hold on to the Catechism of the Catholic Church (presumably excluding the recent revision regarding the death penalty, which he rejects). Well, let’s read it:
Because he is the free and sovereign Creator, the first cause of all that exists, God is present to his creatures’ inmost being: “In him we live and move and have our being” (Acts 17:28). In the words of St. Augustine, God is “higher than my highest and more inward than my innermost self” (Confessions 3,6,11). (CCC 300)
This short paragraph is the entirety of the section called “God transcends creation and is present to it.” Its brevity speaks to the fact that it is an underdeveloped and “controversial” part of Catholic teaching. I hope that when the Catechism is revised again to incorporate this synod, as Francis has said it will be, he will expand it.

But the Catechism does go on in the next section to speak of how God’s beauty and goodness are mirrored in creation:
Each of the various creatures, willed in its own being, reflects in its own way a ray of God’s infinite wisdom and goodness. Man must therefore respect the particular goodness of every creature, to avoid any disordered use of things which would be in contempt of the Creator and would bring disastrous consequences for human beings and their environment.

God wills the interdependence of creatures. The sun and the moon, the cedar and the little flower, the eagle and the sparrow: the spectacle of their countless diversities and inequalities tells us that no creature is self-sufficient. Creatures exist only in dependence on each other, to complete each other, in the service of each other.

The beauty of the universe: The order and harmony of the created world results from the diversity of beings and from the relationships which exist among them. Man discovers them progressively as the laws of nature. They call forth the admiration of scholars. The beauty of creation reflects the infinite beauty of the Creator and ought to inspire the respect and submission of man’s intellect and will.
(CCC 339-41)
Although human beings enjoy a unique relationship to the Creator in that we alone were made in God’s own image (Gen 1:25-26), God is in fact present in all his creatures, even the “cedar and the little flower.” How does this work?

[…]

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"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: I'm Starting to Like This Pope

Post by wosbald » Fri Mar 20, 2020 9:54 am

+JMJ+

“No greater love” in the time of Coronavirus [In-Depth, Opinion]
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Image: Icon of St. Oscar Romero by Vivian Imbruglia, at St. Oscar Romero Parish in Eastvale, Calif., showing the Christian pelican symbol on Romero’s chasuble (click here to see the full icon). Used with permission. (Pelican image: By Motacilla – Own work, CC BY-SA 4.0)

Scripture tells us, “No one has greater love than this: to lay down one’s life for one’s friends.” (John 15:13). Thus, the most famous biblical formula for martyrdom equates and balances sacrifice with a service or benefit for others. This formulation also crystallizes the distinction between the Christian conception of martyrdom and other models — such as the suicide bomber or the kamikaze — that fail to meet the Christian standard because those forms of self-immolation recklessly harm ourselves and others.

This nuance takes on a sudden urgency in the face of the worldwide Coronavirus epidemic, as some misguided hardliners openly resist Church cooperation with civil authorities to prevent the spread of COVID-19. These purists object to the cancellation of Masses, and protest the substitution of livestreamed Masses on the Internet or broadcasted on television as poor replacements for those attended in person. They pledge to organize “underground masses,” often with rhetoric about their willingness to be exposed to the virus and risk their lives for the Eucharist. These protests distort and misrepresent the meaning of martyrdom.

St. Oscar Romero, the Church’s most recently canonized martyr — the fortieth anniversary of his martyrdom will be observed later this month — modeled the proper balance between sacrifice and service in the Christian ideal of martyrdom. Romero did not shy away from danger or personal risks. He “left the security of the world,” Pope Francis said during his canonization Mass, “even his own safety, in order to give his life according to the Gospel, close to the poor and to his people, with a heart drawn to Jesus and his brothers and sisters.” Even this cursory synthesis reveals the equilibrium in Romero’s action: his heart was drawn to Jesus and to his brothers and sisters.

There is no question that Romero cherished the Eucharist as a priceless gift from God to humanity. In 1977, he faced down a hostile army to enter a town where soldiers had occupied a church and defiled the Eucharist. The scene was dramatized in the 1989 film “Romero” with Raul Julia as the timid archbishop scraping up desecrated hosts from the floor of the sanctuary. In an August 1979 sermon, Romero lauded the example of St. Damien of Molokai, who volunteered to serve in a leper colony and eventually contracted leprosy. “The bread of eternal life gave Father Damien strength,” Romero said, “gives strength to every missionary, to all Sisters, to all priests, gives life to the ecclesial base communities, and becomes the center of parish life.”

[…]

That said, Romero agonized over the concern that innocent people might become collateral damage if he was attacked. He famously turned down bodyguards, saying that the shepherd should not have protection while his flock had none. He also said that the pastor must be where the suffering is, and he traveled extensively to remote villages to visit endangered communities, often behind enemy lines. But he was always troubled when the danger extended to others. He wept when his family members were the subject of retaliation by their employers. And he was horrified at a foiled attempt to bomb a basilica where he was preaching, where many would have died if the attack had succeeded. As a result, in the final months Romero lived and traveled alone, in order to bear all risks alone.

[…]

Romero’s martyrdom was not “improvised.” It was not impulsive, knee-jerk, or spur of the moment. It was a systematic choice that began with obedience, duty: “he loved the Church, he loved the Pope, he loved his people.” Romero’s motto was “Sentir con la Iglesia,” meaning “To Think and Feel with the Church.” Commemorative cards from his first Solemn Mass in 1944 document that this Mass was dedicated for the protection of the Pope. When he was an archbishop and people tried to pit him against the Pope, Romero declared, “I prefer to die a thousand times than become a schismatic bishop” (August 26, 1979 Homily).

Thus, the first martyrdom Romero underwent was obedience — abnegation of his own will, which he substituted with the will of the Church and, in a particular way, the Pope. Romero digested and accepted the teachings of the Church at the Second Vatican Council, even though they required him to make changes in his ministry. He accepted the teachings of Pope Paul VI, including the apostolic exhortation Evangelii Nuntiandi, even though it challenged his conservative style as a bishop, and it compelled him to defend social justice. He listened to and obeyed St. John Paul II, even when he sought to reign in Romero’s pastoral action.

These facts strongly suggest that Romero would follow Rome’s lead in response to today’s pandemic. …

[…]

In a word, martyrdom is not defiance but obedience. St. Oscar Romero did not improvise martyrdom, but followed an arduous path to a foreseeable end, pursuing not his own will but that of providence as revealed by the hierarchy, in a true expression of ‘Sentire cum Ecclesia.’ Martyrdom is not placing others in danger but shielding them. St. Damien did not expose others to leprosy; he ministered to those already infected. Martyrdom is accepted “with no fuss,” not in flagrant displays of pomposity. That ‘spirit of martyrdom’ is not dispensed with in a time of crisis; indeed, St. Oscar Romero shows us that this is when it is most essential.

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"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: I'm Starting to Like This Pope

Post by wosbald » Sun Mar 22, 2020 2:56 pm

+JMJ+

A united humanity will rise from pandemic-stricken world, pope says
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In this Tuesday, March 17, 2020 file photo, pallbearers stand outside the Monumentale cemetery, in Bergamo, the heart of the hardest-hit province in Italy’s hardest-hit region of Lombardy, Italy. For most people, the new coronavirus causes only mild or moderate symptoms. For some it can cause more severe illness, especially in older adults and people with existing health problems. (Credit: Luca Bruno/AP)

ROME — As more countries continue to lockdown and isolate to stem the spread of the coronavirus, “we can only get out of this situation together as a whole humanity,” Pope Francis said.

In an interview published in the Italian newspaper La Stampa March 20, the pope said that although Christians must live this moment in history with “penance, compassion and hope,” both believers and nonbelievers “are all in the same boat” and must confront the challenge together.

“What helps us is synergy, mutual collaboration, the sense of responsibility and the spirit of sacrifice that is generated in many places,” he said. “We do not have to make a distinction between believers and nonbelievers; let’s go to the root: Humanity. Before God, we are all his children.”

Reflecting on the Lenten season, the pope said that acts of prayer and fasting are an exercise that “trains us to look at the others with solidarity, especially those who suffer.”

[…]

Pope Francis said the expressions of solidarity today amid the pandemic are a reminder that “humankind is one community,” and he hoped that when the crisis is over, much like a “postwar period, there will no longer be ‘the other,’ but rather ‘us.’”

“We will have to look at the roots even more: The grandparents, the elderly, to build a real sense of fraternity among all of us,” the pope said. “To remember this difficult experience that we all lived through together and to move forward with hope, which never disappoints. These will be the keywords for starting again: Roots, memory, brotherhood and hope.”

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"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: I'm Starting to Like This Pope

Post by wosbald » Mon Mar 23, 2020 12:35 pm

+JMJ+

On Pope Francis, the bishops and the politics of a plague [In-Depth, Analysis]
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Los Angeles Archbishop Jose Gomez, left, prays the rosary to an empty hall at the Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels as TV cameras sit at left and right, Thursday, March 19, 2020, in Los Angeles. The prayer, which was broadcast, was done in conjunction with Pope Francis who urged Catholics to unite spiritually to pray the rosary simultaneously on the Feast of St. Joseph. While services are normally broadcast, the televising of services has become especially important since the archdiocese has had to close their doors to parishioners due to the coronavirus. (Credit: Mark J. Terrill/AP)

ROME — One hopes that no one would consciously set out to take partisan advantage of a global pandemic which, so far, has claimed more than 10,000 lives and left some northern Italian towns piling up corpses because they’ve exhausted the capacity to bury their dead.

Yet there’s no sense pretending there isn’t a risk that discussion of the Church’s response to the coronavirus can’t be swept up into the same ideological dynamics that dominate so much else about Catholic conversation these days. The situation presents itself in especially acute form right now in Italy, which has claimed the world lead in terms of coronavirus fatalities, but we’re also beginning to see it in English-language discussion.

First, let’s sketch the terms of debate.

On the one hand is the urgent public health imperative to limit the spread of the disease by preventing public assemblies, minimizing personal contacts, staying indoors and closing places where people might be tempted to gather. Many dioceses and bishops’ conferences have responded with measures such as suspending public Masses and closing at least some churches to the public.

On the other hand, there’s the equally compelling conviction that times of crisis are when people need the Church most, and that spiritual health is every bit as important as the physical sort. Further, there’s genuine pastoral concern about how people might feel when this crisis has passed if the perception is that the Church was AWOL.

In the beginning, Italian attempts to strike the right balance didn’t come off as especially political.

[…]

As time has gone on, however, the argument against shutting down increasingly has come to be carried by conservative voices, often with an anti-papal edge.

Conservative Italian journalist Camillo Langone issued a scathing verdict after Pope Francis last Sunday left the Vatican unannounced to visit the Basilica of Santa Maria Maggiore, to pray before the famed image of Maria, Salus Populi Romani, and the Church of San Marcello, to pray before a miraculous crucifix credited with saving Rome during an outbreak of the plague in 1522.

“The solitude of this man dressed in white on the Via del Corso … symbolically represented the dissolution, almost the evaporation, of Catholicism, which is a religion and, as such, lives on collective rites,” Langone said.

[…]

Roberto de Mattei, an Italian historian and Catholic traditionalist who’s been a consistent critic of Francis, penned an essay about Borromeo’s leadership during the plague. He never mentioned the pope or today’s crop of bishops, but an unflattering comparison was clearly implied.

Meanwhile in English, First Things editor Rusty Reno argued in a recent essay that Churches should stay open amid the crisis, insisting: “Simply suspending the sacraments suggests that the Church lives in accord with the world’s priorities.”

The opposition to such sentiments was led mostly by well-known liberal commentators and Pope Francis allies such as Massimo Faggioli, who sent the following tweet in response to an announcement by Bishop Richard Strickland in Tyler, Texas, that he was instructing priests to continue to offer adoration and confession despite advice to stay home.

“One of the lessons not learned from the sex abuse crisis: The Church should not be perceived as a threat to public health,” Faggioli wrote.

Papal biographer Austen Ivereigh also dispatched a tweet critical of Reno.

[…]

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"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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