I'm Starting to Like This Pope

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wosbald
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Re: I'm Starting to Like This Pope

Post by wosbald » Wed Mar 25, 2020 9:07 am

+JMJ+

‘Every man for himself’ is not a solution to pandemic, pope says
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Closed restaurants are seen in a mall after the government shut down all the shopping centers in the country due to the coronavirus disease outbreak in Bangkok, Thailand, March 23, 2020. As more and more countries start to feel the economic pinch due to the coronavirus pandemic, Pope Francis urged business leaders to seek solutions that will not hurt employees and their families. (Credit: Soe Zeya Tun/Reuters via CNS)

ROME — As more and more countries start to feel the economic pinch due to the coronavirus pandemic, Pope Francis urged business leaders to seek solutions that will not hurt employees and their families.

“Each (country) must find concrete solutions depending on their situation, but of course, ‘every man for himself,’ is not a solution,” the pope said in an interview via Skype that aired in Spain March 22. “A business that lays off employees to save itself is not a solution. In this moment, instead of laying off, we must welcome and make everyone feel that there is a society of solidarity.”

[…]

He was also asked if he was an “optimist” when it came to how the world would be after the current crisis is over.

“I don’t like that word because optimism sounds to me like makeup,” something false and superficial, he said. “I have hope in humanity, in men and women, and I have hope in the people. I have a lot of hope (in) the people who will take lessons from this crisis to rethink their lives. We are going to come out better, although there will be fewer of us, of course. Many will remain on the path and it is hard. But I have faith we will come out of this better.”

[…]

When asked what he would tell men, women and families who live in fear due to the pandemic, the pope said that “the last thing I would do is tell them something.”

“What I try to do is make them feel that I am close to them. Today, the language of gestures is more important than words. Of course, something should be said, but it is the gesture of sending them a greeting” that is most important, he said.

The current pandemic, Pope Francis added, has also revealed the plight of the less fortunate, which is a tragedy “that is concealed from societies.”

“A couple of days ago, a police officer — with good intentions — told a man, ‘Sir, please go home, you can’t be out here in the street.’ And this man told him, ‘I don’t have a home. I live on the street,’” the pope recalled.

“We must start to be close to those people who we only know as a concept: The homeless, those who are taken advantage of, the sad world of exploited women which is all a business. And this brings us close to those people who, in a way, have very little hope because they don’t have anywhere to lean on. It’s very sad but at the same time, we start to realize that these people exist,” he said.

ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: I'm Starting to Like This Pope

Post by hugodrax » Wed Mar 25, 2020 9:20 am

wosbald wrote:
Wed Mar 25, 2020 9:07 am
+JMJ+

‘Every man for himself’ is not a solution to pandemic, pope says
Image
Closed restaurants are seen in a mall after the government shut down all the shopping centers in the country due to the coronavirus disease outbreak in Bangkok, Thailand, March 23, 2020. As more and more countries start to feel the economic pinch due to the coronavirus pandemic, Pope Francis urged business leaders to seek solutions that will not hurt employees and their families. (Credit: Soe Zeya Tun/Reuters via CNS)

ROME — As more and more countries start to feel the economic pinch due to the coronavirus pandemic, Pope Francis urged business leaders to seek solutions that will not hurt employees and their families.

“Each (country) must find concrete solutions depending on their situation, but of course, ‘every man for himself,’ is not a solution,” the pope said in an interview via Skype that aired in Spain March 22. “A business that lays off employees to save itself is not a solution. In this moment, instead of laying off, we must welcome and make everyone feel that there is a society of solidarity.”

[…]

He was also asked if he was an “optimist” when it came to how the world would be after the current crisis is over.

“I don’t like that word because optimism sounds to me like makeup,” something false and superficial, he said. “I have hope in humanity, in men and women, and I have hope in the people. I have a lot of hope (in) the people who will take lessons from this crisis to rethink their lives. We are going to come out better, although there will be fewer of us, of course. Many will remain on the path and it is hard. But I have faith we will come out of this better.”

[…]

When asked what he would tell men, women and families who live in fear due to the pandemic, the pope said that “the last thing I would do is tell them something.”

“What I try to do is make them feel that I am close to them. Today, the language of gestures is more important than words. Of course, something should be said, but it is the gesture of sending them a greeting” that is most important, he said.

The current pandemic, Pope Francis added, has also revealed the plight of the less fortunate, which is a tragedy “that is concealed from societies.”

“A couple of days ago, a police officer — with good intentions — told a man, ‘Sir, please go home, you can’t be out here in the street.’ And this man told him, ‘I don’t have a home. I live on the street,’” the pope recalled.

“We must start to be close to those people who we only know as a concept: The homeless, those who are taken advantage of, the sad world of exploited women which is all a business. And this brings us close to those people who, in a way, have very little hope because they don’t have anywhere to lean on. It’s very sad but at the same time, we start to realize that these people exist,” he said.
I agree. Get out there and Pope, Pope. No sitting behind closed doors, not interacting with the people. Go Pope. Help somebody rather than cower in fear, you Argentinian Commie. :lol:
Notre Dame de Paris, priez pour nous y comprise les Jesuites.

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Re: I'm Starting to Like This Pope

Post by wosbald » Wed Mar 25, 2020 10:58 pm

+JMJ+

Catholic leaders praise Colorado's repeal of death penalty
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Colorado Gov. Jared Polis is seen in this 2018 file photo. He signed a death penalty repeal bill March 23, 2020, to abolish capital punishment. (CNS/Reuters/Evan Semon)

Washington — Catholic leaders praised Colorado Gov. Jared Polis for signing a death penalty repeal bill into law March 23, making Colorado the 22nd state to abolish the death penalty.

He also commuted the sentences of the state's three death-row inmates to life in prison without the possibility of parole.

"We thank Gov. Jared Polis for signing this historic piece of legislation, and we commend the many state senators and representatives who worked hard to make this important change to our state law," the Colorado Catholic Conference said in a March 23 statement.

The conference, the public policy arm of the state's Catholic bishops, said that for many years it has supported efforts to repeal the death penalty and it was "grateful for the determination and commitment it took for the state legislature to pass this bill."

Krisanne Vaillancourt Murphy, executive director of Catholic Mobilizing Network, the national Catholic organization working to end the death penalty said the state's action was a "critical step toward respecting the dignity of human life."

[…]

Sr. Helen Prejean, a Sister of St. Joseph of Medaille and a longtime opponent of the death penalty, thanked the Colorado governor for his action in a March 23 tweet and added: "Alleluia! I'm celebrating the citizen activists of Colorado who, with stellar collaboration from the legal, law enforcement, education, and faith communities, steadily changed hearts and minds to arrive at this life-affirming day."

Colorado's Catholic bishops also praised the House for passing the death penalty repeal bill on Feb. 26 and included in their statement the words of Denver Auxiliary Bishop Jorge H. Rodriguez, who testified in support of the repeal bill before both the Senate and House Judiciary Committees.

In his testimony, he said: "The Catholic Church has long taught that every person, whether they are unborn, sick or sinful, has a God-given dignity that cannot be erased or taken away. Yes, it can be marred, but it cannot be blotted out in the eyes of God."

When the governor signed the bill and announced the commutation of three death sentences, he said: "The commutations of these despicable and guilty individuals are consistent with the abolition of the death penalty in the state of Colorado, and consistent with the recognition that the death penalty cannot be, and never has been, administered equitably in the state of Colorado."

In recent years, Washington, Delaware, Maryland, Connecticut and Illinois have abolished the death penalty.

Colorado is the third state in the past three years, after Washington in 2018 and New Hampshire in 2019, to abolish capital punishment and it's the third to end the practice since the Vatican's 2018 revision to the Catechism of the Catholic Church which declared the death penalty "inadmissible" in all cases.

[…]

ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: I'm Starting to Like This Pope

Post by wosbald » Thu Mar 26, 2020 8:12 am

+JMJ+

Iranian cleric pleads with pope to help end U.S. sanctions
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Ayatollah Seyed Mostafa Mohaghegh Damad Ahmadabadi, an Islamic scholar, answers reporters’ questions in Rome Oct. 14, 2010, before giving a presentation at the Vatican. (Credit: Paul Haring/CNS)

ROME — Citing the increasing loss of lives to COVID-19 and a lack of medical resources, an Iranian cleric has urged Pope Francis to do what he can to help get U.S. sanctions against Iran lifted.

“Without judging the root causes of these inhuman sanctions imposed by the United States, as an Iranian Islamic scholar, I humbly ask you, as a beloved world leader of Catholics, to intervene so that those sanctions are eliminated,” wrote Ayatollah Seyed Mostafa Mohaghegh Damad Ahmadabadi.

Promoting the end to the sanctions is a humanitarian act befitting those who believe in Jesus, who “for the whole world is a universal symbol of peace and love,” he said in a letter addressed to Pope Francis. The text of the letter was also sent to Fides, the Vatican’s missionary news agency, and was published on their website March 20.

Mohaghegh Damad is a scholar and dean of the department of Islamic Studies at the Academy of Sciences of Iran and a professor of law and Islamic philosophy at Tehran University. Pope Benedict XVI invited him to attend and address the 2010 Synod of Bishops for the Middle East at the Vatican.

In his letter to Pope Francis, the ayatollah said Iran has seen a rapid spread of the coronavirus, with many people “struggling painfully against the loss of loved ones caused very often by the serious lack of medical resources due to the consequences of sanctions imposed by the United States.”

The sanctions “have greatly multiplied the sufferings and afflictions of the oppressed Iranian Muslim people and have forced them to face countless problems that have had a profound and negative impact on their life, on their peace and spiritual tranquility and moreover, have deprived them of the most basic and inalienable human rights,” the letter said.

“In these days in which men all over the world are seriously threatened by the appalling spread of COVID-19, I am deeply convinced that the Holy Father, with sincere love and compassion, continues to pray that this international tragedy may cease and human suffering finds relief.”

[…]

ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: I'm Starting to Like This Pope

Post by wosbald » Fri Mar 27, 2020 7:33 am

+JMJ+

What do we owe the weak? — Or just “say ‘No’ to death’s dominion” [Opinion]
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Forty years — nearly to the day — after Óscar Romero was murdered for advocating for the lives of the poor and for denouncing the regime of death ruling his country, a prominent Catholic journal in the U.S. has published an article accusing those who want to protect the weak from death of paying deference to “the false god of ‘saving lives.'” Americans, R. R. Reno claims, are letting a fear of death control them. He identifies “a demonic side to the sentimentalism of saving lives at any cost.”

False gods, the dominion of death, and demons. Heady language with strong warnings to Christians to be on their guard. Reno is right that Christians are called to discern where death is having its way, where the anti-God forces are at work, and where humans are exchanging the true God for worthless idols. But he is reading the situation upside-down.

Where is death at work in this cultural moment? Romero asked the same question, as he believed a church that preaches resurrection must denounce death-dealing structures in society, and a church that preaches conversion must denounce sin in all its subtleties. In Romero’s moment, many Christians saw the violence of the leftist groups of El Salvador as the only violence worth denouncing, as the primary location of the reign of sin and death. They considered the violence of the military and police and their allies as legitimate violence, intended to maintain “law and order.” Violence meant to keep society intact, to keep the economy humming along and social and political life under control.

Romero denounced both of these types of violence, while also pointing to a different violence, one hidden from our sight by its very everyday-ness. It is the violence of a status quo willing to sacrifice the poor for the sake of a prosperous economy. It is the violence of laws that burden the vulnerable while lightening the load of the elite. For Romero, this kind of “ordinary violence” (in the words of Romero scholar Matthew Whelan) is in some ways even more insidious just because of its hiddenness. He insisted that the “long, drawn out” deaths of Salvadorans were no less the fruit of sin then the “swift death” brought by repression.

Reno, on the other hand, asserts that “the pro-life cause concerns the battle against killing, not an ill-conceived crusade against human finitude and the dolorous reality of death.” The dolorous reality of death. And if that “dolorous reality” takes on flesh in the bodies of the weak, the elderly, the poor? Do we accept that as simply the way of human finitude? Or do we discern where the dominion of death might be at work, where sin might be having its way?

The crux of the problem, of course, is that the poor and weak are more vulnerable to die from a shut-down economy, just as they are more vulnerable to die from the virus itself. Many have been pointing out the ways that the economy and human lives are intertwined, that the economy itself is meant to be directed at human flourishing. What we must acknowledge is that this moment is revealing the ordinary violence that was already present in our systems. “Revealing” — because that is what apocalyptic moments do, they reveal. The ordinary violence instantiated in our systems cannot be an excuse for less drastic action taken to protect the vulnerable from the virus. Rather, we ought to accept it as an opportunity to rethink and refashion those systems. We must hold our leaders to account, insist that they provide for those stripped of jobs, income, and childcare in the months ahead. We have a way forward to help shelter people from the worst consequences of the economic downturn, if we so choose. At the moment, at least, we do not have what we need to shelter people from the worst of the virus — protective gear, hospital beds, ventilators, treatments for the virus.

So we must ask the questions. We must ask, are we succumbing to the fear of death? To the centering of survival? Are we serving a false god? But we must do so with a clear view as to where violence and death are truly at work, particularly in veiled form.

[…]

ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: I'm Starting to Like This Pope

Post by wosbald » Sat Mar 28, 2020 6:52 am

+JMJ+

Coronavirus indulgences evoke Francis' 'ridiculously-pardoning' church [In-Depth]
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Rome — Announcement of the Vatican's offering of new plenary indulgences to those around the world affected by the coronavirus may have left some Catholics asking, "We still do that?"

The answer is yes. And theologians say the move, made in a March 20 decree from the apostolic penitentiary, shows a seemingly unprecedented level of pastoral care for those who suffer from the virus — especially those who may die in isolation without being able to receive final rites.

Jesuit Fr. James Corkery, an Irish theologian at the Pontifical Gregorian University, said the decree fits with Pope Francis' vision for a "merciful, welcoming, 'ridiculously-pardoning' church."

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Pope Francis hears the confession of a priest at Rome's Basilica of St. John Lateran in March 2019. (CNS/Vatican Media)

"He wants people to be 'received back,' to be forgiven, above all to be loved," said Corkery, who has written extensively on the church after the Second Vatican Council.

In Catholic teaching, an indulgence is the remission of the eventual punishment due for sins that have been confessed and forgiven. A plenary indulgence, which can only be granted in various ways outlined by the Vatican, involves the remission of all of a person's eventual punishment.

For persons near death from the virus and unable to receive the sacraments because of isolation measures, the decree says they can obtain the indulgence "at the point of death, as long as they have recited some prayers during their life."

Jeremy Wilkins, a theologian at Boston College, said he sees "something new" in the offering to those who are dying.

"The conditions there are waived. It says … the church fulfills the conditions for you," said the theologian. "That's quite amazing."

"It really is tender," said Wilkins, who has focused his work in the areas of Christology and grace. "I think the church very tenderly wants to say, 'Be sorry for your sins, and know that you're not alone, and it will be OK.' "

Jesuit Fr. Peter Folan, a theologian at Georgetown University, said he found the decree's treatment of the dying "especially moving."

"There's just a deep theology behind that, and just a deep understanding of who God is, that God doesn't ever turn God's gaze away from anybody, especially those at that most important event of their life, which is our death," said Folan.

Both Wilkins and Folan said that it appeared that the penitentiary had two primary objectives in offering the new indulgences: to show mercy to Catholics facing a severe time of trial, and to encourage them to think of their suffering in relation to that endured by Christ, and all the saints who have come before us.

[…]

ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: I'm Starting to Like This Pope

Post by hugodrax » Sat Mar 28, 2020 7:28 am

Oh, that's pretty good. We welcome you at this time of great difficulty to minister to yourselves. See how loving we are? We'll let you do our job. Pontifical mercy has super abundantly blessed the Church with the cessation of its duties.

We no longer need celebrate your marriage, baptize your newborn, hear confessions, or bury the dead. All those priests that died in past plagues ministering to their flocks were superstitious and modern science says they would have lived if they just had stayed home.

What message do they think they're sending?
Notre Dame de Paris, priez pour nous y comprise les Jesuites.

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Re: I'm Starting to Like This Pope

Post by wosbald » Sat Mar 28, 2020 8:48 am

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Intra-Thread Trackbacks: pg 120


'Give me liberty, or give me (grandma's) death!' [In-Depth, Opinion]
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A pedestrian in New York City walks on Wall Street March 23. (CNS/Reuters/Mike Segar)

[…]

I was surprised to see certain Catholic conservatives join the Malthusian Express. R.R. Reno at First Things opined, "Just so, the mass shutdown of society to fight the spread of COVID-19 creates a perverse, even demonic atmosphere. Governor [Andrew] Cuomo and other officials insist that death's power must rule our actions. Religious leaders have accepted this decree, suspending the proclamation of the gospel and the distribution of the Bread of Life. They signal by their actions that they, too, accept death's dominion." He also clarified precisely what the pro-life movement was really about, criticizing New York's Governor Cuomo for "disastrous sentimentalism" in willing to place the entire resources of society behind the cause of stemming the pandemic and saving "even one life." Reno writes:
Everything for the sake of physical life? What about justice, beauty, and honor? There are many things more precious than life. And yet we have been whipped into such a frenzy in New York that most family members will forgo visiting sick parents. Clergy won't visit the sick or console those who mourn. The Eucharist itself is now subordinated to the false god of "saving lives."
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New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo is briefed March 13 about the state's first drive-through coronavirus mobile testing center in New Rochelle, New York, by Michael Kopy, who is New York state's director of emergency management. (CNS/The Journal News/USA Today via Reuters/Mark Vergari)

After years of being told that all social justice issues must come second because "you cannot enjoy any other right unless you first enjoy the right-to-life," now we are told that this is all sentimentalism. Reno is no dummy. He knows that it is not the threat to justice or beauty or honor that has Trump all upset. He wants to reopen "the economy," not the National Gallery of Art.

I would note in passing that it is somewhat ironic that First Things is one of the media outlets most associated with the promotion of the idea that America was founded on a "Judeo-Christian ethic." The phrase "Judeo-Christian" emerged in the 20th century out of a humane desire to diminish anti-Semitism while imbuing our government with religious auras it surely did not possess in 1789. But, as anyone with even a modicum of knowledge of Talmudic law knows, in the Hebrew moral tradition, all legal maxims go by the wayside to defend human life. You can eat treif if that is what is required to preserve a life and, as in the Catholic ethical tradition, you need not embark on extraordinary means to save a life, but you cannot do anything that will hasten death.

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Pro-life advocates participate in a 40 Days for Life vigil near the entrance to a Planned Parenthood center in Smithtown, New York, March 19. (CNS/Gregory A. Shemitz)

[…]

ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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