I'm Starting to Like This Pope

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Re: I'm Starting to Like This Pope

Post by wosbald » Fri Jun 19, 2020 9:45 am

+JMJ+

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Podcast: Why is the Vatican silent on Archbishop Viganò? [Audio]
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Archbishop Carlo Maria Vigano, apostolic nuncio to the United States, attends the opening Mass of the National Prayer Vigil for Life at the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception in Washington in this Jan. 22, 2011, file photo. (CNS photo/Nancy Phelan Wiechec)

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Last week, Archbishop Carlo Maria Viganò was back in the spotlight after President Donald Trump tweeted promoting an open letter that Viganò had written to him. The letter praised Mr. Trump for “defending the right to life” and expressed Archbishop Viganò’s belief in a number of conspiracy theories, including the idea of a “deep state” group undermining the American government and a parallel group within the Catholic church.

Archbishop Viganò has published many such letters since his original 11-page “testimony,” published in 2018, accusing a number of top church officials of knowing about abuse by former Cardinal Theodore McCarrick, blaming a “homosexual network” in the Vatican for the abuse crisis, and calling on Pope Francis to resign.

The Vatican has been relatively tight-lipped in response to the archbishop: When journalists asked Pope Francis about the “testimony,” the pope refused to comment beyond saying, “Read that statement attentively and make your own judgment,” adding, “I think the statement speaks for itself, and you have a sufficient journalistic ability to make a conclusion.” Many of the archbishop’s claims have since been called into question, and the Vatican is conducting its own investigation into Mr. McCarrick.

On this episode of “Inside the Vatican,” veteran Vatican reporter Gerard O’Connell and I discuss why the Vatican has remained quiet in response to Archbishop Viganò and whether that is likely to change following President Trump’s endorsement.

We also discuss Pope Francis’ message for the World Day of the Poor, along with the new fund he established with the mayor of Rome and the governor of Lazio to aid workers who had not previously been eligible for government assistance.

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"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: I'm Starting to Like This Pope

Post by Del » Fri Jun 19, 2020 12:59 pm


If the Vatican speaks out against Vigano, then the Curia would be on the same outside as Amerika and Fishwrap.


My working theory is that Pope Francis does not want to confront the Lavender Mafia directly, but he is content to let Vigano speak out as a voice of conscience.
"Anyone who knows anything of experts will know one thing for certain; that they will always be disturbing our way of living; and therefore we shall always be disputing their right of governing." - GKC. Feb 11, 1933.

The future is certain; it’s the past that keeps changing. ~ Old Soviet joke

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Re: I'm Starting to Like This Pope

Post by wosbald » Wed Jun 24, 2020 8:27 am

+JMJ+

Intra-thread Trackbacks: pg 63 / pg 64 / pg 65 / pg 65 / pg 66 / pg 66 / pg 73 / pg 84 / pg 120 / pg 123 / pg 124 / pg 124 / pg 124 / pg 125 / pg 125 / pg 125 / pg 125 / pg 126

Inter-Thread Trackbacks:
"Evangelical Fundamentalism and Catholic Integralism": pg 4 / pg 6 / pg 6 / pg6 / pg 6 / pg 6



Viganò, QAnon, and the ‘Deep Church’ explained (Part 1) [Audio]
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In this edition of Peter’s Field Hospital, I’m joined by DW Lafferty and Nathan Turowsky. This week, we discuss the origins of some of the more obscure terms used by Archbishop Viganò in his letter to President Trump, and their origins in contemporary conspiracy theories.

DW Lafferty presents his theory about what Viganò was trying to do by publishing this letter, and how he accomplished his goals. We also discuss the troubling fact that many ordinary Catholics seem to be embracing these theories as well.

Part 1 of 2.


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"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: I'm Starting to Like This Pope

Post by wosbald » Thu Jun 25, 2020 10:08 am

+JMJ+

Intra-thread Trackbacks: pg 63 / pg 64 / pg 65 / pg 65 / pg 66 / pg 66 / pg 73 / pg 84 / pg 120 / pg 123 / pg 124 / pg 124 / pg 124 / pg 125 / pg 125 / pg 125 / pg 125 / pg 126 / pg 126

Inter-Thread Trackbacks:
"Evangelical Fundamentalism and Catholic Integralism": pg 4 / pg 6 / pg 6 / pg6 / pg 6 / pg 6



The Danger of a Post-Truth Catholic Schism (Part 2 of 2) [Audio]
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This is part two of my discussion with David Lafferty and Nathan Turowsky about the influence of leaders like Archbishop Viganò and Taylor Marshall on ordinary Catholics.

In part one, we discussed the influence of the QAnon conspiracy theory on Archbishop Viganò’s recent letter-writing campaign.

In part two, we talk about the extremes that this kind of rhetoric has reached, the disturbing impact of these messages on ordinary Catholics, and what we can do to reverse this trend.

We also respond to the frequent charge that we aren’t as hard on “liberal” Catholic dissenters as we are of those on the right.

Part 2 of 2.


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"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: I'm Starting to Like This Pope

Post by wosbald » Fri Jun 26, 2020 10:57 am

+JMJ+

Intra-Thread Trackbacks: pg 78 / pg 78 / pg 79 / pg 79 / pg 88 / pg 89 / pg 89 / pg 118 / pg 118 / pg 119 / pg 124 / pg 124 / pg 124 / pg 125


Hong Kong cardinal says new security law will not limit religious freedom [In-Depth]
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Cardinal John Tong Hon, of Hong Kong, attends Pope Francis's weekly general audience in St. Peter's Square, at the Vatican, Wednesday, June 12, 2019. (Credit: Credit: Gregorio Borgia/AP)

ROME — In a recent interview, Cardinal John Tong, former bishop and current administer of the Hong Kong diocese, has said he does not believe a new security law, which many fear will limit democracy in the territory, will pose a threat to religious freedom.

Speaking to Kung Kao Po, the Diocese of Hong Kong’s weekly Chinese-language publication, Tong said he understands the need for a security law, which is required as part of Hong Kong’s Basic Law.

However, he voiced hope that the government would clarify confusion surrounding the new law, saying, “because citizens have different backgrounds, different ideas, and different concerns, I hope that the government and the (Special Administrative Region) government can eliminate or minimize the public’s doubt.”

Regarding fears that the new law will open the door to assaults on religious freedom, Tong disagreed, saying, “I personally believe that the National Security Law has no effect on religious freedom,” citing provisions in Hong Kong’s Basic Law which guarantee freedom of belief.

“We can also openly preach and hold religious ceremonies. And participate in religious activities,” Tong said.

These comments contradict fears expressed by Jacky Hung, a member of the diocese’s Justice and Peace commission, who upon hearing of the law voiced concern that it “will be used to suppress religious freedom. Hong Kong should adopt universal suffrage before adopting national security laws.”

[…]

Article four of the law is the most controversial. Among other things, it stipulates that when needed, the Chinese Central government in Beijing can step in and set up agencies to help the territory fulfill its security requirements.

[…]

In his interview Tong stressed the importance of unity within the Church, insisting that he does not believe its activities will be impacted by the new law.

“The participation of the Church in social affairs should also not be affected,” he said, citing a separate article of Hong Kong’s Basic Law which specifies “that the Hong Kong SAR government does not interfere in the internal affairs of religious organizations and provides services to the general public.”

Asked whether he feared that the Church in Hong Kong’s relationship with the Vatican would constitute “collusion with foreign forces” under the new security law, Tong also voiced doubt.

“I think the Hong Kong Catholic Church has always had a direct relationship with the Vatican; the relationship between the Hong Kong diocese and the Vatican should be regarded as an internal matter,” he said, insisting that even under the new security legislation, he does not believe this relationship will be considered as collusion.

“In fact, China and the Vatican already have friendly exchanges, and our church focuses on spirituality and pastoralism,” he said.

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"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: I'm Starting to Like This Pope

Post by wosbald » Mon Jun 29, 2020 8:34 am

+JMJ+

Francis praises early Christians: 'They did not complain about Peter'
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Pope Francis arrives to celebrate Mass marking the feast of Sts. Peter and Paul in St. Peter's Basilica at the Vatican June 29, 2020. (CNS photo/Paul Haring)

Rome — Pope Francis praised the example of the early Christian community in his homily for the annual feast of saints Peter and Paul June 29, saying its members prayed for their leaders instead of criticizing them.

In a small, socially-distanced Mass in the nave of St. Peter's Basilica, the pontiff recalled how the arrest of St. Peter by King Herod had put the first Christians into a moment of crisis.

"Those Christians did not cast blame; they prayed," said the pope. "No one said: 'If Peter had been more careful, we would not be in this situation.'"

"No, they did not complain about Peter; they prayed for him," said Francis. "They did not talk about Peter behind his back; they talked to God."

"What would happen if we prayed more and complained less?" the pope then asked, before responding: "The same thing that happened to Peter in prison: now as then, so many closed doors would be opened, so many chains that bind would be broken."

Francis' comments may be taken as a reference to the small but vocal group of critics of his own seven-year papacy, who malign him on a range of issues — from his frequent focus on the expansive nature of God's mercy to his repeated calls for world leaders to do more to combat global climate change.

The pope's homily focused on two main characteristics that he said were shown by the early Christians: unity and prophecy.

Speaking of his desire for a church that is prophetic, Francis said Christians are not prophetic in the way they talk but in the way they serve others.

"If you want a prophetic church, stay quiet and start serving," the pontiff advised.

"We are not to become rich, but rather to love the poor," said Francis. "We are not to save up for ourselves, but to spend ourselves for others."

The feast of saints Peter and Paul commemorates the martyrdom of the two early Christian leaders, and is also a public holiday in the city of Rome.

[…]

ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: I'm Starting to Like This Pope

Post by wosbald » Tue Jun 30, 2020 11:42 am

+JMJ+

Pope Francis gives his blessing to Jesuit anti-hunger projects in Argentina [In-Depth]
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A man plays the guitar below a mural of Pope Francis during a government-ordered lockdown to curb the spread of the new coronavirus in Buenos Aires, Argentina, Wednesday, April 29, 2020. (Credit: Natacha Pisarenko./AP)

ROSARIO, Argentina — Although Pope Francis hasn’t visited his homeland since his 2013 election, he often gives signs that his heart still belongs to the country of his birth.

Recently, he sent hand-written letters to two charitable causes sponsored by the Jesuits, the religious order to which Francis belongs.

The concept of both campaigns is similar: Deliver food packages to as many families as possible during the COVID-19 coronavirus pandemic with the help of the country’s largest companies in the food industry.

[…]

The United Nations recently estimated that by the end of the pandemic, over 52 percent of the country’s total population will be under the poverty line. Hence the need for charitable projects such as the Jesuit-run “Seamos Uno” [Let’s be one] and “Cordoba urgencia alimentaria” [Cordoba alimentary urgency] programs.

[…]

The Buenos Aires-based Seamos Uno is the larger of the two, and its goal is to deliver a million boxes full of food and cleaning products, that can sustain a family of four for at least a week. Each box is filled with enough for 56 meals, and include name brand goods that are being sold at wholesale prices by some of the country’s largest food companies.

Pope Francis sent a letter addressed to Jesuit Father Rafael Velasco, who heads the local Jesuit community: “Initiatives such as this one is what’s needed everywhere, for the present time but also to sustain the measures of the ‘aftermath’.”

He also thanked the Argentine province of the Jesuits for their witness, saying, “it’s good for me.”

So far, they’ve received 600 million Argentine pesos (over $8 million) in donations, which they’ve used to give over 24 million meals, nearly half of their target. This is sixteen times the amount of food that the government has distributed through the military.

[…]

Father Angel Rossi, also a Jesuit, is behind Cordoba Urgencia Alimentaria, that aims to feed 25,000 families. Organized by several Catholic entities, including Caritas, the Jesuits and Radio Maria, it was launched earlier in June. The food is being distributed through a network of parishes. With less than $10, one can sponsor a family of four with enough food to last a week.

[…]

Rossi also said that, without “oversimplifying” things, he believes that Argentina suffers from the “culture of indifference” that the pope talks so much about. “When, hopefully, comfort comes back to visit us, it won’t find us wrapped in the temptation to forget others, those who will still need help, even if for us, things are ‘back to normal’.”

[…]

The pope wrote that he considers the initiative means a “beginning to change looking to what will be the post-COVID-19. The great danger we must overcome is that society ‘is rebuilt’ as it was before the pandemic, or at most, with a brushstroke of varnish. From a crisis (and this is a crisis) we do not come out the same: either better or worse.”

In this sense, Francis adds: “The Cordoba Urgencia Alimentaria initiative is much more than a charity; it’s aims to change the future, to break sclerotic schemes, to put aside the culture of indifference, to proclaim that people — every person, any person — is more important than money.”

ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: I'm Starting to Like This Pope

Post by Del » Tue Jun 30, 2020 8:19 pm

wosbald wrote:
Tue Jun 30, 2020 11:42 am
+JMJ+

Pope Francis gives his blessing to Jesuit anti-hunger projects in Argentina [In-Depth]
Image
A man plays the guitar below a mural of Pope Francis during a government-ordered lockdown to curb the spread of the new coronavirus in Buenos Aires, Argentina, Wednesday, April 29, 2020. (Credit: Natacha Pisarenko./AP)

ROSARIO, Argentina — Although Pope Francis hasn’t visited his homeland since his 2013 election, he often gives signs that his heart still belongs to the country of his birth.

Recently, he sent hand-written letters to two charitable causes sponsored by the Jesuits, the religious order to which Francis belongs.

The concept of both campaigns is similar: Deliver food packages to as many families as possible during the COVID-19 coronavirus pandemic with the help of the country’s largest companies in the food industry.

[…]

The United Nations recently estimated that by the end of the pandemic, over 52 percent of the country’s total population will be under the poverty line. Hence the need for charitable projects such as the Jesuit-run “Seamos Uno” [Let’s be one] and “Cordoba urgencia alimentaria” [Cordoba alimentary urgency] programs.

[…]

The Buenos Aires-based Seamos Uno is the larger of the two, and its goal is to deliver a million boxes full of food and cleaning products, that can sustain a family of four for at least a week. Each box is filled with enough for 56 meals, and include name brand goods that are being sold at wholesale prices by some of the country’s largest food companies.

Pope Francis sent a letter addressed to Jesuit Father Rafael Velasco, who heads the local Jesuit community: “Initiatives such as this one is what’s needed everywhere, for the present time but also to sustain the measures of the ‘aftermath’.”

He also thanked the Argentine province of the Jesuits for their witness, saying, “it’s good for me.”

So far, they’ve received 600 million Argentine pesos (over $8 million) in donations, which they’ve used to give over 24 million meals, nearly half of their target. This is sixteen times the amount of food that the government has distributed through the military.

[…]

Father Angel Rossi, also a Jesuit, is behind Cordoba Urgencia Alimentaria, that aims to feed 25,000 families. Organized by several Catholic entities, including Caritas, the Jesuits and Radio Maria, it was launched earlier in June. The food is being distributed through a network of parishes. With less than $10, one can sponsor a family of four with enough food to last a week.

[…]

Rossi also said that, without “oversimplifying” things, he believes that Argentina suffers from the “culture of indifference” that the pope talks so much about. “When, hopefully, comfort comes back to visit us, it won’t find us wrapped in the temptation to forget others, those who will still need help, even if for us, things are ‘back to normal’.”

[…]

The pope wrote that he considers the initiative means a “beginning to change looking to what will be the post-COVID-19. The great danger we must overcome is that society ‘is rebuilt’ as it was before the pandemic, or at most, with a brushstroke of varnish. From a crisis (and this is a crisis) we do not come out the same: either better or worse.”

In this sense, Francis adds: “The Cordoba Urgencia Alimentaria initiative is much more than a charity; it’s aims to change the future, to break sclerotic schemes, to put aside the culture of indifference, to proclaim that people — every person, any person — is more important than money.”
If Pope Francis has persuaded the Jesuits to do some charitable action for people in need, it should count as a miracle toward his canonization.
"Anyone who knows anything of experts will know one thing for certain; that they will always be disturbing our way of living; and therefore we shall always be disputing their right of governing." - GKC. Feb 11, 1933.

The future is certain; it’s the past that keeps changing. ~ Old Soviet joke

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Re: I'm Starting to Like This Pope

Post by wosbald » Fri Jul 03, 2020 9:29 am

+JMJ+

Intra-thread Trackbacks: pg 63 / pg 64 / pg 65 / pg 65 / pg 66 / pg 66 / pg 73 / pg 84 / pg 120 / pg 123 / pg 124 / pg 124 / pg 124 / pg 125 / pg 125 / pg 125 / pg 125 / pg 126 / pg 126 / pg 126

Inter-Thread Trackbacks:
"Evangelical Fundamentalism and Catholic Integralism": pg 4 / pg 6 / pg 6 / pg6 / pg 6 / pg 6
"Mary Alone": pg 18 / pg 20 /pg 20



Podcast: Catholics, COVID-19, pseudoscience, and confirmation bias (Part 2 of 3) [Audio]
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This is part two of my conversation with Pedro Gabriel and Claire Navarro about how the differences in our native cultures shape the approach to politics and the Catholic Church in our countries.

Pedro provides his insights as a medical doctor on the varied responses of Catholics around the world to COVID-19, and describes how the Church in Portugal responded to the pandemic on the anniversary of the first apparition of Our Lady in Fatima this year.

Later, we talk about the role of ideology and confirmation bias in politicizing and deepening the divisions between Catholics over the faith and Pope Francis.

Pedro will be giving a talk on July 9 at the online Immortal Combat Men’s Conference on “Pope Francis and Silence — How to Defeat the False Angel of Light” (Click ).

Click here to listen to part 1.


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"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: I'm Starting to Like This Pope

Post by wosbald » Sun Jul 05, 2020 8:52 am

+JMJ+

Intra-thread Trackbacks: pg 63 / pg 64 / pg 65 / pg 65 / pg 66 / pg 66 / pg 73 / pg 84 / pg 120 / pg 123 / pg 124 / pg 124 / pg 124 / pg 125 / pg 125 / pg 125 / pg 125 / pg 126 / pg 126 / pg 126 / pg 126

Inter-Thread Trackbacks:
"Evangelical Fundamentalism and Catholic Integralism": pg 4 / pg 6 / pg 6 / pg6 / pg 6 / pg 6
"Mary Alone": pg 18 / pg 20 /pg 20



Podcast: Was that Paganism in the Vatican? (Part 3 of 3) [Audio]
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This is one of the most important — if not the most important — podcasts we have done to date. Pedro Gabriel and I talk about the work he did to unravel and respond to the controversy surrounding the Vatican prayer service before October’s Vatican Synod.

We discuss how not only did he encounter an unrelenting, angry, and intractable hostility from conservative Catholic outlets and social media, where there was an adamant refusal to entertain any explanation other than that the indigenous Amazonian Catholics had conducted a pagan ritual, and that they were worshipping the goddess Pachamama — with the approval of Pope Francis.

Looking back, the contempt directed towards these Catholics from the Amazon was a preview of what we’re witnessing today: white European cultural supremacy, racism, disdain for the authentic cultural expressions of the historically marginalized, and unhinged, unthinking conspiratorial paranoia about the Holy Father.

Click here to listen to part 1. Click here to listen to part 2.



And don't forget!

Pedro will be giving a talk on July 9 at the online Immortal Combat Men’s Conference on “Pope Francis and Silence — How to Defeat the False Angel of Light” (Click here to register).

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"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: I'm Starting to Like This Pope

Post by tuttle » Mon Jul 06, 2020 6:28 am

wosbald wrote:
Sun Jul 05, 2020 8:52 am
+JMJ+

Intra-thread Trackbacks: pg 63 / pg 64 / pg 65 / pg 65 / pg 66 / pg 66 / pg 73 / pg 84 / pg 120 / pg 123 / pg 124 / pg 124 / pg 124 / pg 125 / pg 125 / pg 125 / pg 125 / pg 126 / pg 126 / pg 126 / pg 126

Inter-Thread Trackbacks:
"Evangelical Fundamentalism and Catholic Integralism": pg 4 / pg 6 / pg 6 / pg6 / pg 6 / pg 6
"Mary Alone": pg 18 / pg 20 /pg 20



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Re: I'm Starting to Like This Pope

Post by wosbald » Thu Jul 09, 2020 11:12 am

+JMJ+

Intra-thread Trackbacks: pg 63 / pg 64 / pg 65 / pg 65 / pg 66 / pg 66 / pg 73 / pg 84 / pg 120 / pg 123 / pg 124 / pg 124 / pg 124 / pg 125 / pg 125 / pg 125 / pg 125 / pg 126 / pg 126 / pg 126 / pg 126 / pg 126

Inter-Thread Trackbacks:
"Evangelical Fundamentalism and Catholic Integralism": pg 4 / pg 6 / pg 6 / pg6 / pg 6 / pg 6
"Mary Alone": pg 18 / pg 20 /pg 20



Why the Vatican is silent on Viganò [In-Depth, Opinion]
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Image: Original work created from creative commons sources — (1) Prayer Vigil with Pope Francis ahead of Synod
© Mazur/catholicnews.org.uk. Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0); (2) Di White House Image/Lawrence Jackson, Pubblico dominio, (3) Screencap from Archidiócesis de Valencia video.

The Vatican, however, has not spoken.

— JD Flynn; Catholic News Agency, July 1, 2020
Last week, Catholic News Agency (CNA) published an essay by their editor-in-chief, JD Flynn, analyzing Archbishop Viganò’s growing pile of public missives and the Vatican’s silence about him. In this article, Flynn correctly notes that Viganò’s original contentions — about Cardinal McCarrick’s sexual abuse scandal — have since given way to a variety of other topics, some even going into doctrinal matters (specifically involving the Second Vatican Council).

Flynn then goes on to assert that the Vatican in general (and Pope Francis in particular) have maintained their silence on Viganò. This claim, however, is only partially correct. But the greatest problem arises later on, when Flynn speculates about potential explanations for this papal silence. Here, his essay fails in its analysis. His tone seems to betray a certain (and understandable) frustration with this silence, since Viganò’s rhetoric appears to have reached the mainstream after President Trump tweeted a link to one of his open letters.

Speaking as someone who has closely studied the spirituality and the theological mind of Jorge Mario Bergoglio for several years, the possible explanations that Flynn proposes for Francis’s silence are implausible and reflect neither the character nor the leadership style of our pope. But let us first examine the first misconception in this piece: the claim that the Vatican has remained silent. This is not true.

As Flynn notes, the topic of …

===============================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================

But Flynn’s essay also misses the mark when he advances a series of hypotheses that he believes might explain the Vatican’s silence, namely: 1) Church leaders do not grasp the level of influence that Viganò has; 2) There is a misguided hope that Viganò will simply go away quietly; 3) They are reluctant to publicly admonish an archbishop who is a retired high-ranking diplomatic figure; 4) They are disinclined to answer due to sincere concerns for the archbishop’s health or his personal circumstances; 5) They want to avoid the uncomfortable fact that Francis has chosen to not answer many open “questions” (he specifically names the “substantive claims” by Viganò about McCarrick and the “unanswered” questions on Amoris Laetitia). To his credit, Flynn does add reasons why almost all these hypotheses are likely wrongheaded.

Whatever role these guesses might play in answering his question, the main reason cannot be found anywhere in Flynn’s article. This, in my mind, demonstrates the fundamental lack of comprehension of Francis that is held by even his most deferential critics.

The reason for Pope Francis’s silence is rooted in two facts.

The first is that, as I have mentioned, the Vatican did indeed respond in the beginning, through Cardinal Ouellet’s open letter. It was roundly dismissed by those who supported Viganò, including by CNA and JD Flynn himself. Ultimately, it served no purpose. So why keep pursuing this approach? Nothing the Vatican can say or do will change the minds of those who have decided to believe and support Viganò, no matter how ridiculous his claims have become.

The second reason flows from the first. It is deeply rooted in Pope Francis’s spirituality and his life philosophy. As Father Jorge Bergoglio wrote in an essay in the 1990s:
In moments of darkness and tribulation, when the tangles and the knots cannot be untied, nor things clarified, then we must be silent.
In the same essay, Fr. Bergoglio further explains this reasoning. When a person is attacked in a way that “cannot be clarified,” then that person’s best response is to keep silent. Truth will eventually come to the surface, because the “weakness” shown by this person inevitably emboldens the Devil, who will then manifest himself, revealing the evil motivations he had concealed until that time.

In other words, by letting the accuser talk, the person who suffers in silence will give this accuser enough rope to hang himself. Let him talk. Sooner or later he will reveal the inconsistencies and lies in his accusations.

This is precisely what happened with Viganò. Flynn correctly notes that “the archbishop has changed his topic, from the McCarrick affair to conspiracy theories about the coronavirus pandemic, the Marian apparition at Fatima, and the Second Vatican Council.“

In other words, Viganò is letting it all out now. His accusations do not serve the legitimate aim of doing justice for the McCarrick victims anymore, as they once appeared to do. Viganò’s accusations now seem to be ends in themselves; they seek to transform the Church according to the agenda of certain Catholics who pit themselves as the guardians of orthodoxy against the Vicar of Christ and an ecumenical council.

Not only that, but Viganò’s missives have become so unhinged, conspiratorial, and detached from reality, that at this moment, there is no excuse for a Catholic to follow him. By now, it is as clear as day: Viganò’s best refutation is Viganò himself. This is a much stronger argument than if Pope Francis had issued a point-by-point refutation of every single one of his claims. If someone is still following Viganò at this point, then I don’t know what the Vatican could say that would convince them. They are simply too far off. I believe that for this subset of our Church, only prayers, not arguments, will help.

Those who helped advance Viganò’s claims and supported his ideological agenda in 2018 and 2019 but believe today that he has lost the plot should do a serious self-examination of their role in leading these “little ones” astray.

[…]

In the end, the burden is not on the Vatican to clarify everything that a popular ideologue has been promoting. The burden is on Catholics, who must seek a conversion of heart. This especially involves submitting to the authority of the Vicar of Christ, and to not place him below teachers who say what our itching ears want to hear. When Catholics have this change of heart, I am certain that all the clarifications they long for will come, and from the pope himself.

That is not what is happening, though. For years, the supporters and defenders of Pope Francis have faced mockery, ridicule, and dismissiveness by influential Catholic public figures who have opposed him at every pivotal moment: the Synods on the Family, Amoris Laetitia, the dubia, the change to the official Church teaching on the death penalty, the Synod on Young People, the Amazon Synod, the authentically Catholic religious practices of indigenous people, the original Viganò testimony. And now they criticize him again, when the division and hysterical paranoia that they helped foster has gone a bit farther than some of them would like. Their game — no matter what their goal — is attempting to disrupt Pope Francis and criticizing his decisions.

But nothing has changed since 2018, even if Viganò has now become a mainstream figure. The number of followers he has is irrelevant at this point. What matters is their mindset. Are they open to clarifications from the pope, even if the truth is inconvenient to their narrative? Or have they simply made Viganò a hero that embodies their hopes and desires, which are not open to change? Because if it’s the latter, addressing Viganò will be futile. Maybe it’s time instead to listen to and learn from the pope rather than tell everyone else what you think he should be doing.

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Re: I'm Starting to Like This Pope

Post by wosbald » Wed Jul 15, 2020 7:57 pm

+JMJ+

Intra-thread Trackbacks: pg 63 / pg 64 / pg 65 / pg 65 / pg 66 / pg 66 / pg 73 / pg 84 / pg 120 / pg 123 / pg 124 / pg 124 / pg 124 / pg 125 / pg 125 / pg 125 / pg 125 / pg 126 / pg 126 / pg 126 / pg 126 / pg 126 / pg 126

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Exposing Viganò’s spurious theory of two councils [In-Depth, Opinion]
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Image: adapted from “Rome 11 Oct 1962 – Panorama inside St. Peter’s Basilica during the 2nd Vatican Ecumenical Council of the Roman Catholic Church” by manhhai. Licensed under CC BY 2.0

In my last piece, I showed how Archbishop Viganò rejects many teachings of Vatican II and the Council itself. How does he justify this, given that he is a Catholic archbishop who would naturally be expected to uphold the councils and teachings of the Church? He offers a tendentious theory that claims there were really two councils, one technically “valid” but impotent, and the other a subversive conspiracy that led to the creation of a new, false church:
From Vatican II onwards a parallel church was built, superimposed over and diametrically opposed to the true Church of Christ. This parallel church progressively obscured the divine institution founded by Our Lord in order to replace it with a spurious entity, corresponding to the desired universal religion that was first theorized by Masonry.
How does Viganò think this strange thing happened? He places the blame principally on the theologians who drafted the documents. Although he only explicitly names Edward Schillebeeckx, he must have in mind the full gamut of the “New Theologians,” among whom were Yves Congar, Henri de Lubac, Karl Rahner, and Hans Urs von Balthasar. They were the “protagonists” of the Council, and reminds us that they had been, almost to a man, censured by the Vatican prior to the Council. I will add that legend has it that Cardinal Angelo Roncalli was under suspicion by the Holy Office prior to being elected Pope John XXIII!

Although Viganò says that most of the bishops were pious and innocent, the theologians, who he asserts were modernist heretics and Freemasons, were trying to create a new Church. Since they could not do this openly, they put ambiguous expressions into the documents that would later be interpreted in a heretical way and even “den[y] the true God.” Now, the idea that there are “ambiguous expressions” in the documents is true. The final documents are the result of consensus, as the majority of bishops had to find common ground with the conservative minority. The only way to do this in certain cases was to find ways of saying things on which both sides could agree, even though they held different opinions about how the statements were interpreted.1 Far from being a nefarious plot, this was the usual business of a council of thousands of bishops who did not all agree about everything. Nor was it happening in secret, as though the bishops did not understand their own documents! They were crafted through multiple drafts, as bishops debated in open sessions and put forth written amendments to the drafting committees. And the vast majority of what Vatican II says is plain enough, particularly on the issue that most vexes traditionalists: “This Vatican Synod declares that the human person has the right to religious liberty” (DH 2).

Viganò says that teaching such as this allowed the later “deviations” like John Paul II’s Assisi gathering, the Abu Dhabi document, the “Protestantization” of the Mass, and of course the infamous Pachamama! Therefore, to combat these, it is necessary first to undo Vatican II itself, since “the roots of these deviations are found in the principles laid down by the Council.” This can be accomplished by a “damnatio memoriae” (condemnation of memory). This means erasing all memory of a persona non grata by removing all artwork of them or written references to them. In other words, the Church would cease to refer to the Council, its documents, the postconciliar writings of the popes, the Catechism of the Catholic Church, and revert to the preconciliar papal writings and the 1908 Catechism of Pius X.

Given the radical nature of Viganò’s claim, he was asked for clarification by his English-language publication of choice, LifeSiteNews, as to whether he was really rejecting the Council as such or merely certain “errors” in it. He begins his reply of July 1 by saying “Vatican II is a valid Council.” This pull-quote is intended to deflect criticism, but keep reading: the rest of his statement doubles down on his “two councils” theory: “We can no longer deny the evidence and pretend that Vatican II was not something qualitatively different from Vatican I, despite the numerous heroic and documented efforts, even by the highest authority, to interpret it by force as a normal Ecumenical Council.” He speculates that “intentional fraud” may cause a magisterial act to prove to be “non-magisterial” and in need of later nullification. Putting this theory into practice, he puts the word “magisterium” in scare-quotes when referring to Amoris Laetitia.

[…]

According to Viganò, because its “architects” were modernists, the heretical meanings cannot be erased. Far from retracting his claim that the Council’s documents are corrupt and that the whole Council must be damned, he actually reiterates it. He was even clearer two days earlier in his reply to John-Henry Westen of LSN: “We can ask ourselves whether it may be right to expunge the last assembly from the catalog of canonical Councils.”

If this happens, what remains of the “valid” Council? Nothing. It is a legal fiction, intended to inure Viganò from the accusation of schism.4 Though he blames the theologians, it was the bishops who debated the documents and submitted thousands of amendments to them, which were incorporated into subsequent drafts until a final draft was reached. It was the bishops that voted overwhelmingly, almost unanimously, to accept the final documents. Once promulgated by Pope Paul VI, these documents became the property of the whole Church. If this Council must be rejected “as such and en bloc,” erased from memory, and removed from the list of councils because it is not a “true and proper” council but an “ambush against the Church” — and not because of “one or two cases” only, but because its documents were written by heretics while the popes remained “silent” — what does “valid” mean? Nothing. The bishops that John XXIII assembled published these documents; that was the purpose of the assembly. If the assembly was valid, so are the documents.

[…]

==================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================

1 An example of this is “nostrae salutis causa” in DV 11, which I will cover in my next post, but there is also the case of “subsistit in” (LG 8​), which Viganò mentions. Most dramatically, the debate about episcopal collegiality was so contested that Paul VI had a “note of explanation” appended to Lumen Gentium saying that it cannot be understood in such a way as to rival papal primacy.

[…]

4 See Robert Fastiggi, “Is Archbishop Viganò in Schism?” WPI (June 13, 2020).

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"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
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Re: I'm Starting to Like This Pope

Post by wosbald » Fri Jul 17, 2020 10:08 am

+JMJ+

Cardinal Dolan, George Weigel and the fraudulence of the neocon project [Opinion]
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Pope Francis crosses St. Peter's Basilica on his way to celebrate Mass at the tomb of St. John Paul II May 18, the 100th anniversary of the late pope's birth. (CNS/Vatican Media)

There is something amusing about watching George Weigel back-pedal. In response to my colleague Joshua J. McElwee's reporting that Cardinal Timothy Dolan had sent a letter to accompany Ignatius Press' mailing of Weigel's book, The Next Pope: The Office of Peter and a Church in Mission, to all the cardinals, the biographer of Pope John Paul II told McElwee that the book "does not contain a single sentence about a future conclave." He added, "No potential candidates are named and no conclave strategy is discussed." This is disingenuous.

Where, pray, does he think this "next pope" about whom he has penned a tome will emerge if not from a conclave?

What is more, I find it hard to believe that Weigel has never been on a search committee. The first thing the committee does is sketch a job description, examine what kind of candidate they would like, what skills that person needs, how important it is that the person to be hired shares a particular sense of mission, that sort of thing.

Those are precisely the sorts of things Weigel details in his book, which I reviewed a fortnight ago. And if I had to sum up the attributes Weigel is seeking in a new pope in a single phrase, it would be that he wants the next pope to be very unlike the incumbent. The book is littered with attacks, some more subtle than others, on Pope Francis.

[…]

I say that [Weigel hiding behind National Catholic Reporter's Peter Hebblethwaite's book about the prospects for a future pope] is all a distraction because the relevant analogy from what McElwee reported is not between Weigel's book and Hebblethwaite's. The relevant analogy is a fanciful one: Imagine what would have happened if Cardinal Joseph Bernardin had sent a letter to accompany a mailing of Hebblethwaite's book that was akin to the missive sent by Dolan?

Of course, Bernardin would never have been so presumptuous in the first place and, what is more, he would never have endorsed a book that was so critical of an incumbent pope. This gets to the heart of what was wrong with Dolan's letter and with Weigel's book: While disdainful of the sede vacantism and other looniness we associate with the extremists at LifeSiteNews or Church Militant, the opposition to Francis manifested by Dolan and Weigel is akin to the behavior of a child who has had his toys taken away. Dolan was a darling of the John Paul II-Benedict XVI era, the rising American star, the American papabile even. Weigel was the "authoritative" interpreter of the John Paul II papacy, the layman who had easy access to the papal apartment and whose phone calls America prelates returned. Then the cardinals elected Francis, and suddenly all the markers of American Catholic identity that Dolan, Weigel and their ilk had crafted in the last quarter of the 20th century and first decade of the 21st were cast aside.

Not to put too fine a point on it, but those markers of Catholic identity were always hooey. The Dolan-endorsed Weigel vision for the Catholic Church was always driven as much — or more — by political as theological concerns. So, for example, John Paul II's repeated defense of unions was downplayed on this side of the Atlantic, or unions in Poland were deemed good while those in the U.S. were in the vanguard of secularism. The promotion of interreligious dialogue so central to the Second Vatican Council and the work of every pope since became slanted, as mainstream Protestant churches became a target for derision, and an "ecumenism of hate" was forged with white Protestant evangelicals. This development was so twisted by politics that regular church-going, white Christians are Donald Trump's base, a fact so monstrous it should send a shiver down the spine of the body of Christ. (I deplore efforts to reduce the Christian Gospel to a politics of the left as well!)

The distortion of the Catholic tradition touched more basic realities, too. In a devastating review of Weigel's new book just published at America, Msgr. John Strynkowski, former director of the doctrine committee at the U.S. bishops' conference, writes:
In his insistence on the centrality of Christ in the church, Weigel makes only passing reference to the crucified and risen Lord and no reference at all to the cross. This is a serious omission; the church stands under the cross for both judgment and salvation. And the cross also stands over against a world of massive greed and exploitation of peoples. The cross is ultimately the source of Christian solidarity with those who are most vulnerable and leads not only to works of charity but also to the church's social doctrine for transforming unjust social structures. St. John Paul II was quite critical of those who by silence become complicit in systemic injustice.
The word jumps off the page: complicit. It is the key to the Weigel vision, the transformation of engagement with the world into complicity with the world.

That habit of complicity is what prevented the Cardinal Archbishop of New York from recognizing how absurd his obsequiousness was to the president in April. It is the habit of complicity that kept any of the U.S. bishops from publicly defending the decision by the University of Notre Dame to invite the first Black president in the nation's history to receive an honorary degree. It is the habit of complicity that resulted in their inability to even pass a statement on poverty in 2012.

[…]

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"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: I'm Starting to Like This Pope

Post by wosbald » Mon Jul 20, 2020 3:25 pm

+JMJ+

Intra-Thread Trackbacks: pg 78 / pg 78 / pg 79 / pg 79 / pg 88 / pg 89 / pg 89 / pg 118 / pg 118 / pg 119 / pg 124 / pg 124 / pg 124 / pg 125 / pg 126


New archbishop says Vatican courtship of China doesn’t imperil Taiwan [In-Depth]
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Pope Francis meets a delegation of the Taiwan National Council of Churches, at the Vatican, Thursday, Dec. 7, 2017. (Credit: L'Osservatore Romano/Pool Photo via AP)

ROME — In comments to media over the weekend, Taipei’s new Archbishop Thomas Chung An-zu said he’s confident that the Vatican’s apparent courtship of China will not have an impact on Taiwan’s relationship with the Holy See.

According to Taiwanese news agency Focus Taiwan, Chung, in comments to media before his installation as the new archbishop of Taipei on Saturday, said that while the Vatican is concerned with evangelization in China, “In my opinion, this will not affect Taiwan-Vatican relations.”

Among other things, he cited his appointment as an indication of how valuable the Vatican’s relationship with Taiwan is.

Currently Taiwan holds diplomatic relations with just 15 countries, the Holy See being its only diplomatic tie in Europe.

[…]

According to Focus Taiwan, Chung said the chargé d’affaires of the Apostolic Nunciature in Taiwan, Monsignor Arnaldo Catalan, is happy with the development of the Catholic Church in Taiwan and celebrates the religious freedom Catholics in the country enjoy.

[…]

Despite its ongoing courtship of China, the Vatican has consistently insisted that it will not abandon Taiwan; however, many remain skeptical that the Holy See will maintain formal ties should Beijing signal an openness to diplomatic relations.

During the coronavirus outbreak in Italy, Pope Francis remained silent about Taiwan’s donations to the Vatican and its efforts to assist ailing religious congregations while publicly praising China for the assistance it provided.

[…]

In addition to its silence on Taiwan, the Vatican has also remained silent about the ongoing protests in Hong Kong over a new national security law which many pro-democracy activists see as an end to the “one country, two systems” approach to Hong Kong that China has touted since it regained control of the territory from the United Kingdom in 1997.

Taiwan has not only condemned the new law, but alongside several other countries has offered citizenship to anyone who flees Hong Kong because of the legislation.

In a July 10 statement from its Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Taiwan called the law “a grave renunciation of the commitment China made to Hong Kong and the international community,” insisting that the “criminalization” of certain actions under the new law restricts “the high degree of autonomy that its people have enjoyed” and undermines “the widely held values of democracy, human rights, and freedom.”

Taiwan also insisted that it occupies a crucial position in securing democracy in Asia, and voiced hope that the international community would “jointly support the people of Hong Kong and protect Taiwan.”

[…]

So far, Pope Francis has remained silent on this issue of Hong Kong. Two weeks ago, he came under fire for omitting an appeal for religious freedom and human rights in Hong Kong during his July 5 Angelus address.

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"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: I'm Starting to Like This Pope

Post by wosbald » Thu Jul 23, 2020 10:31 am

+JMJ+

Cardinal Scola calls out Pope Francis’ critics: ‘The pope is the pope’
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Pope Francis is seen in a file photo making a point. (CNS photo/Paul Haring)

Cardinal Angelo Scola, the runner-up in the last papal conclave, has twice in recent weeks come out strongly against those, especially within the church, who frequently and increasingly attack Pope Francis. “It’s a very strong sign of contradiction and denotes a certain weakening of the people of God, above all of the intellectual class,” he said. “It is a profoundly wrong attitude because it forgets that ‘the pope is the pope.’”

“It is not by affinity of temperament, of culture, of sensibility, or for friendship, or because one shares or does not share his affirmations that one acknowledges the meaning of the pope in the church,” the cardinal said in an interview published on the Archdiocese of Milan’s website on the occasion of the 50th anniversary of his priestly ordination on July 18.

“[The pope] is the ultimate, radical and formal guarantor — certainly, through a synodal exercise of the Petrine ministry — of the unity of the church,” the cardinal, theologian and former rector of the Pontifical Lateran University stated.

Then, referring to the countless ways in which attacks have been launched against Pope Francis in these years, the former cardinal-patriarch of Venice and archbishop of Milan declared, “I consider these forms of pronouncements, letters, writings, pretenses of judgments on his action, above all when they establish irritating comparisons with previous papacies, a decisively negative phenomenon that is to be eradicated as soon as possible.”

Both in the interview and in a new introduction to the second edition of his autobiography, Ho scommesso sulla libertà (“I Bet on Freedom”), written with the Italian journalist Luigi Geninazzi and released on June 13, the Italian cardinal emphasized that one has “to learn the Pope” (“imparare il papa”), an expression he said he got from St. John Paul II.

“It means to have the humility and the patience to empathize with his personal history, the way he expresses his faith, addresses us, and makes choices of leadership and governance,” Cardinal Scola said. He added that this is “even more necessary in relation to a Latin-American pope, who has a mentality and a different kind of approach than we Europeans.” He recalled that “something similar also happened with John Paul II.”

Cardinal Scola declared, “I truly consider admirable and moving the extraordinary capacity of Pope Francis to make himself close to everyone, and especially to the excluded, to those who are subjected to ‘the throw-away culture’ as he so often reminds [us] in his keenness to communicate the Gospel to the world.”

[…]

Cardinal Scola added, “Ever since I was a child, I learned that ‘the pope is the pope,’ to whom the Catholic believer owes affection, respect and obedience, since he is the visible sign and secure guarantor of the unity of the church in the following of Christ.” Moreover, he said, “communion with the successor of Peter is not a question of cultural affinity, or human sympathy, or a sentimental feeling; rather it relates to the very nature of the church.”

Concluding his strong critique of attacks against Pope Francis, the cardinal went on to express concern over “the polemics and divisions that are becoming ever more bitter, also at the expense of truth and of charity.” But, he stated, “I do not see the risk of a schism; I fear instead a journey backward” to “the postconciliar debate between conservatives and progressives” over the legacy of Vatican II.

He sees the return of this in “the re-emergence in agitated tones” of “the sterile contraposition” between “the guardians of Tradition rigidly understood” and “the proponents of what is intended to be the adaptation of practice and doctrine to worldly demands.” But like Pope Francis, Cardinal Scola believes the way to overcome these tensions is to entrust oneself to the Holy Spirit, “who does not allow himself to be harnessed by the logic of the opposing camps.”

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"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: I'm Starting to Like This Pope

Post by wosbald » Fri Jul 24, 2020 5:34 pm

+JMJ+

Intra-Thread Trackbacks: pg 126


Bishops speaking up, defending Pope Francis and Vatican II [Opinion]
Image
Image: Cardinal Angelo Scola. By Superbass – Own work, CC BY-SA 4.0, Link

This is a positive development.

As the polarization in the Church has begun to increase, fueled by a flurry of increasingly paranoid and bizarre open letters from former U.S. papal nuncio Archbishop Carlo Maria Viganò, some Church leaders are beginning to speak out as the problem of vocal reactionary dissent from the radical traditionalist movement becomes too loud to ignore.

In the past week, three influential prelates have added their voices to those who support of Pope Francis and the Second Vatican Council.

Perhaps the most significant figure to recently reaffirm the importance of fidelity to the pope is Cardinal Angelo Scola, the retired archbishop of Milan who is widely believed to have been the runner-up to Pope Francis in the last conclave, spoke out strongly against those who have attacked the pope. Gerard O’Connell in America reported Scola’s strong affirmation of the authority of the Successor of Peter (emphasis mine):

[…]

In an apparent critique of the continuing onslaught of open letters, petitions, manifestos, and dubia unleashed against Francis over the last several years, the cardinal asserted, “I consider these forms of pronouncements, letters, writings, pretenses of judgments on his action, above all when they establish irritating comparisons with previous papacies, a decisively negative phenomenon that is to be eradicated as soon as possible.” I couldn’t have said it better myself. Remember, Cardinal Scola was considered the “conservative” candidate in the last conclave. I can’t imagine that he would have put up with the barrage of abuse that Pope Francis has been willing to tolerate.

Speaking being barraged with abuse, Auxiliary Bishop Robert Barron of Los Angeles has become the latest target of attacks from the reactionary fringe. His defense of Vatican II and some of his other statements have put him in the crosshairs of Taylor Marshall and others. As a bishop who has consistently sought to strike a conciliatory tone and remain “above the fray” (he’s been attacked for years by Michael Voris but never taken the bait, for example), he has apparently decided that it is time to address the problem of radical traditionalism. He recently posted a video in which he repudiates those who claim to be traditionalists but reject the Second Vatican Council, saying, “Since the Church’s tradition includes the Second Vatican Council, it’s therefore impossible to repudiate Vatican II and claim to be a faithful traditionalist. There’s nothing traditional about rejecting an ecumenical council.”

Watch the video here:


Finally, the very promising Bishop Daniel Flores of Brownsville, Texas, tweeted this critique of contemporary traditionalism, comparing them to modernists (similar to Rodrigo Guerra’s assessment of their post-modern tendencies in our recent podcast). Bishop Flores puts this forward as a conversation starter, and I would love to see this conversation continue. Sometimes Catholics are misled to believe that the most severe traditionalists are the most “traditional” Catholics, but in reality, that is very far from the truth. Reiterating what Bishop Barron says above, the radical traditionalist rejection of papal authority (and of Vatican II) is a sure sign that what they propose is contrary to Tradition.


► Show Spoiler
More and more Catholics are finally waking up to the fact that the extremist elements in the Church are becoming too dangerous to ignore. Bravo to these Catholic leaders for speaking up.

[UPDATE]

I cannot believe I forgot to include this essential contribution to the Catholic Twitter “memeverse” of WPI’s favorite prelate from Down Under, Sydney Auxiliary Richard Umbers, who created this illustrative monument of gratitude to the living Magisterium:


► Show Spoiler
[…]

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"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
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Re: I'm Starting to Like This Pope

Post by wosbald » Sat Aug 01, 2020 11:45 am

+JMJ+

Intra-thread Trackbacks: pg 63 / pg 64 / pg 65 / pg 65 / pg 66 / pg 66 / pg 73 / pg 84 / pg 120 / pg 123 / pg 124 / pg 124 / pg 124 / pg 125 / pg 125 / pg 125 / pg 125 / pg 126 / pg 126 / pg 126 / pg 126 / pg 126 / pg 126 / pg 125

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"Mary Alone": pg 18 / pg 20 /pg 20



Who still stands with Viganò? [Opinion]
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Auxiliary Bishop Athanasius Schneider of Astana, Kazakhstan, second from left, and U.S. Cardinal Raymond Burke, second from right, and other clergy participate in the sixth annual March for Life in Rome May 8, 2016. (CNS/Paul Haring)

Next month will be the second anniversary of the infamous "testimony" of former nuncio Archbishop Carlo Maria Viganò, published first at the EWTN-owned National Catholic Register. It was obviously the work of a profoundly disturbed person, all the settling scores, spewing accusations hither and yon, demonstrating that he, and he alone, was virtuous. He even called upon Pope Francis to resign! The timing — at the end of Francis' visit to Ireland — was designed to gain maximum exposure.

At a press conference on the plane back to Rome, Francis chose not to engage the charges Viganò had leveled. "I will not say a single word on this," the pope said about Viganò's screed. "I think this statement speaks for itself, and you have the sufficient journalistic capacity to draw conclusions."

[…]

Image
Screenshot of Archbishop Carlo Maria Viganò on EWTN's "The World Over" (NCR screenshot)

[…]


Tweet from @ThomasJTobin1 July 15, 2020
[…]

We can now, two years later, render a verdict. Francis was right: Don't get into a pissing match with a skunk.

Now, at long last, most conservatives have come to view Viganò as a liability, not an asset, and they are throwing him under the bus. In his blog "Settimo Cielo," Sandro Magister, the conservative Vaticanista, took on Viganò last week over the archbishop's criticisms of the Second Vatican Council. Magister is not exactly friendly to Francis, but he saw Viganò's wholesale rejection of Vatican II as beyond the pale. "If this rejection by Viganò of the whole of Vatican Council II is not a schismatic act, it is undoubtedly on the brink," Magister wrote. "But who among the bishops and cardinals will want to follow him? Probably no one."

Actually, Bishop Athanasius Schneider, auxiliary bishop in Kazakhstan, might follow Viganò as Magister goes on to demonstrate. Schneider has also called for corrections in certain documents of Vatican II, specifically those that can be seen as the texts that corrected the Syllabus of Errors: Dignitatis humanae and Nostra aetate. These were the texts that caused Archbishop Michel Lefebvre to go into schism, and they continue to cause consternation for those who are dipping their toes into the schismatic waters. (For more on this issue, see my two-part review of Jesuit Fr. Jared Wicks' book Investigating Vatican II here and here.) Magister cites a letter written by Cardinal Walter Brandmüller — a church historian by training and one of the four cardinals who had signed the "dubia" challenging Francis on the issue of Communion for divorced and remarried Catholics — disputing Schneider and exposing his errors. Magister also wonders why Cardinal Gerhard Müller, ex-prefect of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, has sat on the sidelines in the debate about Vatican II. When you are a conservative and one of the dubia cardinals criticizes you, it is time to recalibrate.

Image
Screenshot of Robert Royal, Raymond Arroyo and Fr. Gerald Murray on EWTN's "The World Over" (NCR screenshot)

Schneider may be the only bishop to stick with Viganò publicly. And LifeSiteNews will forever see him as a hero. There will always be a fringe element in the church. What is worrisome is when someone tries to mainstream the fringe. Leave it to Raymond Arroyo of EWTN to continue to uncritically wave the Viganò flag. Just last Thursday, one of his guests, Robert Royal, referred to the fact that it has been almost two years since the "Viganò revelations about McCarrick" (See minute 21:25 in the video). The show's producers helpfully put a photo of the disgraced archbishop on the screen. Neither Arroyo nor his other guest, Fr. Gerald Murray, said anything to clarify that "Viganò's revelations" were fantastic lies and lying fantasies with barely a veneer of veracity. Even Oliver Stone knew he could not switch the location of JFK's assassination from Dallas to Denver.

It is an awful thing to look at another human being and speculate about whether they are mentally disturbed or simply evil, but Viganò's behavior has invited the question. It is time for those bishops who testified to his integrity to speak up now and distance themselves from him, and to do so as publicly as they once attested to his character. "Not so, not so, Master Secretary. The maxim is 'Qui tacet consentire': The maxim of the law is 'Silence gives consent,' " Sir Thomas More says to Thomas Cromwell in the play "A Man for All Seasons." Who stands with Viganò still? And who with Pope Francis?

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"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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AFRS
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Re: I'm Starting to Like This Pope

Post by AFRS » Sat Aug 01, 2020 6:25 pm

wosbald wrote:
Sat Aug 01, 2020 11:45 am

Now, at long last, most conservatives have come to view Viganò as a liability, not an asset, and they are throwing him under the bus. In his blog "Settimo Cielo," Sandro Magister, the conservative Vaticanista, took on Viganò last week over the archbishop's criticisms of the Second Vatican Council. Magister is not exactly friendly to Francis, but he saw Viganò's wholesale rejection of Vatican II as beyond the pale. "If this rejection by Viganò of the whole of Vatican Council II is not a schismatic act, it is undoubtedly on the brink," Magister wrote. "But who among the bishops and cardinals will want to follow him? Probably no one."
Luther started out as a Roman Monk. Perhaps there's hope for the RC Church yet.

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Re: I'm Starting to Like This Pope

Post by wosbald » Wed Aug 05, 2020 10:59 pm

+JMJ+

Intra-Thread Trackbacks: pg 78 / pg 78 / pg 79 / pg 79 / pg 88 / pg 89 / pg 89 / pg 118 / pg 118 / pg 119 / pg 124 / pg 124 / pg 124 / pg 125 / pg 126 / pg 126


Pressure on Francis increases over human rights in China [In-Depth]
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The Chinese national flag flies in front of a Catholic church in Huangtugang, China, in this 2018 photo. (Credit: Thomas Peter/Reuters via CNS)

ROME — As Chinese central authorities tighten their grip on Hong Kong and as the world continues to hear news of the alleged repression of the country’s Uighur Muslim population, Pope Francis is the target of increasing international pressure over his hesitancy to speak out.

This silence from one of the world’s most visible champions of the oppressed was the topic of a new article in Foreign Policy magazine penned by Benedict Rogers — the East Asia Team Leader at Christian Solidarity Worldwide and the founder of Hong Kong Watch — who says in the piece that he is a Catholic convert sympathetic to Francis, but who said he is confused about “how badly wrong” he believes the pope has handled China.

In the article, Rogers cites statements made by public figures such as Marie van der Zyl, president of the Board of Deputies of British Jews, who earlier this month wrote a letter to the Chinese ambassador in London comparing the situation of Uighur Muslims in China to the Holocaust.

Van der Zyl in her letter pointed to what she said are similarities between what is reportedly happening to the Uighurs and what happened in Nazi Germany: “People being forcibly loaded on to trains; beards of religious men being trimmed; women being sterilized; and the grim specter of concentration camps.”

Maajid Nawaz, a prominent British Muslim counterextremism activist, has gone on a hunger strike and promoting a parliamentary debate about imposing sanctions on China for its treatment of the Uighurs.

In a statement issued last week, Myanmar Cardinal Charles Bo of Yangon said that, “In China, Uighur Muslims are facing what amounts to some of the contemporary world’s worst mass atrocities and I urge the international community to investigate.”

In his piece, Rogers noted that so far, no major Muslim authority has come out in condemnation of the Uighur situation, nor has Archbishop Justin Welby of Canterbury, the head of the Anglican Communion. However, of all these, Rogers said “it is Francis’s silence that shocks” the most, as he is normally outspoken on behalf of the oppressed.

[…]

Pope Francis has repeatedly advocated for an end to conflicts in Syria, Yemen, Ukraine and Nigeria, and recently said he was “deeply pained” by Turkey’s decision to revert Istanbul’s famed Hagia Sophia museum into a mosque.

Yet in all his appeals, China has been conspicuous by its absence, despite increased attention over the Uighurs, the imposition of the new security law in Hong Kong, and ongoing harassment of Catholic clergy.

[…]

In his article, Rogers suggested that Pope Francis’s silence on China over all of these issues is the result of the 2018 agreement between the Vatican and Beijing on the appointment of bishops, the renewal of which is currently being negotiated.

Rogers echoes the critique of many of Francis’s critics, saying by making the deal, China has “bought” the pope’s silence, as he is unlikely to make any public statements in condemnation while negotiations are underway.

Many experts have argued that little has changed as a result of the agreement, that no imprisoned clergy have been released, but that in fact several have been either detained or arrested in the past two years.

In his article, Rogers argues that now is the time for Christian leaders such as Welby and Francis to “wake up” and review their positions up until this point.

[…]

ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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