I'm Starting to Like This Pope

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wosbald
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Re: I'm Starting to Like This Pope

Post by wosbald » Tue Sep 08, 2020 5:50 pm

+JMJ+

Subject Header: Viganò/QAnon/Deep State/Deep Church
Intra-thread Trackbacks: pg 63 / pg 64 / pg 65 / pg 65 / pg 66 / pg 66 / pg 73 / pg 84 / pg 120 / pg 123 / pg 124 / pg 124 / pg 124 / pg 125 / pg 125 / pg 125 / pg 125 / pg 126 / pg 126 / pg 126 / pg 126 / pg 126 / pg 126 / pg 125 / pg 126 / pg 127 / pg 127

Inter-Thread Trackbacks:
"Evangelical Fundamentalism and Catholic Integralism": pg 4 / pg 6 / pg 6 / pg6 / pg 6 / pg 6
"Mary Alone": pg 18 / pg 20 /pg 20
"Any QAnoners Here?": pg 5 / pg 5 / pg 5



Online Catholicism: Radtrads, Integralists, and Anonymous Trolls [Podcast]
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In this episode of Peter’s Field Hospital, Adam Rasmussen and DW Lafferty join me to discuss the odd, extreme, and apocalyptic views of many online Catholics. We discuss the role of anonymity in some of the most harsh rhetoric, the rise of neo-integralism, and the real damage done by Catholic extremists.

We talk about how some of the most radical traditionalists seem to have drifted away from attempting to unseat Pope Francis towards apocalyptic fantasy.

We try to unpack the beliefs of the new brand of Catholic integralists, and attempt to get to the core of their ideology.

Finally, we talk about the situation of internet trolls in Catholic social media. What motivates them? What do they seek to accomplish? Do they even take themselves seriously?


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"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Del
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Re: I'm Starting to Like This Pope

Post by Del » Tue Sep 08, 2020 7:07 pm

On September 8, most Catholics are celebrating the Nativity of Mary.
"Anyone who knows anything of experts will know one thing for certain; that they will always be disturbing our way of living; and therefore we shall always be disputing their right of governing." - GKC. Feb 11, 1933.

The future is certain; it’s the past that keeps changing. ~ Old Soviet joke

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Re: I'm Starting to Like This Pope

Post by hugodrax » Tue Sep 08, 2020 8:48 pm

Del wrote:
Tue Sep 08, 2020 7:07 pm
On September 8, most Catholics are celebrating the Nativity of Mary.
Wosbald is post-Catholic now. He’s moved beyond all that primitive stuff and into the pure realms of the synodal path.

He keeps his urine like his posts...cross indexed for easy identification. :D
Everything we hear is an opinion, not a fact. Everything we see is a perspective, not the truth
—Marcus Aurelius

non nobis, Domine, non nobis, sed nomini tuo da gloriam

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Re: I'm Starting to Like This Pope

Post by wosbald » Wed Sep 09, 2020 10:00 am

+JMJ+

Subject Header: Viganò/QAnon/Deep State/Deep Church
Intra-thread Trackbacks: pg 63 / pg 64 / pg 65 / pg 65 / pg 66 / pg 66 / pg 73 / pg 84 / pg 120 / pg 123 / pg 124 / pg 124 / pg 124 / pg 125 / pg 125 / pg 125 / pg 125 / pg 126 / pg 126 / pg 126 / pg 126 / pg 126 / pg 126 / pg 125 / pg 126 / pg 127 / pg 127 / pg 128

Inter-Thread Trackbacks:
"Evangelical Fundamentalism and Catholic Integralism": pg 4 / pg 6 / pg 6 / pg6 / pg 6 / pg 6
"Mary Alone": pg 18 / pg 20 /pg 20
"Any QAnoners Here?": pg 5 / pg 5 / pg 5



COVID deniers invoke Pope Benedict, burn image of Francis at Rome rally
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A protester burns an image of Pope Francis during a Sept. 5 rally in Rome describing restrictive measures to combat the coronavirus as a "dictatorship." (Credit: Screen capture)

ROME — During a demonstration in Rome on Saturday expressing opposition to restrictive measures to combat the COVID-19 coronavirus, a gathering endorsed by Italian Archbishop Carlo Maria Viganò, participants displayed a papal flag with the image of Pope emeritus Benedict XVI and burned a picture of Pope Francis.

The demonstration, which took place in Rome’s Piazza della Bocca della Verità, was supported by the Italian political party Forza Nuova, a neo-fascist movement best known for its opposition to immigrants. During the rally, participants burned facemasks promoted as a means of combating the coronavirus, denouncing them as a “symbol of slavery.”

Several signs also expressed affection for US President Donald Trump, described by one as a leader who “loves Italy.”

Demonstrators displayed the Italian flag and signs reading “We are the people,” expressing opposition to what organizers called a “healthcare dictatorship.” In addition to political parties, sponsors included groups of taxi drivers and hotel operators, both groups whose incomes have suffered as a result of coronavirus restrictions.

According to local media reports, there was a significant presence of Catholic traditionalists and conservatives at the demonstration, including protesters who carried a version of the gold-and-white papal flag with an image of Benedict XVI. Another demonstrator who came dressed as a Catholic priest burned a photograph to Pope Francis to applause and cheers.

[…]

According to the Italian newspaper La Stampa, one of the demonstrators exhibiting the image of Benedict XVI insisted that the emeritus pope had not validly resigned his office and remained the legitimate pope while showing passers-by video images of Pope Francis slapping the hand of a Chinese woman last New Year’s Eve and also playing portions of homilies delivered by Italian Father Alessandro Minutella, a Sicilian priest who was excommunicated for his unstinting opposition to both Pope Francis and his local bishop.

“Benedict XVI is the truth, and Bergoglio is a lie,” the demonstrator said, referring to the given name of Pope Francis.

“He’s part of the diabolical project behind this fraud of the coronavirus, which is nothing more than the flu,” the demonstrator told a reporter. “The coronavirus is the flu, not a pandemic like they say on TV.”

Organizers of the rally cited the support of Viganò, the former Vatican ambassador to the United States who rose to fame in 2018 by accusing Pope Francis of a cover-up with regard to ex-cardinal, and ex-priest, Theodore McCarrick, and demanding the pope’s resignation.

In the run-up to the event, Viganò sent a letter to organizers offering his support.

[…]

According to the La Stampa report, some organizers of Saturday’s rally believed that Viganò would be in attendance, but in the end he was not on hand.

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"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: I'm Starting to Like This Pope

Post by hugodrax » Wed Sep 09, 2020 10:13 am

So I'm just going to assume it was batshit insane? Amirite?
Everything we hear is an opinion, not a fact. Everything we see is a perspective, not the truth
—Marcus Aurelius

non nobis, Domine, non nobis, sed nomini tuo da gloriam

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Re: I'm Starting to Like This Pope

Post by wosbald » Tue Sep 15, 2020 8:27 am

+JMJ+

Subject Header: China–Vatican Deal
Intra-Thread Trackbacks: pg 78 / pg 78 / pg 79 / pg 79 / pg 88 / pg 89 / pg 89 / pg 118 / pg 118 / pg 119 / pg 124 / pg 124 / pg 124 / pg 125 / pg 126 / pg 126 / pg 126 pg 127 / pg 127



Top officials optimistic about renewal of Vatican-China deal [In-Depth]
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The Chinese national flag flies in front of a Catholic church in Huangtugang, China, in this 2018 photo. As the Vatican-China agreement on the naming of bishops approaches two years, Beijing is still lagging behind in giving concessions compared with those made ahead of the deal by the Vatican. (Credit: Thomas Peter/Reuters via CNS)

ROME — Over the past week top officials from both China and the Vatican have given indications that the controversial agreement between the two on the appointment of bishops, which expires at the end of this month, will be renewed.

According to Italian news agency Ansa, Vatican Secretary of State Italian Cardinal Pietro Parolin spoke to a group of journalists on the margins of a Sept. 14 conference with Italian Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte, saying the agreement with China is set to expire “in October,” but that the common intention of both parties is to renew the deal.

The conference Parolin attended was called, “45 years from the Helsinki Accords, Cardinal Silvestrini, and Vatican Ostpolitik.”

His remarks come days after Zhao Lijian, spokesman for the Chinese foreign ministry, also expressed optimism for the renewal of the agreement during a regular Sept. 10 press conference.

Asked if he was hopeful that China’s deal with the Vatican on the appointment of bishops would be extended for another two years, Lijian said that thanks to efforts from both sides, “the interim agreement on the appointment of bishops between China and the Vatican has been implemented successfully since it was signed nearly two years ago.”

“Since the beginning of this year, the two sides have lent mutual support to each other amid COVID-19 pandemic, stayed committed to upholding global public health security, and accumulated greater mutual trust and consensuses through a series of positive interactions,” he said.

In this light, Lijian insisted that both China and the Holy See “will continue to maintain close communication and consultation and improve bilateral relations.”

[…]

It has long been known that the Vatican under Pope Francis desperately wants formal diplomatic ties with the People’s Republic of China. The 2018 secret agreement on the appointment of bishops was interpreted by many as a step in this direction, and the Vatican’s silence toward Taiwan — officially known as the Republic of China — during the COVID-19 outbreak in Italy was a clear sign to many of just how far the Holy See would go to ensure that the door they have stays open.

It should be no surprise, then, that Parolin’s optimism about the renewal of the deal came on the margins of a conference on the Vatican’s Ostpolitik policy.

Originally, Ostpolitik was a term in the late 1960s to describe normalization of relations between East and West Germany. Later, it also came to refer to efforts under Paul VI to engage Eastern European communist regimes through compromise and agreements with the aim of building on small gains over time.

The same basic approach has been employed for China by each of Paul VI’s successors, including Francis — with the exception, perhaps, of John Paul I, whose 33 days in office didn’t allow much time for international affairs.

[…]

Opponents of Pope Francis’s agreement with China on the appointment of bishops have argued that these are the freedoms China has consistently denied to the Catholic Church and other religious denominations for years, and which the deal allows them to perpetuate without repercussion.

However, both the Holy See and China are masters at playing the long game.

Reacting to criticism at conference on religious freedom last spring, Parolin said the Holy See’s vision in making the agreement was to “help advance religious freedom, to find normalization for the Catholic community there.”

He stressed the need to be patient, saying, “history has not been built in one day. History is a long process, and I think we have to put ourselves in this perspective.”

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"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: I'm Starting to Like This Pope

Post by wosbald » Thu Sep 17, 2020 9:09 am

+JMJ+

Subject Header: China–Vatican Deal
Intra-Thread Trackbacks: pg 78 / pg 78 / pg 79 / pg 79 / pg 88 / pg 89 / pg 89 / pg 118 / pg 118 / pg 119 / pg 124 / pg 124 / pg 124 / pg 125 / pg 126 / pg 126 / pg 126 / pg 127



The Vatican is ready to renew its deal with China. Privately, officials admit they’re walking a tightrope. [In-Depth]
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(Left: CNS photo/Vatican Media; Right: CNS photo/Luong Thai Linh, Pool via Reuters)

The Holy See will communicate to representatives of the Chinese government a proposal approved by Pope Francis for the renewal of the provisional agreement with China.

Cardinal Pietro Parolin, the Vatican secretary of state and a key figure in the dialogue with China, responding to journalists’ questions on Sept. 14, confirmed the Vatican’s intention to extend the provisional agreement for “at least 2 years” and “in that way to verify its usefulness for the church in China.” He said he thinks and hopes China wants this too.

Sources contacted by America, who asked not to be identified because they are not authorized to speak to the press, also expect an extension of the provisional agreement because they believe it is practical for both sides.

While Vatican officials have thus far publicly defended the agreement with enthusiasm, privately, they are more sober in their analysis. In several conversations, they have acknowledged the obstacles and challenges that remain while expressing hope for future talks.

From the Vatican’s perspective, the agreement is functional because it has opened a way to engage in a direct dialogue with China not only on the nomination of bishops but on other questions like the normalization of the life of the church in China and, in due course, to diplomatic relations with China, something that has been severed since 1951.

From the Chinese perspective, the agreement can be seen as facilitating the official registration of all Catholic bishops, priests and communities, including those of the so-called underground community, which according to some estimates account for almost half of the country’s 10 million Catholics. China moreover sees that it stands to gain in international reputation from a positive relation with the Holy See and Pope Francis; particularly at this moment in history when opposition to, and distrust of China is growing in many countries, including the United States, because of its crackdown on Hong Kong, its repression of the Uighurs and its initial handling of information regarding coronavirus. Notably, Pope Francis and the Holy See have been silent on these issues of human rights and international law.


[…]

To this day, the text of the provisional agreement has been kept secret, much to the chagrin of many Chinese Catholics who say the secrecy allows the Chinese authorities to claim that bishops and priests must obey their instructions because the Vatican agrees with Beijing.

America has learned that China insisted on the secrecy and the Vatican acquiesced perhaps because, as one source remarked, “while it’s not a good agreement, it’s better than no agreement, and there’s hope it can be improved.”

The agreement only concerns the nomination of bishops. It does not did not deal with other important questions that the Vatican wished to address, but the Chinese side refused to discuss prior to the signing. It does not address the question of the underground bishops and priests; the status of the Chinese bishops’ conference, which is not recognized by Rome because only state-recognized bishops belong to it or the number of dioceses on the mainland.

[…]

Vatican sources describe the Holy See’s relations with Beijing as “cordial” and more friendly since the signing of the agreement. They note “a changing attitude” on the part of the Chinese. Nevertheless, they acknowledge that there have been tensions and problems continue to exist.

At the time of the agreement’s signing, a crackdown on religion was already underway in China as Beijing demanded that all bishops and priests be officially registered with the Patriotic Association. Pressure was being put at the local level, though more forcibly in some provinces than others.

A Vatican source reminded America that “there is not just one China,” referring to the different political realities at provincial level and how the church’s relation with the authorities varied from province to province following the agreement. It has improved in some, not changed in others, but deteriorated in a number of places.

[…]

Overall, the concrete fruits of the agreement are still meager when it comes to nomination of bishops, as Vatican officials admit. Only two new bishops have been ordained since the agreement was signed, but their nominations were already agreed before Sept. 2018.

America has learned that three more bishops will soon be ordained, but this is a small number given the more than 40 dioceses that lack a bishop. Nevertheless, although the agreement did not address the situation of the “underground” bishops, seven have been recognized by the state over the past two years.

In the absence of diplomatic relations, the Holy See has long sought to open an office in Beijing with a permanent representative there to facilitate communications with the authorities and the local church, as has happened with Vietnam, but so far China has refused.

Vatican officials recognize that China has the upper hand in the negotiations. Prior to the signing of the agreement one official told me, “they have the knife in the hand,” meaning if the Holy See had not signed, then China could simply go ahead and appoint bishops to some 40 dioceses and thereby greatly compromise the church’s future in a country where it has existed for centuries.

The signing has given rise to some positive fruits, nonetheless. First, the dialogue continues, and in a more positive spirit. The Chinese embassy to Italy serves as a channel for ongoing communication.

Second, official delegations from both sides meet once or twice annually, at the deputy-foreign minister level, either at the Vatican or in Beijing. The next meeting is to be in Rome and was expected to formalize the extension of the provisional agreement, but no date has been set because of Covid-19 travel restrictions.

In addition to these official encounters, there is also a joint working group that meets with some regularity. It most recently met in Beijing last November. On that occasion, the Chinese allowed Archbishop Claudio Maria Celli, the head of the Vatican delegation, to celebrate Mass in the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception in Beijing, the first time a Vatican bishop has been permitted to do so since 1949.

[…]

If China were to pursue the diplomatic ladder approach with the Holy See, the next logical step would be a meeting between its prime minister, Li Keqiang, and Cardinal Pietro Parolin, the Secretary of State, who has long played a key role in the China-Vatican dialogue.

Such an encounter could pave the way to the establishment of diplomatic relations, but China would require the Holy See to break diplomatic ties with Taiwan at that same time. Neither question has been broached so far in the bilateral negotiations, according to Vatican sources.

However, the Holy See has been ready for that eventuality since the pontificate of St. John Paul II. As Cardinal Angelo Sodano, then secretary of state, told journalists in 1999, the Vatican is ready to move its embassy from Taipei to Beijing “not tomorrow, but tonight if the Chinese authorities allow it.”

If the provisional agreement is extended for another two years, as is expected, then some headway may be made on the many unresolved questions that remain. But it is difficult to predict where progress may come or how soon.

ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: I'm Starting to Like This Pope

Post by wosbald » Fri Sep 18, 2020 10:43 am

+JMJ+

Subject Header: Capital Punishment/Death Penalty
Intra-Thread Trackbacks: pg 66 / pg 67 / pg 67 / pg 67 / pg 67 / pg 67 / pg 68 / pg 101 / pg 101 / pg 107 / 124

Inter-Thread Trackbacks:
"Faith in the News":pg 121 / pg 123 / pg 123



Report: The death penalty is a ‘descendant of slavery’ [In-Depth]
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Demonstrators are seen near the Federal Correctional Complex in Terre Haute, Ind., to show their opposition to the death penalty July 13, 2020. (CNS photo/Bryan Woolston, Reuters)

A new Death Penalty Information Center report explores the impact of entrenched racism on the contemporary institution of capital punishment in the United States.

Krisanne Vaillancourt Murphy, executive director of Catholic Mobilizing Network, a national organization that works for the abolition of capital punishment, said that the report comes at a moment of national reckoning.

“As the most punitive and irreversible practice found within a criminal legal system known for its widespread racial disparities, the death penalty serves as a sort of litmus test for how our nation is making progress to either dismantle or uphold racism,” Ms. Vaillancourt Murphy said.

“As Catholics [at C.M.N.], we believe the death penalty is unacceptable in all instances because it violates human dignity and deems certain lives invaluable. But what D.P.I.C.’s report lays out so clearly is that the lives deemed worthless by our death penalty system are disproportionately Black lives and the lives of other people of color.”

Hannah Cox, senior national manager for Conservatives Concerned About the Death Penalty, said in a statement released in response to the report that the racial bias reflected in “indisputable” death penalty data “is why a large number of conservative GOP state legislators who believe in limited government and individual liberty are leading efforts to end capital punishment.”

[…]

“The mechanism by which racial bias operates in the death penalty is similar to the way in which it infects other areas of the criminal legal system,” the report’s authors conclude. “This understanding is important as reformers address the challenge of creating a criminal legal system that lives up to the promise of equal justice.”

Today, offenders convicted of killing white victims are more likely to be sentenced to death than those who kill Black victims. Since a short-lived moratorium on the death penalty ended in 1977, 295 Black defendants have been executed for murdering a white victim, while only 21 white defendants have been executed for murdering a Black victim.

[…]

The report also notes one study which showed that qualified Black jurors were dismissed at more than double the rate of white jurors, while another found that white jurors were more likely to sentence poor Latino defendants to death than defendants who were poor and white.

Ms. Vaillancourt Murphy said that the Catholic Mobilizing Network, which works in close collaboration with the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, is committed to educating Catholics about the U.S. death penalty — especially its roots in systemic racism — and amplifying the church’s teaching that “racism is a life issue.” (Ms. Vaillancourt Murphy wrote an article for America last month about Lezmond Mitchell, a Navajo man executed by the U.S. government over the objections of the Navajo Nation.)

“As the national Catholic organization committed to the abolition of the death penalty — driven by a pro-life ethic — C.M.N. considers anti-racism work to be inextricable from our mission to transform the U.S. criminal legal system into one that promotes human dignity, hope and healing,” she told America.

According to the report, since as early as the 17th century, the judicial authorities in America have executed Black people at a consistently higher per-capita rate than white people. From 1980 to 2019, the percentage of people on death row who are of color increased to 57.8 percent. Although approximately 60 percent of the American population is white, only 42 percent of those on death row are white, while 42 percent are Black (though only about 13 percent of the total U.S. population is Black) and 13 percent are Latino.

[…]

The D.P.I.C. report concludes that accepting racial prejudice in capital punishment implicitly allows for the same in policing, prosecution and incarceration. It “embodies what America most needs to change” — ending legal practices that devalue Black and brown lives.

“Due to the recent string of highly-public acts of racial violence, more and more people are beginning to live into the painful but necessary work of confronting America’s ‘original sin’ of racism,” Ms. Vaillancourt Murphy said. “The modern U.S. death penalty grew out of America’s history of racial violence; as such, confronting racism’s linkages to capital punishment is crucial to dismantling this death-dealing system.”

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"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: I'm Starting to Like This Pope

Post by wosbald » Fri Sep 18, 2020 6:43 pm

+JMJ+

Subject Header: Capital Punishment/Death Penalty
Intra-Thread Trackbacks: pg 66 / pg 67 / pg 67 / pg 67 / pg 67 / pg 67 / pg 68 / pg 101 / pg 101 / pg 107 / 124 / pg 128

Inter-Thread Trackbacks:
"Faith in the News":pg 121 / pg 123 / pg 123



Archdiocese Calls Attorney General Barr to Halt Federal Executions, Calls for Withdrawal of Award to Attorney General Barr [News Release, PDF]
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ALBUQUERQUE — Friday, September 18, 2020 — It has come to our attention that a non-profit group called the National Catholic Prayer Breakfast, which is not an official Catholic organization, will honor Attorney General William Barr with their Christifideles Laici award on September 23, 2020 “In Honor and Gratitude for Fidelity to the Church, Exemplary Selfless and Steadfast Service in the Lord’s Vineyard.” We are appalled this group will honor Attorney General Barr in light of the fact he just recently began executions of federal prisoners; something that has not been done since 2003. Catholic teaching on capital punishment (the death penalty) is clear. The Church teaches that "the death penalty is inadmissible because it is an attack on the inviolability and dignity of the person, and she works with determination for its abolition worldwide" (Catechism of the Catholic Church #2267).

[…]

There are numerous serious reasons to oppose the death penalty: the dignity of both victim and perpetrator, the routine inconsistent application of capital punishment, the fact that mistakes are irreversible, the exorbitant cost of the appeals process, and a lack of correlation between the death penalty and crime deterrence. As Catholics, we acknowledge the inherent dignity and sacredness of all. We work to protect all life, whether it be a child in the womb, a person without a home, a refugee family, an elderly person at the end of life, a victim of a crime, or a person on death row. There is no justifiable reason to support government-sponsored execution as punishment for even the most heinous crimes. We possess means in today’s society to render the perpetrators harmless through life in prison without parole. With this in mind, we call for the National Catholic Prayer Breakfast to withdraw their honor of Attorney General Barr; and we call on Attorney General Barr to stop all federal executions. Let us not become the evil we despise.

Submitted by: Archdiocese of Santa Fe Office of Social Justice & Respect Life — END.

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"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: I'm Starting to Like This Pope

Post by hugodrax » Fri Sep 18, 2020 7:15 pm

That's pretty laughable considering the source, old boy.
Everything we hear is an opinion, not a fact. Everything we see is a perspective, not the truth
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non nobis, Domine, non nobis, sed nomini tuo da gloriam

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Re: I'm Starting to Like This Pope

Post by wosbald » Sun Sep 20, 2020 10:05 am

+JMJ+

Subject Header: China–Vatican Deal
Intra-Thread Trackbacks: pg 78 / pg 78 / pg 79 / pg 79 / pg 88 / pg 89 / pg 89 / pg 118 / pg 118 / pg 119 / pg 124 / pg 124 / pg 124 / pg 125 / pg 126 / pg 126 / pg 126 / pg 127 / pg 128



Mike Pompeo Attacks Pope Francis & The ‘Moral Authority’ Of The Vatican Amidst Potential Deal With China
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Jason Lee / Chris Jackson / Getty Images

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo has hit out at Pope Francis following the news that diplomats from the Holy See are meeting later this month with members of the Chinese Communist Party to renew a two-year-old agreement between China and the Vatican.

Though the Middle Kingdom nominally adheres to the principle of religious freedom, it is officially an atheist state and has routinely been accused of cracking down on faith-based organizations.

“Two years ago, the Holy See reached an agreement with the Chinese Communist Party, hoping to help China’s Catholics. Yet the CCP’s abuse of the faithful has only gotten worse. The Vatican endangers its moral authority, should it renew the deal,” Pompeo wrote in a tweet.

In a longer statement published on First Things, Pompeo also criticized the Holy See’s decision to “legitimize” Chinese priests and bishops who were simultaneously involved with the CCP, claiming that they had “unclear” loyalties.

[…]

Pompeo continued his missive with the hope that the Pope would reconsider making an alliance with China, bringing up Catholicism’s power in helping end communism in Eastern Europe and fascism in South America in the 20th century.

Pompeo ended his statement by citing both the leader’s own words as well as the Gospel’s.

“Pope Francis said in 2013 that ‘Christians must respond to evil with good, taking the Cross upon themselves as Jesus did.’ History teaches us that totalitarian regimes can only survive in darkness and silence, their crimes and brutality unnoticed and unremarked,” he wrote.

“I pray that … the Holy See will heed Jesus’s words in the Gospel of John, ‘The truth will set you free,'” he concluded.

ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: I'm Starting to Like This Pope

Post by wosbald » Mon Sep 21, 2020 8:04 am

+JMJ+

Subject Header: China–Vatican Deal
Intra-Thread Trackbacks: pg 78 / pg 78 / pg 79 / pg 79 / pg 88 / pg 89 / pg 89 / pg 118 / pg 118 / pg 119 / pg 124 / pg 124 / pg 124 / pg 125 / pg 126 / pg 126 / pg 126 / pg 127 / pg 128 / pg 128



No easy solutions: a response to Weigel's critique of the Vatican-China deal [In-Depth, Opinion]
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Demonstrators march during a protest against the national security law in Hong Kong July 1. (CNS/ Reuters/Tyrone Siu)

Vatican Secretary of State Cardinal Pietro Parolin confirmed Sept. 14 that it is the intention of the Holy See to renew its two-year agreement with the Chinese government over the appointment of Catholic bishops in the communist country.

Parolin was speaking to journalists at the margins of a commemorative event for the late Cardinal Achille Silvestrini, an architect of the Vatican's strategy during the later Cold War-era of Ostpolitik, or engaging in dialogue with Eastern European communist authorities.

The Vatican-China agreement of September 2018 is the most important diplomatic success of Pope Francis' pontificate and of Parolin's tenure as secretary of state. The bilateral talks for its renewal are underway; their repercussions and the interest they spark are much higher than from other secret diplomatic talks involving the Holy See, given the danger of a new kind of cold war between China and the United States.

And, of course, in certain parts of the U.S. church, the prospect of the renewal of the agreement has caused consternation among proponents of a U.S.-centered worldview and a U.S.-centered Catholicism.

Among the most prominent critics is George Weigel, who wrote an Aug. 31 op-ed for The Washington Post — just the latest in a series of his articles in the last few years against the Holy See's opening to China. This article is important, in its own way, because it shows the faulty historical and theological assumptions guiding Weigel.

[…]

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Cardinal Pietro Parolin, Vatican secretary of state, at the Vatican Feb. 3 (CNS/Paul Haring)

[…]

The second faulty assumption is that Francis and Parolin's policy towards China can be compared with other diplomatic openings by the Vatican towards communist countries in the 20th century. There are a series of distinctions that need to be made here.

The contemporary Chinese regime is more about hegemony in the world than about communism: it's more about an idea of China reemerging as its former dynastic, imperial self (as it was centuries before the birth of Christ) than about Chairman Mao.

The goal of Ostpolitik was the survival of the Catholic Church in Europe, the historical cradle of Christianity, while the Vatican-China agreement takes place in a new global scenario where Christianity is in most countries a minority in a world of religious, cultural and political differences.

It's not about Europe and the Western hemisphere, but the global Catholic Church in the global world. In this sense, Wojtyla's post-World War II Poland is a totally misleading comparison. A more apt comparison is, for example, the position of the Catholic Church in India or Indonesia today or, even better, in China in the 17th and 18th centuries.

[…]

The third faulty assumption concerns what we mean by the Vatican and the papacy. Weigel wrote that "the only power the Vatican has in 21st-century global politics is the moral authority that comes with the forthright defense of human rights for all."

This is only partially true. This month Catholics mark the 150th anniversary of that dramatic September 1870: the declaration of papal primacy and infallibility at Vatican Council I, the taking of Rome by the Italians and the collapse of the Papal States, and the eventual interruption of the council.

One of the hard lessons learned by the Holy See since 1870 is that papal diplomacy has to rely on the exercise of papal moral authority more than on the usual tangible instruments of state power.

Image
The Minor Basilica of Our Lady of Sheshan, or Our Lady, Help of Christians in Shanghai, China (CNS/Nancy Wiechec)

On the other hand, the uncharted territory of the current disruption of the international order and the consequences this disruption causes on the landscape of global religions today makes more visible the uniqueness of the Holy See in dealing with international issues.

In other words, the moral authority of the papacy is different from other churches also because some instruments of state power are a key aspect of the activity of the Holy See. (Think of the Holy See's diplomatic missions in almost every country in the world, the diplomatic missions accredited to the Holy See, its status as a permanent observer at the U.N., and its signature of the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons.)

As China expert Michel Chambon wrote in February 2018, before the Vatican-China agreement was announced: "when journalists and other activists frame this encounter [between the Vatican and China] as an issue about morality only, they indeed belittle the legal aspect of such dialogue. More or less consciously, they insidiously deny rights to the Holy See, and therefore to the Holy Father himself, to stand as a sovereign entity. In their eyes, the pope should only be a moral leader telling the world what 'the good' is about. This approach is highly problematic, and those who are Catholic should carefully question it."

[…]

Being a Catholic Church in the global world today means difficult choices. What the Holy See and the papacy can do is limited, and acting responsibly means that there are no easy or simple solutions.

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"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: I'm Starting to Like This Pope

Post by wosbald » Tue Sep 22, 2020 9:56 am

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Subject Header: Economic Magisterium
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The fraternal heart transcends power struggles [In-Depth, Interview]
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Image: Pope Francis addresses the General Assembly during his visit to United Nations headquarters. Credit: UN Photo/Kim Haughton. Photo Date: 25/09/2015. NICA ID: 644147. Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 Generic (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

This interview of Rodrigo Guerra by Miroslava Lopez was originally published in Spanish at Vida Nueva (link). This English translation is published with permission.

The Vatican has announced a new encyclical by Pope Francis entitled
Fratelli Tutti, about human fraternity and social friendship. The pope will sign the document on October 3, 2020 in Assisi and it will be released to the public on October 4.

Vida Nueva interviewed Rodrigo Guerra López on the significance of Francis’s new teaching document and what the pope is saying in the context of our present situation. Dr. Guerra, who is from Mexico, is a philosopher, an ordinary member of the Pontifical Academy for Life, and serves on the Theological Commission of the Latin American Conference of Bishops (CELAM). He is president of the Center for Advanced Social Research (CISAV).

============================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================

Q: What can we expect from the next Encyclical of Pope Francis on the themes of human fraternity and social friendship?

GUERRA: My impression is that Pope Francis will surprise us again by announcing the Gospel in its essential simplicity. Of course, we should take a few days to study and meditate on the text and not rush to conclusions. That said, we can already glean from the various messages and documents he has given us throughout his pontificate that “fraternity” will have to be understood as an analogous concept — that is, in its multiple possibilities within Christian semantics.

Ideologues always look for a narrow, “univocal” meanings of words. They try to set traps and trip up the Successor of Peter. It was enough that in the “Document on Human Fraternity,” signed by Pope Francis and the Grand Imam of Al-Azhar, when the concept “brothers” was introduced, some immediately raised suspicions as if they were trying to build an immanentistic inter-religion in order to dissolve the specificities of faith. Something similar also happened when Laudato si’ was published. From the first lines, we were reminded of the importance of recognizing — following Francis of Assisi — not only our neighbor but our “common home” as a “sister.”

True Christian intelligence always operates animated by “analogy,” that is, by verifying what things are “similar” and “different”. The analogia entis and the analogia fidei are a constitutive dimension of authentically Christian thinking.

Q: It seems that the world marked by the pandemic is the great scenario that Pope Francis reflects on in his new document. Why might the issue of fraternity be relevant in this context?

GUERRA: The pandemic has provided a heuristic dimension: it forced us to learn to recognize things that we have been carrying around for a long time and to which we have not paid enough attention.

One of these is the way we resolve conflicts. The logics of power that prevailed in the 20th century has established a pattern that would make Hegel or Nietzsche very happy: conflicts are resolved through the triumph of force. This mentality not only inhabits non-Christian or anti-Christian groups and movements but is held even by some within the Church. For them the important thing is to “win,” even if this involves postponing or canceling the truth.

In ongoing electoral processes or in certain struggles over fundamental values, the logic of combat tends to prevail. Those who build bridges, those who recognize something of truth in the adversary, or those who — when fighting — seek not to destroy but to leave a door open through which it is possible to walk, are viewed with distrust. The Christian faith, on the other hand, points in another direction: unity is superior to conflict, communion is a method of political action, and we are all brothers and called to behave as such even when we have disagreements.

The political manipulation of faith

Q: Does the combat mentality really mean “postponing or cancelling the truth”?

GUERRA: Recently, when I was speaking with some friends who are very committed to the defense of marriage and the family, they told me that sometimes to keep people motivated and encouraged it is necessary to “scare” people a little, by creating simplified interpretations of the origins of evil and its agents. They told me, for example, that it may not be very accurate — philosophically and politically speaking — to affirm that “cultural Marxism” and the “New World Order” are the cause of the pro-gay mentality, but that affirming these things does serve to maintain tension and draw attention in the civic struggle. I tried to explain to them that this type of oversimplification is a misdiagnosis — philosophical and political — that leads to equally bad strategies in the practical order. Among other things, it will blow up any bridges of dialogue that have been built with those who do not think like us.

The conversation ended when my friends told me that maybe this would happen and that it would be up to others, not them, to do the evangelization work of rebuilding “what is left” after the war is over. From my point of view, this is an example of how truth is sacrificed in the name of force. The important thing in these worldviews is to succeed — even if it means using things like “white lies,” ideological oversimplification, and the sacrifice of bridges of communication and Christian charity. Of course, it must also be said that the examples of those who — from the other side and also renouncing the truth — seek to justify sexual behaviors contrary to the complementarity and reciprocity between men and women, do not help. Like in a hall of mirrors, the extremes — conservative and liberal — feed off each other, and over time, they tend to resemble each other in their fundamental forms of behavior.

Q: How does this translate to the current political landscape?

GUERRA: In countries with neo-populist governments, such as those of Mexico and the United States, who are currently experiencing intense political and electoral processes, polarization tears brothers and sisters apart. Perhaps what is new — in cases like these — is the political manipulation of faith. The clash between opposing sides has led to irrational exaltations, as well as the manipulation of extremely delicate aspects of people’s consciousness, such as their religious sensitivity.

[…]

Embrace fraternity and work for the common good

Q: Politics always seems to oppose human fraternity. Should we dream about a world without politics?

GUERRA: Contemporary politics is sick. It has lost its original “ethos.” Pope Francis in his important speech of March 4, 2019 said it briefly and clearly: “Politics is not a mere search for efficiency, strategy and organized action. Politics is a vocation to service, a lay diaconate that promotes social friendship for the generation of the common good. Only in this way does politics help the people to become protagonists of their history.” It is impossible to think about the life of the people without social friendship, that is, without understanding politics as a service of fraternal construction for the common good. There is an essential connection between fraternity and the common good. The common good is nourished qualitatively when those who have been estranged have reconciled in their hearts and work together without manipulating each other. This way of understanding politics is a constitutive dimension of social life and a lay projection of the commandment of love.

[…]

This is our translation of the original Vida Nueva interview, originally published in Spanish as, “Fraternidad: un corazón que se expande más allá de las luchas de poder“

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"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: I'm Starting to Like This Pope

Post by wosbald » Tue Sep 22, 2020 6:33 pm

+JMJ+

Subject Header: Capital Punishment/Death Penalty
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U.S. bishops urge immediate halt to federal executions
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The Federal Correctional Complex in Terre Haute, Ind., from June 2001: William Emmett LeCroy, 50, on Tuesday would be the sixth federal inmate executed by lethal injection here this year. (CNS photo/Andy Clark, Reuters)

The U.S. bishops’ conference has called for a halt to federal executions scheduled for this week, issuing a statement on the afternoon before U.S. Attorney General William Barr is scheduled to receive an award at the National Catholic Prayer Breakfast in Washington — a gathering this year that has proved especially controversial precisely because of the federal government’s reinstatement of the death penalty under Mr. Barr. The bishops called the application of capital punishment “completely unnecessary and unacceptable.”

“In the last 60 years, before the Trump administration restarted federal executions, there were only four federal executions,” the bishops wrote. “Since July, there have been five, which is already more federal executions than were carried out in any year in the last century. There are two more federal executions scheduled this week.

“We say to President Trump and Attorney General Barr: Enough. Stop these executions.”

Archbishop Paul S. Coakley of Oklahoma City, chair of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops’ Committee on Domestic Justice and Human Development, and Archbishop Joseph F. Naumann of Kansas City, Kan., chair of the Committee on Pro-Life Activities, issued the statement on behalf of the conference.

[…]

“Accountability and legitimate punishment are a part of this process,” they said. “Responsibility for harm is necessary if healing is to occur and can be instrumental in protecting society, but executions are completely unnecessary and unacceptable, as Popes St. John Paul II, Benedict XVI, and Francis have all articulated.”

In August 2018 Pope Francis approved a revision of number 2267 of the Catechism of the Catholic Church, according to which “a new understanding has emerged of the significance of penal sanctions imposed by the state,” rendering the death penalty “inadmissible.”

[…]

The execution of William Emmett LeCroy is scheduled later today, Sept. 22, and Christopher Andre Vialva is scheduled for execution on Sept. 24. The Trump administration reinstated capital punishment in July, conducting the first federal execution since 2003 when Daniel Lewis Lee was put to death by lethal injection in Terre Haute, Ind.

Image

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"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: I'm Starting to Like This Pope

Post by wosbald » Wed Sep 23, 2020 7:57 am

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Subject Header: China–Vatican Deal
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Vatican-China Agreement: Secretary Pompeo Enters the Debate [In-Depth, Video]
Image

VATICAN CITY (CNS) — About 10 days before he was expected in Rome, U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo tweeted that the Vatican “endangers its moral authority” by considering an extension of its 2018 agreement with China on the nomination of bishops.

[…]

The Vatican did not publicly respond to Pompeo’s tweet or article.

“If the Holy See made such a comment about U.S. relations with a state, I can’t imagine Secretary Pompeo would be happy,” a former Vatican official, not authorized to speak on the record, told Catholic News Service Sept. 21.

He also pointed out that the Holy See’s negotiations and agreement are with the Chinese government, not the Chinese Communist Party, as Pompeo suggested. Arguing they are one and the same would be like claiming treaties negotiated with the Trump administration “were with the Republican Party. It makes no sense.”

As for the heart of Pompeo’s argument — that the agreement has not ended persecution of Catholics in China — the former official agreed, but pointed out that the situation for Catholics varies “depending on the province they live in. For some, it is better. For others, it’s the same. And, unfortunately, for some, it’s worse.”

But the Vatican always has insisted that dialogue is a process and walking away from the table because the other side does not give you everything you want at the beginning is more akin to attempting a business transaction than dialogue.

“This agreement is the fruit of 30 years’ work; we’re not going to just rip it up,” another Vatican official said, asking that his name not be used.

He said the Vatican was surprised that Pompeo’s article in First Things was “so substantial,” detailing situations of alleged violations of human rights.

But even more, he said, “we were surprised given that he’s coming here at the end of the month and we expected to have substantial discussions on this. It’s not the approach most diplomats would take” when setting an agenda for a high-level meeting.

Calling Pompeo’s article and tweet “megaphone diplomacy,” he said that it was not completely unusual for the Trump Administration.

At the same time, he said, the Vatican does not believe it is “just rhetoric,” citing Pompeo’s allegations of the forced sterilization of Muslims in Xinjiang, a region where there are few Catholics, so the Vatican has no direct information.

Many observers in the Italian press saw Pompeo’s tweet and article as more partisan politics than diplomacy.

[…]

The Vatican official who spoke to CNS said the Vatican believes, “quite seriously, that ours is a technical agreement on the appointment of bishops. We hope it would help the Catholics there.”

“Dialogue — that’s the only tool at our disposal,” he said, contrasting the Vatican’s position with that of nations who can use weapons or financial deals to sway another country.

The Vatican negotiators do “raise the various human rights issues that impact the Catholic Church,” including the mistreatment or detainment of priests and bishops but have not had great success in that area, he said. However, the agreement about bishops was built over decades and the Vatican plans to persist, even if the going is slow.

[…]

Image


ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: I'm Starting to Like This Pope

Post by wosbald » Thu Sep 24, 2020 12:41 pm

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Subject Header: Holy Land Peace
Inter-Thread Trackbacks:
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"Something Good": pg 2
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"President Trump is a problem...": pg 15 / pg 16 / pg 18 / pg 19



Explaining the Vatican’s silence on the “Abraham Accords” [Opinion]
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In this Aug. 31, 2020 file photo, U.S. President Donald Trump's senior adviser Jared Kushner, center, speaks as Israeli National Security Advisor Meir Ben-Shabbat, left, and U.S. National Security Advisor Robert O'Brien stand by after an El Al plane from Israel landed in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates. For the first time in more than a quarter-century, a U.S. president hosted a signing ceremony, Tuesday, Sept. 15, between Israelis and Arabs at the White House, billing it as an "historic breakthrough" in a region long known for its stubborn conflicts. (Credit: Nir Elias/Pool Photo via AP)

The Vatican typically abhors being dragged into partisan domestic debates, doing everything in its power to avoid them, and it’s a special idée fixe of Pope Francis.

ROME — From the “dog that didn’t bark” files, it seems highly curious at first blush that a major peace accord for the Middle East was signed at the White House last week — with an explicitly religious reference in the title, no less — and, so far, the Vatican has had absolutely nothing to say about it.

The “Abraham Accords,” the heart of which is normalization of relations between the United Arab Emirates and Israel while Israel suspends plans for annexing parts of the West Bank, were announced in August and signed in Washington on Sept. 15. Concurrently, Israel and Bahrain have also announced plans to launch full diplomatic relations.

Aside from reporting the above in Vatican News, the Vatican’s official medial outlet, neither Pope Francis nor any of his senior diplomatic aides have commented on the accords. The chair of the U.S. bishops’ Committee on International Justice and Peace said they could be a “step for peace,” but nobody in the Vatican publicly has taken even that cautious stance.

At face value, that’s puzzling. The Middle East has long been the Vatican’s top diplomatic concern, for at least three reasons: Geopolitically, the Israeli/Palestinian divide is the “mother of all conflicts,” and avoiding wider tensions in the region is a key to global security; religiously, the Holy Land is the cradle of Christianity; and pastorally, there’s a small but important Christian minority in the Middle East that tends to be especially vulnerable when conflict erupts.

[…]

Presumably, it lies in some version of two basic points.

First, it’s election season in America. As of today, there are 41 days remaining until the election itself on Nov. 3, and just one week before the first debate between President Donald Trump and democratic challenger Joe Biden. No doubt Trump will use the accords as part of the argument for his reelection, and anything the Vatican might say, whether praising them or criticizing them, immediately would be seen as a political move.

The Vatican typically abhors being dragged into partisan domestic debates, doing everything in its power to avoid them, and it’s a special ] fixe of Pope Francis. It’s not eight years and counting that he’s refused to make a homecoming trip to Argentina, and according to friends and allies that’s at least in part because he worries the timing of any such visit might be seen as benefitting one political faction or another in his native country.

Granted, Francis wasn’t too discrete to resist taking what was seen as a shot against then-candidate Trump in February 2016, saying that anyone who wanted to build a wall to keep people out of the country “isn’t Christian.” Yet he’s been more restrained since, avoiding most anything that could be seen as a directly critical comment about the American president, despite the crystal-clear policy differences between the two leaders.

Moreover, not only does this deal likely benefit Trump politically, it also helps Netanyahu in Israel, and neither man is exactly the head of government of the Vatican’s dreams. The Vatican can’t object to any step that seems to promote peace, but it also doesn’t have to go out of its way to praise figures about whom it has reservations on multiple fronts.

Second, the Holy See definitely wants peace in the Middle East, but this isn’t really their plan for it.

The Vatican is a longtime advocate of the two-state solution, meaning sovereignty for the Palestinians, security for Israel, and a special international status for holy sites. According to many observers, the Abraham Accords effectively sideline the Palestinians by carving out separate deals with Arab states, ones in which the Palestinians aren’t a party. If anything, some would argue the accords actually reward Israel for its intransigence, and perhaps mark a pivot point away from regarding sovereignty for the Palestinians as a sine qua non of a lasting peace.

As a longtime advocate of justice for the Palestinians, the Vatican can’t endorse any step that appears to make that less likely, even if it also can’t object to two longtime foes coming to terms while invoking the Biblical archetype of Abraham.

As a footnote, the signing ceremony for the accords came three days before U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo publicly rebuked the pope and the Vatican for not pushing back harder against China for religious freedom violations, so that’s not the reason the Vatican has remained silent. However, going forward, it may provide an additional reason why Rome doesn’t feel inclined to go out of its way to do Pompeo any favors.

As the old saying goes, “If you don’t know what to say, keep quiet and you can’t be wrong.” Right now, the Vatican appears to be taking that wisdom to heart.

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"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: I'm Starting to Like This Pope

Post by wosbald » Fri Sep 25, 2020 1:15 pm

+JMJ+

Pope to UN: Rethink the future of our common home [In-Depth, Video]
Image


Pope Francis calls for reforms, multilateralism, cooperation and respect for human dignity in his video message to the 75th Session of the General Assembly of the United Nations.

This year marks a special anniversary for the UN — it is the seventy-fifth year from the signing of the UN Charter in San Francisco in 1945. On Monday, representatives of the Member States gathered in a high-level event to commemorate the anniversary, with other activities scheduled throughout the week.

With the Covid-19 health crisis still limiting global movement, participation at the event was mostly virtual as world leaders sent in pre-recorded video messages. The Vatican Secretary of State, Cardinal Pietro Parolin also addressed the General Assembly via a video message on Monday.

Pope Francis to the UN

Pope Francis, on Friday addressed the representatives of the 193-member world body. In a video message, the Pope appealed for a joint commitment towards a better future through multilateralism and collaboration among states.

He also noted that this 75th anniversary is a fitting occasion to express the Holy See’s desire that the organization serves “as a sign of unity between States and an instrument of service to the entire human family.”

Choose what matters

As the world continues to face challenges stemming from the deadly coronavirus pandemic, Pope Francis highlights that the ongoing crisis has exposed our human fragility and has called into question our economic, health and social systems. More so, it has brought to the fore the need to realize the right of every person to basic health care.

Reiterating his reflections during the Extraordinary Moment of Prayer on 27 March, Pope Francis said the pandemic calls us to seize this time of trial to “choose what matters and what passes away,” and “separate what is necessary from what is not.” He urged that we choose the path that leads to the consolidation of multilateralism, global responsibility, peace and inclusion of the poor.

True solidarity

The current crisis, the Pope notes, shows us that solidarity cannot be “an empty word or promise.” It also shows us “the importance of avoiding every temptation to exceed our natural limits.” In this regard, the Pope considers the effect of the pandemic on the labour market driven by an increasing robotization and artificial intelligence (AI), and stressed the need for “new forms of work that are truly capable of satisfying human potential while affirming our dignity.”

To ensure this, the Pope proposes “a change of direction” that involves a more robust ethical framework capable of overcoming “today’s widespread and quietly growing culture of waste.” He called for a change in the dominant economic paradigm which aims only to expand profit. At the same time, he urged businesses to make offering jobs to more people one of their main objectives.

The culture of waste

Pope Francis points out that at the origin of the culture of waste, there is a “gross lack of respect for human dignity, the promotion of ideologies with reductive understandings of the human person, a denial of the universality of fundamental human rights and a craving for absolute power and control.” These, he states, are “an attack against humanity itself.”

[…]

Humanitarian responses

The Pope notes that international efforts to respond to crises begin with great promise but many subsequently fail due to a lack of the political support necessary to succeed or “because individual states shirk their responsibilities and commitments.” To combat this, he is appealing to the international community to ensure that institutions are truly effective in the struggle against these challenges and reiterated the Holy See’s commitment to playing its part to help the situation.

In responding to the inequalities between the rich and the poor, Pope Francis proposes a reconsideration of the role of economic and financial institutions. He recommends an economic model that “encourages subsidiarity, supports economic development at the local level, and invests in education and infrastructure benefitting local communities.” He also calls on the international community to put an end to economic injustices through greater fiscal responsibility among nations and “an effective promotion of the poorest” including offering assistance to poorer and highly-indebted nations.

Children particularly affected by Covid-19

[…]

Peace, not warfare

[…]

Post-pandemic society

[…]

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"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: I'm Starting to Like This Pope

Post by wosbald » Sun Sep 27, 2020 10:17 am

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Subject Header: China–Vatican Deal
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► Show Spoiler

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"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: I'm Starting to Like This Pope

Post by wosbald » Tue Sep 29, 2020 9:13 am

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Subject Header: China–Vatican Deal
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The Holy See and China: reasons for Agreement on appointment of bishops
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Image
The Church of the Savior in Beijing (©WaitforLight - stock.adobe.com)

By October a decision is expected regarding the Vatican proposal to extend the Provisional Agreement ad experimentum: “It is worth continuing”, Cardinal Parolin explains.

The Provisional Agreement signed on 22 September 2018 between the Holy See and the People’s Republic of China regarding the appointment of bishops, which went into effect a month later, will expire this coming 22 October. Signed in Beijing, the term of the ad experimentum Provisional Agreement was set for two years after which it would eventually be definitively confirmed or some other decision reached. Recently, the Cardinal Secretary of State Pietro Parolin explained that the intention is to propose an extension to the Chinese authorities, maintaining the Agreement as provisional, “as done in these first two years, so as to further verify its usefulness for the Church in China”. Notwithstanding the lengthy period of time and difficulties, aggravated in the last ten months due to the pandemic, Parolin said, “it seems to me that a direction has been marked out that is worth continuing; then we will see”.

From the first communiqué, jointly published by the Holy See and the Chinese government on 22 September 2018, the subject matter of the Agreement itself had been clearly specified immediately: that it does not cover direct diplomatic relations between the Holy See and China, the juridical status of the Catholic Chinese Church, or the relations between the clergy and the country’s authorities. The Provisional Agreement exclusively treats the process for the appointment of bishops: an essential question for the life of the Church and for the necessary communion between the pastors of the Chinese Catholic Church with the Bishop of Rome and with the bishops throughout the world. The goal of the Provisional Agreement, therefore, has never been merely diplomatic, much less, political, but was always genuinely pastoral. Its objective is to permit the Catholic faithful to have bishops in full communion with the Successor of Peter who are at the same time recognized by the authorities of the People’s Republic of China.

[…]

Well aware of the wounds inflicted on the communion of the Church caused by weakness and error, but also by undue external pressure on people, Pope Francis, after years of lengthy negotiations undertaken by his predecessors, has reestablished full communion with Chinese bishops ordained without papal mandate. This decision was taken after having reflected, prayed and examined each individual personal situation. The sole scope of the Provisional Agreement, the Pontiff clarified, is “to support and advance the preaching of the Gospel, and to reestablish and preserve the full and visible unity of the Catholic community in China”.

The first two years led to new episcopal appointments with Rome’s agreement, some of which were officially recognized by the government in Beijing. Even though contact was blocked in recent months due to the pandemic, the results have been positive, although limited, and suggest going forward with the application of the Agreement for another determined period of time.

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"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: I'm Starting to Like This Pope

Post by wosbald » Wed Sep 30, 2020 10:58 am

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Subject Header: China–Vatican Deal
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Holy See preparing to renew China deal [In-Depth]
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Mike Pompeo has written an article in First Things arguing that the Vatican risks endangering its moral authority if it extends the deal. (Eurokinissi/Zuma Press/PA Images)

The Holy See is preparing to renew its 2018 deal with China which it says has delivered positive results in ensuring the pastoral care of Chinese Catholics in the communist-run country.

[…]

A Vatican delegation is expected to travel to Beijing in the coming days for talks about extending the agreement, and Tornielli says that a decision is expected “by October”.

The Holy See has faced criticism over its deal with China, including human rights groups who argue Pope Francis should stand up to Beijing over mass arbitrary detentions of Uyghur Muslims, while Lord Patten of Barnes, the former Governor of Hong Kong and a prominent Catholic, argues the Vatican could be making a “serious misjudgment.”

The harshest criticism has come from United States’ Secretary of State, Mike Pompeo, who wrote an article in First Things — a media outlet which is hostile to the Francis pontificate — arguing that the Vatican risks endangering its moral authority if it extends the deal. His intervention took the Holy See by surprise, and has placed a strain on relations between the Vatican and the White House.

Although the Holy See made no official comment in response to the article, the 29 September editorial was released on the day that Pompeo arrived in Rome for a visit where he will meet his opposite number, Cardinal Pietro Paolin, and Archbishop Paul Gallagher, the Vatican foreign minister.

Secretary Pompeo has, however, been refused a meeting with the Pope on the grounds that it is too close to the US presidential elections. Unofficially his public criticism of the Vatican-China accord was a factor in the decision and since the First Things article Pompeo has shifted his tone stressing that the Church “has an enormous amount of moral authority."

[…]

One priest serving in China said the Vatican-China agreement is bearing fruit.

“Everyone has seen the visible results regarding the bishops in China: no more illicit and underground ordinations,” Fr Paul Han SVD, a priest working at a seminary in Hebei province, explained in a reflection on Sino-Vatican relations, sent to The Tablet.

“Bishops in China are now able to come together more often in collaboration and consultation with each other in solving some Church issues. They can grow in friendship and fraternal encouragement. This in turn will be beneficial to both the communion among them and the whole Church. Isn’t this the key objective of the Sino-Vatican Provisional Agreement on Bishop’s appointment?”

He added that the “Vatican is no more an ally of the Western and North American bloc, but a moral and spiritual leadership of a truly Universal Church” which is “concerned for the well-being of the entire world and all humanity, not political ideology and a preferable government ruled by a particular party.” He added that the Chinese government must have sensed a change in the Vatican, “especially when they realised that the Holy See and Pope Francis are being constantly mocked and attacked for being friendly to them!”

China broke off relations in 1951, and since then various Popes have made efforts to re-establish ties. On 14 February 2020, in Munich, Archbishop Gallagher met Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi, the highest level meeting between representatives of the Vatican and Beijing since 1949. The 2018 deal is the first agreement signed between the two states since relations were severed.

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"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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