I'm Starting to Like This Pope

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Re: I'm Starting to Like This Pope

Post by wosbald » Tue Nov 10, 2020 9:57 am

+JMJ+

Subject Header: Viganò/QAnon/Deep State/Deep Church
Intra-thread Trackbacks: pg 63 / pg 64 / pg 65 / pg 65 / pg 66 / pg 66 / pg 73 / pg 84 / pg 120 / pg 123 / pg 124 / pg 124 / pg 124 / pg 125 / pg 125 / pg 125 / pg 125 / pg 126 / pg 126 / pg 126 / pg 126 / pg 126 / pg 126 / pg 125 / pg 126 / pg 127 / pg 127 / pg 128 / pg 128

Inter-Thread Trackbacks:
"Mary Alone": pg 18 / pg 20 /pg 20
"Any QAnoners Here?": pg 5 / pg 5 / pg 5
"Evangelical Fundamentalism and Catholic Integralism": pg 4 / pg 6 / pg 6 / pg6 / pg 6 / pg 8



The McCarrick Report: 40 years of facts laid bare [In-Depth, Analysis]
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Theodore McCarrick. (License: Some rights reserved by U.S. Institute of Peace)

There are two jaw-dropping revelations in the Vatican report on the apparently irresistible rise of former Cardinal Theodore McCarrick.

The first is that St John Paul II personally made the decision to name McCarrick Archbishop of Washington in November 2000 despite being fully aware of many reports of his predatory sexual behavior as head of two previous dioceses, including sleeping with seminarians and soliciting sex from priests. The decision is even more astonishing given that the pope had already passed over McCarrick for two other important sees because of those same reports.

The second astonishing reveal comes 12 years later, after Archbishop Carlo Maria Viganò’s appointment as apostolic nuncio to the United States.

When a priest (described in the report as “Priest 3”) in McCarrick’s former diocese of Metuchen informed the nuncio of his lawsuit he was bringing over McCarrick’s sexual misconduct, Viganò naturally informed Cardinal Marc Ouellet, prefect of the Congregation for Bishops in Rome. Ouellet told him to launch an inquiry into the allegation, following a series of steps.

Yet “Viganò did not take these steps,” the report says, “and therefore never placed himself in the position to ascertain the credibility of Priest 3.”

The difference between the two revelations is that the report offers a convincing explanation of the first: not justifying it, but providing context to understand how it could have happened. The disobedience and negligence of Viganò, on the other hand, are left hanging, crying out for an explanation for which there appears to be none.

Given the former nuncio’s extravagant efforts to paint himself as a lonely righteous crusader vainly seeking to persuade authorities to act against McCarrick, the revelation will come as a major shock to those convinced of his integrity. For others, it will revive suspicions that Viganò’s true motive in attacking Pope Francis over McCarrick was to deflect attention from his own complicity in the cover-up.

The “Report on the Holy See’s Institutional Knowledge and Decision-Making related to former Cardinal Theodore Edgar McCarrick” was compiled by unnamed officials of the Secretariat of State under instructions from Pope Francis from primary sources, including a vast cache of documents and 90 witness interviews on both sides of the Atlantic.

“No limit was placed on the examination of documents, the questioning of individuals, or the expenditure of resources necessary to carry out the investigation,” it says at the start of a 16-page summary released to journalists prior to the publication of the full 400-page report.

The summary does not make excuses, nor attempt to justify failings. But nor does it pass judgment. It lays bare facts, provides context, and suggests explanations. Overall, it is a bracingly candid account of how the disgraced former archbishop rose through the episcopal ranks under John Paul II, and how he was able to continue to act freely under Benedict XVI, even when the stories of his sexual proclivities had been shown to be well-founded.

The report leaves readers to draw their own conclusions about the process of decision-making that failed to stop McCarrick or properly hold him responsible until June 2018, when the Archdiocese of New York announced a “credible and substantiated” allegation that McCarrick had abused a minor. The ensuing investigation unveiled his past as a sexual predator, as victims stepped forward with accounts of harassment and abuse.

The scandal that followed — which the traditionalist Viganò attempted to exploit in his campaign to undermine Pope Francis — led to McCarrick’s removal from the college of cardinals and laicization. It also led to changes that will make it much harder for the same to happen again, including new procedures mandating the investigation of bishops accused of abuse, and laws extending the definition of abuse to include adult victims.

As part of that response, Francis also commissioned this long-awaited report, which is itself a milestone in the Vatican’s road to greater transparency and accountability. There are not many institutions that would choose to expose themselves in this way.

John Paul II and McCarrick

[…]

Benedict XVI and McCarrick

[…]

Francis and McCarrick

[…]

But the Report’s purpose was never to blame or exonerate. As the Secretary of State, Cardinal Pietro Parolin comments, the appointment of bishops — like almost any human procedure — depends on the honesty of those concerned. McCarrick was an impressive bishop whose denials were convincing. His victims were not just those he preyed on, but those who believed his denials.

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"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: I'm Starting to Like This Pope

Post by wosbald » Thu Nov 12, 2020 5:52 pm

+JMJ+

Subject Header: Economic Magisterium/Integral Ecology/Fratelli Tutti
Intra-Thread Trackbacks:pg 65 / pg 121 / pg 121 / pg 122 / pg 127 / pg 128 / pg 129 / pg 129 / pg 129 / pg 129 / pg 129 / pg 129 / pg 129 / pg 129 / pg 130 / pg 130

Inter-Thread Trackbacks:
"THE CATHOLIC THREAD: pg 119 / pg 119 / pg 119 / pg 119 / pg 151 / pg 151
"Pro-life Bills/Laws": pg 15
"The Climate Change Thread": pg 14



Pope and Biden discuss equality, climate change and immigration
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President-elect Joe Biden wavs as he leaves The Queen theater, Tuesday, Nov. 10, 2020, in Wilmington, Del. (Credit: Carolyn Kaster/AP)

NEW YORK — According to a press release for the campaign of President-elect Joe Biden, Pope Francis and Biden had a phone conversation Thursday morning where they discussed working together on issues such as equality, climate change and immigration.

“The president-elect thanked His Holiness for extending blessings and congratulations and noted his appreciation for His Holiness’ leadership in promoting peace, reconciliation, and the common bonds of humanity around the world,” the statement said.

Pope Francis hasn’t publicly congratulated Biden as of Thursday afternoon. In response to a Crux question, Vatican spokesman Matteo Bruni confirmed that a call between Francis and Biden took place but did not comment on its contents.

[…]

Equality, climate change and immigration were three prominent issues Biden ran on in the election. His stance in those areas had some Catholic voters calling him more pro-life than President Donald Trump, despite Biden’s pro-choice stance on abortion. Those also three issues of great importance to Francis.

“The president-elect expressed his desire to work together on the basis of a shared belief in the dignity and equality of all humankind on issues such as caring for the marginalized and the poor, addressing the crisis of climate change, and welcoming and integrating immigrants and refugees into our communities,” the statement said.

Francis and Trump met at the Vatican in 2017. The two previously had a well-documented back and forth in the media over Trump’s immigration policy.

[…]

The election, however, still isn’t officially decided. The Trump campaign has called for recounts in a number of states, as well as filed lawsuits in some over the vote counting process. If Biden is confirmed as the next president of the United States he will be inaugurated Jan. 20, 2021.

ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: I'm Starting to Like This Pope

Post by tuttle » Fri Nov 13, 2020 9:29 am

wosbald wrote:
Thu Nov 12, 2020 5:52 pm
+JMJ+

Subject Header: Economic Magisterium/Integral Ecology/Fratelli Tutti
Intra-Thread Trackbacks:pg 65 / pg 121 / pg 121 / pg 122 / pg 127 / pg 128 / pg 129 / pg 129 / pg 129 / pg 129 / pg 129 / pg 129 / pg 129 / pg 129 / pg 130 / pg 130

Inter-Thread Trackbacks:
"THE CATHOLIC THREAD: pg 119 / pg 119 / pg 119 / pg 119 / pg 151 / pg 151
"Pro-life Bills/Laws": pg 15
"The Climate Change Thread": pg 14



Pope and Biden discuss equality, climate change and immigration
Image
President-elect Joe Biden wavs as he leaves The Queen theater, Tuesday, Nov. 10, 2020, in Wilmington, Del. (Credit: Carolyn Kaster/AP)

NEW YORK — According to a press release for the campaign of President-elect Joe Biden, Pope Francis and Biden had a phone conversation Thursday morning where they discussed working together on issues such as equality, climate change and immigration.

“The president-elect thanked His Holiness for extending blessings and congratulations and noted his appreciation for His Holiness’ leadership in promoting peace, reconciliation, and the common bonds of humanity around the world,” the statement said.

Pope Francis hasn’t publicly congratulated Biden as of Thursday afternoon. In response to a Crux question, Vatican spokesman Matteo Bruni confirmed that a call between Francis and Biden took place but did not comment on its contents.

[…]

Equality, climate change and immigration were three prominent issues Biden ran on in the election. His stance in those areas had some Catholic voters calling him more pro-life than President Donald Trump, despite Biden’s pro-choice stance on abortion. Those also three issues of great importance to Francis.

“The president-elect expressed his desire to work together on the basis of a shared belief in the dignity and equality of all humankind on issues such as caring for the marginalized and the poor, addressing the crisis of climate change, and welcoming and integrating immigrants and refugees into our communities,” the statement said.

Francis and Trump met at the Vatican in 2017. The two previously had a well-documented back and forth in the media over Trump’s immigration policy.

[…]

The election, however, still isn’t officially decided. The Trump campaign has called for recounts in a number of states, as well as filed lawsuits in some over the vote counting process. If Biden is confirmed as the next president of the United States he will be inaugurated Jan. 20, 2021.
The Pope is a pinko :pipe3:
"The Evangelium has not abrogated legends; it has hallowed them" -JRR Tolkien

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Re: I'm Starting to Like This Pope

Post by wosbald » Sat Nov 14, 2020 6:09 pm

+JMJ+

Subject Header: Viganò/QAnon/Deep State/Deep Church
Intra-thread Trackbacks: pg 63 / pg 64 / pg 65 / pg 65 / pg 66 / pg 66 / pg 73 / pg 84 / pg 120 / pg 123 / pg 124 / pg 124 / pg 124 / pg 125 / pg 125 / pg 125 / pg 125 / pg 126 / pg 126 / pg 126 / pg 126 / pg 126 / pg 126 / pg 125 / pg 126 / pg 127 / pg 127 / pg 128 / pg 128 / pg 131

Inter-Thread Trackbacks:
"Mary Alone": pg 18 / pg 20 /pg 20
"Any QAnoners Here?": pg 5 / pg 5 / pg 5
"Evangelical Fundamentalism and Catholic Integralism": pg 4 / pg 6 / pg 6 / pg6 / pg 6 / pg 8




► Show Spoiler

ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: I'm Starting to Like This Pope

Post by wosbald » Thu Nov 19, 2020 2:31 pm

+JMJ+

Subject Header: Viganò/QAnon/Deep State/Deep Church
Intra-thread Trackbacks: pg 63 / pg 64 / pg 65 / pg 65 / pg 66 / pg 66 / pg 73 / pg 84 / pg 120 / pg 123 / pg 124 / pg 124 / pg 124 / pg 125 / pg 125 / pg 125 / pg 125 / pg 126 / pg 126 / pg 126 / pg 126 / pg 126 / pg 126 / pg 125 / pg 126 / pg 127 / pg 127 / pg 128 / pg 128 / pg 131 / pg 131

Inter-Thread Trackbacks:
"Mary Alone": pg 18 / pg 20 /pg 20
"Any QAnoners Here?": pg 5 / pg 5 / pg 5
"Evangelical Fundamentalism and Catholic Integralism": pg 4 / pg 6 / pg 6 / pg6 / pg 6 / pg 8



Viganò burns EWTN and Raymond Arroyo [In-Depth, Analysis, Opinion]
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Catholic media serves a vital role in service of the Church’s mission of evangelization. Good journalism and expert commentary can help inform Catholics about the important issues facing the Church. It can empower us to be more effective in the world. The trustworthiness of Catholic media has become increasingly important as trust in Church leadership fades. It is therefore tremendously scandalous when a Catholic media outlet deliberately misleads its audience in an attempt to present a false narrative.

It is very troubling to witness an ostensibly-Catholic media organization apparently abandon their commitment to truth and instead deliberately impose an ideological and political agenda on its audience. It is nothing short of deplorable. Even more worrying is when that agenda directly opposes the teachings and authority of the pope. For this reason, my colleagues and I have attempted to warn other Catholics about the inherent dishonesty and flagrant heterodoxy of the programming on the EWTN network since 2018. Within the last week, they were caught red-handed.

Last Thursday, November 12, at 8 p.m. EST, an interview between Raymond Arroyo and the former papal nuncio to the United States, Archbishop Carlo Maria Viganò, aired on Arroyo’s weekly show, The World Over. Following the broadcast, videos of the interview, a discussion between Arroyo and his so-called “papal posse,” and the full episode were posted to the network’s Facebook and YouTube pages.

While I didn’t see the interview during its original broadcast, I was alerted to the headline of an article about the interview on LifeSiteNews: “Viganò skewers McCarrick Report on EWTN: ‘Bergoglio is to the deep church as Biden is to the deep state’.” The timestamp on this article says “Thu Nov 12, 2020 – 8:50 pm EST.” In other words, it was posted shortly after the interview aired, and even before the program ended.

I was intrigued by this, in part because I was somewhat surprised that EWTN had fallen that far down the rabbit hole, and in part because I was curious about what else he might have said. EWTN, despite its clear antipathy and opposition to the Holy Father, has thus far striven to maintain a veneer of “respect” for Pope Francis, and — to my knowledge, anyway — has not yet indulged in the wildest QAnon-related conspiracy theories that other reactionary Catholic outlets and figures typically embrace.

In the early morning hours of the next day, Vatican reporter Edward Pentin posted a tweet about an “exclusive” transcript of this interview on the website of the National Catholic Register.


► Show Spoiler
When I read this transcript, I noticed that it omits the “deep church” line. This was strange. Where the LifeSite story quotes him as saying, “the evidence of the facts demonstrates the opposite. I would say that Bergoglio is to the deep church as Biden is to the deep state,” the Register’s transcript stops at the word “opposite.” I checked the YouTube video (cued here to several seconds before the missing statement). At around 21:25 — the point at which the “deep church” line should appear — the video cuts from a photograph of Viganò to a reaction shot of Arroyo and moves on to the following paragraph:


Meanwhile, I was directed to several reactionary Catholic websites that also purported to have the “complete” transcript of the interview, including LifeSiteNews, One Peter Five, Catholic Family News, and GloriaTV. All of these transcripts included the “deep church” line, as well as other content that was not featured in the EWTN interview.

This seemed very odd. How did these outlets obtain and publish transcripts of an interview so soon after the program, why were they all identical to each other, and why did they not match the transcript published by the Register (an EWTN-affiliated outlet)?

When questioned about this, Arroyo took to Twitter to insist that the transcript Pentin posted was the complete one:


At this point, things started to look really fishy. I couldn’t understand how the same interview had two different transcripts. Despite Arroyo’s insistence, it was clear that EWTN had made cuts. I also found small discrepancies — a word or two here and there — between the transcripts in addition to the missing sections of the Register’s transcript. Additionally, I noticed that there was one question and answer in the Register’s transcript that didn’t appear in the “alternative” versions. Then I stumbled upon a PDF transcript of the interview on an Italian website on Viganò’s letterhead.

Finally, things seemed to start becoming clearer. It was now apparent that Viganò must have sent out the script to numerous friendly outlets and permitted them to publish it in full after midnight Eastern time (based on the timestamps on the articles) following the broadcast. The editors of LifeSite must have been so excited by the “deep church” line that they decided to publish their short piece about it immediately after the interview aired.

There were other things that struck me as odd about the video of interview. For one thing, at the very beginning we don’t hear Viganò greet Arroyo. In fact, Viganò doesn’t say a word until he launches into a paragraph-long response to the first question. There was very little (if any) direct interaction between Viganò and Arroyo the entire interview. Viganò spoke in long, multi-sentence monologues in response to each of the questions, while Arroyo nodded along with a look of keen interest on his face. Was it possible that he was talking to a recording of Viganò’s voice and it wasn’t a real interview at all?

Several times throughout my investigation, I asked Arroyo questions about it on Twitter. He ignored me until I posted my theory that his “interview” had been conducted with pre-recorded answers from Viganò. In a tweet that was quickly deleted, he responded:

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If Arroyo was not speaking to a recording, the only other reasonable explanation is that both Viganò and Arroyo were working from a script.

Confirmation came in the form of Robert Moynihan’s ”Inside the Vatican” Letter #37, which arrived in my inbox the following evening and now appears on his website. This letter not only contains a combined transcript, but makes parenthetical notes of the parts that were cut from the EWTN broadcast. It also confirms that most of the interview was pre-scripted.

Additionally, the letter confirms that the EWTN version of the interview was edited, making a note near the beginning that says:
The entire text originally prepared for this Arroyo-Viganò interview is below in its entirety; the broadcast interview does not have the complete prepared text, because some prepared sections were omitted from the broadcast interview.
Towards the end, he adds this “Special Note”:
The following question and answer were not in the prepared interview. So this is the sole question and answer which were completely extemporaneous …
In addition to the aforementioned “deep church” quote, statements removed from Viganò’s transcript by EWTN include mentions of secretive networks of nefarious people (“The same connections, the same complicities, the same acquaintances always recur: McCarrick, Clinton, Biden, the Democrats, and the Modernists, along with a procession of homosexuals and molesters that is not irrelevant”). He suggests that Francis is an illegitimate pope when he states that Benedict XVI “is too meek to blatantly disavow his successor by calling him a liar and discrediting him, as well as the function he holds.”

Additionally, the EWTN version of the interview omits Viganò’s closing rant:
In this grotesque farce, now cloaked in a false semblance of legalism, there is no hesitation to drag the entire Church through the mud — its prestige before the world, its authority over the faithful — in order to save the now-compromised image of corrupt, unworthy, depraved prelates. I limit myself to observing that even now, in the Vatican, Bergoglio still surrounds himself with notorious homosexuals and people with gravely compromised reputations. This is the most blatant disavowal of Bergoglio’s supposed moralizing work.
Why would EWTN want to censor these parts of the interview? Well, for the most part, while EWTN’s opposition to Pope Francis has been brazen and deceptive, the grounds for their opposition have largely been political and theological. They had not veered into the sensational and paranoid as much as other far-right Catholic media. Apparently they thought it was worth the risk to give a platform to Archbishop Viganò — who has become a symbol of political and ecclesial opposition to Pope Francis — despite his obsession with conspiracy theories. Maybe they thought they could control the message. If they did, he proved them wrong.

The publication of Letter #37 suggests Viganò and Moynihan pulled a bait-and-switch on Arroyo and EWTN. Arroyo and his network seem to have agreed to a pre-scripted interview with Viganò, apparently thinking that they could edit out Viganò’s most bizarre statements and produce a “complete transcript” that would match what they aired in their broadcast. It seems unlikely that they anticipated Viganò sending the “full” transcript to numerous other outlets in advance, who would in turn highlight the most outrageous passages. Even more, I doubt they foresaw Robert Moynihan blowing the lid off the entire plot and exposing their “interview” for the sham it was.

The way the interview was presented, viewers were left with the impression that it was a spontaneous exchange. It appears, however, that each side was reading their part in a script, like actors. If so, it was a serious breach of journalistic ethics and would be grounds for dismissal at other broadcast news outlets.

It remains unclear if Viganò’s team provided the questions to EWTN, but is certainly a strong possibility. As the veteran Vatican journalist Philip Pullella of Reuters tweeted on Monday, “Vigano and his handlers are total control freaks. They will not let anyone who might challenge him or ask a tough question anywhere near him. He/they want it all orchestrated. That is why all his missives are just regurgitated without checks or challenges.”

Meanwhile, as all of this unfolded, EWTN repeatedly deleted videos of this broadcast to YouTube and uploaded new versions. You can see the deletion history in the screenshot below:

Image

Whether this was due to additional interview edits is unclear, but they have certainly not been forthcoming about the genesis of the interview or the completeness of their transcript.

EWTN and Moynihan did not respond to requests for comment.

[…]

Regarding these recent events, the fact that EWTN would allow an interview of Viganò on the network at all is disturbing in itself. Honestly, this is distressing with or without Viganò’s comments about the deep church or networks of predators surrounding the pope. But this episode shows the lengths to which those bent on undermining Pope Francis are willing to bend the truth and try to present this dangerous ideological narrative to their viewers.

When you dance with the devil, you will get burned. When you tango with Viganò, you shouldn’t be surprised when the fire spreads beyond your control.

ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: I'm Starting to Like This Pope

Post by hugodrax » Thu Nov 19, 2020 3:08 pm

Wosbald, the Howard Hughes of CPS.
Everything we hear is an opinion, not a fact. Everything we see is a perspective, not the truth
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non nobis, Domine, non nobis, sed nomini tuo da gloriam

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Re: I'm Starting to Like This Pope

Post by wosbald » Fri Nov 20, 2020 10:49 am

+JMJ+

Subject Header: Economic Magisterium/Integral Ecology/Fratelli Tutti
Intra-Thread Trackbacks:pg 65 / pg 121 / pg 121 / pg 122 / pg 127 / pg 128 / pg 129 / pg 129 / pg 129 / pg 129 / pg 129 / pg 129 / pg 129 / pg 129 / pg 130 / pg 130 / pg 131

Inter-Thread Trackbacks:
"THE CATHOLIC THREAD: pg 119 / pg 119 / pg 119 / pg 119 / pg 151 / pg 151
"Pro-life Bills/Laws": pg 15
"The Climate Change Thread": pg 14



‘Economy of Francis’ event to showcase papal vision for global economic shakeup [In-Depth]
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A man in Orick, Calif, walks along the Redwood Highway by the Pacific Ocean Sept. 9, 2020, as smoke from wildfires fills the air. (Credit: Carlos Barria/Reuters via CNS)

ROME — Historians say that Franciscan lending institutions in the 14th century, the montes pietatis, were a predecessor to modern banking and formed the foundation for today’s economy. Today, a pope named Francis is once again invoking the spirit of the Saint of Assisi, this time in an effort to reform the post-modern economy from the bottom up.

A long-outspoken critic of market capitalism and neoliberalism, Pope Francis offered a clear picture of his vision for global economics in a post-pandemic world in his recent encyclical Fratelli Tutti, which, among other things, criticized nationalist populism and argued in favor of multilateral accords.

In his opening for the document, Francis points to the world’s inability to rally together for a common response to COVID-19, and goes on to repeat frequent criticisms of the current global economy and calls for an entirely new system based on solidarity and which prioritizes the poor and vulnerable.

This vision will be the crux of a largescale 3-day event called “The Economy of Francis,” taking place from Nov. 19-21 online. Originally scheduled to take place in March in Assisi, the event was postponed and converted to a digital discussion due to the coronavirus pandemic.

Around 2,000 young people from 120 different countries all over the world will hear from a slew of experts known for their advocacy in favor of models protecting the environment as well as basic human needs, and which promote cooperation, generativity, and sustainable economic endeavors. There are also some controversial figures set to address the digital gathering, such as Brazilian theologian and former Franciscan priest, Leonardo Boff.

One of the founders of Liberation Theology in Latin America, Boff left the Franciscan order and the priesthood in the 1990s after a years-long throwdown with the Vatican over what they viewed as his Marxist interpretation of Liberation Theology. He is still a well-known left-wing figure in Brazil, and has had a lengthy career teaching ethics, ecology, theology and philosophy a several universities throughout South America and Europe. In the past, he has praised the leadership of Pope Francis, who in December 2018 sent a letter to Boff for his 80th birthday.

Organized by the Vatican department for integral human development, the Basilica of St. Francis in Assisi, and the city and diocese of Assisi, among others, this week’s summit will draw together students in advanced economics, managers in social enterprises, Nobel Prize winners and representatives from international organizations.

The streaming will be done 4 hours at a time apart from one 24-hour session on Nov. 20. The livestreams themselves will be set in iconic places in Assisi, such as the basilicas of St. Francis and St. Claire; the church of San Damiano, which was rebuilt by St. Francis and his followers; and the Shrine of the Spogliazione, or “undressing,” where St. Francis stripped himself while renouncing his title and inheritance.

Ghanaian Cardinal Peter Turkson, who heads the integral human development office, will open the event.

[…]

In addition to talks from these and other experts, there will also be 12 working sessions during the online conference dedicated to topics addressed by different preparation groups, including: work and care; management and gift; finance and humanity; agriculture and justice; energy and poverty; profit and vocation; policies for happiness; CO2 of inequality; business and peace; economy and women; businesses in transition; and life and lifestyle.

A follow-up meeting in Assisi is being planned for autumn 2021, with the hope that the coronavirus crisis will have abated by then, and restrictions on travel and social proximity will be more relaxed, allowing participants to gather in person, rather than online.

According to a press release from the Basilica of St. Francis, the pope’s goal in organizing this year’s “Economy of Francis” event with young people as the protagonists is to initiate “a process of global change so that the economy of today and tomorrow is more just, fraternally inclusive, and sustainable, leaving no one behind.”

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"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: I'm Starting to Like This Pope

Post by wosbald » Sun Nov 22, 2020 11:33 am

+JMJ+

Subject Header: Capital Punishment/Death Penalty
Intra-Thread Trackbacks: pg 66 / pg 67 / pg 67 / pg 67 / pg 67 / pg 67 / pg 68 / pg 101 / pg 101 / pg 107 / pg 124 / pg 128 / pg 128 / pg 128 / pg 129 / pg 129

Inter-Thread Trackbacks:
"Faith in the News":pg 121 / pg 123 / pg 123



U.S. bishops urge Trump, Barr to stop upcoming federal executions
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In this file photo, the sun sets behind one of the guard towers at the Federal Correctional Complex in Terre Haute, Ind., June 10, 2001. The death chamber at the correctional facility is where the federal death penalty is carried out. (Credit: Andy Clark/Reuters via CNS)

WASHINGTON — Ahead of the execution of Orlando Hall that was scheduled for Nov. 19, and two more federal executions scheduled to take place in December, two U.S. bishops’ committee chairmen called on the government to end this practice.

“We ask President (Donald) Trump and Attorney General (William) Barr, as an act of witness to the dignity of all human life: stop these executions,” said the Nov. 18 statement from Archbishop Paul S. Coakley of Oklahoma City, chairman of U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops’ Committee on Domestic Justice and Human Development, and Archbishop Joseph F. Naumann of Kansas City, Kansas, chairman of the USCCB Committee on Pro-Life Activities.

“Sadly, we must call on the administration yet again to stop an execution,” the archbishops said, noting the country is “now on pace for 10 federal executions in 2020, more than double the previous record of four in 1938.”

The archbishops’ statement said the death penalty is “not necessary to protect society. It is not necessary to hold people accountable for grave crimes. The decision not to execute someone, even someone who has done something terrible, is not ‘soft on crime’; rather, it is strong on the dignity of life.”

They also quoted Fratelli Tutti, the recent encyclical by Pope Francis, which says: “The firm rejection of the death penalty shows to what extent it is possible to recognize the inalienable dignity of every human being and accept that he or she has a place in the universe.”

On Sept. 22, the two archbishops issued a similar statement, urging Trump and Barr to stop an execution that day and one two days later.

Sister Helen Prejean, a Sister of St. Joseph of Medaille and longtime anti-death penalty activist, has spoken against Hall’s execution on Twitter, describing him as a Black man who was “convicted and sentenced to death by an all-white jury after prosecutors enlisted a lawyer with a known track record of excluding Black citizens from juries.”

Hall, who is 49, was convicted of kidnapping and killing a Texas teenager in 1994.

Prejean tweeted Nov. 18 the Department of Justice is “trying to rush through as many federal executions as possible during the ‘lame-duck’ period between now and January 20, 2021,” saying that lawyers with the Justice Department “have informed federal judges that more execution dates will be announced soon.”

“This shameful killing spree must end,” she added.

[…]

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"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: I'm Starting to Like This Pope

Post by wosbald » Mon Nov 23, 2020 4:55 pm

+JMJ+

Subject Header: China–Vatican Deal
Intra-Thread Trackbacks: pg 78 / pg 78 / pg 79 / pg 79 / pg 88 / pg 89 / pg 89 / pg 118 / pg 118 / pg 119 / pg 124 / pg 124 / pg 124 / pg 125 / pg 126 / pg 126 / pg 126 / pg 127 / pg 128 / pg 128 / pg 128 / pg 128 ] pg 128 / pg 128 / pg 128 / pg 129 / pg 129 / pg 129



The China-Vatican agreement has been extended. Now, Rome is looking for more from Beijing. [In-Depth]
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The Chinese national flag is pictured in a file photo in front of a Catholic church in the village of Huangtugang. (CNS photo/Thomas Peter, Reuters)

On Oct. 22, the Holy See and China announced that they had agreed to extend the provisional agreement on the appointment of bishops for another two years. At the end of this “for experiment” agreement — the expression used by the Vatican — the accord will either become definitive or another decision will have to be taken. Between now and then, however, the Vatican will want to see some concrete results.

Pope Francis, committed to the culture of dialogue and encounter and opposed to confrontation, gave the green light for the extension despite pressure to terminate the agreement. External pressure came from various political actors, including the United States as articulated by Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, while internal pressure surfaced from sectors of the church, including cardinals such as Joseph Zen of Hong Kong and Gerhard Müller, former prefect of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith.

Sources close to the pope told America that Francis is aware of the criticisms of the Holy See’s approach to China and remains informed of the deeply troubling situation there as periodic crackdowns on religion and repression of human rights continue, but he is convinced that the path to change is through dialogue and the building of trust with the Chinese leadership, not through confrontation.

The text of the agreement, signed in September 2018 and extended in October, remains secret by mutual consent but, as Cardinal Pietro Parolin, Secretary of State, remarked, much of its content is known. Moreover, he added, Benedict XVI approved a draft of the agreement when he was pope.

An article published in L’Osservatore Romano on the day the extension was announced stated that “the primary objective” of the agreement regarding the appointment of bishops in China “is that of sustaining and promoting the proclamation of the Gospel in that land, restoring the full and visible unity of the Church.” It added that “the primary motivations” that guide the Holy See in its dialogue with the Chinese authorities “are fundamentally of an ecclesiological and pastoral nature” because the question of the appointment of bishops “is of vital importance for the life of the Church, both at the local as well as at the universal levels.”

[…]

From the Vatican’s perspective, the major achievement was the acceptance by Beijing that the Bishop of Rome, the pope, has the final say in the appointment of bishops in China. Chinese authorities had rejected this authority before as an interference in the internal affairs of the country. For its part Beijing got the Vatican to accept the process of “the democratic election” of candidates to be bishops, something not envisaged in canon law. For Francis, however, that concession was less of a problem, given his knowledge of the history of the involvement of Spanish and Portuguese monarchs in the appointment of bishops in Latin America in past centuries.

Speaking in Milan on the 150th anniversary of the arrival of the first Italian P.I.M.E. (Pontifical Institute of Foreign Missions) missionaries in Henan, China, Cardinal Parolin noted that “misunderstandings” had arisen about the agreement “because extraneous objectives or unrelated events regarding the life of the Catholic Church in China were attributed to the agreement and it was even connected to political issues that have nothing to do with the actual agreement which ‘exclusively concerns the appointment of bishops.’”

He reminded his audience that the agreement is not just “a point of arrival” after decades of negotiation; it is most importantly “a point of departure” for the church in China and Sino-Vatican relations.

[…]

There are many other unresolved questions on which the Vatican will want to reach an agreement with Chinese authorities in due course. Among them, it will want Beijing to eliminate or at least suspend the practice of the convocation of clergy for political indoctrination and making them “disappear” for an unspecified time for this purpose.

One of the most troubling issues for the Vatican and the church in China are the regulations being enforced by the authorities since February 2018 that prevent parents from giving children under the age of 18 any religious instruction or prohibit them from taking children to church or participating in any event linked to religion. America has learned that the Vatican has protested these restrictions and hopes Beijing will return to a mode of greater tolerance.

There are other matters that the Vatican will want to address before approaching the question of diplomatic relations. It cannot overlook the unresolved questions as to the whereabouts of two elderly bishops and whether they are still alive. Another important issue is the need to resolve in a dignified manner the situation of the bishop of Shanghai, Thaddeus Ma Daquin, who was taken away on the day of his episcopal ordination on July 7, 2012 and has been deprived of his freedom and pastoral ministry ever since.

Cardinal Parolin said he is “aware of the existence of various problems regarding the life of the Catholic Church in China” but emphasized “that it is impossible to confront all the issues together.”

Nevertheless, it is to be expected that the Vatican will seek to address some of these issues with Beijing over the coming two years. Before the signing of the provisional agreement, China had refused to address these questions, saying they were matters for subsequent discussion.

Two years later, it should be possible to consider them in the improved climate of understanding and increasingly friendlier relations. Pope Francis hopes that by building trust and friendship through sincere dialogue, relations can improve between Rome and Beijing and new doors can be opened, not only in the religious field but also in relation to such global issues as peace, climate change and human rights. The next two years will reveal how far China is willing to go down this road with the Holy See.

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"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: I'm Starting to Like This Pope

Post by hugodrax » Mon Nov 23, 2020 5:58 pm

This is the online equivalent of keeping bottles of urine around and wearing Kleenex boxes for shoes.
Everything we hear is an opinion, not a fact. Everything we see is a perspective, not the truth
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Re: I'm Starting to Like This Pope

Post by Hovannes » Mon Nov 23, 2020 7:01 pm

Hunter was able to con some big bucks off of the PRC.
Just sayin' :whistling:
DEUS VULT!

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Re: I'm Starting to Like This Pope

Post by wosbald » Tue Nov 24, 2020 1:03 pm

+JMJ+

Subject Header: Economic Magisterium/Integral Ecology/Fratelli Tutti
Intra-Thread Trackbacks: pg 65 / pg 121 / pg 121 / pg 122 / pg 127 / pg 128 / pg 129 / pg 129 / pg 129 / pg 129 / pg 129 / pg 129 / pg 129 / pg 129 / pg 130 / pg 130 / pg 131 / pg 131

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"THE CATHOLIC THREAD: pg 119 / pg 119 / pg 119 / pg 119 / pg 151 / pg 151
"Pro-life Bills/Laws": pg 15
"The Climate Change Thread": pg 14 / pg 14



Pope Francis talks about Uighurs, George Floyd and Universal Basic Income in new interview [In-Depth]
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Pope Francis greets the crowd as he leads the Angelus from the window of his studio overlooking St. Peter's Square at the Vatican Nov. 15, 2020. (CNS photo/Vatican Media)

In a wide-ranging book-length interview, Pope Francis speaks publicly for the first time about the persecution of the Uighurs in China, voices his support for the racial justice protests that followed the killing of George Floyd, speaks against those protesting coronavirus restrictions and calls for a universal basic income.

The book, Let Us Dream, which will be published by Simon & Schuster on Dec. 1, is the product of a series of exchanges between the pope and Austen Ivereigh, his English-language biographer. It is an extended reflection on the change Pope Francis sees as necessary in building a post-Covid world. It is in this context that he addresses several hot-button issues.

Describing how one can only see what the world is really like by looking at the situations of marginalized people, Francis urges thinking of challenges faced by specific people so as not to fall into seeing the world’s problems in the abstract and feeling paralyzed by their size. In this section, he acknowledges the plight of the Uighurs for the first time publicly, saying, “I think often of persecuted peoples: the Rohingya, the poor Uighurs, the Yazidi.” The pope’s previous silence on the Uighurs had been interpreted as not wanting to jeopardize the Holy See’s agreement with China, which focuses mostly on the appointment of bishops.

Pope Francis on Racial Justice

The pope also speaks favorably a number of times about the protests for racial justice that emerged after the police killing of George Floyd in late May. He contrasts them with anti-lockdown protestors who “are victims only in their own imagination: those who claim, for example, that being forced to wear a mask is an unwarranted imposition by the state, yet who forget or do not care about those who cannot rely, for example, on social security or who have lost their jobs.” The pope has drawn criticism for appearing frequently without a mask during the pandemic. Describing people who “live off grievance” and only consider their own problems, he says, “It is the inability to see that we don’t all have the same possibilities available to us.” He continues:
You’ll never find such people protesting the death of George Floyd, or joining a demonstration because there are shantytowns where children lack water or education, or because there are whole families who have lost their income. You won’t find them protesting that the astonishing amounts spent on the arms trade could be used to feed the whole of the human race and school every child. On such matters they would never protest; they are incapable of moving outside of their own little world of interests.
Francis later describes the place of “a healthy indignation” in uniting people for a common cause, without turning such a cause into an ideology—a strict system of beliefs that, in Francis’ view, ends up imposing a uniformity and lack of diversity of opinion and can fall prey to serving a political party or figure rather than the average person advocating for that cause. “To know ourselves as a people is to be aware of something greater that unites us, something that cannot be reduced to a shared legal or physical identity. We saw this in the protests in reaction to the killing of George Floyd, when many people who otherwise did not know each other took to the streets to protest, united by a healthy indignation,” the pope says in “A Time to Act.”

Pope Francis on Universal Basic Income

In the book’s final section, Francis says, “I believe it is time to explore concepts like the universal basic income (UBI), also known as ‘the negative income tax’: an unconditional flat payment to all citizens, which could be dispersed through the tax system.” Francis said it “may be the time to consider a universal basic wage” in April, but a Vatican official said then that the pope had not meant “universal basic income.” America has reached out to Austen Ivereigh and the Vatican for clarification.

The pope outlines several benefits he sees to such unconditional payments, including compensating unpaid caretakers and “informal workers,” allowing people to refuse undignified work and thus reshaping labor relations, removing “the stigma of welfarism” and allowing people to combine work with community service.

[…]

Pope Francis on Self Transformation

Following the “See, judge, act” method popular in Latin American Catholic social teaching, the book is divided into three parts: “A Time to See,” “A Time to Choose” and “A Time to Act.” The pope guides the reader through seeing the injustices that have been exacerbated by the pandemic and the sins they are rooted in. He describes making decisions through the Jesuit tradition of “discernment of spirits,” noticing where God is working and where what St. Ignatius calls the “evil spirit” is working. In “A Time to Act,” he exhorts the reader not to return to normal after the pandemic but to work for personal and structural change.

Unlike Francis’ recent encyclical “Fratelli Tutti,” which diagnosed the problems he sees in society, Let Us Dream deals more with “the process of transformation itself: how historic change happens, how we resist or embrace that process: the dynamic of conversion,” Mr. Ivereigh writes in the epilogue.

[…]

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"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: I'm Starting to Like This Pope

Post by wosbald » Wed Nov 25, 2020 12:36 pm

+JMJ+

Subject Header: China–Vatican Deal
Intra-Thread Trackbacks: pg 78 / pg 78 / pg 79 / pg 79 / pg 88 / pg 89 / pg 89 / pg 118 / pg 118 / pg 119 / pg 124 / pg 124 / pg 124 / pg 125 / pg 126 / pg 126 / pg 126 / pg 127 / pg 128 / pg 128 / pg 128 / pg 128 ] pg 128 / pg 128 / pg 128 / pg 129 / pg 129 / pg 129 / pg 131



China criticizes pope over comment on Uighur Muslim minority
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In this Nov. 22, 2020, file photo, Pope Francis incenses the altar as he celebrates Mass on the occasion of the Christ the King festivity, in St. Peter's Basilica at the Vatican. China criticized Pope Francis on Tuesday over a passage in his new book in which he mentions suffering by China’s Uighur Muslim minority group. (Vincenzo Pinto/Pool Photo via AP)

BEIJING — China criticized Pope Francis on Tuesday over a passage in his new book in which he mentions suffering by China’s Uighur Muslim minority group.

Foreign ministry spokesperson Zhao Lijian said Francis’ remarks had “no factual basis at all.”

“People of all ethnic groups enjoy the full rights of survival, development, and freedom of religious belief,” Zhao said at a daily briefing.

Zhao made no mention of the camps in which more than 1 million Uighurs and members of other Chinese Muslim minority groups have been held. The U.S. and other governments, along with human rights groups, say the prison-like facilities are intended to divide Muslims from their religious and cultural heritage, forcing them to declare loyalty to China’s ruling Communist Party and its leader, Xi Jinping.

China, which initially denied the existence of the facilities, now says they are centers intended to provide job training and prevent terrorism and religious extremism on a voluntary basis.

In his new book Let Us Dream, due Dec. 1, Francis listed the “poor Uighurs” among examples of groups persecuted for their faith.

Francis wrote about the need to see the world from the peripheries and the margins of society, “to places of sin and misery, of exclusion and suffering, of illness and solitude.”

In such places of suffering, “I think often of persecuted peoples: the Rohingya, the poor Uighurs, the Yazidi — what ISIS did to them was truly cruel — or Christians in Egypt and Pakistan killed by bombs that went off while they prayed in church,” Francis wrote.

[…]

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"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: I'm Starting to Like This Pope

Post by wosbald » Fri Nov 27, 2020 6:57 pm

+JMJ+

Pope Francis weighs in on Argentina’s abortion debate [In-Depth]
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Pope Francis sent a hand-written note to a group of women from Argentina, in response to a letter in which they had asked for him to be their voice in favor of the unborn child as the country once again, debates legalizing abortion. (Credit: Twitter/Victoria Morales Gorleri)

ROSARIO, Argentina — Pope Francis got himself involved with the ongoing debate over the decriminalization of abortion in his Argentinian homeland, sending a handwritten letter to a group of women from Buenos Aires’ slums asking, “Is it fair to hire a hitman to resolve a problem?”

The pope’s handwritten letter is a direct response to mothers from some of the largest slums in his former archdiocese. The women sent him the letter last week, asking for him to be their voice in the debate over abortion currently taking place in Argentina.

Last week, President Alberto Fernandez presented a bill to Argentina’s Congress, calling on it to make abortion “legal, safe and free” across the nation.

[…]

In his Nov. 22 letter, Francis argued that the issue of abortion “is not primarily a religious matter but a matter of human ethics, preceding any religious confession.”

“And it’s good for us to ask two questions,” he wrote. “Is it fair to eliminate a human life to resolve a problem? Is it fair to hire a hitman to resolve a problem?”

Though Pope Francis has often spoken against abortion — even asking those two questions — this is the first time he has directly addresses the pro-abortion campaign in his home country.

Francis sent his response through Victoria Morales Gorleri — a member of the Argentine Congress who belongs to Pro, the major opposition party. She was also the intermediary for the women from the “slums of misery,” as shantytowns are called in Argentina.

“We write to your Holiness, with the desire to ask for you to help us express to public opinion that we feel prisoners in a situation where our own family is compromised, as are our teenage daughters and future generations, that grow old with the idea that our life is not wanted and that we don’t have a right to have children because we are poor,” the women wrote on Nov. 18. (Bold and underline in the original.)

“We ask for your help in making our voice heard, surely you will be listened to with more attention that that our politicians give us,” they continued.

“Our voice, like that of unborn children, is never heard … They classified us as a ‘factory of the poor’ or ‘workers of the State’. Our reality as women who overcome life’s challenges with our children is overshadowed by women who claim to represent us without us giving our consent, stifling our true positions on the right to life. They do not want to listen to us, neither the legislators nor the journalists. If we did not have the slum priests who raise their voices for us, we would be even more alone,” the letter added.

Their letter was signed by eight women activists who met in 2018, when the legalization of abortion was being discussed by Argentina’s Senate for the first time in 12 years. Since then, they’ve opened three soup kitchens: “No one asked us to do this; we do it because we know that our contribution is important and because, though we don’t have things to spare, what we have is shared and multiplied.”

In his handwritten response, Francis thanked Morales Gorleri and the women for writing to him.

“They truly are women who know what this life is. Please, tell them from my part that I admire their work and their witness; that I thank them from the heart what they do and to carry on,” the pope wrote.

“The homeland is proud of having women such as these,” he continued.

[…]

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"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: I'm Starting to Like This Pope

Post by wosbald » Sat Nov 28, 2020 11:16 am

+JMJ+

Subject Header: Economic Magisterium/Integral Ecology/Fratelli Tutti
Intra-Thread Trackbacks: pg 65 / pg 121 / pg 121 / pg 122 / pg 127 / pg 128 / pg 129 / pg 129 / pg 129 / pg 129 / pg 129 / pg 129 / pg 129 / pg 129 / pg 130 / pg 130 / pg 131 / pg 131 / pg 131

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"THE CATHOLIC THREAD: pg 119 / pg 119 / pg 119 / pg 119 / pg 151 / pg 151
"Pro-life Bills/Laws": pg 15
"The Climate Change Thread": pg 14 / pg 14




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"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: I'm Starting to Like This Pope

Post by wosbald » Sun Nov 29, 2020 10:57 am

+JMJ+

Subject Header: China–Vatican Deal
Intra-Thread Trackbacks: pg 78 / pg 78 / pg 79 / pg 79 / pg 88 / pg 89 / pg 89 / pg 118 / pg 118 / pg 119 / pg 124 / pg 124 / pg 124 / pg 125 / pg 126 / pg 126 / pg 126 / pg 127 / pg 128 / pg 128 / pg 128 / pg 128 ] pg 128 / pg 128 / pg 128 / pg 129 / pg 129 / pg 129 / pg 131 / pg 131



Vatican, China courtship a classic case of one-step forward, one-step back [In-Depth]
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In this April 18, 2018 file photo, Pope Francis meets a group of faithful from China at the end of his weekly general audience in St. Peter's Square, at the Vatican. (Credit: Gregorio Borgia/AP)

ROME — One month after the Vatican and China extended a provisional agreement on the appointment of bishops, two recent episodes have illustrated the complicated back-and-forth relationship between the two in terms of attempts to strengthen ties.

On Nov. 23, Monsignor Thomas Chen Tianhao, 58 and widely regarded as a government loyalist, was ordained as the new bishop of Qingdao, in Shandong, making him the first bishop to be ordained according to the terms of the Vatican-China deal.

A day later, a spokesman for China’s Foreign Ministry criticized Pope Francis for a comment he made in a new book in which he mention’s China’s Uighur Muslim population while naming minorities suffering persecution across the globe.

[…]

In a Nov. 24 statement, Vatican spokesman Matteo Bruni spoke of Chen’s ordination, saying he is “the third bishop nominated and ordained” according to the framework of the deal, and that in the future ordinations “are certainly foreseen” because “various processes for new episcopal appointments are underway.”

However, observers have argued that the two bishops ordained prior to Chen were selected before the provisional agreement was made, meaning they were not selected according to the terms of the agreement and thus could not be a litmus test for the deal’s success.

Tianhao’s appointment and ordination, then, is widely seen as the first real case in which the effectiveness of the agreement can be evaluated.

There is concern among some Chinese Catholics over Chen’s close ties to the government-backed Chinese Catholic Patriotic Association, as he previously served as president of the body’s Qingdao office and since 2010 has been a member of the Standing Committee of the National Patriotic Association.

Born in Pingdu, Shandong, in 1962, Chen studied at the province’s Holy Spirit Seminary and was ordained a priest in 1989. He was appointed bishop of Qingdao in November 2019, almost a year before his installation Monday.

Should other bishops continue to be appointed in China, which for years has seen an increasing number of vacant dioceses whose bishops have died without being replaced, it could restore faith in the deal and rekindle hope in the pope’s longstanding desire to unite Catholics in China, who for years have been divided into a “underground” church loyal to Rome, and an official church registered with the government.

However, human rights abuses and religious freedom would likely still be a major concern among critics.

Pope Francis thus far has been hesitant to say anything against China in terms of its treatment of religious minorities, including Catholics, as well as its attempts to clamp down on democracy in Hong Kong, which made his mention of the Uighurs in his new book so notable.

Many observers believe the pope has chosen to stay silent so as not to jeopardize the agreement on bishops, yet his comment about Uighurs could indicate a new boldness now that the deal has already been renewed for another two years.

Regardless, if these episodes show anything, it’s that while it appears that progress is being made, there still are wrinkles to iron out, and for the near future, at least, it’s likely that the Vatican and China’s one-step forward, one-step back relationship is bound to continue.

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"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: I'm Starting to Like This Pope

Post by wosbald » Mon Nov 30, 2020 8:58 am

+JMJ+

Subject Header: Viganò/QAnon/Deep State/Deep Church
Intra-thread Trackbacks: pg 63 / pg 64 / pg 65 / pg 65 / pg 66 / pg 66 / pg 73 / pg 84 / pg 120 / pg 123 / pg 124 / pg 124 / pg 124 / pg 125 / pg 125 / pg 125 / pg 125 / pg 126 / pg 126 / pg 126 / pg 126 / pg 126 / pg 126 / pg 125 / pg 126 / pg 127 / pg 127 / pg 128 / pg 128 / pg 131 / pg 131 / pg 131

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Response to Raymond Arroyo
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Thursday night, at the conclusion of The World Over, Raymond Arroyo responded to the piece I published Wednesday about his interview last week with the former US papal nuncio, Archbishop Carlo Maria Viganò. His response is below (starting at 55:20):


I want to be as transparent as possible in my response.

Arroyo’s first claim is that I accused him of asking questions around a “pre-taped recording” of Archbishop Viganò’s voice.

It is true that on the morning of November 15, I put forth the theory that Arroyo was speaking to a recording on Twitter. However, as I make clear in my piece (which was published November 18), he responded to me on the evening of November 15 that it was not a recording. I accepted his statement at face value, and it was not part of my conclusion.

What he did not address directly was the question of whether the questions and responses in the interview (with the exception of the one I discuss in the piece) were pre-scripted. Remember, this was not my theory. This was the assertion of Robert Moynihan, who wrote in his Inside the Vatican Letter #37:
The interview was prepared in advanced, [sic] in writing.
He also writes:
Note: The entire text originally prepared for this Arroyo-Viganò interview is below in its entirety; the broadcast interview does not have the complete prepared text, because some prepared sections were omitted from the broadcast interview.
In another section, Moynihan asserts,
Special Note: The following question and answer were not in the prepared interview. So this is the sole question and answer which were completely extemporaneous
Following that question and answer, Moynihan writes:
Note: Here, in the following question, Arroyo returns to the prepared text of the interview.
Arroyo, by focusing on the claim that he was speaking to a recording, did not adequately address what Robert Moynihan claims: that the interview was pre-scripted, with the questions and answers agreed to in advance (with the exception of one extemporaneous exchange, which was also noted in my piece). He also did not address whether some of Viganò’s more controversial statements (including the deep church/deep state line) were edited out by EWTN.

As I mentioned in my piece, in the process of my investigation I reached out to EWTN Communications and Inside the Vatican by email. I identified myself and Where Peter Is, and asked specific questions, but I received no response. I also asked Arroyo several questions on Twitter. The only response I received was the one I mentioned above. By avoiding my more substantive conclusions in his response, Arroyo certainly raises suspicions that I was on the right track. In my post, I provided a link or screenshot for each piece of information I used in my report. This was so that others can verify for themselves that my reporting was accurate. I have nothing to hide.

My article showed that the questions were clearly pre-agreed, and Viganò wrote out his answers, which were sent beforehand to LifeSite and other outlets. The point of making all this clear is to show that Viganò did not submit himself to a genuine journalistic inquiry, and that Arroyo and EWTN accommodated his demands, while presenting an edited version of the exchange as a real interview. In other words, this was not journalism.

While facts may emerge that prove my conclusions wrong, such facts were not provided by Raymond Arroyo. Regarding his claims about my personal integrity and commitment to the truth, I will let my writing speak for itself.

[…]

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"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: I'm Starting to Like This Pope

Post by wosbald » Tue Dec 01, 2020 9:39 am

+JMJ+

Polish academics warn against ‘slandering’ John Paul II after McCarrick report [In-Depth]
Image
Pope John Paul II embraces Cardinal Theodore E. McCarrick of Washington after placing the red biretta on the new cardinal during consistory ceremony in St. Peter's Square at the Vatican Feb. 21, 2001. (Credit: Arturo Mari/L'Osservatore Romano via CNS)

KRAKÓW, Poland — Nearly 1500 academics in Poland have written an appeal against “slandering and rejecting John Paul II” after the publication of the McCarrick report by the Vatican on November 10.

The report documented the rise of disgraced former Cardinal Theodore McCarrick, who was laicized by Pope Francis in 2019 after he was credibly accused of abusing minors, after rumors had for decades swirled around both the United States and the Vatican about his sexual misconduct with seminarians.

John Paul played a significant role in McCarrick’s rise, appointing him Bishop of Metuchen, Archbishop of Newark, and Archbishop of Washington before creating him a cardinal in 2001.

“We appeal to all people of goodwill for reflection. John Paul II, as every other person, deserves to be discussed with honesty,” said the letter by the group of academics. “By slandering and rejecting John Paul II we not only do harm to himself, but also to ourselves.”

Among the signatories were Krzysztof Zanussi, and award-winning director and teacher to a generation of filmmakers; Adam Daniel Rotfeld, former Minister of Foreign Affairs; and Hanna Suchocka, who served as Polish ambassador to the Holy See from 2001-2013.

“Unsupported attacks on the memory of John Paul II are motivated by a preconceived thesis, which we view with sadness and deep disturbance,” the appeal reads.

Suchocka told Polish Press Agency that “John Paul II appointed McCarrick. This is undeniable,” but “to state that he knew about McCarrick’s actions and even with that knowledge appointed him is not true and is not the finding of the report.”

“John Paul II was resolving problems unequivocally and in accordance to his knowledge. He never avoided action or covered up,” added.

While the McCarrick report clearly showed John Paul obtained a letter from Cardinal John O’Connor of New York, warning about “sound reasons for believing that rumors and allegations about the past might surface (…) with the possibility of accompanying grave scandal and widespread adverse publicity”, the report states the John Paul didn’t ignore the case, but asked his most trusted advisors for an investigation into the matter. The report also shows there was no direct accusation from a victim until 2017, when a canonical investigation was started.

[…]

Stephen White, the Executive Director of The Catholic Project at Catholic University of America says that calls for de-canonizing John Paul II or suppressing his cult “are not serious proposals and they come mostly from people or groups with an ideological axe to grind.”

Although some groups now say John Paul II was made a saint too quickly — he was beatified in 2011, just six years after his death, and canonized less than three years later — White disagrees.

“The question then is: Too quickly for what? It makes at least as much sense to suppose that he was canonized ‘just in time’ — that what the Church needs now is an example of a saint who was both manifestly holy and manifestly imperfect.”

The Catholic Project has been looking into different aspects of the clerical abuse crisis, recently launching an in-depth podcast on the issue called “Crisis.”

“It is crucial to remember that most of the events in the McCarrick Report — at least those pertaining to his promotion and elevation to the college of cardinals — happened 20-30 years ago,” White said, noting it offers a glimpse into the workings of a Church before the American abuse crisis exploded in 2002. This led to the landmark Dallas Charter on child protection the same year. Most recently, Pope Francis promulgated Vos Estis Lux Mundi, the 2019 Vatican law on combatting clerical abuse.

“Many of the structural reforms that would have helped prevent McCarrick’s rise have already been put into place. More importantly, there has been a cultural shift within the Church,” White told Crux.

[…]

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"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: I'm Starting to Like This Pope

Post by wosbald » Fri Dec 04, 2020 12:04 pm

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Subject Header: Economic Magisterium/Integral Ecology/Fratelli Tutti
Intra-Thread Trackbacks: pg 65 / pg 121 / pg 121 / pg 122 / pg 127 / pg 128 / pg 129 / pg 129 / pg 129 / pg 129 / pg 129 / pg 129 / pg 129 / pg 129 / pg 130 / pg 130 / pg 131 / pg 131 / pg 131 / pg 131

Inter-Thread Trackbacks:
"THE CATHOLIC THREAD: pg 119 / pg 119 / pg 119 / pg 119 / pg 151 / pg 151
"Pro-life Bills/Laws": pg 15
"The Climate Change Thread": pg 14 / pg 14
"THE CHRISTIAN THREAD": pg 8



Is Fratelli Tutti a “leftist” encyclical? [In-Depth, Opinion]
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Workhouse in Victorian London, ca. 1900. (Public domain)

Pope Francis is often accused by his critics of being a leftist, a Marxist, a Communist, a liberal. Not surprisingly, many have argued that Fratelli Tutti is a “leftist” document, inspired by the ideas of Freemasonry, Liberation Theology, and socialism.

These accusations are quite ironic. I am not aware of any other encyclical by any pope that offers an explicit critique of a “leftist” approach (using that precise term, anyway). In Fratelli Tutti, Francis calls out such ideologies when he writes:
Love of neighbour is concrete and squanders none of the resources needed to bring about historical change that can benefit the poor and disadvantaged. At times, however, leftist ideologies or social doctrines linked to individualistic ways of acting and ineffective procedures affect only a few, while the majority of those left behind remain dependent on the goodwill of others (FT 165).
It is certainly true that the message of Fratelli Tutti focuses primarily on social issues that are usually associated with the political left, including immigration, the death penalty, war, and poverty. It is also true that this encyclical condemns, in no uncertain terms, many ideologies typically associated with the political right, such as nationalism, populism, globalism, and unbridled capitalism.

It is shallow and short-sighted, however, to jump from this to the conclusion that Fratelli Tutti adheres to a contemporary left-wing political ideology. For one thing, no ideology devised by humans will ever be in perfect alignment with Catholic social doctrine. For this reason alone, no social encyclical will ever perfectly mirror any political ideology.

To assert that Fratelli Tutti promotes a leftist ideology is a serious disservice to the Holy Father’s thought, since he has continuously worked to de-ideologize our faith. Additionally, this assertion is contrary to Fratelli Tutti itself, since the encyclical teaches that “no one solution, no single acceptable methodology, no economic recipe can be applied indiscriminately to all” (FT 167).

A primary purpose of any social encyclical is to correct the errors and excesses present in the ideologies of its day. Even when Francis denounces the dangers of nationalistic and capitalistic movements, he also warns us against ideological and extreme reactions from the opposing side.

Interestingly, according to the Holy Father, the dangers of such reactions differ from the concerns usually raised by right-wing pundits. While they tend to focus on the threat of a potential loss of freedom, Francis is much more concerned with the possibility of a potential loss of humanity.

A frequently-used argument in right-wing circles is, “you cannot legislate charity.” Their argument is that by redistributing wealth, the state not only infringes on the right to private property, but also prevents people from being charitable by choice. They suggest that government policies that redistribute wealth deprive people of the opportunity to exercise virtue and achieve sanctification through private charitable giving.

In Fratelli Tutti, Francis refutes this argument on two fronts. First, he expounds on the traditional principle that the right to private property is not an absolute right (FT 120). Catholic doctrine does not exclude the properly-ordered redistribution of wealth by the state. This is taught in the Compendium of the Social Doctrine of the Church:
Looking after the common good means making use of the new opportunities for the redistribution of wealth among the different areas of the planet, to the benefit of the underprivileged that until now have been excluded or cast to the sidelines of social and economic progress (363; see also paragraphs 130, 303, 353, 355 in the Compendium).
[…]

Francis stresses that the exercise of political charity must always be rightly-ordered. Welfare systems, while necessary, cannot be ends unto themselves. They must be centered on the person they are created to serve. When a person becomes a mere line-item in an Excel spreadsheet, we make the same mistake as a disordered market that turns people into the cogs of a corporate machine. Man does not live by bread alone (Mt 4:4). A person’s dignity is as important to their welfare as their material well-being. Someone’s face is as much a part of them as is their stomach. Someone’s life is infinitely more than the sum of his or her needs.

If we have been paying attention, we know that the Holy Father has consistently been warning us about this problem, which he calls “assistentialism.” He first mentioned this in a 2017 speech:
A participatory society can not settle for the objective of pure solidarity and assistentialism, since a society that was characterised only by solidarity and assistance, without being fraternal, would be a society of unhappy and desperate people from whom everybody would try to flee, in extreme cases even by suicide.

A society in which the true fraternity dissolves is not capable of having a future; a society in which only “giving in order to have” or the “giving out of duty” exist, is not capable of progressing. That is why neither the liberal-individualist vision of the world, in which everything (or almost) is an exchange, nor the state-centric vision of society, in which everything (or almost) is a duty, are safe guides for overcoming inequality, inequity and exclusion that now overwhelm our societies. It is a search for a way out of the suffocating alternative between the neoliberal thesis and that neo-state-centric thesis. Indeed, precisely because market activity and the manipulation of nature — both driven by egoism, greed, materialism and unfair competition — at times know no limits, it is urgent to act on the causes of such malfunctions, especially in the financial field, rather than just correcting the effects.
[…]

Those who accuse Francis and Fratelli Tutti of embracing a leftist ideology have overlooked or ignored all of these warnings and nuances in the document. Their political tribalism — their “us vs. them” mentality — has directed their focus to Francis’s critiques of their pet ideologies. It is difficult to believe that they have done anything other than read the document through the lens of their ideological opposition to him. Because his views do not align with those of their political camp, they have reflexively and irresponsibly categorized him as a “leftist.”

It is imperative — obligatory, even — that Catholics read and understand the magisterial teachings of the pope without political biases or a spirit of polarization. The overbearing influence of ideological views has hindered many Catholics from grasping the richness of Francis’s doctrinal wisdom. We should all be open to correction of any ideological excesses — or even idolatries — in our social projects, no matter how well-intentioned they may be. We have already seen the harm caused by the vicious cycle of conservatives and liberals reinforcing each other’s distorted understanding of this papacy. If we really want to help the poor and the marginalized, the sound principles delineated in Fratelli Tutti should serve as a guide to creating programs rooted in subsidiarity, solidarity, fraternity, and charity.

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"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: I'm Starting to Like This Pope

Post by wosbald » Sun Dec 06, 2020 9:04 am

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Zairean rite offers example for developing an Amazonian rite, pope says
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Pope Francis delivers his blessing as he leads his general audience in the library of the Apostolic Palace at the Vatican Nov. 18, 2020. (Credit: CNS photo/Vatican Media)

ROME — The approval decades ago of a Zairean rite of the Roman Missal demonstrated that it is possible also to develop a rite for the Amazon region, Pope Francis said in a preface to a new book.

The Zairean rite, which is an example of liturgical inculturation, “suggests a promising way also for the eventual elaboration of an Amazonian rite, in that the cultural needs of a specific area of the African context are acknowledged without distorting the nature of the Roman Missal as a guarantee of continuity with the ancient and universal tradition of the church,” the pope wrote.

The pope’s remarks appear in the preface of a new book, Pope Francis and the Roman Missal for the Dioceses of Zaire: A Promising Rite for Other Cultures. The book, currently only in Italian, was being released Dec. 9 by the Vatican publishing house. The Italian Catholic newspaper, Avvenire, published the pope’s text Dec. 1.

Edited by Congolese Sister Rita Mboshu Kongo, a theologian and member of the Daughters of Mary Most Holy, the book is meant to help readers learn more about the different aspects of the Zairean rite, which incorporates elements of Congolese culture and reflects the needs of Catholics in the sub-Saharan African nation, formerly Zaire, now Congo.

The missal received formal approval from the Vatican in 1988 after a long process of inculturation encouraged by the country’s bishops, St. Paul VI and St. John Paul II. Work on the rite had begun in 1961 and the Second Vatican Council’s Constitution on the Sacred Liturgy, adopted in 1963, called for liturgical adaptation.

“It is so far the only inculturated rite of the Latin church issued after the Second Vatican Council,” the pope wrote in the book’s preface.

[…]

The liturgy features the use of drums, ululations and dance, and has slight changes in order from the Roman rite.

The pope wrote that the celebration “resonates” a culture and spirituality animated by religious song following African rhythm and it represents “true progress in the rooting of the Christian message in the Congolese soul.”

It is a “joyous” celebration, which means it is “a true place of encounter with Jesus,” he said, because “with Christ joy is constantly born anew.”

“The liturgy must touch the heart of the members of the local church,” in a way that “strikes a chord” or is suggestive or appealing.

“Christianity does not have simply one cultural expression, but rather, remaining completely true to itself, with unswerving fidelity to the proclamation of the Gospel and the tradition of the church, it will also reflect the different faces of the cultures and peoples in which it is received and takes root,” he wrote.

“It is clear that each people, after having the personal experience of the transformative encounter with Christ, seeks to invoke God, who is revealed through Jesus Christ with his words, with their religious, poetic, metaphoric, symbolic and narrative language and style,” he wrote. “The encounter with Christ brings the grace that transforms human experience in all its dimensions,” he added.

“This is the process the Congolese bishops followed in their desire to pray to God, not with words borrowed from others, but with the transformation of their own socio-cultural elements,” he said.

“That is why the Zairean rite represents a promising example and path for the development of an Amazonian-rite liturgy,” he said. Several working groups at the Synod of Bishops for the Amazon in 2019 supported the creation of an “Amazonian Rite,” which would incorporate symbols and gestures familiar to indigenous people while maintaining the essential elements of the Eucharist.

In the book preface, Pope Francis said his postsynodal apostolic exhortation, Querida Amazonia, stated explicitly that “we can take up into the liturgy many elements proper to the experience of indigenous peoples in their contact with nature, and respect native forms of expression in song, dance, rituals, gestures and symbols. The Second Vatican Council called for this effort to inculturate the liturgy among indigenous peoples; over 50 years have passed and we still have far to go along these lines.”

He said he hoped the new book “may help walking in this direction.”

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"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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