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The gearhead thread.

Posted: Sun Nov 17, 2013 11:58 pm
by Thunktank
This thread is for motorized vehicle enthusiasts, wannabes and minivan drivers who need help. Just don't ask for advise about contraceptives here, ok?. So if you drive, fly, float or ride things with motors, this is your thread to talk about it.

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I worked today (Sunday). Tomorrow begins my "weekend." My truck (2004 Ford F150 fx4) will go on jack stands and it's transformation begins. I ordered the lions share of parts from Rockauto which is a good on line business for this sort of thing. Prices are good and no sales tax for me. Things were shipped quickly and arrived on time.

Over the next two days I'll be installing ceramic brakes, performance rotors, a Rancho quicklift leveling kit for the front shocks which should add about 2 inches up front and reduce the factory rake and Rancho 9000s for the rear which are adjustable shocks. I'm kind of curious as to how well they will actually work. I will also be installing lower control arms and replacing the break fluid. More work to do in a week or two. . .

Posted: Mon Nov 18, 2013 12:19 am
by Hovannes
I washed the windows and added air to the tires on the family VW at the Valero this evening. :wink:

Posted: Mon Nov 18, 2013 12:39 am
by Thunktank
Hovannes wrote:I washed the windows and added air to the tires on the family VW at the Valero this evening. :wink:
Let me guess. The water heater spewed dirty water all over your windshield as it flooded your garage. You then had to air down in order to get enough traction to drive out against the current? :lol:

Re: The gearhead thread.

Posted: Mon Nov 18, 2013 3:35 am
by michigander
Thunktank wrote:This thread is for motorized vehicle enthusiasts, wannabes and minivan drivers who need help. Just don't ask for advise about contraceptives here, ok?. So if you drive, fly, float or ride things with motors, this is your thread to talk about it.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

I worked today (Sunday). Tomorrow begins my "weekend." My truck (2004 Ford F150 fx4) will go on jack stands and it's transformation begins. I ordered the lions share of parts from Rockauto which is a good on line business for this sort of thing. Prices are good and no sales tax for me. Things were shipped quickly and arrived on time.

Over the next two days I'll be installing ceramic brakes, performance rotors, a Rancho quicklift leveling kit for the front shocks which should add about 2 inches up front and reduce the factory rake and Rancho 9000s for the rear which are adjustable shocks. I'm kind of curious as to how well they will actually work. I will also be installing lower control arms and replacing the break fluid. More work to do in a week or two. . .
How about some before/after pictures :D

Posted: Mon Nov 18, 2013 11:43 am
by FredS
I have a dead 99 Ranger in the driveway. All signs point to a head gasket or cracked head and I don't feel like trying to fix it so it will soon go to the salvage yard. In the meantime, daughter #2 (21 years old) is scavenging parts for her 2002 Exploder. She's swapped out the radio - mine was better, but required some dash modifications to properly fit her truck, and troubleshooting a couple of different wires. Next up is swapping out the cruise control pod because her's is broken. She's also built a big box full of speakers and an amp in the back. She's painting some of the interior plastic trim red (the truck is silver/charcoal) - I don't like it, but hey, it's her deal. I'm sure my dad felt the same way when I came home one day with a 'glasspack' muffler on my 6 cylinder Mustang - sounded like crap, but hey it was my deal.

It's cool to have a kid who likes mechanical stuff and is actually good enough at it that she can do most work herself. It makes me proud. Unfortunately, we share the same shop and tools but we have different ideas about tidiness and tool organization. Anyone who's ever had a mechanically inclined child can understand this Corb Lund song.

Posted: Mon Nov 18, 2013 12:26 pm
by tuttle
My dad is a mechanic and knows everything about anything. I wish I knew more about how to fix cars but I never was interested when I was younger. I definitely had the opportunity, I just never cashed in. I know just enough to pass the man test if ever the topic comes up. But after 15 minutes (or 15 seconds depending on the company) I'm lost in the woods and usually nod my head knowingly until the topic changes.

So now I just take everything to dad. :lol:

Re: The gearhead thread.

Posted: Mon Nov 18, 2013 1:52 pm
by Thunktank
michigander wrote: How about some before/after pictures :D
You betcha! The after pictures may take a while to get posted. I can see this as being a looooong road. In a good way of course (just don't ask my wife if it's a "good way"). :lol:

Already I found more tinkering to do like painting my brake calipers. I'll do that once the must do maintenance is done. New rims and tires will wait a couple of months, then there's the LED light bar for off road use and the automatic electronically controlled side steps that "need" to be installed. . .

I really wish Ford would have put an e locker in the fx4 back in 2004. I have to rectify that oversight too. :wink:

Posted: Mon Nov 18, 2013 1:55 pm
by Thunktank
FredS wrote:I have a dead 99 Ranger in the driveway. All signs point to a head gasket or cracked head and I don't feel like trying to fix it so it will soon go to the salvage yard. In the meantime, daughter #2 (21 years old) is scavenging parts for her 2002 Exploder. She's swapped out the radio - mine was better, but required some dash modifications to properly fit her truck, and troubleshooting a couple of different wires. Next up is swapping out the cruise control pod because her's is broken. She's also built a big box full of speakers and an amp in the back. She's painting some of the interior plastic trim red (the truck is silver/charcoal) - I don't like it, but hey, it's her deal. I'm sure my dad felt the same way when I came home one day with a 'glasspack' muffler on my 6 cylinder Mustang - sounded like crap, but hey it was my deal.

It's cool to have a kid who likes mechanical stuff and is actually good enough at it that she can do most work herself. It makes me proud. Unfortunately, we share the same shop and tools but we have different ideas about tidiness and tool organization. Anyone who's ever had a mechanically inclined child can understand this Corb Lund song.
It's even cooler that she's a girl doing this stuff. Now watch her find a guy to marry who doesn't know what a torque wrench is.

Posted: Mon Nov 18, 2013 2:36 pm
by FredS
Thunktank wrote:
FredS wrote:I have a dead 99 Ranger in the driveway. All signs point to a head gasket or cracked head and I don't feel like trying to fix it so it will soon go to the salvage yard. In the meantime, daughter #2 (21 years old) is scavenging parts for her 2002 Exploder. She's swapped out the radio - mine was better, but required some dash modifications to properly fit her truck, and troubleshooting a couple of different wires. Next up is swapping out the cruise control pod because her's is broken. She's also built a big box full of speakers and an amp in the back. She's painting some of the interior plastic trim red (the truck is silver/charcoal) - I don't like it, but hey, it's her deal. I'm sure my dad felt the same way when I came home one day with a 'glasspack' muffler on my 6 cylinder Mustang - sounded like crap, but hey it was my deal.

It's cool to have a kid who likes mechanical stuff and is actually good enough at it that she can do most work herself. It makes me proud. Unfortunately, we share the same shop and tools but we have different ideas about tidiness and tool organization. Anyone who's ever had a mechanically inclined child can understand this Corb Lund song.
It's even cooler that she's a girl doing this stuff. Now watch her find a guy to marry who doesn't know what a torque wrench is.
Alas, she self-labels herself a lesbian. Mrs FredS and I hope that because she's mechanical, outdoorsy, athletic, and mildly aspergerly she see's herself as 'different' than other girls and thinks that means she must be gay. She may be. Or she may be confused about it all. She's the only girl in a class of guys studying HVAC at the local college (she's top of her class) and has a 'friend' with a cool Dodge truck (her words) who works at an auto parts store. She and he often eat lunch together and they went out to a bar last night to watch the Chiefs/Broncos fb game. So there's that.

All of her friends call her to fix their stuff. One day a friend who owns a landscaping business (that's code for 'mows lawns') drug a busted trailer over here so she could beat it into submission with a sledge hammer and weld it back together. The same friend called her a few days later to bring a floor jack and fix a flat on the side of the highway.

Last month, daughter #1 and her awesome but unhandy husband contracted her to build a small stage in their daughters bedroom. She built it based on a photo from a magazine.

Like her old man, she's more comfortable with machines than with people.

Posted: Mon Nov 18, 2013 4:40 pm
by Thunktank
FredS wrote:
Thunktank wrote:
FredS wrote:I have a dead 99 Ranger in the driveway. All signs point to a head gasket or cracked head and I don't feel like trying to fix it so it will soon go to the salvage yard. In the meantime, daughter #2 (21 years old) is scavenging parts for her 2002 Exploder. She's swapped out the radio - mine was better, but required some dash modifications to properly fit her truck, and troubleshooting a couple of different wires. Next up is swapping out the cruise control pod because her's is broken. She's also built a big box full of speakers and an amp in the back. She's painting some of the interior plastic trim red (the truck is silver/charcoal) - I don't like it, but hey, it's her deal. I'm sure my dad felt the same way when I came home one day with a 'glasspack' muffler on my 6 cylinder Mustang - sounded like crap, but hey it was my deal.

It's cool to have a kid who likes mechanical stuff and is actually good enough at it that she can do most work herself. It makes me proud. Unfortunately, we share the same shop and tools but we have different ideas about tidiness and tool organization. Anyone who's ever had a mechanically inclined child can understand this Corb Lund song.
It's even cooler that she's a girl doing this stuff. Now watch her find a guy to marry who doesn't know what a torque wrench is.
Alas, she self-labels herself a lesbian. Mrs FredS and I hope that because she's mechanical, outdoorsy, athletic, and mildly aspergerly she see's herself as 'different' than other girls and thinks that means she must be gay. She may be. Or she may be confused about it all. She's the only girl in a class of guys studying HVAC at the local college (she's top of her class) and has a 'friend' with a cool Dodge truck (her words) who works at an auto parts store. She and he often eat lunch together and they went out to a bar last night to watch the Chiefs/Broncos fb game. So there's that.

All of her friends call her to fix their stuff. One day a friend who owns a landscaping business (that's code for 'mows lawns') drug a busted trailer over here so she could beat it into submission with a sledge hammer and weld it back together. The same friend called her a few days later to bring a floor jack and fix a flat on the side of the highway.

Last month, daughter #1 and her awesome but unhandy husband contracted her to build a small stage in their daughters bedroom. She built it based on a photo from a magazine.

Like her old man, she's more comfortable with machines than with people.
Whether or not she has lesbian inclinations or not I don't know. But I do know that her inclination for tools has nothing whatsoever to do with it. I think her local society might be confusing her if that's the case.

My mother isn't a lesbian but she drives backhoes, big Johndeere tractors, Bobcats and plows with the guys. She shoots and hunts and uses my dad's table saw, wood planer, drill press. . . she knows how to be butch but doesn't know how to be lesbian. Tell your daughter about my mother. But if she is in fact geared toward lesbianism we're gonna love her anyway and support her love for tools. :D

Re: The gearhead thread.

Posted: Mon Nov 18, 2013 5:49 pm
by Roadmaster
Thunktank wrote:This thread is for motorized vehicle enthusiasts, wannabes and minivan drivers who need help. Just don't ask for advise about contraceptives here, ok?. So if you drive, fly, float or ride things with motors, this is your thread to talk about it.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

I worked today (Sunday). Tomorrow begins my "weekend." My truck (2004 Ford F150 fx4) will go on jack stands and it's transformation begins. I ordered the lions share of parts from Rockauto which is a good on line business for this sort of thing. Prices are good and no sales tax for me. Things were shipped quickly and arrived on time.

Over the next two days I'll be installing ceramic brakes, performance rotors, a Rancho quicklift leveling kit for the front shocks which should add about 2 inches up front and reduce the factory rake and Rancho 9000s for the rear which are adjustable shocks. I'm kind of curious as to how well they will actually work. I will also be installing lower control arms and replacing the break fluid. More work to do in a week or two. . .
If you lift the body you may want to check the pinion angles to avoid eating ujoints and to reduce viberation but you probably already know this.

Posted: Mon Nov 18, 2013 7:45 pm
by jruegg
I don't care what detractors say, I want a Ford Mustang.

Posted: Mon Nov 18, 2013 8:30 pm
by Jonno
I just put a K&N air filter into my Dodge Charger this evening. I think that counts for something.

Posted: Mon Nov 18, 2013 9:00 pm
by JimVH
I grew up in a car family surrounded by very capable car guys. I always dreamed of building street rods and having cool cars. Then, during the 'poor' years with my bride, I drove a variety of crappy cars. I learned to work on them because I had to in order to make a living. After years of making repairs in parking lots, carrying parts and antifreeze all the time, and losing sleep for all-night car repairs, my desire to be a car guy faded.

I still desire cool cars, but I could give two poots about ever working on one again. Lord willing, I will always drive something under warranty.

Posted: Mon Nov 18, 2013 9:06 pm
by Roadmaster
JimVH wrote:Lord willing, I will always drive something under warranty.
Smart!

Working on cars for fun is an illness.

Posted: Mon Nov 18, 2013 9:11 pm
by JimVH
Roadmaster wrote:
JimVH wrote:Lord willing, I will always drive something under warranty.
Smart!

Working on cars for fun is an illness.
A big part of me wishes I had the illness, but then I wake up :)

Posted: Mon Nov 18, 2013 10:50 pm
by Hovannes
I have a Ford Model T frame, axles and motor/tranny waiting for the day I can rebuild it with my son. I do hope I'll live long enough!

Posted: Tue Nov 19, 2013 9:09 am
by FredS
Roadmaster wrote:
JimVH wrote:I grew up in a car family surrounded by very capable car guys. I always dreamed of building street rods and having cool cars. Then, during the 'poor' years with my bride, I drove a variety of crappy cars. I learned to work on them because I had to in order to make a living. After years of making repairs in parking lots, carrying parts and antifreeze all the time, and losing sleep for all-night car repairs, my desire to be a car guy faded.

I still desire cool cars, but I could give two poots about ever working on one again. Lord willing, I will always drive something under warranty.
Smart!

Working on cars for fun is an illness.
Jim wasn't working on cars for fun, he was working on them for survival. Mrs FredS and I drove junkers in our lean years too and I grew to hate emergency roadside repairs and working late in to Sunday night to fix at least one car so we could carpool to work the next day. But once we had the money to afford a couple of reliable daily drivers I started tinkering for fun. There's a huge difference in my mindset between having to work on a car and just doing it for fun. When it's a hobby, you don't have to work all night if you don't want to. You don't have to pack 150 lbs worth of tools before leaving on a trip over an hour long. You don't have to dig a tunnel through the snow to change a starter when it's freezing outside.

Today's newlywed whippersnappers have it easier than we did. Driving a 10-15 year old car in 2013 is a whole different thing than driving a 10-15 year old car in 1983. There are 3 cars in the S fleet with more than 100k on the clock - 2 of them are over 150k. That's no big deal for a car made in 2000, but it was a huge deal for a car made in 1970.

Posted: Tue Nov 19, 2013 10:53 am
by Thunktank
My truck has crossed a few rivers and has been through a couple of mud holes. My truck has BADLY frozen rotors. This requires creativity. 8O

Lord have mercy.

Posted: Tue Nov 19, 2013 11:05 am
by FredS
BFH