An interesting short film about photography

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An interesting short film about photography

Post by Hovannes » Sat Feb 10, 2018 10:50 am

Digital photographers have near unlimited resources for making pictures. OK the battery dies---just charge it up and you're gtg again.
With film it's not so easy. What if you only have one shot , one frame left?
Format by format, factory film is disappearing, The factories that make the stuff are facing declining markets and ultimately extinction.
Here's a short film that asks the question, if you only have one frame left, what would you shoot?
https://www.nowness.com/story/one-last- ... -windfeldt
Last edited by Hovannes on Sat Feb 10, 2018 10:31 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: An interseting short film about photography

Post by durangopipe » Sat Feb 10, 2018 12:11 pm

Lovely video.

In every age, some photographers “look back,” and lament the loss of the difficulty photographic processes previously presented.

And they confuse “difficulty” with intentionality. With worth.

When I was in art school a zillion years ago, many “art” photographers rediscovered gum bichromate prints, and because printing on ready made photographic paper from sheet film negatives (both manufactured by a corporate conglomerate) exposed in view cameras were too easy, they embraced the antique process as “more arty.”

Besides, gum bichromate prints looked like watercolors and everyone knows that water colors are art and many weren’t so sure about photographic prints. Too much technology. Not enough “art.”

Now we have digital cameras and software, so “artists” are rediscovering film.

The fact of the matter is that photography has always been and will always be a technical medium. What makes it art, when it is art, is not how easy or difficult it is to make an image, but how well the photographer sees and how well he or she is able to render their vision.

Choose film over digital media if the medium liberates your vision. Choose film over digital media if you love the “feel” of the implements and the process. Choose film over digital media if those tools give you the look you desire in the completed image.

But never use the choice of the tool as the defining characteristic of aesthetic value.

If I had one more frame to expose for the rest of my life, I would photograph my wife in black and white, one more time, the moment she opens her eyes and smiles for the first time in the morning.

But I have so many more frames.

So I will forgive myself for making both silly and serious images. Some, simple records of her ways of moving in goofiness and glory through life. A thousand times.

Image
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Re: An interseting short film about photography

Post by bean_counter » Sat Feb 10, 2018 4:14 pm

We spent six days at Yellowstone last July. I carried my film Leica,as usual, shooting Ektar and Tri-X mostly with a 35mm 'cron. I made a point of checking out the cameras other folks were carrying. Must have looked at well over a thousand.

I didn't observe a single film camera, other than my own. I am afraid film is going more quickly than I thought it would.
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Re: An interseting short film about photography

Post by Hovannes » Sat Feb 10, 2018 10:36 pm

bean_counter wrote:
Sat Feb 10, 2018 4:14 pm
We spent six days at Yellowstone last July. I carried my film Leica,as usual, shooting Ektar and Tri-X mostly with a 35mm 'cron. I made a point of checking out the cameras other folks were carrying. Must have looked at well over a thousand.

I didn't observe a single film camera, other than my own. I am afraid film is going more quickly than I thought it would.
I think film should be around for as long as people will buy it. Of course it's getting more and more expensive. Selection, R&D for new products, and processing (like with Kodachrome) are what we seem to be quickly losing.

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Re: An interesting short film about photography

Post by durangopipe » Sun Feb 11, 2018 12:16 am

Film sales, especially B&W, are making a dramatic comeback in the past few years.

A good buddy of mine in Denver is doing well making a replica of a hard to find accessory for Leica rangefinders - the Ablon film end trimmer template for Leica photographers who bulk load. In addition to shaping the film tab, it lines up the sprocket holes for proper indexing.

Image

Image

He also makes a lens shade/filter holder and a nice half-case.

This, after having made some of the most beautiful pinhole cameras ever built:

Image

Image

Image

I suspect film will be around for a long while.

Don’t get me wrong, Hov, I really enjoyed the video and clearly remember the joys of film photography and darkroom work. Just wanted to say that the image is made by the photographer, not the tools
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Re: An interesting short film about photography

Post by Hovannes » Sun Feb 11, 2018 5:03 pm

durangopipe wrote:
Sun Feb 11, 2018 12:16 am
Film sales, especially B&W, are making a dramatic comeback in the past few years.

A good buddy of mine in Denver is doing well making a replica of a hard to find accessory for Leica rangefinders - the Ablon film end trimmer template for Leica photographers who bulk load. In addition to shaping the film tab, it lines up the sprocket holes for proper indexing.

Image

Image

He also makes a lens shade/filter holder and a nice half-case.

This, after having made some of the most beautiful pinhole cameras ever built:

Image

Image

Image

I suspect film will be around for a long while.

Don’t get me wrong, Hov, I really enjoyed the video and clearly remember the joys of film photography and darkroom work. Just wanted to say that the image is made by the photographer, not the tools
Is that pinhole a panoramic? It sure looks beautiful!
I do agree with you about the image being made by the photographer, but the tools are the limitations we work within. Hey a drone with a min-digi is practically unlimited, but the short film asks a very profound question about the "last frame" Every life in this world will have a "last frame"
I find that's kind of a sobering thought.

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Re: An interesting short film about photography

Post by durangopipe » Sun Feb 11, 2018 5:37 pm

durangopipe wrote:
This, after having made some of the most beautiful pinhole cameras ever built:

Image

Image

Image
Hov wrote:Is that pinhole a panoramic? It sure looks beautiful!
I do agree with you about the image being made by the photographer, but the tools are the limitations we work within. Hey a drone with a min-digi is practically unlimited, but the short film asks a very profound question about the "last frame" Every life in this world will have a "last frame"
I find that's kind of a sobering thought.
Regarding the camera . . .

It's got holders for two kinds of film:
It will take a standard 4X5 sheet, in which case it isn't panoramic - simply a somewhat wide angle with nearly infinite depth of field.
It will also take half a sheet of 8X10, cut to 4X10, in which case it is panoramic.

Regarding the question in the video:

Agreed.

Contemplating your last shot is a pretty profound question. But it seemed that the film was asking, "How would you shoot if you knew that this frame would be your last?" in order to make a separate point.

I took the point of the video to be that digital photography had somehow trivialized photography in a way that film does not, and that we should approach every shot with seriousness, as if it were our last frame; and further, that film somehow forces us to consider that question.

The same was said of roll film photographers by sheet film photographers.

And had I known any glass plate photographers, I imagine they'd have said the same of sheet film photographers.

Wet plate photographers of dry plate photographers . . .

and other painters of Vermeer, who used a camera lucida.

Don't mean to sound overly critical of the video, it was beautifully done, but this assertion that the use of new technology somehow cheapens art has been around forever, and it's exactly the sort of reasoning used by those who suggest that photography can never be taken seriously as art because it is a technological medium that requires no real talent.

I reject that with all of my being.

That's where I'm coming from, Hov.
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Re: An interseting short film about photography

Post by Skip » Sun Feb 11, 2018 8:13 pm

durangopipe wrote:
Sat Feb 10, 2018 12:11 pm
Lovely video.

In every age, some photographers “look back,” and lament the loss of the difficulty photographic processes previously presented.

And they confuse “difficulty” with intentionality. With worth.

When I was in art school a zillion years ago, many “art” photographers rediscovered gum bichromate prints, and because printing on ready made photographic paper from sheet film negatives (both manufactured by a corporate conglomerate) exposed in view cameras were too easy, they embraced the antique process as “more arty.”

Besides, gum bichromate prints looked like watercolors and everyone knows that water colors are art and many weren’t so sure about photographic prints. Too much technology. Not enough “art.”

Now we have digital cameras and software, so “artists” are rediscovering film.

The fact of the matter is that photography has always been and will always be a technical medium. What makes it art, when it is art, is not how easy or difficult it is to make an image, but how well the photographer sees and how well he or she is able to render their vision.

Choose film over digital media if the medium liberates your vision. Choose film over digital media if you love the “feel” of the implements and the process. Choose film over digital media if those tools give you the look you desire in the completed image.

But never use the choice of the tool as the defining characteristic of aesthetic value.

If I had one more frame to expose for the rest of my life, I would photograph my wife in black and white, one more time, the moment she opens her eyes and smiles for the first time in the morning.

But I have so many more frames.

So I will forgive myself for making both silly and serious images. Some, simple records of her ways of moving in goofiness and glory through life. A thousand times.

Image
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Re: An interesting short film about photography

Post by Hovannes » Thu Feb 15, 2018 11:09 am

durangopipe wrote:
Sun Feb 11, 2018 5:37 pm
durangopipe wrote:
This, after having made some of the most beautiful pinhole cameras ever built:

Image

Image

Image
Hov wrote:Is that pinhole a panoramic? It sure looks beautiful!
I do agree with you about the image being made by the photographer, but the tools are the limitations we work within. Hey a drone with a min-digi is practically unlimited, but the short film asks a very profound question about the "last frame" Every life in this world will have a "last frame"
I find that's kind of a sobering thought.
Regarding the camera . . .

It's got holders for two kinds of film:
It will take a standard 4X5 sheet, in which case it isn't panoramic - simply a somewhat wide angle with nearly infinite depth of field.
It will also take half a sheet of 8X10, cut to 4X10, in which case it is panoramic.

Regarding the question in the video:

Agreed.

Contemplating your last shot is a pretty profound question. But it seemed that the film was asking, "How would you shoot if you knew that this frame would be your last?" in order to make a separate point.

I took the point of the video to be that digital photography had somehow trivialized photography in a way that film does not, and that we should approach every shot with seriousness, as if it were our last frame; and further, that film somehow forces us to consider that question.

The same was said of roll film photographers by sheet film photographers.

And had I known any glass plate photographers, I imagine they'd have said the same of sheet film photographers.

Wet plate photographers of dry plate photographers . . .

and other painters of Vermeer, who used a camera lucida.

Don't mean to sound overly critical of the video, it was beautifully done, but this assertion that the use of new technology somehow cheapens art has been around forever, and it's exactly the sort of reasoning used by those who suggest that photography can never be taken seriously as art because it is a technological medium that requires no real talent.

I reject that with all of my being.

That's where I'm coming from, Hov.
I didn't see the film as being critical of methods and tools, but rather as a parable about life.
There are plenty of folks who enjoy keeping old ways alive (heck, I have glass plate holders in two formats) but I think there is something more profound going on here.
Perhaps digital capture is a foretaste of the afterlife if we consider it in this scenario?
But I don't think that is the film maker's intention.
Turn the tables around and ask if all the digital capture devices were going to burn up because of an EMP and you only had time to take one more picture (presumably before getting the Nikon F2 out of your underwear drawer where it's been hiding) what would it be?

We tend to get passionate about our hobbies, be it photography or pipe smoking or derelict Colemans or motorcycles or shotguns or fishing.
When a given photo emulsion or enlarging paper or tobacco blend is discontinued, there is always a cohort somewhere on the internet that proclaims it the end of the world (or something like that.)
I think that is trivializing not other methods or tools, but Life.
I think there is a difference in what we gain from a hobby, which is positive, to using a hobby to exclude living in the larger kingdom.
Sadly, it's laughable, but it happens. I'm sure you've seen it.

The actors in the film seem obsessed with film(hey they are young, and I've got to give them credit) but are they that shallow?
No, I think film is being used as a metaphor for life.
I think the precarious future of film is being used as a vehicle for the story.

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Re: An interesting short film about photography

Post by durangopipe » Thu Feb 15, 2018 11:40 am

Hovannes wrote:
Thu Feb 15, 2018 11:09 am

I didn't see the film as being critical of methods and tools, but rather as a parable about life.
There are plenty of folks who enjoy keeping old ways alive (heck, I have glass plate holders in two formats) but I think there is something more profound going on here.
Perhaps digital capture is a foretaste of the afterlife if we consider it in this scenario?
But I don't think that is the film maker's intention.
Turn the tables around and ask if all the digital capture devices were going to burn up because of an EMP and you only had time to take one more picture (presumably before getting the Nikon F2 out of your underwear drawer where it's been hiding) what would it be?

We tend to get passionate about our hobbies, be it photography or pipe smoking or derelict Colemans or motorcycles or shotguns or fishing.
When a given photo emulsion or enlarging paper or tobacco blend is discontinued, there is always a cohort somewhere on the internet that proclaims it the end of the world (or something like that.)
I think that is trivializing not other methods or tools, but Life.
I think there is a difference in what we gain from a hobby, which is positive, to using a hobby to exclude living in the larger kingdom.
Sadly, it's laughable, but it happens. I'm sure you've seen it.

The actors in the film seem obsessed with film(hey they are young, and I've got to give them credit) but are they that shallow?
No, I think film is being used as a metaphor for life.
I think the precarious future of film is being used as a vehicle for the story.
Your interpretation of the film is thoughtful, gracious and generous, Hov.
And, thought provoking.

I won't worry about the filmmakers' intentions.
Yours is wonderful enough.
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Re: An interesting short film about photography

Post by bean_counter » Thu Feb 15, 2018 8:13 pm

I didn't comment about the film earlier, but "shallow" came to mind for me too.

I thought maybe I was just jaded after having a daughter in art school. I lost a lot of patience for artsy-fartsy overwrought fake drama.
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