Because We Care Food Thread

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Re: Absolutely Useless Facts About Yourself, No One Cares About

Post by mont974x4 » Sat Dec 01, 2018 4:11 pm

Today I made some of this. Image


Hello FredS
It sounded better when the voices in my head were saying it.

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Re: Absolutely Useless Facts About Yourself, No One Cares About

Post by JimVH » Sat Dec 01, 2018 4:14 pm

mont974x4 wrote:
Sat Dec 01, 2018 4:11 pm
Today I made some of this. Image


Hello FredS
That's basically what I use, but I haven't tried the peppermint. Intriguing.
Image

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Re: Absolutely Useless Facts About Yourself, No One Cares About

Post by mont974x4 » Sat Dec 01, 2018 4:18 pm

JimVH wrote:
mont974x4 wrote:
Sat Dec 01, 2018 4:11 pm
Today I made some of this. Image


Hello FredS
That's basically what I use, but I haven't tried the peppermint. Intriguing.
Same here. I thought it was worth a shot. Pun totally intended.


Hello FredS
It sounded better when the voices in my head were saying it.

Ire attracter-at-large and general misanthrope.

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Re: Absolutely Useless Facts About Yourself, No One Cares About

Post by gaining_age » Sat Dec 01, 2018 4:21 pm

JimVH wrote:
Sat Dec 01, 2018 3:58 pm
I have Chinese Tea Leaf Eggs simmering on the stove.



In case caring occurs:

INGREDIENTS:
12 eggs
4 cups water
8 tablespoons soy sauce
3 tablespoons Chinese pu-erh or black tea leaf
1 cinnamon stick
3 star anise
2 cloves
1 teaspoon Chinese five-spice powder
2 teaspoon sugar


METHOD:
Add 4 cups of water to a medium pot and gently drop in the eggs. Make sure the water covers the eggs. Bring the water to boil on high heat. Boil for about 10 minutes or so to make sure the eggs are cooked.

Transfer the hard-boiled eggs out of the hot boiling water and rinse them with cold water. Using the back of a teaspoon, gently tap the eggshell to crack the shell. Return the eggs to the water and add in the remaining ingredients. Bring the tea mixture to a boil and immediately turn the heat to low. Simmer for 2 hours (the longer the simmering, the better the taste). Add more water if needed. Serve immediately or leave the tea eggs in the mixture overnight to further develop the color and flavor.
Now this could be worth caring about. I had some of these in China a time or two and I liked them. I did wonder about making them myself back in the USA.
Out of control odd rare old man (or possibly an hobbyist). -- Label by The Big R.
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Re: Absolutely Useless Facts About Yourself, No One Cares About

Post by Bloodhound » Mon Dec 03, 2018 10:23 am

gaining_age wrote:
Sat Dec 01, 2018 4:21 pm
JimVH wrote:
Sat Dec 01, 2018 3:58 pm
I have Chinese Tea Leaf Eggs simmering on the stove.



In case caring occurs:

INGREDIENTS:
12 eggs
4 cups water
8 tablespoons soy sauce
3 tablespoons Chinese pu-erh or black tea leaf
1 cinnamon stick
3 star anise
2 cloves
1 teaspoon Chinese five-spice powder
2 teaspoon sugar


METHOD:
Add 4 cups of water to a medium pot and gently drop in the eggs. Make sure the water covers the eggs. Bring the water to boil on high heat. Boil for about 10 minutes or so to make sure the eggs are cooked.

Transfer the hard-boiled eggs out of the hot boiling water and rinse them with cold water. Using the back of a teaspoon, gently tap the eggshell to crack the shell. Return the eggs to the water and add in the remaining ingredients. Bring the tea mixture to a boil and immediately turn the heat to low. Simmer for 2 hours (the longer the simmering, the better the taste). Add more water if needed. Serve immediately or leave the tea eggs in the mixture overnight to further develop the color and flavor.
Now this could be worth caring about. I had some of these in China a time or two and I liked them. I did wonder about making them myself back in the USA.
OK I care....pics of the completed project?
Scott ( aka - Thor )
Do Justice...Love Mercy...Walk Humbly With Your GOD

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Re: Absolutely Useless Facts About Yourself, No One Cares About

Post by JimVH » Mon Dec 03, 2018 1:31 pm

Bloodhound wrote:
Mon Dec 03, 2018 10:23 am
gaining_age wrote:
Sat Dec 01, 2018 4:21 pm
JimVH wrote:
Sat Dec 01, 2018 3:58 pm
I have Chinese Tea Leaf Eggs simmering on the stove.



In case caring occurs:

INGREDIENTS:
12 eggs
4 cups water
8 tablespoons soy sauce
3 tablespoons Chinese pu-erh or black tea leaf
1 cinnamon stick
3 star anise
2 cloves
1 teaspoon Chinese five-spice powder
2 teaspoon sugar


METHOD:
Add 4 cups of water to a medium pot and gently drop in the eggs. Make sure the water covers the eggs. Bring the water to boil on high heat. Boil for about 10 minutes or so to make sure the eggs are cooked.

Transfer the hard-boiled eggs out of the hot boiling water and rinse them with cold water. Using the back of a teaspoon, gently tap the eggshell to crack the shell. Return the eggs to the water and add in the remaining ingredients. Bring the tea mixture to a boil and immediately turn the heat to low. Simmer for 2 hours (the longer the simmering, the better the taste). Add more water if needed. Serve immediately or leave the tea eggs in the mixture overnight to further develop the color and flavor.
Now this could be worth caring about. I had some of these in China a time or two and I liked them. I did wonder about making them myself back in the USA.
OK I care....pics of the completed project?
Image
Image
Image

I simmered them for two hours, turned off the heat, and let them sit for another five hours. The flavor did not soak in as deep as I expected. I put two fully peeled eggs, however, and they came out almost coal black with a much bolder flavor and the color soaked in almost all the way to the yolk. If I were cooking them strictly for consumption this is how I would do all of them, but the webbed presentation is pretty cool. Several of the eggs had large dark spots with less web patterning because of separation of the shell. I blame using the instant pot for the initial cook. It makes the shell come off so easily that they did not cling to the egg in many of them.

The flavor is very unique. The anise, cinnamon, and clove spices are unusual to me in the context of a savory flavor. I really like the five-spice blend, but can't really articulate why. The pu-erh gave it a grassy mellowness and aroma, and the spices were a little richer than I expected. My coworkers seemed to think the flavor was more subtle than I did, but it was by no means harsh or overpowering.

I liked eating them best with a small dab of soy sauce

It was a fun experiment that I will do again.
Image

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Re: Absolutely Useless Facts About Yourself, No One Cares About

Post by gaining_age » Mon Dec 03, 2018 1:44 pm

JimVH wrote:
Mon Dec 03, 2018 1:31 pm
Bloodhound wrote:
Mon Dec 03, 2018 10:23 am
gaining_age wrote:
Sat Dec 01, 2018 4:21 pm
JimVH wrote:
Sat Dec 01, 2018 3:58 pm
I have Chinese Tea Leaf Eggs simmering on the stove.



In case caring occurs:

INGREDIENTS:
12 eggs
4 cups water
8 tablespoons soy sauce
3 tablespoons Chinese pu-erh or black tea leaf
1 cinnamon stick
3 star anise
2 cloves
1 teaspoon Chinese five-spice powder
2 teaspoon sugar


METHOD:
Add 4 cups of water to a medium pot and gently drop in the eggs. Make sure the water covers the eggs. Bring the water to boil on high heat. Boil for about 10 minutes or so to make sure the eggs are cooked.

Transfer the hard-boiled eggs out of the hot boiling water and rinse them with cold water. Using the back of a teaspoon, gently tap the eggshell to crack the shell. Return the eggs to the water and add in the remaining ingredients. Bring the tea mixture to a boil and immediately turn the heat to low. Simmer for 2 hours (the longer the simmering, the better the taste). Add more water if needed. Serve immediately or leave the tea eggs in the mixture overnight to further develop the color and flavor.
Now this could be worth caring about. I had some of these in China a time or two and I liked them. I did wonder about making them myself back in the USA.
OK I care....pics of the completed project?
Image
Image
Image

I simmered them for two hours, turned off the heat, and let them sit for another five hours. The flavor did not soak in as deep as I expected. I put two fully peeled eggs, however, and they came out almost coal black with a much bolder flavor and the color soaked in almost all the way to the yolk. If I were cooking them strictly for consumption this is how I would do all of them, but the webbed presentation is pretty cool. Several of the eggs had large dark spots with less web patterning because of separation of the shell. I blame using the instant pot for the initial cook. It makes the shell come off so easily that they did not cling to the egg in many of them.

The flavor is very unique. The anise, cinnamon, and clove spices are unusual to me in the context of a savory flavor. I really like the five-spice blend, but can't really articulate why. The pu-erh gave it a grassy mellowness and aroma, and the spices were a little richer than I expected. My coworkers seemed to think the flavor was more subtle than I did, but it was by no means harsh or overpowering.

I liked eating them best with a small dab of soy sauce

It was a fun experiment that I will do again.
We may need to go to a food thread.

A few questions:
1) first instructions did not indicate an instant pot-- did you use the 5:5:5 method?
2) What is in your five spice blend? I saw two at the grocery store and they had different sets of ingredients. I was left confused and bought the cheaper one and determined to include ginger in the pot.

3) did you stew them for a couple hours like your directions and then went the full 5-8 hours for sit soaking?

4) Could this be a non-Instant Pot preferred recipe?

5) Any issue with the green yolks? That seems to be a side effect of the long cooking time-- not much of a way around it from what I've read.
Out of control odd rare old man (or possibly an hobbyist). -- Label by The Big R.
The 6s of 1st John:
2:6 Whoever claims to live in him must walk as Jesus walked
3:6 No one who lives in him keeps on sinning

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Because We Care Food Thread

Post by UncleBob » Mon Dec 03, 2018 1:58 pm

Yep.
"One man's theology is another man's belly laugh." - Robert A. Heinlein

"Many of the points here, taken to their logical conclusions, don't hold up to logic; they're simply Godded-up ways of saying "I don't like that." - Skip

"Get your facts first, then you can distort them as you please." -Mark Twain

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Re: Absolutely Useless Facts About Yourself, No One Cares About

Post by JimVH » Mon Dec 03, 2018 3:27 pm

gaining_age wrote:
Mon Dec 03, 2018 1:44 pm
JimVH wrote:
Mon Dec 03, 2018 1:31 pm
Bloodhound wrote:
Mon Dec 03, 2018 10:23 am
gaining_age wrote:
Sat Dec 01, 2018 4:21 pm
JimVH wrote:
Sat Dec 01, 2018 3:58 pm
I have Chinese Tea Leaf Eggs simmering on the stove.



In case caring occurs:

INGREDIENTS:
12 eggs
4 cups water
8 tablespoons soy sauce
3 tablespoons Chinese pu-erh or black tea leaf
1 cinnamon stick
3 star anise
2 cloves
1 teaspoon Chinese five-spice powder
2 teaspoon sugar


METHOD:
Add 4 cups of water to a medium pot and gently drop in the eggs. Make sure the water covers the eggs. Bring the water to boil on high heat. Boil for about 10 minutes or so to make sure the eggs are cooked.

Transfer the hard-boiled eggs out of the hot boiling water and rinse them with cold water. Using the back of a teaspoon, gently tap the eggshell to crack the shell. Return the eggs to the water and add in the remaining ingredients. Bring the tea mixture to a boil and immediately turn the heat to low. Simmer for 2 hours (the longer the simmering, the better the taste). Add more water if needed. Serve immediately or leave the tea eggs in the mixture overnight to further develop the color and flavor.
Now this could be worth caring about. I had some of these in China a time or two and I liked them. I did wonder about making them myself back in the USA.
OK I care....pics of the completed project?
Image
Image
Image

I simmered them for two hours, turned off the heat, and let them sit for another five hours. The flavor did not soak in as deep as I expected. I put two fully peeled eggs, however, and they came out almost coal black with a much bolder flavor and the color soaked in almost all the way to the yolk. If I were cooking them strictly for consumption this is how I would do all of them, but the webbed presentation is pretty cool. Several of the eggs had large dark spots with less web patterning because of separation of the shell. I blame using the instant pot for the initial cook. It makes the shell come off so easily that they did not cling to the egg in many of them.

The flavor is very unique. The anise, cinnamon, and clove spices are unusual to me in the context of a savory flavor. I really like the five-spice blend, but can't really articulate why. The pu-erh gave it a grassy mellowness and aroma, and the spices were a little richer than I expected. My coworkers seemed to think the flavor was more subtle than I did, but it was by no means harsh or overpowering.

I liked eating them best with a small dab of soy sauce

It was a fun experiment that I will do again.
We may need to go to a food thread.

A few questions:
1) first instructions did not indicate an instant pot-- did you use the 5:5:5 method?
2) What is in your five spice blend? I saw two at the grocery store and they had different sets of ingredients. I was left confused and bought the cheaper one and determined to include ginger in the pot.

3) did you stew them for a couple hours like your directions and then went the full 5-8 hours for sit soaking?

4) Could this be a non-Instant Pot preferred recipe?

5) Any issue with the green yolks? That seems to be a side effect of the long cooking time-- not much of a way around it from what I've read.
1) I use 4:4:4 on my IP. This is the only part I used my IP for, but I have seen full IP recipes for tea leaf eggs.

2) My spice blend. No ginger in this one, thought it would be good. I use this one for no other reason than that's what I had.

3) Yes, two hour simmer and five hour soak. Next time I will let it soak all night.

4) I will not use the IP at all next time.

5) It's rare that I do not have the green surface on yolks no matter how I cook them. It bothers me not.
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Re: Because We Care Food Thread

Post by Bloodhound » Mon Dec 03, 2018 3:30 pm

They turned out cool. I am going to do some and tell my grand daughters that they are alligator eggs! They are al ready "Grossed out" by Quail eggs :)
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Re: Absolutely Useless Facts About Yourself, No One Cares About

Post by GaryInVA » Mon Dec 03, 2018 3:41 pm

JimVH wrote:
Mon Dec 03, 2018 1:31 pm
Bloodhound wrote:
Mon Dec 03, 2018 10:23 am
gaining_age wrote:
Sat Dec 01, 2018 4:21 pm
JimVH wrote:
Sat Dec 01, 2018 3:58 pm
I have Chinese Tea Leaf Eggs simmering on the stove.



In case caring occurs:

INGREDIENTS:
12 eggs
4 cups water
8 tablespoons soy sauce
3 tablespoons Chinese pu-erh or black tea leaf
1 cinnamon stick
3 star anise
2 cloves
1 teaspoon Chinese five-spice powder
2 teaspoon sugar


METHOD:
Add 4 cups of water to a medium pot and gently drop in the eggs. Make sure the water covers the eggs. Bring the water to boil on high heat. Boil for about 10 minutes or so to make sure the eggs are cooked.

Transfer the hard-boiled eggs out of the hot boiling water and rinse them with cold water. Using the back of a teaspoon, gently tap the eggshell to crack the shell. Return the eggs to the water and add in the remaining ingredients. Bring the tea mixture to a boil and immediately turn the heat to low. Simmer for 2 hours (the longer the simmering, the better the taste). Add more water if needed. Serve immediately or leave the tea eggs in the mixture overnight to further develop the color and flavor.
Now this could be worth caring about. I had some of these in China a time or two and I liked them. I did wonder about making them myself back in the USA.
OK I care....pics of the completed project?
Image
Image
Image

I simmered them for two hours, turned off the heat, and let them sit for another five hours. The flavor did not soak in as deep as I expected. I put two fully peeled eggs, however, and they came out almost coal black with a much bolder flavor and the color soaked in almost all the way to the yolk. If I were cooking them strictly for consumption this is how I would do all of them, but the webbed presentation is pretty cool. Several of the eggs had large dark spots with less web patterning because of separation of the shell. I blame using the instant pot for the initial cook. It makes the shell come off so easily that they did not cling to the egg in many of them.

The flavor is very unique. The anise, cinnamon, and clove spices are unusual to me in the context of a savory flavor. I really like the five-spice blend, but can't really articulate why. The pu-erh gave it a grassy mellowness and aroma, and the spices were a little richer than I expected. My coworkers seemed to think the flavor was more subtle than I did, but it was by no means harsh or overpowering.

I liked eating them best with a small dab of soy sauce

It was a fun experiment that I will do again.
If you need a second opinion on the next batch, let me know.
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Re: Because We Care Food Thread

Post by JimVH » Mon Dec 03, 2018 3:44 pm

Bloodhound wrote:
Mon Dec 03, 2018 3:30 pm
They turned out cool. I am going to do some and tell my grand daughters that they are alligator eggs! They are al ready "Grossed out" by Quail eggs :)
They do look like gator skin.

There are other variations of the recipe on the web. Some called for tangerine or orange zest, spicy pepper, peanuts, bay leaf, and even wine. I just kept it basic to start.
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Re: Because We Care Food Thread

Post by DepartedLight » Mon Dec 03, 2018 7:45 pm

Image

Jim,

May I please use this for a 48hr. avatar silliness?*

*Minimum hours listed. Actual elapsed time may be indefinite. Or, less.
DL Jake

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Re: Because We Care Food Thread

Post by JimVH » Mon Dec 03, 2018 7:47 pm

DepartedLight wrote:
Mon Dec 03, 2018 7:45 pm
Image

Jim,

May I please use this for a 48hr. avatar silliness?*

*Minimum hours listed. Actual elapsed time may be indefinite. Or, less.
Be my guest.
Image

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