Birds of the Sonoran Desert

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Del
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Re: Birds of the Sonoran Desert

Post by Del » Sat Nov 28, 2020 4:42 pm

Goose55 wrote:
Tue Nov 24, 2020 10:24 am
Image
Turkey Vulture

These large soaring birds have a characteristic dihedral wing pattern easily noticed from afar. From below in good light the plumage appears two-toned, black and gray-brown. The head is without feathers and conspicuously red in adults. Unlike most birds, turkey vultures have an excellent sense of smell and can detect carrion from a considerable distance. In the Sonoran Desert, they are very rare north of the Gila River during the winter months. During the rest of the year they are very common especially soaring above range lands and along highways. Road-kill has become an important food source.

They can smell rotting meat up to 8 miles away and 1000 ft in elevation....
Turkey buzzards are everywhere. They are common in Wisconsin.
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Re: Birds of the Sonoran Desert

Post by daveinlax » Sat Nov 28, 2020 4:44 pm

Good Stuff, thanks for posting. :pipe:

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Re: Birds of the Sonoran Desert

Post by Goose55 » Thu Dec 03, 2020 6:17 pm

Del wrote:
Sat Nov 28, 2020 4:42 pm
Goose55 wrote:
Tue Nov 24, 2020 10:24 am
Image
Turkey Vulture

These large soaring birds have a characteristic dihedral wing pattern easily noticed from afar. From below in good light the plumage appears two-toned, black and gray-brown. The head is without feathers and conspicuously red in adults. Unlike most birds, turkey vultures have an excellent sense of smell and can detect carrion from a considerable distance. In the Sonoran Desert, they are very rare north of the Gila River during the winter months. During the rest of the year they are very common especially soaring above range lands and along highways. Road-kill has become an important food source.

They can smell rotting meat up to 8 miles away and 1000 ft in elevation....
Turkey buzzards are everywhere. They are common in Wisconsin.
And, they are in the Sonoran Desert. Thus, Birds of the Sonoran Desert,....
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Re: Birds of the Sonoran Desert

Post by Goose55 » Thu Dec 03, 2020 6:23 pm

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Harris Hawk

This is a characteristic raptor across the Sonoran Desert. Harris's Hawks are almost always seen in small groups - these are family groups that hunt and nest cooperatively. Prey include rabbits and young quail. Look for dark overall, maroon legs and shoulders and bright white patch/band in tail visible in flight.

"At present we're on the wrong side of the door. But all the pages of the New Testament are rustling with the rumor that it will not always be so." ~ C.S. Lewis

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Re: Birds of the Sonoran Desert

Post by Goose55 » Tue Dec 08, 2020 8:51 pm

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Red-tailed Hawk

Red-tailed Hawks are familiar aerial predators across North America including the Sonoran Desert. During the hottest summer months they are largely absent from low desert areas. But during the winter months their abundance is greatly augmented by migrants from the north; in agricultural areas and grasslands one might be seen resting on an utility pole every half mile or less.

"At present we're on the wrong side of the door. But all the pages of the New Testament are rustling with the rumor that it will not always be so." ~ C.S. Lewis

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Re: Birds of the Sonoran Desert

Post by Goose55 » Wed Dec 16, 2020 6:57 pm

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Ferruginous Hawk, a Winter visitor

Found in prairies, deserts, and open range of the West, the regal Ferruginous Hawk hunts from a lone tree, rock outcrop, or from high in the sky. This largest of North American hawks really is regal—its species name is regalis—with a unique gray head, rich, rusty (ferruginous) shoulders and legs, and gleaming white underparts.

"At present we're on the wrong side of the door. But all the pages of the New Testament are rustling with the rumor that it will not always be so." ~ C.S. Lewis

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Re: Birds of the Sonoran Desert

Post by Goose55 » Sun Dec 20, 2020 5:03 pm

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Swainson's Hawk -- Fall and Spring Migrant. Absent during Summer and Winter

Swainson's Hawk is absent from the Sonoran Desert for most of the year. However, large numbers can pass through during spring and fall migrations. Hundreds in several groups were observed by bird watchers in the Sonoran Desert during August-September, 2007. These predators feed heavily on rodents, but also eat many insects, especially grasshoppers and katydids (mormon crickets). Argentina is the eventual wintering ground.

"At present we're on the wrong side of the door. But all the pages of the New Testament are rustling with the rumor that it will not always be so." ~ C.S. Lewis

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Re: Birds of the Sonoran Desert

Post by Goose55 » Sat Jan 09, 2021 10:10 am

ImageImage
American Kestrel (male and female)

The smallest and the most widespread raptor in North America. It is a powerful falcon that can kill birds as large as Mourning Doves. Also can spot grasshoppers and other large insects on the ground and swoop down from a high perch to catch them. Once known as the Sparrow Hawk, it is very common in winter on utility wires and poles. But fairly common all year in the Sonoran Desert, in agricultural areas, and in the cities. Note the beautiful coppery head and back - which is brighter in males.

"At present we're on the wrong side of the door. But all the pages of the New Testament are rustling with the rumor that it will not always be so." ~ C.S. Lewis

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Re: Birds of the Sonoran Desert

Post by sweetandsour » Sun Jan 10, 2021 2:53 pm

Goose55 wrote:
Tue Dec 08, 2020 8:51 pm
Image
Red-tailed Hawk

Red-tailed Hawks are familiar aerial predators across North America including the Sonoran Desert. During the hottest summer months they are largely absent from low desert areas. But during the winter months their abundance is greatly augmented by migrants from the north; in agricultural areas and grasslands one might be seen resting on an utility pole every half mile or less.

I watched a red tail yesterday afternoon in a field where we had been running a couple of bird dogs. As the hawk glided low (and fast) across the field, Wilsons snipe were flushing left and right. The hawk didn't chase any of them however, and finally landed in a tree, and sat perched there until we left. I didn't get a pic of it, but I did take a pic of a butcher bird, or what we used to call a "French mockingbird".
Anyway, they indeed do migrate down here to SE Texas in winter, as well as the Sonoran.
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Re: Birds of the Sonoran Desert

Post by John-Boy » Sat Jan 16, 2021 6:57 pm

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