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Space Aged

Posted: Thu Nov 07, 2019 9:35 am
by tuttle
Wine cellar in space: 12 bottles arrive for year of aging
Image

A dozen bottles of fine French wine arrived at the space station Monday, not for the astronauts, but for science.

The red Bordeaux wine will age for a year up there before returning to Earth. Researchers will study how weightlessness and space radiation affect the aging process. The goal is to develop new flavors and properties for the food industry.
Other items like barley seeds and scotch are being experimented on as well.

I'd drink it.

Re: Space Aged

Posted: Thu Nov 07, 2019 12:37 pm
by Del
tuttle wrote:
Thu Nov 07, 2019 9:35 am
Wine cellar in space: 12 bottles arrive for year of aging
Image

A dozen bottles of fine French wine arrived at the space station Monday, not for the astronauts, but for science.

The red Bordeaux wine will age for a year up there before returning to Earth. Researchers will study how weightlessness and space radiation affect the aging process. The goal is to develop new flavors and properties for the food industry.
Other items like barley seeds and scotch are being experimented on as well.

I'd drink it.
Criminy.

We age beer and wine in dark bottles and dark cellars because we already know that normal radiation (sunlight) is harmful to the delicious flavors.

Weightlessness just means that the dregs won't settle. In beer, we use the settled mass of dead yeast to remove the coagulated proteins and other "trub."

Thousands of years of selectively choosing those yeasts that settle well, wasted by space-age novelty.

Re: Space Aged

Posted: Thu Nov 07, 2019 1:02 pm
by tuttle
Del wrote:
Thu Nov 07, 2019 12:37 pm
tuttle wrote:
Thu Nov 07, 2019 9:35 am
Wine cellar in space: 12 bottles arrive for year of aging
Image

A dozen bottles of fine French wine arrived at the space station Monday, not for the astronauts, but for science.

The red Bordeaux wine will age for a year up there before returning to Earth. Researchers will study how weightlessness and space radiation affect the aging process. The goal is to develop new flavors and properties for the food industry.
Other items like barley seeds and scotch are being experimented on as well.

I'd drink it.
Criminy.

We age beer and wine in dark bottles and dark cellars because we already know that normal radiation (sunlight) is harmful to the delicious flavors.

Weightlessness just means that the dregs won't settle. In beer, we use the settled mass of dead yeast to remove the coagulated proteins and other "trub."

Thousands of years of selectively choosing those yeasts that settle well, wasted by space-age novelty.
But would you drink it?

Re: Space Aged

Posted: Thu Nov 07, 2019 1:53 pm
by FredS
Good grief Del. I understand you're a Christian Pipe smoker so, by definition, you appreciate the old days, but dang man, not every new thing is bad and not every old thing is better.

Re: Space Aged

Posted: Thu Nov 07, 2019 2:00 pm
by Jester
The moon should become our wine cellar.

Re: Space Aged

Posted: Thu Nov 07, 2019 2:17 pm
by tuttle
This got me investigating.

I found a few years back an Oregon brewery produced a Stout Fermented with Space-Traveled Yeast

No idea if it's still being brewed but looks to be available basically in the west (and Colorado...hook me up FredS!)

Re: Space Aged

Posted: Thu Nov 07, 2019 2:26 pm
by Jester
tuttle wrote:
Thu Nov 07, 2019 2:17 pm
This got me investigating.

I found a few years back an Oregon brewery produced a Stout Fermented with Space-Traveled Yeast

No idea if it's still being brewed but looks to be available basically in the west (and Colorado...hook me up FredS!)
We could steal the yeast from the bottom of the bottle.

Re: Space Aged

Posted: Thu Nov 07, 2019 2:48 pm
by Del
FredS wrote:
Thu Nov 07, 2019 1:53 pm
Good grief Del. I understand you're a Christian Pipe smoker so, by definition, you appreciate the old days, but dang man, not every new thing is bad and not every old thing is better.
I'm also an old chemist, an old home brewer, and an old aircraft pilot.

I have old relationships with fermentation and with gravity. Zero-g offers novel opportunities.... wasting a year of aging wine in space won't tell us much.

I suppose it might get Europeans interested in helping us plan a manned mission to Mars, or something. Russians already take vodka to the space station.

Re: Space Aged

Posted: Thu Nov 07, 2019 7:54 pm
by rgcurrey
This is just stupid. I would like to think some private company is paying a butt load of money for this "experiment," but, we all know it is probably government funded.

Re: Space Aged

Posted: Thu Nov 07, 2019 9:05 pm
by arank87
Del wrote:
Thu Nov 07, 2019 12:37 pm
tuttle wrote:
Thu Nov 07, 2019 9:35 am
Wine cellar in space: 12 bottles arrive for year of aging
Image

A dozen bottles of fine French wine arrived at the space station Monday, not for the astronauts, but for science.

The red Bordeaux wine will age for a year up there before returning to Earth. Researchers will study how weightlessness and space radiation affect the aging process. The goal is to develop new flavors and properties for the food industry.
Other items like barley seeds and scotch are being experimented on as well.

I'd drink it.
Criminy.

We age beer and wine in dark bottles and dark cellars because we already know that normal radiation (sunlight) is harmful to the delicious flavors.

Weightlessness just means that the dregs won't settle. In beer, we use the settled mass of dead yeast to remove the coagulated proteins and other "trub."

Thousands of years of selectively choosing those yeasts that settle well, wasted by space-age novelty.
This

Re: Space Aged

Posted: Thu Nov 07, 2019 9:05 pm
by arank87
rgcurrey wrote:
Thu Nov 07, 2019 7:54 pm
This is just stupid. I would like to think some private company is paying a butt load of money for this "experiment," but, we all know it is probably government funded.
And this

Re: Space Aged

Posted: Fri Nov 08, 2019 9:29 am
by tuttle
arank87 wrote:
Thu Nov 07, 2019 9:05 pm
rgcurrey wrote:
Thu Nov 07, 2019 7:54 pm
This is just stupid. I would like to think some private company is paying a butt load of money for this "experiment," but, we all know it is probably government funded.
And this
But would you drink it?

Re: Space Aged

Posted: Fri Nov 08, 2019 12:51 pm
by arank87
tuttle wrote:
Fri Nov 08, 2019 9:29 am
arank87 wrote:
Thu Nov 07, 2019 9:05 pm
rgcurrey wrote:
Thu Nov 07, 2019 7:54 pm
This is just stupid. I would like to think some private company is paying a butt load of money for this "experiment," but, we all know it is probably government funded.
And this
But would you drink it?
Not if I had to pay for it.

Re: Space Aged

Posted: Sat Nov 09, 2019 10:20 am
by Stanley76
tuttle wrote:
Fri Nov 08, 2019 9:29 am
arank87 wrote:
Thu Nov 07, 2019 9:05 pm
rgcurrey wrote:
Thu Nov 07, 2019 7:54 pm
This is just stupid. I would like to think some private company is paying a butt load of money for this "experiment," but, we all know it is probably government funded.
And this
But would you drink it?
I'd drink it if I was stuck on a space station for a year.

Re: Space Aged

Posted: Thu Nov 14, 2019 7:38 am
by Hovannes
What if all those bottles come back empty? :yes:

Re: Space Aged

Posted: Thu Nov 14, 2019 7:39 am
by Hovannes
Stanley76 wrote:
Sat Nov 09, 2019 10:20 am
tuttle wrote:
Fri Nov 08, 2019 9:29 am
arank87 wrote:
Thu Nov 07, 2019 9:05 pm
rgcurrey wrote:
Thu Nov 07, 2019 7:54 pm
This is just stupid. I would like to think some private company is paying a butt load of money for this "experiment," but, we all know it is probably government funded.
And this
But would you drink it?
I'd drink it if I was stuck on a space station for a year.
^^^this^^^

Re: Space Aged

Posted: Tue Dec 10, 2019 9:45 am
by tuttle
Brewing in spaaaaace: SpaceX sends a malting kit to the International Space Station
Highlights onboard include gear to test an automated malting procedure to compare malt produced in space with that on Earth for genetic and structural changes. Boffins insist that the microgravity research will help in assessing the stuff for nutritional use on long duration spaceflights.
You can click the link if you want, but that's all the info on the "brewing". It's a bit click baity. No actual brewing in space. But the idea of comparing malt produced in space and malt on earth is interesting.

I'd brew with it.