Four season gardening and canning

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Mick
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Re: Four season gardening and canning

Post by Mick » Thu Jan 10, 2013 10:26 am

coco wrote:How does the old fashioned gentleman save money by gardening in depressionary times?
He grows or scavenges any and all food sources available to him, in addition to what meat he can either hunt or acquire. I find that buying pork or beef in large quantity (say, buying half a cow from someone with a farm) and rendering the meat into cuts yourself can be quite cost efficient, though it is a large investment at first.
After that, you are able to can pretty much everything, though you can also freeze, dry, or otherwise preserve lots of foods to see you through.
I often cook things BEFORE canning (ie soups, stews, chili, etc.) in large batches (10-15 qts) and then just can the whole thing, less supper for that day. This makes them heat&serve capable. I leave it to your imagination (and locality) to dream up all sorts of edibles that you can either grow, or harvest from the wild perhaps.
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sweetandsour
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Post by sweetandsour » Thu Jan 10, 2013 10:48 am

I typically have spring, summer, and fall gardens ... winter (very brief, here in SE Texas) is when I plant onions; potatoes traditionally get planted on Valentines Day.

I now have 2 pear trees and a fig tree. Struck out so far with blueberries ... planted 4, lost 4. (Maybe not enough cold temp days.) I now have 2 muscadine grape vines still in pots, and deciding where in the yard to plant.

I'd like to plant a couple of pecan trees also; as well as some holly trees and then start a bee hive. A lot of plans ... not enough time, though, at the moment.

BTW, Del, I seem to remember seeing some rather nice garden plots around the capital grounds when I was in town there last year.
I'm old but I'm happy. (Most of the time.)

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Post by Irish-Dane » Sun Jan 20, 2013 8:47 am

I'm working on my garden seeds this afternoon.
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Post by JudgeRusty » Fri Jan 25, 2013 1:33 pm

Feed me, Seymour.
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Post by 4thmedbn » Sun Jun 23, 2013 8:09 pm

A little input, on this thread which I hope will be helpful. As to how to grow food for times of meager income, I'd strongly recommend John Seymour's The Guide to Self Sufficiency and The Self Sufficient Gardner. Also, Elliot Coleman's The New Organic Grower, and probably the most relevant to what type of gardening I'm doing these days, and I think probably the most sustainable/sound gardening practices, John Jeavons' How to Grow More Vegetables Than You Ever Thought Possible on Less Land Than You Ever Imagined. This last recommendation is a little more technical, in a way, but is still pretty reader friendly. It's geared at helping you grow an entire vegetarian diet for the entire year. I'm not a vegetarian, so I do supplement the growing of pork and things like that, but I definitely think it's a great way to build the soil and significantly increase your yields. I'm in my second year, and I'm pretty happy with the results (when I actually get my garden in on time)

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Re: Four season gardening and canning

Post by Goose55 » Sat Mar 25, 2017 10:54 am

The red romaine and spinach in my tiny raised box garden have bolted now, so I have beet seedlings coming up in half of it. After tonight, will plant pre-soaked beet seeds in the other half, too. Only 60 days from germination to harvest. And this type of beet is excellent for making pickled beets, which--in those hot summer days--I love with a cold roast beef sandwich

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Re:

Post by Hovannes » Sat Mar 25, 2017 2:27 pm

sweetandsour wrote:
Thu Jan 10, 2013 10:48 am
I typically have spring, summer, and fall gardens ... winter (very brief, here in SE Texas) is when I plant onions; potatoes traditionally get planted on Valentines Day.

I now have 2 pear trees and a fig tree. Struck out so far with blueberries ... planted 4, lost 4. (Maybe not enough cold temp days.) I now have 2 muscadine grape vines still in pots, and deciding where in the yard to plant.

I'd like to plant a couple of pecan trees also; as well as some holly trees and then start a bee hive. A lot of plans ... not enough time, though, at the moment.

BTW, Del, I seem to remember seeing some rather nice garden plots around the capital grounds when I was in town there last year.
Be careful with pecan trees if you have dogs. Fallen, rotten pecans are extremely poisonous when dogs ingest them.
"What doesn't kill you, gives you a lot of unhealthy coping mechanisms and a really dark sense of humor."

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sweetandsour
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Re: Re:

Post by sweetandsour » Sat Mar 25, 2017 4:10 pm

Hovannes wrote:
Sat Mar 25, 2017 2:27 pm
sweetandsour wrote:
Thu Jan 10, 2013 10:48 am
I typically have spring, summer, and fall gardens ... winter (very brief, here in SE Texas) is when I plant onions; potatoes traditionally get planted on Valentines Day.

I now have 2 pear trees and a fig tree. Struck out so far with blueberries ... planted 4, lost 4. (Maybe not enough cold temp days.) I now have 2 muscadine grape vines still in pots, and deciding where in the yard to plant.

I'd like to plant a couple of pecan trees also; as well as some holly trees and then start a bee hive. A lot of plans ... not enough time, though, at the moment.

BTW, Del, I seem to remember seeing some rather nice garden plots around the capital grounds when I was in town there last year.
Be careful with pecan trees if you have dogs. Fallen, rotten pecans are extremely poisonous when dogs ingest them.
Thanks, I've never heard that.
I'm old but I'm happy. (Most of the time.)

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