Faith in the News

For those deep thinkers out there.
User avatar
wosbald
Crux' Cleveland Correspondent
Crux' Cleveland Correspondent
Posts: 21531
Joined: Mon Feb 25, 2008 6:00 pm
Location: Cleveland, Ohio
Contact:

Re: Faith in the News

Post by wosbald » Sat Mar 21, 2020 8:03 am

+JMJ+

Francis Chan, Evangelical Pastor, Faces Backlash After Preaching on the Real Presence [Video]
Image

Evangelical pastor Francis Chan went viral, as in the sermon Chan shared about Communion and his discovery of the scriptural and historical basis for transubstantiation — that the bread and the wine become the literal Body and Blood of Christ.

The sermon was maligned by many Protestants and praised by many Catholics, with speculation as to whether Chan is moving toward a conversion to Catholicism. Chan is an internationally recognized preacher and author, and former pastor of Cornerstone Community Church in Simi Valley, CA, so his sermon came as a shock to many in the Evangelical world.

Chan began his sermon by sharing, “God has taught me so much in the last month or two. I feel like I’m on another level, like I’m so excited about the future because I feel like there’s nothing in store for me but greater and greater intimacy with God.”

He then acknowledged that, “There were some things about Communion that always bothered me when I read about it in Scripture.” Chan described the Scripture passages that did not fit in with his understanding of Communion as an Evangelical, and explained how he began to study the Early Church. Through this he discovered the scriptural and historical basis of Communion as the literal Body and Blood of Christ. Below is a clip of the full sermon:


[…]

ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

User avatar
Jocose
a very large Chinese lizard man named Wu
a very large Chinese lizard man named Wu
Posts: 23609
Joined: Fri Jan 11, 2008 6:00 pm
Location: Moonbase Alpha
Contact:

Re: Faith in the News

Post by Jocose » Sat Mar 21, 2020 2:54 pm

"And for Freds sake, DO NOT point anyone towards CPS or you'll put them off of both Christianity and pipe smoking forever." ~ FredS

"This thread makes me sad." ~ SlowToke

"The yutz is silly Jocose. I have him foed yet still have to view his stupid and annoying thread titles." ~ Goose55

User avatar
wosbald
Crux' Cleveland Correspondent
Crux' Cleveland Correspondent
Posts: 21531
Joined: Mon Feb 25, 2008 6:00 pm
Location: Cleveland, Ohio
Contact:

Re: Faith in the News

Post by wosbald » Sun Mar 22, 2020 9:16 am

+JMJ+


► Show Spoiler

ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

User avatar
wosbald
Crux' Cleveland Correspondent
Crux' Cleveland Correspondent
Posts: 21531
Joined: Mon Feb 25, 2008 6:00 pm
Location: Cleveland, Ohio
Contact:

Re: Faith in the News

Post by wosbald » Tue Mar 24, 2020 10:21 am

+JMJ+

Author says evangelization should start with Christ, not moral dictums [In-Depth]
Image
Brandon Vogt is a bestselling author of eight books and the founder of ClaritasU. (Credit: Courtesy to Crux)

[Editor’s Note: Brandon Vogt is a bestselling author of eight books and the founder of ClaritasU, which trains Catholics how to talk about their faith, especially hot-button issues. He works as the Content Director for Bishop Robert Barron’s Word on Fire Catholic Ministries. Vogt’s work has been featured by several media outlets including NPR, FoxNews, CBS, EWTN, Vatican Radio, Our Sunday Visitor, National Review, and Christianity Today. Vogt serves as a consultant to the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops’ Committee on Evangelization and Catechesis. He’s also on the board of the Society of G.K. Chesterton and serves as President of the Central Florida Chesterton Society. He spoke to Charles Camosy about his new book, What to Say and How to Say It: Discuss Your Catholic Faith with Clarity and Confidence.]

Camosy: Your forthcoming book, What to Say and How to Say It: Discuss Your Catholic Faith with Clarity and Confidence, comes after your award-winning and bestselling book Why I Am Catholic (and You Should Be Too). Can you tell us a little a bit about the journey that led you to this new book? What prompted you to write it?

Vogt: Sure! My previous book (Why I Am Catholic) was designed to make a positive case for Catholicism, especially to atheists, agnostics, and “nones,” those who don’t identify with any religion. The goal was to show how the Catholic faith is true, good, and beautiful, and why everyone should consider it.

This book approaches things from the other end. It responds to the most common reasons people give for not being Catholic, whether they doubt God exists, question the Bible or the Eucharist, or balk at the Church’s sexual moral teachings. So, it’s more a defensive resource. After my first book, lots of Catholics became more comfortable making the positive case for Catholicism. This book helps them answer the toughest objections they’ll hear in response.

I noticed that you ordered the chapters in such a way that the topics on God, Sacred Scripture, and the Eucharist come before topics on morality and ethics like abortion, sexuality, and gender. Can you tell us something about why you ordered the topics this way?

Yes, that was intentional. It’s simply the way evangelization should always proceed — from God, to Christ, to the moral life. Many people want to jump straight to debating abortion, same-sex marriage, or transgenderism, because those are admittedly urgent, contentious issues. But when it comes to evangelization, that’s the wrong starting point. The starting point is God and his objective order, then Christ and his Church, and then finally the moral life (notably, this is precisely how the Catechism of the Catholic Church is arranged.)

So, the order is very important. Suppose a non-religious friend sees you going to Mass, or Eucharistic adoration, and can’t make sense of what appears to be you worshiping a piece of bread. You want to help them understand, so you begin by referring to Jesus’ words in John 6 about the Eucharist, but your friend might raise the obvious question, “But the Bible is just full of myths, and historians aren’t even sure Jesus even existed. Why should I trust what the Bible says?” Well, you might be taken aback, but from there you could share good reasons to trust the Gospels, especially when they suggest Jesus is the divine Son of God, but that would only raise another question from your friend: “Well, how can I believe that Jesus is God when I’m not even sure whether God exists?” So, you see how if you start at the wrong end of the path, assuming things the other person doesn’t already believe, you’ll have to keep going backward before taking even one small step forward. That’s why it makes sense to start with God, then move to Christ and the Church, and then the moral issues.

A hundred years ago, you could be pretty confident that most Americans you spoke with believed in God or trusted the Bible. So, you could skip those steps. But that’s not true today. That’s why those fundamental topics appear first in the book. Increasingly, people are not just denying the Eucharist — they’re denying God exists at all, or that miracles are possible. So that’s where we need to start, with the basic foundational objections.

[…]

ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

User avatar
wosbald
Crux' Cleveland Correspondent
Crux' Cleveland Correspondent
Posts: 21531
Joined: Mon Feb 25, 2008 6:00 pm
Location: Cleveland, Ohio
Contact:

Re: Faith in the News

Post by wosbald » Wed Mar 25, 2020 11:09 am

+JMJ+

Post-reformation theology of the priesthood influenced abuse crisis, author says [In-Depth]
Image
(Credit: Pixabay)

[Editor’s Note: Clare McGrath-Merkle, OCDS, DPhil, is a philosopher of religion and author of the 2018 book, Bérulle’s Spiritual Theology of Priesthood: A Study in Speculative Mysticism and Applied Metaphysics. She also earned an ABD status in spirituality, focusing on the priesthood, an MTS, and an MA from St. John’s College, Annapolis. She spoke to Charles Camosy.]

Camosy: You’ve done a lot of work on the theology of the priesthood. Can you give us the short version of your central view or a couple central ideas that could give Crux readers some insight into how you are thinking about this topic?

McGrath-Merkle: My work has been focused mainly on the theology of the priesthood and its possible role, if any, in the crisis of sexual abuse and cover-up. The causes of the crisis are, of course, varied, but I have wanted to try to understand how this theology might have somehow contributed to a clerical identity prone to the abuse of power.

The understanding I’ve come to is that what we think of as the official theology of the priesthood is actually a 400-year-old revolutionary one, linked to clerical formation spirituality. Its underlying spiritual theology has influenced the training of seminarians up until Vatican II and has had a major resurgence since the 90’s. Interestingly, it hasn’t been of much interest to most systematic theologians.

This theology was proposed in the early 17th century by a little-known cardinal-Pierre de Bérulle, the founder of the French School of Spirituality, and is a rather psychologically and spiritually unhealthy one. Leading up to my research on the possible historical roots of the crisis as found in this theology, I explored some current serious psychosocial maladaptions in priestly identity in a 2010 article.

Arguably, Bérulle’s innovations have contributed to an unhealthy priestly identity and culture over centuries, principally through both an over-identification with Christ and an exaggerated sacrificial spirituality.

What was behind these innovations?

Bérulle wanted to form a new kind of priest during a time when clerical corruption was still rampant in France, a half century after the Council of Trent’s reforms. He particularly wanted to defend the Church against Protestant objections to the necessary role of the priest in the sacrifice of the Mass.

Interestingly, he made major departures from tradition when he tried to answer Protestant Reformers on their own terms — who had rejected St. Thomas Aquinas, particularly his conceptualization of the sacramental character of the priesthood.

If I could boil it down to one central idea, Bérulle asserted that the priest is not just an instrument of Christ, as Aquinas asserted, but is somehow connected to Christ as a part of His Person. In fact, Bérulle proposed that priests pray constantly so that they could give over their person to Christ, the Incarnate Word, so that He could then replace His Person with theirs.

In terms of pious rhetoric today, the idea that the priest is in some kind of essentialist relation to Christ is defended by insisting there is an “ontological” difference between the priest and laity. The word “ontological” merely points to something having to do with being. Many documents, books, and popular articles on both the theology of the priesthood and priestly spirituality are available today that refer to this “ontological” difference between priests and the laity. But, if it’s used to denote an essential difference, it’s metaphysically impossible, because if a priest’s essence changed, he would no longer be human.

Bérulle’s priestly identity is very different than the priestly identity proposed by Pope St. Gregory the Great — a more humble, service-oriented but still cultic vision of the priest, which I have also explored as one model for renewal in a 2011 article. Gregory’s pastoral manual served the Church for a thousand years before the Berullian priestly identity and spirituality took over.

[…]

ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

User avatar
wosbald
Crux' Cleveland Correspondent
Crux' Cleveland Correspondent
Posts: 21531
Joined: Mon Feb 25, 2008 6:00 pm
Location: Cleveland, Ohio
Contact:

Re: Faith in the News

Post by wosbald » Thu Mar 26, 2020 8:35 am

+JMJ+

Catholic moral theology has important role as pandemic causes ethical dilemmas [In-Depth]
Image
A nurse at a drive up COVID-19 coronavirus testing station set up by the University of Washington Medical Center wears a face shield, mask, and other protective gear as she waits by tents, Friday, March 13, 2020, in Seattle. (Credit: Ted S. Warren/AP)

As the world faces the unprecedented effects of the COVID-19 coronavirus pandemic, thorny moral questions are arising.

From every level and sector of society, people are asking: What is the right thing to do?

From mundane issues such as how much toilet paper is too much toilet paper, to the life-and-death decisions being made in hospitals in northern Italy, ethical dilemmas abound.

Joseph Meaney is the president of the Philadelphia-based National Catholic Bioethics Center, and he told Crux that the Catholic moral framework is “centered on willingness to make sacrifices for others.”

What follows are excerpts of his conversation with Crux.

===========================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================

Crux: First of all, this is probably the most drastic international event since World War II — with huge sacrifices being asked of people. Are these sacrifices justified?

Meaney: In a word yes. The Catholic moral framework is centered on willingness to make sacrifices for others. There are many people whose lives can be saved by taking extraordinary measures. These strong measures are justified and even necessitated by the real potential for overburdening the health sector, especially intensive care capacities, in various countries.

It has to be said, however, that effectively shutting down huge sections of modern economies comes at a tremendous cost. The ethical analysis of what we should do as societies needs to take into account the potential for more deaths resulting from the loss of employment and the economic hardships and potential civil disorder that will result from an extended disruption of the normal activities of nations.

One of the problems associated with the COVID-19 pandemic is the large number of hospitalizations which — as we see in Italy — can overwhelm healthcare systems. This leads to major ethical questions, primarily: Who gets help? What must be taken into consideration when making these decisions.

There is a medical-moral duty to deliver care, so no one should be refused medical help. The agonizing problem that is currently confronting Italy, and potentially other countries soon, is that certain very intensive therapies cannot be given to more than a certain number of patients at a time. There are only so many ventilators available, for instance. A just form of triage may need to be put in place. The medical term “triage” refers to sorting patients on the basis of their immediate treatment needs while keeping in mind their chances of benefiting from available therapies.

Succinctly speaking, objective criteria must be used to give the most limited intensive therapies to those most in need who can still benefit from them. It is tragic when a patient has so many organ system failures that they are extremely unlikely to survive, and it would also be wrong to prioritize these patients for the limited number of ventilators over other seriously ill patients who would likely survive if given this chance. Similarly, it would be unacceptable to place a patient on a ventilator when they could clearly survive without one and when others are at grave risk of death if they cannot receive this medical care.

I add that everything must be done to increase the quantities of scarce medical equipment that is needed at this time. Also, compassionate care, including pain medication, must be provided to all patients, even if they cannot receive all the therapies we would wish to provide.

COVID-19 disproportionately affects the elderly. The median age of fatal cases in Italy is 79.5. However, there are still a large number of younger people needing ventilation in the hospital as they recover. This has led to some proposals to refuse ventilators for people over a certain age. Given the limit of resources, and the relative expectation of recovery based on age, can that be ethical?

No. It would not be ethical to triage a person out simply on the basis of their age, disability, sex, etc. It is true that some elderly patients may not meet objective criteria for ventilator access in a crisis situation because they are dying and it is impossible to save them, but that can also be true of younger patients. We have to be very mindful of not discriminating. The slippery slope goes downhill very rapidly once one starts on that road.

[…]

ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

Post Reply