Faith in the News

For those deep thinkers out there.
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wosbald
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Re: Faith in the News

Post by wosbald » Wed Aug 12, 2020 5:24 pm

+JMJ+

Intra-Thread Trackbacks: pg 122 / pg 122

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"Religious Liberty Task Force": pg 2



What Catholic social teaching says about property rights [In-Depth, Opinion]
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Photo by Alex D'Alessio on Unsplash

For another analysis of the Commission on Unalienable Rights’ draft report, see “Why you shouldn’t dismiss Mike Pompeo’s report on human rights,” by Drew Christiansen, S.J., published on July 23.

===========================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================

Last month, Secretary of State Michael Pompeo announced the release of “Unalienable Rights and the Securing of Freedom”, a draft report from the Commission on Unalienable Rights. Mr. Pompeo has charged that 11-person panel with determining how U.S. human rights policy could best promote the nation’s “founding principles”. Chaired by Mary Ann Glendon, former U.S. ambassador to the Holy See, the commission has surveyed the development of rights in the United States, placing them in “the major traditions that merged in America’s founding — Biblical faith, civic republicanism, and the modern tradition of freedom.”

In a section titled “The Distinctive American Rights Tradition,” the report, approved by all members of the commission, states, “Foremost among the unalienable rights that government is established to secure, from the founders’ point of view, are property rights and religious liberty.”

The understanding of these two rights as presented in the report is not consistent with Catholic doctrine on the social order.

[…]

While I respect the commission’s goal of considering the United States in the context of substantive philosophical commitments, the understanding of these two rights as presented in the report is not consistent with the wisdom of Catholic teaching on how a society can pursue the common good.

First, Catholic social teaching does advocate the protection of property rights, but only when strongly situated within what is called the universal destination of goods. That is, “Christian tradition has never recognized the right to private property as absolute and untouchable: ‘On the contrary, it has always understood this right within the broader context of the right common to all to use the goods of the whole of creation: the right to private property is subordinated to the right to common use, to the fact that goods are meant for everyone.’” (See the “Compendium of the Social Doctrine of the Church”, No. 177, quoting St. John Paul II’s Laborem Exercens.)

Because God intends the world to provide for the needs of every person, the distribution of resources must allow every human person with what is needed for a full life. In his encyclical Pacem in Terris, St. John XXIII explained: “Man has the right to live. He has the right to bodily integrity and to the means necessary for the proper development of life, particularly food, clothing, shelter, medical care, rest, and, finally, the necessary social services. In consequence, he has the right to be looked after in the event of ill health; disability stemming from his work; widowhood; old age; enforced unemployment; or whenever through no fault of his own he is deprived of the means of livelihood” (No. 11).

A defense of property, absent that context, functions to absolve those who own property from responsibility to those in desperate need. But Catholic teaching treats the withholding of resources from those in need as a failure of justice, and so private property always comes with a “social mortgage”.

[…]

Religious liberty must also respect the common good

Regarding religious liberty, the commission’s narrative repeatedly names “Protestant Christianity” as one of “the traditions that formed the American spirit.” This tradition is described as “infused with the beautiful Biblical teachings that every human being is imbued with dignity and bears responsibilities toward fellow human beings, because each is made in the image of God."

Such language privileges a certain reading of biblical faith, bringing it into the sphere of “special recognition” — of which the “Compendium” says, “Such recognition must in no way create discrimination within the civil or social order for other religious groups” (No. 423). The church’s witness to the Gospel always requires (and Catholics must acknowledge that it often has failed in this) the defense of the well-being of persons who do not accept the Gospel, in keeping with the commands to love both neighbor and enemy. The purpose of the right to religious liberty within Catholic thought is both to make room for the church’s freedom to give witness to the Gospel and also to honor the call of God for every person to freely enter into communion with the divine life. These two purposes are not at odds.

[…]

The commission does not advocate discrimination against anyone’s conscience, certainly. But the narrative of its draft report implies that those whose Christianity fits into this American tradition may have a privileged place in its exercise. This makes it even more important to remember that Catholic teaching says the right to religious liberty “is not of itself an unlimited right. The just limits of the exercise of religious freedom must be determined in each social situation with political prudence, according to the requirements of the common good, and ratified by the civil authority through legal norms consistent with the objective moral order” (No. 422).

The commission report’s emphasis on a distinctive and rational U.S. tradition of rights, capable of self-correction, appears to be an attempt to provide intellectual underpinnings for a kind of moral declaration of independence from international human rights governance. That is a complicated proposition for U.S. Catholics. The church has supported and encouraged the development of international agreements on human rights, though such agreements do not always advocate positions consistent with Catholic teaching.

Further, what the report advocates as the “tradition” in the United States is, from the perspective of Catholic teaching, seriously flawed. A society that treats the rights to property and to religious liberty in this way — isolated from the context of the requirements of the universal destination of goods, the common good and the human dignity of all persons — will not be able to overcome the legacy of injustice that has marked our shared life in the United States.

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"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: Faith in the News

Post by wosbald » Sun Aug 16, 2020 3:35 pm

+JMJ+

Pope baptizes formerly conjoined twins who were separated at Vatican hospital
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Pope Francis baptized Ervina and Prefina Bangalo on August, Friday 7, 2020. The two-year old conjoined twins had been successfully separated at a Vatican-ran hospital in Rome in June. (Credit: Antoinette Montaigne/Twitter)

Pope Francis on Thursday baptized conjoined twins who had been separated at a Vatican-owned hospital in June.

The announcement of the baptism came not from the Vatican but from Antoinette Montaigne, a politician from Central African Republic, where the girls were born with fused skulls on June 29, 2018, in the town of Mbaiki.

When the twins were stable enough to make the trip, they were transferred to the capital, Bangui, where they were cared for in a hospital built with the help of the Bambino Gesu Pediatric Hospital, a Vatican-owned hospital in Rome. The unit built in the Central African Republic was a project started after Pope Francis visited the war-torn country in 2015.

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Ervina and Prefina with their mother at the Bambino Gesu Pediatric Hospital on June 29, 2020. (Credit: Bambino Gesu Hospital)

In Bangui, the family met with Mariella Enoc, the Italian director of the Bambino Gesu, who made the decision to transfer the girls to Rome to see if a separation was possible. A special taskforce was created to study the case, and decided it was worth the risk.

It took three surgeries and hundreds of man-hours but Ervina and Prefina Bangalo were successfully separated with a final surgery on June 5 that ran for 18-hours, involving 30 specialists.

[…]

“Now that they are separated and doing well, I would like them to be baptized by Pope Francis, who has always taken care of the children of Bangui. My little ones can now grow up, study and become doctors to save other children,” she had said.

On Thursday, that wish came truth.

[…]



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"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: Faith in the News

Post by wosbald » Tue Aug 18, 2020 12:00 am

+JMJ+

UK Catholic group says migrants crossing Channel because ‘lives under threat’ [In-Depth]
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A Border Force vessel assist a group of people thought to be migrants on board from their inflatable dinghy in the Channel, Monday Aug. 10, 2020. A Royal Air Force surveillance plane is flying over the English Channel as the British government tries to curb the number of people crossing from France in small boats. Britain’s Conservative government has talked tough amid a surge in the number of migrants crossing the Channel during recent warm summer weather. (Credit: Gareth Fuller/PA via AP)

LEICESTER, United Kingdom — Britain’s leading Catholic refugee agency says Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s declaration he wanted to “send away” asylum seekers might “pre-judge people’s asylum claims without considering them individually.”

Johnson was speaking about an uptick of asylum seekers making their way to the United Kingdom from France. Figures show that more than 4,000 people have crossed the English Channel so far this year.

Officials from the UK and France met on Tuesday about the issue and agreed to “comprehensive action plan” to make such crossings “unviable.”

Speaking on Monday, Johnson called Channel crossings by asylum seekers a “very bad and stupid and dangerous and criminal thing to do,” and added his Conservative government wanted to “look at the legal framework that means that when people do get here, it is very, very difficult to then send them away again,” referring to “the panoply of laws that an illegal immigrant has at his or her disposal.”

Sarah Teather, the director of Jesuit Refugee Service UK (JRS UK), noted that people are making the “perilous journeys” across the Channel “because they are desperate and because their lives are under threat.”

“If the government is serious about preventing Channel crossings, it must provide safe routes for people seeking sanctuary to come to the UK,” she told Crux in a statement.

“Instead, we hear those forced to undertake dangerous crossing described as criminal. To protect human life, it is vital that we uphold the right to seek asylum, making it safer to cross borders in order to do so, and not prejudging the cases of those obliged to cross informally,” Teather added.

[…]

A JRS UK spokesperson took issue with the language used by the prime minister, saying the government “should prioritise a culture of protection, bringing an end to the current culture of disbelief and the hostile environment which already have a devastating effect on the lives of those seeking asylum here.”

“First, it is important to note that people are allowed to cross borders informally in order to seek asylum, so it is inaccurate to describe them as ‘illegal immigrants.’ In fact, our experience is that people often have to struggle for years to get international protection they badly need. Many initially refused are ultimately recognised as refugees, which raises worrying questions about how many people we are forcibly removing back into danger after refusing their asylum claims,” the spokesperson told Crux.

“Unfortunately, comments like the PM’s do seem to pre-judge people’s asylum claims without considering them individually, and if this were carried over into the asylum determination system, which is already crippled by a culture of disbelief, that would be very disturbing and deny many refugees international protection,” JRS UK added.

[…]

JRS UK noted that the vast majority of asylum seekers do stay on the continent, and of those trying to reach the UK normally have family ties or other links to the country.

“Language plays a big part too, as you are more likely to integrate well if you speak the local language,” the JRS UK spokesperson told Crux.

“Those who come to the UK to seek asylum find themselves in desperate situations as they flee violence and persecution and in many cases have suffered traumatic abuse at the hands of traffickers along the way. They absolutely have the right to seek asylum where they need to, and this includes the right to be reunited with family. They have often been forced to risk their lives and make these dangerous journeys due to the lack of safe and legal routes to migrate and seek asylum,” the representative said.

JRS UK also called on the UK to implement a post-EU system “where people seeking asylum can arrive safely in the UK and have their claims processed, and where it is possible for people seeking asylum to reunite with family.”

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"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: Faith in the News

Post by wosbald » Wed Aug 19, 2020 4:16 pm

+JMJ+

Fordham’s Bryan Massingale: White Catholics need to sit with the discomfort of systemic racism [Video]
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A man in Washington holds up a child during a protest against racial inequality June 6, 2020. Demonstrations continue after a white police officer in Minnesota was caught on a bystander's video May 25 pressing his knee into the neck of George Floyd, an African American, who was later pronounced dead at a hospital. (CNS photo/Eric Thayer, Reuters)

White Catholics need to be challenged by their religious leaders if the church is to be an effective partner in the fight against systemic racism because for too long “the Catholic Church has prioritized the comfort of whites over a commitment to justice.”

That is the message from the Rev. Bryan Massingale, an ethicist at Fordham University who has spent his nearly four decades as a priest working for racial justice in the church. In an interview with America on June 5, Father Massingale said the recent viral video of a white woman in New York calling the police to report an African-American man who asked her to obey park rules compelled him to reflect on how white supremacy operates in the United States.

“What Amy Cooper reveals are the dynamics of whiteness that sustain the entire system of racism,” Father Massingale said. “She assumed that her race would work in her benefit.”

He said the viral video was effective in showing how white privilege works because he thinks most white people believe they are not capable of carrying out the type of violence that resulted in the killing of George Floyd by a Minneapolis police officer. In Ms. Cooper’s case, calling the police on Christian Cooper and emphasizing his race was a reflexive act, the result of systematic racism that taught her and other white people how to use race to their advantage.

“She gives us a window into the ways of whiteness, how we understand, even though we don’t want to admit it, how race works in America,” Father Massingale said. “How it works to frame people of color in certain ways. And how it works to frame people, white people, in certain ways.

“We know how it works, even though we don’t want to admit it,” he added.

[…]

As for the church, he said Catholics who support the pro-life movement need to be aware of underlying motives.

“All too often in this church, we find a concern for pro-life being used to soft-pedal concern for racism,” he said. “And we’ve seen that in terms of people supporting the policies of a president — saying, ‘He’s a pro-life president’ — despite the fact that his administration has enacted a draconian immigration policy, separating families, consigning brown children into cages, a president who has routinely insulted people of color. And yet Catholics will justify their support for him because he’s ‘pro-life.’”

[…]

The author of Racial Justice in the Catholic Church, Father Massingale is a noted speaker and author about race and sexuality in the Catholic Church. Asked about his work advocating for L.G.B.T. people in the church, he said that there are parallels because Catholics often insert a “but” when talking about justice for people of color or L.G.B.T. people.

“We want to put qualifiers, saying, ‘I’m for racial justice, as long as they’re not too angry,’ or we want to defend L.G.B.T.Q. people, but we always have to insert that their behavior is immoral,” he said.

“God has given people of color equal dignity, value and worth. God has given L.G.B.T. people equal dignity, value and worth,” he said. “We need to catch up with God and finally be a church that can assert our belief in the equal human dignity of all of God’s creatures.”

Catholics and other believers have a unique role to play in the fight for justice, Father Massingale said, through prayer. He called white supremacy and systemic racism “a spiritual disorder.”

“This reflects a spiritual wound, and until we have the ability to engage in deep forms of prayer, not just saying prayers but deep forms of prayer … asking the Holy Spirit to come into our lives and to change our hearts and to make us willing to see what we’d rather not see, until we’re willing to do that, we’re going to be caught in these perpetual cycles,” he said.



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"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: Faith in the News

Post by wosbald » Fri Aug 21, 2020 10:07 am

+JMJ+

Immigrants with COVID-19 symptoms may suffer silently, fearing deportation [In-Depth]
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Enedelia Martinez holds a picture of her partner, Raul Castaneda, who died of COVID-19 in April, at their Shoreview, Minn., home July 20, 2020. Experts and those who minister to immigrant communities say fears about finances and the threat of deportation may be keeping some who are ill from seeking testing and treatment for the coronavirus. (Credit: Dave Hrbacek/The Catholic Spirit via CNS)

ST. PAUL, Minnesota — Raul Castaneda, 48, didn’t feel well, with fluctuating fevers and fatigue, in the two weeks before he died of COVID-19 in April. But he didn’t want to seek medical attention.

He and his family lacked health insurance for one thing, his loved ones and friends said. But being an immigrant in the country illegally who was afraid of arrest and removal from the country undoubtedly was another factor.

“In every moment he was aware of the danger that he could be arrested,” said Carlos Urrutia, an immigrant like Castaneda who advocates for economic and racial justice through ISAIAH, a St. Paul-based coalition of faith communities. “Why would he not think if he goes to the hospital — in addition to the money — why would he not think that he is a person ICE (Immigration and Customs Enforcement) could arrest?”

Urrutia, 46, and Richard Podvin, both members with Castaneda of St. Odilia Parish in Shoreview, said they fear Castaneda’s predicament is shared by many undocumented immigrants, who might suffer with the novel coronavirus at the risk of their own lives and the lives of their loved ones.

“Undocumented immigrants often do not have insurance, don’t have financial resources to pay emergency room costs, and feel pressure to go to work no matter how they feel, to support their families,” Podvin said. “In addition, they are fearful of being a ‘public charge’ and later being denied consideration” for permanent residency.

However, Podvin said, the federal government has stated that it won’t consider immigrants seeking medical care for COVID-19 or other communicable diseases to be a factor in “public charge” determinations, which are made by the federal government as it tries to ensure immigrants entering the country or seeking permanent residency can support themselves.

But for many immigrants, that message of hope has been drowned out by the Trump administration in February broadening its definition of public charge — from someone who might be dependent on income assistance or long-term, institutionalized care from the government — to also include immigrants receiving public assistance such as Medicaid, housing vouchers, rental assistance or food stamps, Podvin said.

That broader definition has prompted fears among immigrants about drawing attention to themselves, he said.

[…]

Podvin contacted The Catholic Spirit, newspaper of the Archdiocese of St. Paul and Minneapolis, to draw attention to Castaneda’s death and the plight of immigrants in the country without papers who are afraid to seek medical care in the midst of the pandemic.

It’s important for people in the community to know about their fears and the protection afforded by the federal government, so they can share those facts and encourage undocumented immigrants to seek help when they need it, Podvin said. Seeking proper medical care also protects the broader community, he said.

[…]

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"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: Faith in the News

Post by wosbald » Sun Aug 23, 2020 10:08 am

+JMJ+

Subject Header: Capital Punishment/Death Penalty
Intra-Thread Trackbacks: pg 121

Inter-Thread Trackbacks:
"I'm Starting to Like This Pope": pg 66 / pg 67 / pg 67 / pg 67 / pg 67 / pg 67 / pg 68 / pg 101 / pg 101 / pg 107 / 124



Church in the Philippines condemns efforts to resurrect capital punishment [In-Depth]
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This Oct. 9, 2014, file photo shows the gurney in the the execution chamber at the Oklahoma State Penitentiary in McAlester, Oklahoma. (Credit: Sue Ogrocki/AP)

Catholic leaders in the Philippines are urging Congress to ignore the call of President Rodrigo Duterte to reimpose the death penalty in the country.

Both the Philippines House of Representatives and Senate are considering bills to reinstate the practice, which was abolished in the country in 2006.

Duterte has advocated reinstituting capital punishment since he became president on a tough on crime platform in 2016.

On Aug. 11, the The Sangguniang Laiko ng Pilipinas [the bishops’ conference commission on the laity] issued a statement saying it “laments and decries the actuations of our elected lawmakers in calling back from its grave the death penalty proposals.”

The commission urged lawmakers “to remove the blinders that prevent you from seeing that death penalty is an offense ‘against the inviolability of life and the dignity of the human person.’”

“Its reimposition will single out for punishment the most vulnerable sectors of society who have no means to defend themselves. Moreover, as a country, our failure to honor our commitment, with the International Community, not to bring back death penalty, will not only put us in a bad light but lose their respect as well,” the statement continued.

[…]

In a separate statement, the clergy of the Archdiocese of Manila condemned members of Congress for “the lack of independence and imprudence of some of them who decided to immediately bow to the wishes of President Rodrigo Duterte by filing death penalty bills while we are still mired in this seemingly insurmountable crisis brought by COVID-19.”

[…]

However, the Manila clergy emphasized that their support for victims and their families “does not oblige us to push for the re-imposition of the penalty of death.”

“Instead, we call the attention of our leaders and lawmakers to make every effort to establish a system of justice that brings restoration and harmony and not death,” the letter said.

The Episcopal Commission on Prison Pastoral Care of the Catholic Bishops’ Conference of the Philippines (CBCP-ECPPC) issued a statement saying the death penalty “violates the inherent dignity of a person, which is not lost despite the commission of a crime.”

[…]

“The death penalty is tilted against the most vulnerable sectors of society, the marginalized and the poor. Experience shows that most, if not all persons meted the death penalty are the poor and uneducated, who cannot afford prominent lawyers to defend them,” it continued.

Instead, the bishops called on congress to focus on three other areas confronting the Philippines.
  • To focus its full attention to coming up with a comprehensive program to combat the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic and to alleviate the plight especially of the poor who are the ones most adversely affected by the pandemic.
  • To formulate laws and effectively implement existing ones aimed at modernizing and reforming the judicial and correctional systems to make them more restorative and rehabilitative, rather than punitive. This will enable convicted prisoners to be truly reformed and, after they have served time, be ready to return to the mainstream of society.
  • To stop the reality of graft and corruption in the various institutions that manage the Philippines’s jails and penitentiaries, so that the basic human rights of prisoners are respected, their legitimate demands properly heard and their needs adequately responded to.
“No person, no matter how evil he is perceived to be, is beyond reformation,” the CBCP-ECPPC statement said.

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"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: Faith in the News

Post by wosbald » Tue Aug 25, 2020 9:04 am

+JMJ+

Subject Header: Holy Land Peace
Intra-Thread Trackbacks: pg 119 / pg 120 / pg 121 / pg 121 / pg 121

Inter-Thread Trackbacks:
"The Catholic Thread": pg 142 / pg 142 / pg 143
"President Trump is a problem..." pg 15 / pg 16 / pg 18
"Something Good": pg 2



Trump: Embassy move was for Evangelicals — Jews not excited about it
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President Trump said that moving the U.S. embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem was for Evangelicals during a rally in Oshkosh, Wis. on Monday.

“We moved the capital of Israel to Jerusalem. That’s for the Evangelicals. You know, it’s amazing with that: The Evangelicals are more excited about that than Jewish people. Right, it’s incredible,” said the president to a cheering crowd.


Jerusalem has been Israel’s capital since 1949; most major government institutions, such as the Knesset, supreme court and office of the prime minister have been based there since the 1950s. Trump did, however, move the American embassy there.

Of Evangelical Christians, 53% supported the decision while only 40% opposed, according to a poll by the Brookings Institution.

Some 59% percent of Jews somewhat (14%) or strongly (45%) disapproved of how the president is handling U.S.-Israel relations, according to a poll by the American Jewish Committee.

Several prominent Evangelical figures such as Pastors John Hagee and Robert Jeffress were included in the American delegation that opened the new embassy.

Trump has implied before that Jews are single-issue voters and that American Jewish interests are equivalent to Israeli ones.

In April of last year, President Trump referred to Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu as “your prIme minister” while addressing members of the Republican Jewish Coalition. A few months later, while speaking to press in the Oval Office, he said that Jews who vote Democratic show “great disloyalty.”

[…]

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"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: Faith in the News

Post by ReverendThom » Tue Aug 25, 2020 10:37 am

This is interesting.

Catholic priest finds out he's not a Catholic. Oops
https://www.catholicnewsagency.com/news ... olic-42001
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Re: Faith in the News

Post by Adam Z » Tue Aug 25, 2020 11:50 am

ReverendThom wrote:
Tue Aug 25, 2020 10:37 am
This is interesting.

Catholic priest finds out he's not a Catholic. Oops
https://www.catholicnewsagency.com/news ... olic-42001
Wow... What a convoluted mess this has created, all because decades ago a deacon said "we" instead of "I".

I wonder how many couples will actually follow through with going through another wedding ceremony since their first one is now considered invalid, and how many people who were properly baptized by this Detroit priest will be rebaptized because of this revelation that according to church teaching he wasn't qualified to baptize.

But of course, the ripple effects spread far further. Hood’s initial lack of a valid baptism means that the Masses, confirmations, absolutions and anointings— and likely at least some of the marriages— that Hood had performed as a priest were not valid.


Per the information given in the article, I wonder why some of the marriages he performed are considered valid and others are not. This is where I like to think that there is a certain element of grace for those married and baptized by this priest. I don't think this is like Uzzah touching the Ark of the Covenant (2 Samuel 6:1-7). I cannot think that people married by this Detroit priest are going to be considered by the Lord to have been living with one another in a state of sin. SMH.
[Insert pithy quote here]

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Re: Faith in the News

Post by hugodrax » Tue Aug 25, 2020 12:13 pm

Adam Z wrote:
Tue Aug 25, 2020 11:50 am
ReverendThom wrote:
Tue Aug 25, 2020 10:37 am
This is interesting.

Catholic priest finds out he's not a Catholic. Oops
https://www.catholicnewsagency.com/news ... olic-42001
Wow... What a convoluted mess this has created, all because decades ago a deacon said "we" instead of "I".

I wonder how many couples will actually follow through with going through another wedding ceremony since their first one is now considered invalid, and how many people who were properly baptized by this Detroit priest will be rebaptized because of this revelation that according to church teaching he wasn't qualified to baptize.

But of course, the ripple effects spread far further. Hood’s initial lack of a valid baptism means that the Masses, confirmations, absolutions and anointings— and likely at least some of the marriages— that Hood had performed as a priest were not valid.


Per the information given in the article, I wonder why some of the marriages he performed are considered valid and others are not. This is where I like to think that there is a certain element of grace for those married and baptized by this priest. I don't think this is like Uzzah touching the Ark of the Covenant (2 Samuel 6:1-7). I cannot think that people married by this Detroit priest are going to be considered by the Lord to have been living with one another in a state of sin. SMH.
Exactly. There is a provision in the Catechism for this. Any absolution he did, however, is worthless.

This is why priests shouldn't eff around. Making up your own words is no different than sacrificing in high places or building a good old Asheroth.
Everything we hear is an opinion, not a fact. Everything we see is a perspective, not the truth
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Re: Faith in the News

Post by wosbald » Tue Aug 25, 2020 12:38 pm

+JMJ+
Adam Z wrote:
Tue Aug 25, 2020 11:50 am
[…]

… how many people who were properly baptized by this Detroit priest will be rebaptized because of this revelation that according to church teaching he wasn't qualified to baptize.

[…]

… This is where I like to think that there is a certain element of grace for those married and baptized by this priest. …

[…]
“Some of the things Father Matthew did were invalid, but his baptisms were valid because you don’t need to be a priest to perform baptism,” [Father Stephen Pullis, director of evangelization and missionary discipleship for the archdiocese] said, although the church strongly prefers a priest or deacon except in cases of emergency. “If someone was baptized by Father Matthew, they should have no doubt their baptism was valid.” [LINK]

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"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Cleon
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Re: Faith in the News

Post by Cleon » Tue Aug 25, 2020 2:40 pm

hugodrax wrote:
Tue Aug 25, 2020 12:13 pm
Adam Z wrote:
Tue Aug 25, 2020 11:50 am
ReverendThom wrote:
Tue Aug 25, 2020 10:37 am
This is interesting.

Catholic priest finds out he's not a Catholic. Oops
https://www.catholicnewsagency.com/news ... olic-42001
Wow... What a convoluted mess this has created, all because decades ago a deacon said "we" instead of "I".

I wonder how many couples will actually follow through with going through another wedding ceremony since their first one is now considered invalid, and how many people who were properly baptized by this Detroit priest will be rebaptized because of this revelation that according to church teaching he wasn't qualified to baptize.

But of course, the ripple effects spread far further. Hood’s initial lack of a valid baptism means that the Masses, confirmations, absolutions and anointings— and likely at least some of the marriages— that Hood had performed as a priest were not valid.


Per the information given in the article, I wonder why some of the marriages he performed are considered valid and others are not. This is where I like to think that there is a certain element of grace for those married and baptized by this priest. I don't think this is like Uzzah touching the Ark of the Covenant (2 Samuel 6:1-7). I cannot think that people married by this Detroit priest are going to be considered by the Lord to have been living with one another in a state of sin. SMH.
Exactly. There is a provision in the Catechism for this. Any absolution he did, however, is worthless.

This is why priests shouldn't eff around. Making up your own words is no different than sacrificing in high places or building a good old Asheroth.
What if he didn't mean to say "we"? What if the intention was to say "I" but he just said it that way and never caught himself? I know it's not the case here, by this particular Deacon, but what if? Does intent matter?

I'm not Catholic, but can't the Archdiocese ask for a special exception or some more clarification?
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Re: Faith in the News

Post by hugodrax » Tue Aug 25, 2020 6:31 pm

Cleon wrote:
Tue Aug 25, 2020 2:40 pm
hugodrax wrote:
Tue Aug 25, 2020 12:13 pm
Adam Z wrote:
Tue Aug 25, 2020 11:50 am
ReverendThom wrote:
Tue Aug 25, 2020 10:37 am
This is interesting.

Catholic priest finds out he's not a Catholic. Oops
https://www.catholicnewsagency.com/news ... olic-42001
Wow... What a convoluted mess this has created, all because decades ago a deacon said "we" instead of "I".

I wonder how many couples will actually follow through with going through another wedding ceremony since their first one is now considered invalid, and how many people who were properly baptized by this Detroit priest will be rebaptized because of this revelation that according to church teaching he wasn't qualified to baptize.

But of course, the ripple effects spread far further. Hood’s initial lack of a valid baptism means that the Masses, confirmations, absolutions and anointings— and likely at least some of the marriages— that Hood had performed as a priest were not valid.


Per the information given in the article, I wonder why some of the marriages he performed are considered valid and others are not. This is where I like to think that there is a certain element of grace for those married and baptized by this priest. I don't think this is like Uzzah touching the Ark of the Covenant (2 Samuel 6:1-7). I cannot think that people married by this Detroit priest are going to be considered by the Lord to have been living with one another in a state of sin. SMH.
Exactly. There is a provision in the Catechism for this. Any absolution he did, however, is worthless.

This is why priests shouldn't eff around. Making up your own words is no different than sacrificing in high places or building a good old Asheroth.
What if he didn't mean to say "we"? What if the intention was to say "I" but he just said it that way and never caught himself? I know it's not the case here, by this particular Deacon, but what if? Does intent matter?

I'm not Catholic, but can't the Archdiocese ask for a special exception or some more clarification?
Not for baptism. The CDF has made this clear. This fellow needs baptized and re-ordained and Father McFeelGood really fucked up a lot of lives when he decided to switch the rubrics for "let's just wing it."
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Re: Faith in the News

Post by wosbald » Wed Aug 26, 2020 10:25 am

+JMJ+

Church spars with Sicily government over migrant expulsion order [In-Depth]
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A Border Force vessel assist a group of people thought to be migrants on board from their inflatable dinghy in the Channel, Monday Aug. 10, 2020. (Credit: Gareth Fuller/PA via AP)

ROME — Church leaders in Sicily have criticized the directive of a local political to expel all migrants in the region and close reception centers on the alleged basis of public safety amid the coronavirus, calling the move hypocritical, discriminatory and dangerous.

Earlier this month Nello Musumeci, the center-right president of the Italian region of Sicily, issued a decree closing all migrant welcome centers considered to be hotspots for the COVID-19 coronavirus on the ground of public health and safety, setting the deadline to comply to Aug. 14 at midnight.

Musumeci’s Diventera Bellissima party is an ally of the rightwing Lega party, whose leader. Ex-deputy prime minister Matteo Salvini, pushed a hardline anti-migrant agenda during his June 2018-September 2019 term that met resistance from numerous Church authorities, including Pope Francis.

In Musumeci’s decree, he insisted that “all migrants present in the hotspots and in each reception center must without exception be transferred and/or relocated to other structures outside of the territory of Sicilian region, as it is not currently possible to guarantee their safety on the island in compliance with the health measures to prevent contagion.”

This directive was immediately met with backlash from both left-leaning politicians and Catholic leaders in Sicily, including the Diocese of Palermo and the coadjutor Archbishop of Agrigento, Alessandro Damiano, who among others, have expressed their “strong concern and firm dissent.”

A statement from the Archdiocese of Palermo’s migrant office and the local Caritas insisted that Musumeci’s order “chooses the path of the umpteenth denial of the human right to mobility, the mystifying path of a new conscious discrimination.”

Musumenci, the statement said, has in recent months done nothing to implement nation-wide safety measures for the coronavirus outlined by the Italian government in May, “nor have security protocols been put into place to avoid gatherings or other forms of dangerous promiscuity.”

To crack down on migrant centers, then, is not only arbitrary, but it sends “an intimately wrong and anthropologically dangerous message.”

“Intimately wrong because it attributes to migrants the responsibility for the spread of the contagion which, if anything, is to be attributed to the lack of protocols and adequate measures to protect citizens of the island and anyone who comes to Sicily,” the Church organizations said, adding that it is dangerous because “it equates the poor with the infectors and once again divides humanity in two, unwittingly preparing and not avoiding the planetary catastrophe that will come from a disunited and inhumane world.”

[…]

In an Aug. 24 statement, the Palermo and Catania territorial headquarters of the Jesuit-run Centro Astalli refugee center also chimed in, expressing “serious concern for the situation of the migrants who recently arrived on the island and the welcome they received.”

Pointing to the fact they have been on “the front line” for years in caring for and welcoming migrants to Sicily, the Centro Astalli said the real emergency is not the potential spread of contagion in migrant centers, but “the people who die in the Mediterranean and the causes which prompt them to flee their countries oppressed by wars, humanitarian crises and grave social injustices.”

[…]

“We do not find ourselves in front of an unexpected emergency, but rather, today we are paying the very high price of the effects of the security decrees,” they said, adding that “the migratory policies, restrictive and closing — if not even discriminatory — which have characterized the past year exacerbate the precariousness of life, exclusion and irregularity, making the whole of society more vulnerable.”

“Today in Sicily,” they added, “we see damages caused by not having invested in the protection, welcome and integration of migrants.”

The standoff in Sicily comes as the European Un𝗂on faces increased pressure over a new wave of migrant deaths off the coast of Libya among those attempting to cross the Mediterranean.

[…]

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"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: Faith in the News

Post by wosbald » Thu Aug 27, 2020 10:58 am

+JMJ+

Subject Header: Capital Punishment/Death Penalty
Intra-Thread Trackbacks: pg 121 / pg 123

Inter-Thread Trackbacks:
"I'm Starting to Like This Pope": pg 66 / pg 67 / pg 67 / pg 67 / pg 67 / pg 67 / pg 68 / pg 101 / pg 101 / pg 107 / 124



The federal government is about to execute the only Native American man on death row — despite his tribe’s wishes. [In-Depth]
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Auska Mitchell holds a photograph of his nephew, Lezmond Mitchell, on Aug. 21 in the Phoenix area. Lezmond Mitchell is scheduled to be executed this Wednesday, Aug. 26. (AP Photo/Jonathan J. Cooper)

In 1991, the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops called on the church to be “alert and active regarding federal policies which … undermine Native American lives, dignity, and rights.” One effort to devalue the dignity of Native Americans is unfolding right now, as the federal government plans the execution of Lezmond Mitchell, the only Native American on federal death row. Mr. Mitchell, who is Navajo, is scheduled to be executed on Aug. 26, over the objections of the Navajo Nation, for a crime committed against Navajo citizens on Navajo land.

As Catholics, we uphold that the dignity of the human person is God-given and inviolable. It is this belief that leads us to oppose the death penalty in all cases and work for its abolition worldwide in accordance with Pope Francis’ revision of the Catechism of the Catholic Church in 2018. But ours is not the only tradition which espouses this hallowed tenet. Navajo culture, too, professes the sanctity of life, a teaching which undergirds the opposition of the Navajo Nation and many other tribes to the practice of capital punishment.

The federal government’s planned execution of Mr. Mitchell violates the Navajo Nation’s cultural values, serves as a manifestation of the racial oppression inflicted upon Native Americans for centuries in the United States and devalues the sacred dignity of human life.

Lezmond Mitchell and his co-defendant, Johnny Orsinger, were convicted in 2003 for the brutal killing of Alyce Slim, 63, and her 9-year-old granddaughter, Tiffany Lee. The crime was committed on Native American territory, which, under the Federal Death Penalty Act, should have made a murder case subject to Native approval before any death sentence could be sought. (Mr. Orsinger, it should be noted, was 17 at the time of the killings and thus ineligible for a death sentence under any circumstance.)

The Navajo Nation opposes the death penalty for Mr. Mitchell. But instead of respecting the tribe’s wishes, the federal government has used a legal loophole to pursue his death sentence, trying him for carjacking resulting in death — a federal offense that did not depend on the crime occurring on tribal land — and sidestepping the Navajo Nation’s aversion to the use of capital punishment.

The death sentence for Mr. Mitchell seemed only symbolic during the federal government’s 17-year hiatus from the practice of executions. But in July 2019, the U.S. Department of Justice announced it would resume lethal injections, and Lezmond Mitchell was one of the first whose execution date was set.

After a year of legal challenges, federal executions officially restarted in July 2020, drawing an outcry of Catholic opposition. (See “Sister Helen Prejean: Stop the federal killings,” published by America on July 15.) Now Mr. Mitchell stands to be executed unless President Trump commutes his sentence.

The president of the Navajo Nation, Jonathan Nez, made a personal appeal to request that clemency be granted, and letters supporting clemency have also come from the Navajo vice president, the Navajo Nation Tribal Council, the National Congress of American Indians, more than a dozen other Native American tribes and hundreds of individual Native American citizens.

Catholics can join this chorus of voices by calling for Mr. Trump to respect the God-given dignity of Mr. Mitchell by commuting his death sentence to life without the possibility of release.

[…]

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"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: Faith in the News

Post by wosbald » Sat Aug 29, 2020 12:40 pm

+JMJ+

10 years later, still no answers for families of San Fernando massacre victims [In-Depth]
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In this Sept. 1, 2010 file photo, police wearing face-masks guard a truck that arrived carrying the bodies of some of the 72 migrants who were killed in northern Mexico while trying to reach the US border, at a funeral home in Mexico City. (Credit: Eduardo Verdugo/AP)

ROSARIO, Argentina — Ten years ago, 72 migrants “on a journey of hope” — as Pope Francis described it — were massacred by the Los Zetas cartel in San Fernando, Mexico. Although there are 15 people detained for the crime, no one has been convicted.

The migrants were traveling from several Latin American countries and were trying to reach the United States. In the state of Tamaulipas, in north-eastern Mexico, they were stopped by the drug traffickers, who murdered them after they refused to be used as drug mules.

They were 90 miles away from Brownsville, Texas.

Tamaulipas, which provides the quickest route from Central America to the United States, is infamous for being the battle ground between two notorious criminal gangs, Los Zetas and the Gulf Cartel.

After the end of his Sunday Angelus prayer, Pope Francis marked the anniversary, saying that the migrants murdered “were people from various countries looking for a better life. The Lord will hold us to account for all of the migrants who’ve fallen on their journey of Hope.”

On Monday — the anniversary of the massacre — Francis sent out a in which he reiterated the idea of being held accountable for the death of migrants, but also expressing “my solidarity with the families of the victims who today are still asking for truth and justice.”

Although Francis is the most recognizable figured who has spoken out about the massacre in recent days, he’s far from being the only one. For instance, the Archbishop of San Salvador, capital of El Salvador, called for justice in the case.

“To date, ten years have passed and that dreadful crime, like many others committed against our migrant brothers, continues to go unpunished,” said Archbishop José Luis Escobar Alas.

Escobar Alas said that “we demand that the corresponding authorities provide justice to the victims and we raise our voices to demand due respect for human rights for all our migrant brothers.”

Fourteen of the migrants killed were from El Salvador. The others came from Brazil (3), Ecuador (5), Honduras (24), Guatemala (13) and one of them was a citizen of India. Of those killed, 58 were men, 14 women.

The Mexican bishops conference released its own statement on Sunday, signed by Bishop José Guadalupe Torres Campos of Ciudad Juarez and head of the migrants section of the conference.

“Migrants of different nationalities, who were looking for a better life, were locked in an abandoned bodega,” the statement says. “There, they were shot at because they refused to work for criminals, transporting in their bags drugs headed towards the United States.”

[…]

ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: Faith in the News

Post by wosbald » Sun Aug 30, 2020 9:52 am

+JMJ+

Evangelicals ask Ivanka Trump to help protect migrant kids
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More than a dozen prominent evangelicals are appealing to first daughter and presidential adviser Ivanka Trump to help ensure the Trump administration adheres to federal anti-trafficking law in its treatment of unaccompanied migrant children.

In a letter to President Donald Trump's daughter sent Monday, the evangelical leaders laud Ivanka Trump for her recent declaration that human trafficking is "the gravest of human rights violations." They urge her to "use your significant influence within the administration" to help end the suspension of a federal anti-trafficking law that had provided safeguards for unaccompanied children who cross the border.

"For many evangelical Christians throughout the United States, fighting human trafficking and standing for vulnerable children are key policy priorities," the evangelicals wrote in their letter, which was shared in advance with The Associated Press.

The signatories added that they "support measures to protect public health, but we believe our government can take appropriate precautions to minimize any public health concerns without disregarding the life-saving protections guaranteed by" the anti-trafficking law, which was suspended by the Trump administration in the first month of the coronavirus pandemic

[…]

Walter Kim, president of the National Association of Evangelicals, said he and other Christian leaders who signed the letter see a "continuum of issues, that in particular relate to children, that we feel as followers of Jesus it is incumbent upon us to speak up."

Their aim, Kim said in an interview, is ensuring there is "a consistent ethic we pursue as a nation with respect to the protection of the vulnerable."

The evangelicals note in their letter that several of their groups work in Central America and can attest to the "high risk of trafficking, violence and exploitation" facing many children expelled back to the countries they attempted to leave by seeking asylum in the United States.

In addition, the letter notes that the administration's acknowledged practice of expelling unaccompanied migrant children after they have tested negative for the coronavirus indicates that applying the anti-trafficking protections of the 2008 law would not pose a pandemic-related risk.

"We must not allow COVID-19 to serve as a pretext for abandoning our national commitment to standing for vulnerable children and against the scourge of human trafficking," it said. "Our faith compels us to speak up for these children."

Other signatories include Russell Moore, president of the Southern Baptist Convention's Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission; Edgar Sandoval Sr., president of World Vision U.S.; Scott Arbeiter, president of World Relief; and Chris Palusky, president of Bethany Christian Services.

Many of the signatories are members of the Evangelical Immigration Table, a group of faith-motivated advocates for comprehensive immigration reform. Members of that group pressed the Trump administration for changes in its pandemic-related immigration policies in April.

ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: Faith in the News

Post by FredS » Mon Aug 31, 2020 5:00 pm

THIS THREAD NEEDS TO GO AWAY.

<Mod snip>. Burn it with fire then bury it. Please.
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Re: Faith in the News

Post by John-Boy » Mon Aug 31, 2020 6:08 pm

Closing the thread due to popular demand. Please feel free to start a new thread to discuss and share your thoughts on whatever.
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