Faith in the News

For those deep thinkers out there.
Locked
User avatar
Cleon
Walmart Cargo Short Model
Walmart Cargo Short Model
Posts: 15696
Joined: Thu Sep 03, 2009 6:00 pm
Location: Indiana - South of 40
Contact:

Re: Faith in the News

Post by Cleon » Thu Jan 16, 2020 9:10 am

wosbald wrote:
Wed Jan 15, 2020 5:22 pm
+JMJ+

The Falkirk Center for Faith & Liberty
Image

The mission of the Falkirk Center at Liberty University is to equip courageous champions to proclaim the truth of Jesus Christ, to advance his kingdom and American freedom.

[…]

Bemoaning the rise of leftism is no longer enough, and turning the other cheek in our personal relationships with our neighbors as Jesus taught while abdicating our responsibilities on the cultural battlefield is no longer sufficient. There is too much at stake in the battle for the soul of our nation. Bold, unapologetic action and initiative is needed, which is why we just launched the Falkirk Center, a think tank dedicated to restoring and defending American ideals and Judeo-Christian values in all aspects of life.

Founded by Liberty University President, Jerry Falwell Jr. and Turning Point USA President, Charlie Kirk, the principles of the Falkirk Center transcend generational divides and withstand cultural trends, as we believe they are rooted in compelling, enduring, absolute truths. As the creeds of secularism are proving fragile and unsatisfying to millions of Americans, there has never been a better time to fill this void and amplify these truths.

[…]

Accomplishing this requires more than adding noise to the echo chamber. It requires an army of bold ambassadors equipped with Judeo-Christian and Constitutional knowledge to speak truth to believers and unbelievers alike in every professional field and public forum. This includes Christian leaders and influencers of all ages and backgrounds defending, explaining, and sharing their beliefs on all platforms and sectors of society. That is the function and the moral mission of the Falkirk Center. We will go on offense in the name of Judeo-Christian principles and in the name of exceptional, God-given American liberties.

[…]
Bemoaning the rise of leftism is no longer enough, and turning the other cheek in our personal relationships with our neighbors as Jesus taught while abdicating our responsibilities on the cultural battlefield is no longer sufficient.
Holy cow. The foundation of their argument is completely off kilter. Whiny, even.
"Let the little children come to Me, and do not forbid them; for of such is the kingdom of heaven" - Jesus

"More people need to put their big boy britches on." - JMG

"Dang, a pipe slap." - JimVH

User avatar
wosbald
Crux' Cleveland Correspondent
Crux' Cleveland Correspondent
Posts: 22590
Joined: Mon Feb 25, 2008 6:00 pm
Location: Cleveland, Ohio
Contact:

Re: Faith in the News

Post by wosbald » Mon Jan 20, 2020 12:45 pm

+JMJ+

Muslim world leaders visit Auschwitz in 'strong signal' of interfaith support [In-Depth]
Image

Few Muslims have visited the notorious site of some of history's worst atrocities. But high-ranking leaders of Muslim and Jewish communities are coming together to mark 75 years since the concentration camp's liberation.

In 2013, the leader of Berlin's Social Democratic parliamentary group, Raed Saleh, visited the Auschwitz-Birkenau memorial site with a group of pupils. The fact that Saleh, who was born in the West Bank and came to Germany as a 5-year-old, made his way to the site of a former Nazi concentration and extermination camp garnered national attention. At the time, he was Germany's most prominent Muslim to ever visit the site where Nazis murdered more than 1.1 million people, most of them Jews, during the Holocaust.

"There was this pupil called Mustafa, a really big guy, standing in front of a vast pile of children's shoes," said Saleh, recalling the visit to bloc 5 of Auschwitz-Birkenau camp. "Each pair had once belonged to a child obviously, and suddenly I noticed how this realization did something with Mustafa." The lawmaker says the pupils in his group had "diverse, multi-religious backgrounds" in Berlin and that "anti-Semitism among young Muslims is not uncommon."

Image
Though millions visit the Auschwitz every year, few Muslims are among them.

[…]

On Thursday, the memorial site will be visited by the most senior Muslim figure to date: Sheikh Mohammed al-Eissa, the secretary general of the Muslim World League, who represents over a billion Muslims worldwide. Al-Eissa, who previously served as Saudi justice minister, will make his way to the former camp with David Harris, the director of the American Jewish Committee (AJC). This joint visit by a high-ranking 54-year-old Islamic scholar and a 70-year-old descendant of Holocaust survivors is nothing short of remarkable.

[…]

'Shook humanity to the core'

Roughly two years prior to this visit, al-Eissa sent a letter to the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, in which he expressed "great sympathy with the victims of the Holocaust, an incident that shook humanity to the core." He underlined that "true Islam is against these crimes" and that "we consider any denial of the Holocaust or minimizing of its effect a crime to distort history and an insult to the dignity of those innocent souls who have perished."

Image
Al-Eissa has urged 'all Muslims to learn the history of the Holocaust, to visit memorials and museums to this horrific event.'

Following his visit to the museum in May 2018, he described how it made him feel in an op-ed in The Washington Post: "I saw for myself the mountains of evidence — the videos, the photos, the placards, the interviews, the memorabilia — that testify to the historic truth of the Holocaust. One doesn't have to go to the museum to recognize the enormity of the Holocaust — but no one who does come to the museum can deny it."

[…]

In response to al-Eissa's initiative, the president of the Foundation for Ethnic Understanding, Marc Schneier, penned an opinion piece in The Jerusalem Post, supporting him and arguing that there exists "a false narrative out there that Muslims are inveterately hostile to Jews." Schneier, who has long worked to foster Judeo-Muslim dialogue and understanding, continued to say that "Muslims are speaking out — and acting out — every day in defense of Jews who are under attack."

Thinking back to his Auschwitz visit, Berlin lawmaker Raed Saleh said that going there was not about feeling "guilty," and that the visit of a senior Muslim leader like al-Eissa will send "a good, strong signal." Saleh said it is important to him to see his generation, and the one after it, keep the memory of the Holocaust alive. This, he told DW, "is the best antidote against right-wing extremism, anti-Semitism and xenophobia." And Saleh believes the young, Muslim pupils who accompanied him on his Auschwitz visit were profoundly touched by the experience. "It was moving. I saw them asking questions that never came up before."

[…]

ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

User avatar
wosbald
Crux' Cleveland Correspondent
Crux' Cleveland Correspondent
Posts: 22590
Joined: Mon Feb 25, 2008 6:00 pm
Location: Cleveland, Ohio
Contact:

Re: Faith in the News

Post by wosbald » Thu Jan 30, 2020 5:31 pm

+JMJ+

Evangelicals embrace Trump's peace plan, saying it recognizes the Bible 'as legal' [In-Depth]
Image
President Donald Trump speaks during an event with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu in the East Room of the White House in Washington, Tuesday, Jan. 28, 2020. (AP/Susan Walsh)

To many evangelicals and ardent Christian Zionists, God promised the land of Israel to the Jews and to the Jews alone.

The belief comes, at least in part, from the Book of Genesis which recounts of the covenant God made with Abraham:

“The whole land of Canaan, where you now reside as a foreigner, I will give as an everlasting possession to you and your descendants after you" (Genesis 17:8).

Yet on Jan. 28, when President Donald Trump unveiled his long-awaited plan for peace between Israel and the Palestinians, which calls for some land swaps with Palestinians and a Palestinian capital in East Jerusalem, his evangelical advisers congratulated him for it.

Robert Jeffress, pastor of First Baptist Church in Dallas who attended the unveiling in Washington, called the proposal "courageous and compassionate."

The Rev. Johnnie Moore, another evangelical adviser, said it was "nuanced, realistic and comprehensive."

Pastor John Hagee, chairman of Christians United for Israel, said it was “the best peace proposal any American administration has ever put forth.”

For years, Hagee has defended Israel’s right to make decisions free of international interference or pressure.

"God did not make a covenant with Washington, D.C.,” Hagee said in 2011. “He made a covenant with Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob. And that covenant stands. It is still the covenant.”

But Trump’s plan, developed with adviser and son-in-law Jared Kushner and announced alongside Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, is as close to the biblical ideal as Israel is likely to get, evangelicals said.

[…]

Evangelical leaders who were briefed on the proposal during the three years it took to draft it said the plan was close to biblical, mindful that even Abraham divided his property with Lot, his nephew, after a quarrel.

“From our perspective what he’s done is recognize the Bible as legal,” said Mike Evans, a Christian Zionist who heads the Jerusalem Prayer Team, referring to Trump’s plan to apply Israeli law to parts of the West Bank.

Evans, who attended the unveiling ceremony, said he had talked beforehand to Kushner as well as Jason Greenblatt, Trump’s Israel adviser; David Friedman, the U.S. ambassador to Israel; and Avi Berkowitz, another Trump adviser.

[…]

ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

User avatar
wosbald
Crux' Cleveland Correspondent
Crux' Cleveland Correspondent
Posts: 22590
Joined: Mon Feb 25, 2008 6:00 pm
Location: Cleveland, Ohio
Contact:

Re: Faith in the News

Post by wosbald » Mon Feb 03, 2020 11:02 am

+JMJ+

American Paganism [in-Depth, Opinion]
Image
Border-patrol agents detain migrants near the U.S.-Mexico border. (John Moore/Getty Images News)

It’s not what the Religious Right thinks it is.

[…]

In the first place, the term “paganism” only works in this maneuver because it is vague and perspectival. It always has been, ever since Christians invented it. Ancient Christians stuck the name on those who continued the traditional rites of Greco-Roman religion rather than adopt the true faith. Indeed the largely urban Christians meant it as a mild pejorative for the rural country bumpkins, the pagani, who lived far from imperial centers and persisted in their benighted worship of the old gods. In our terms, the first “pagans” lived in flyover country and clung to their traditional religion.

Since “pagan” has come to mean “un-Christian,” every invocation of “pagan” brings with it an implicit understanding of “Christian.” The meaning of the former is parasitic on the latter. Misunderstanding the essence of paganism, therefore, also means misunderstanding the demands of Christianity, and vice versa.

More left-leaning Christians might well agree with [Steven D.] Smith and [R.R.] Reno in one sense: there is indeed an ascendant paganism afoot in our country today. It threatens the social and moral fabric of American public life and contends directly against the voice of Christian truth. One can brook no compromise in resisting it. The difference comes in how that paganism is defined. The debate is not whether paganism is real, but where it lives, how it appears, and what it does. If conservatives have mistaken its location, they might be training their weapons in the wrong direction.

Much hangs, then, on accurately discerning the meaning of “modern paganism.” Let us consider three proposals: Steven Smith’s recent version, T. S. Eliot’s original version, and another timely version from First Things.

[…]

If there was an ancient paganism of sacred immanence, it was soon outstripped by the more radical immanence of Christians in their claims of an Incarnation, a Resurrection, and above all the enduring food of the Eucharist. In every Mass the priest washes his hands in imitation of the pagan Pilate, but now as an act of humility and celebration. The Catholic repeats as her own the words of the pagan centurion — Lord, I am not worthy — but now as an intimate prayer on the threshold of Communion. That version of paganism was overtaken and dissolved from within by the Christian sacralization of the body.

But there is another paganism that has survived into the present, and has emerged so vividly in contemporary politics that even First Things in 2016 could not miss it. This is not the paganism of immanence, but the paganism of cruelty and violence. It mocks the vulnerable, reviles the weak, and gains strength through hatred. We don’t have to look too far to discover the “postmodern paganism” threatening American Christianity today.

[…]

This modern paganism ultimately means the nihilistic exercise of power for its own sake, especially power over weak and vulnerable bodies. In its purest form, it is expressed as conspicuous cruelty, both to render one’s power maximally visible and to increase that power by engendering fear. The cruelty is the point. This is the joyful paganism that Nietzsche sought to revive as the Wille zur Macht, retrieving from ancient Rome the glorious pleasure in cruelty that rewards the strong who exercise their strength. This is the reason Italian fascist Julius Evola hated Christianity for its compassion for the poor and weak.

We find this paganism exposed in the ancient world as well, in the Athenian mockery and massacre of the Melians in Thucydides’s History of the Peloponnesian War, in Thrasymachus’s authoritarian attacks on Socrates in Plato’s Republic, or in Augustine’s shrewd deconstruction of imperial power in The City of God against the Pagans. John Milbank calls this Nietzschean worldview an ontology of eternal violence opposed to an Augustinian counter-ontology of eternal peace. As Schmitz himself suggests, the perfect example of pagan disdain for vulnerability and conspicuous cruelty is the Roman practice of public crucifixion. Pagan is to Christian not as immanent is to transcendent, but as Rome is to the Crucified — a cruel empire to its tortured victims.

But modern paganism can also assume subtler forms, whenever the common good is reduced to ruthless economic competition, confirming Eliot’s fears that we have no values more essential than our “belief in compound interest and the maintenance of dividends.” The paganism we should fear is not secularism, sacred immanence, or pantheist naturalism. It is power celebrating its violence, perceiving the world empty of everything save the contest of wills, a nihilism ruled by the libido dominandi.

This paganism views moral responsibility as a fool’s errand for the weak, since all that matters is to dominate or be dominated. It sacralizes the emperor as an agent of God, scorns truth, despises the weak, and tortures the vulnerable. And it cloaks its nihilism, to cite Eliot once again, in “a disguised and peculiarly sanctimonious nationalism, accelerating our progress toward the paganism which we say we abhor.”

ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

User avatar
wosbald
Crux' Cleveland Correspondent
Crux' Cleveland Correspondent
Posts: 22590
Joined: Mon Feb 25, 2008 6:00 pm
Location: Cleveland, Ohio
Contact:

Re: Faith in the News

Post by wosbald » Fri Feb 07, 2020 11:10 am

+JMJ+



ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

User avatar
hugodrax
Doctor Buttcrack
Doctor Buttcrack
Posts: 23390
Joined: Fri Jan 25, 2013 6:00 pm
Location: Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
Contact:

Re: Faith in the News

Post by hugodrax » Fri Feb 07, 2020 12:08 pm

wosbald wrote:
Fri Feb 07, 2020 11:10 am
+JMJ+


See the value of feudalism yet?

It has something for everybody.
Everything we hear is an opinion, not a fact. Everything we see is a perspective, not the truth
—Marcus Aurelius

non nobis, Domine, non nobis, sed nomini tuo da gloriam

User avatar
wosbald
Crux' Cleveland Correspondent
Crux' Cleveland Correspondent
Posts: 22590
Joined: Mon Feb 25, 2008 6:00 pm
Location: Cleveland, Ohio
Contact:

Re: Faith in the News

Post by wosbald » Tue Feb 18, 2020 10:59 pm

+JMJ+

Trump critic Russell Moore, ERLC to face scrutiny by Southern Baptists
Image
Russell Moore, president of the Southern Baptist Convention's Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission, speaks June 12, 2019, during the annual meeting of the Southern Baptist Convention at the Birmingham-Jefferson Convention Complex in Birmingham, Alabama. (RNS photo by Butch Dill)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (RNS) — The Southern Baptist Convention’s Executive Committee will launch a task force to examine the activities of the Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission, the convention’s public policy organization headed by the theologian and author Russell Moore.

Southern Baptist leaders fear controversy over Moore could lead to a drop in donations.

Moore, 48, who has been president of the ERLC since 2013, has been an outspoken critic of Donald Trump since the president began campaigning for the White House. In 2016, Moore called Trump “an arrogant huckster” and wrote an essay for the National Review citing “Trump’s vitriolic — and often racist and sexist — language about immigrants, women, the disabled and others.”

[…]

Mike Stone, chair of the Executive Committee, said in a news conference Tuesday (Feb. 18) that committee members have heard anecdotal accounts of churches withholding money or reducing giving because of concerns about the ERLC. He said that local church leaders and state Baptist leaders have expressed concerns in private but not on the record. The task force will give them a place to officially lodge their concerns.

Stone added that the Executive Committee does not know if concerns about the ERLC have indeed caused giving to drop. He also said that there is a lot of “fake news” about the convention and about the ERLC and that the task force will try to find the truth.

In early February, Baptist Press, the official news service of the SBC, reported that giving to the Cooperative Program was up about 3% from last year. Last year Baptists had given $64.5 million by the end of January. This year, giving totaled just under $66.5 million by the same point in the year.

Similar complaints were raised against ERLC in 2017 over Moore’s anti-Trump comments. At that time, Moore met with Frank Page, the former president of the Executive Committee, and the two agreed to work together for the good of the convention.

Stone said the task force is not an attempt to remove Moore from office.

[…]

Given the controversy the organization has generated, Stone was asked if the ERLC had outlived its usefulness and whether funding the commission was still a good use of Cooperative Program funds.

He said he expects the task force will look into that question.

The task force will “review the past and present activities” of the ERLC, said Stone, and “assess whether the actions of the commission and its leadership are affecting Cooperative Program giving or the further advancement of the Cooperative Program.”

[…]

ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

User avatar
tuttle
Tomnoddy Attercop
Tomnoddy Attercop
Posts: 15542
Joined: Tue Dec 02, 2008 6:00 pm
Location: Middle-west
Contact:

Re: Faith in the News

Post by tuttle » Wed Feb 19, 2020 9:36 am

wosbald wrote:
Tue Feb 18, 2020 10:59 pm
+JMJ+

Trump critic Russell Moore, ERLC to face scrutiny by Southern Baptists
Image
Russell Moore, president of the Southern Baptist Convention's Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission, speaks June 12, 2019, during the annual meeting of the Southern Baptist Convention at the Birmingham-Jefferson Convention Complex in Birmingham, Alabama. (RNS photo by Butch Dill)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (RNS) — The Southern Baptist Convention’s Executive Committee will launch a task force to examine the activities of the Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission, the convention’s public policy organization headed by the theologian and author Russell Moore.

Southern Baptist leaders fear controversy over Moore could lead to a drop in donations.

Moore, 48, who has been president of the ERLC since 2013, has been an outspoken critic of Donald Trump since the president began campaigning for the White House. In 2016, Moore called Trump “an arrogant huckster” and wrote an essay for the National Review citing “Trump’s vitriolic — and often racist and sexist — language about immigrants, women, the disabled and others.”

[…]

Mike Stone, chair of the Executive Committee, said in a news conference Tuesday (Feb. 18) that committee members have heard anecdotal accounts of churches withholding money or reducing giving because of concerns about the ERLC. He said that local church leaders and state Baptist leaders have expressed concerns in private but not on the record. The task force will give them a place to officially lodge their concerns.

Stone added that the Executive Committee does not know if concerns about the ERLC have indeed caused giving to drop. He also said that there is a lot of “fake news” about the convention and about the ERLC and that the task force will try to find the truth.

In early February, Baptist Press, the official news service of the SBC, reported that giving to the Cooperative Program was up about 3% from last year. Last year Baptists had given $64.5 million by the end of January. This year, giving totaled just under $66.5 million by the same point in the year.

Similar complaints were raised against ERLC in 2017 over Moore’s anti-Trump comments. At that time, Moore met with Frank Page, the former president of the Executive Committee, and the two agreed to work together for the good of the convention.

Stone said the task force is not an attempt to remove Moore from office.

[…]

Given the controversy the organization has generated, Stone was asked if the ERLC had outlived its usefulness and whether funding the commission was still a good use of Cooperative Program funds.

He said he expects the task force will look into that question.

The task force will “review the past and present activities” of the ERLC, said Stone, and “assess whether the actions of the commission and its leadership are affecting Cooperative Program giving or the further advancement of the Cooperative Program.”

[…]
This goes deeper than just mere anti-Trump comments. The groundswell of concern is less about Trump and more about how the ERLC, under Moore's leadership, has taken a decidedly woke, weird, or doctrinally different positions on numerous issues. Some of those bump into politics, but others have nothing to do with Trump.

They've continually come down on the sides of issues that have traditionally been the opposite of what the SBC has believed in the past. Some of that is refreshing, but some of it walks the line or outright crosses the line, on actual statements of faith held by Southern Baptists. Partnering and promoting people who are at odds with Baptist (and I'd say Christian) beliefs. They are becoming notorious for ignoring major issues when the spotlight is on something controversial in the public square. One of the most egregious (for SBCers) was their absence and plain avoidance of participating in the Tennessee Heartbeat law when called upon by Tennessee Baptists. This was in the home state of their office, on an issue that is historically right up their ally. Lots of pro-life groups showed up and Tennessee Baptists were outraged that they didn't even get a response after multiple attempts. They do weird tings like writing articles about baptizing robots in the midst of states being sued for pro-life laws and they've gone out of their way to promote a new stance on LGBT issues.

This has led a number of SBCers feeling like there's at least a major disconnect, at worst an infiltration. If you are an SBC church that believes same sex attraction is sinful and the ERLC is promoting that same sex attraction is merely biological, not sinful whatsoever, and such a position effects how the ERLC chooses to partner with or which legal/political issues they participate in, would you want your money to keep going to them? If you know that if ever your congregation found itself in legal trouble of those issues that the ERLC would sit it out or positionally be actively against you, then it's hard to blame folks for wanting their activities examined.
"The Evangelium has not abrogated legends; it has hallowed them" -JRR Tolkien

"Better to die cheerfully with the aid of a little tobacco, than to live disagreeably and remorseful without." -CS Lewis

User avatar
tuttle
Tomnoddy Attercop
Tomnoddy Attercop
Posts: 15542
Joined: Tue Dec 02, 2008 6:00 pm
Location: Middle-west
Contact:

Re: Faith in the News

Post by tuttle » Wed Feb 19, 2020 10:06 am

Protestants to take Catholic communion at John Calvin's St. Pierre Cathedral in Geneva

Despite the headline, it's a first for both sides in 500 years. Both Catholic Mass celebrated in St Pierre and Protestants welcome to receive communion there. Though apparently in Geneva it's common for both Catholic and Protestant to partake together during ecumenical event.

The article linked above links to a French site, the content of which (with Google translation) is below:
Mass again at Saint-Pierre
CHURCHESJanuary 16, 2020Anne Buloz
For the first time since the Reformation, Catholics will celebrate a mass in Saint-Pierre cathedral.
In August 1535, mass was abolished in Geneva after iconoclasts devastated Saint-Pierre cathedral by breaking statues and slashing images which were not in accordance with the new reformed cult. Since then, no mass has taken place in the building, used for Protestant worship. A long dearth that will end on Saturday February 29, 2020, with a mass celebrated, at 6.30 p.m., by Pascal Desthieux, episcopal vicar for the canton of Geneva.
This unprecedented proposal from the Saint-Pierre-Fusterie Protestant parish was born following a "broken stick discussion" which followed an ecumenical ceremony. The idea then "matured" in the Parish Council, which voted for. "There was no opposition, which is significant. The idea appealed because it corresponds to our desire to make the cathedral a meeting place for all Geneva Christians. A space that transcends confessional boundaries, ”says Daniel Pilly, president of the Parish Council.



Two previous ones
If Roman Catholics have not celebrated alone in Saint-Pierre for almost 500 years, they have, however, already taken part in ecumenical ceremonies. For their part, the Lutherans were authorized to celebrate the confirmations of their catechumens there on Pentecost Sunday, the temple of the Madeleine where they traditionally officiated having had to close the time for asbestos removal work. The English have also come, for several years, to sing Christmas carols at the cathedral.
If Roman Catholics will be at their home in Saint-Pierre on February 29, this will also be the case for Protestants, who, like all Christians, will be welcome at this Mass and welcomed to communion. “This is nothing exceptional in Geneva. This is already practiced locally in many parishes during ecumenical celebrations where Protestants and Catholics invite each other to the Lord's Supper and to communion, ”recalls Daniel Pilly.

Favorable and fertile climate
This invitation also stems from very good relationships, imprints of trust, established for several years with Pascal Desthieux. “It is a signal that the climate in Geneva is extremely favorable and fertile with the Roman Catholic Church. We have made notable progress in terms of ecumenism, in particular with the Joint Declaration, signed in 2017, which recognizes our respective ministries, ”specifies Emmanuel Fuchs, president of the Protestant Church in Geneva and also pastor in Saint-Pierre. For Daniel Pilly as for Emmanuel Fuchs, even if the differences between Protestants and Catholics remain remarkable, what unites them is much more important. "It is a strong sign that we are giving by lending our cathedral, a will to open up, to make Church all together, to carry the Gospel and to bear witness to our love of Christ. As Pope Francis said, ecumenism is achieved by walking. We are trying to walk together in the hope that when we have walked enough, the obstacles that seem to us today insurmountable will no longer be, ”concludes Emmanuel Fuchs.
"The Evangelium has not abrogated legends; it has hallowed them" -JRR Tolkien

"Better to die cheerfully with the aid of a little tobacco, than to live disagreeably and remorseful without." -CS Lewis

User avatar
wosbald
Crux' Cleveland Correspondent
Crux' Cleveland Correspondent
Posts: 22590
Joined: Mon Feb 25, 2008 6:00 pm
Location: Cleveland, Ohio
Contact:

Re: Faith in the News

Post by wosbald » Wed Feb 19, 2020 10:16 am

+JMJ+
tuttle wrote:
Wed Feb 19, 2020 9:36 am
wosbald wrote:
Tue Feb 18, 2020 10:59 pm
Trump critic Russell Moore, ERLC to face scrutiny by Southern Baptists
Image
Russell Moore, president of the Southern Baptist Convention's Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission, speaks June 12, 2019, during the annual meeting of the Southern Baptist Convention at the Birmingham-Jefferson Convention Complex in Birmingham, Alabama. (RNS photo by Butch Dill)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (RNS) — The Southern Baptist Convention’s Executive Committee will launch a task force to examine the activities of the Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission, the convention’s public policy organization headed by the theologian and author Russell Moore.

Southern Baptist leaders fear controversy over Moore could lead to a drop in donations.

Moore, 48, who has been president of the ERLC since 2013, has been an outspoken critic of Donald Trump since the president began campaigning for the White House. In 2016, Moore called Trump “an arrogant huckster” and wrote an essay for the National Review citing “Trump’s vitriolic — and often racist and sexist — language about immigrants, women, the disabled and others.”

[…]

Mike Stone, chair of the Executive Committee, said in a news conference Tuesday (Feb. 18) that committee members have heard anecdotal accounts of churches withholding money or reducing giving because of concerns about the ERLC. He said that local church leaders and state Baptist leaders have expressed concerns in private but not on the record. The task force will give them a place to officially lodge their concerns.

Stone added that the Executive Committee does not know if concerns about the ERLC have indeed caused giving to drop. He also said that there is a lot of “fake news” about the convention and about the ERLC and that the task force will try to find the truth.

In early February, Baptist Press, the official news service of the SBC, reported that giving to the Cooperative Program was up about 3% from last year. Last year Baptists had given $64.5 million by the end of January. This year, giving totaled just under $66.5 million by the same point in the year.

Similar complaints were raised against ERLC in 2017 over Moore’s anti-Trump comments. At that time, Moore met with Frank Page, the former president of the Executive Committee, and the two agreed to work together for the good of the convention.

Stone said the task force is not an attempt to remove Moore from office.

[…]

Given the controversy the organization has generated, Stone was asked if the ERLC had outlived its usefulness and whether funding the commission was still a good use of Cooperative Program funds.

He said he expects the task force will look into that question.

The task force will “review the past and present activities” of the ERLC, said Stone, and “assess whether the actions of the commission and its leadership are affecting Cooperative Program giving or the further advancement of the Cooperative Program.”

[…]
This goes deeper than just mere anti-Trump comments. …

[…]
And yet, that's the common denominator.

Things That Make You Go Hmmm…

Image

ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

User avatar
tuttle
Tomnoddy Attercop
Tomnoddy Attercop
Posts: 15542
Joined: Tue Dec 02, 2008 6:00 pm
Location: Middle-west
Contact:

Re: Faith in the News

Post by tuttle » Wed Feb 19, 2020 11:30 am

wosbald wrote:
Wed Feb 19, 2020 10:16 am
+JMJ+
tuttle wrote:
Wed Feb 19, 2020 9:36 am
wosbald wrote:
Tue Feb 18, 2020 10:59 pm
Trump critic Russell Moore, ERLC to face scrutiny by Southern Baptists
Image
Russell Moore, president of the Southern Baptist Convention's Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission, speaks June 12, 2019, during the annual meeting of the Southern Baptist Convention at the Birmingham-Jefferson Convention Complex in Birmingham, Alabama. (RNS photo by Butch Dill)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (RNS) — The Southern Baptist Convention’s Executive Committee will launch a task force to examine the activities of the Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission, the convention’s public policy organization headed by the theologian and author Russell Moore.

Southern Baptist leaders fear controversy over Moore could lead to a drop in donations.

Moore, 48, who has been president of the ERLC since 2013, has been an outspoken critic of Donald Trump since the president began campaigning for the White House. In 2016, Moore called Trump “an arrogant huckster” and wrote an essay for the National Review citing “Trump’s vitriolic — and often racist and sexist — language about immigrants, women, the disabled and others.”

[…]

Mike Stone, chair of the Executive Committee, said in a news conference Tuesday (Feb. 18) that committee members have heard anecdotal accounts of churches withholding money or reducing giving because of concerns about the ERLC. He said that local church leaders and state Baptist leaders have expressed concerns in private but not on the record. The task force will give them a place to officially lodge their concerns.

Stone added that the Executive Committee does not know if concerns about the ERLC have indeed caused giving to drop. He also said that there is a lot of “fake news” about the convention and about the ERLC and that the task force will try to find the truth.

In early February, Baptist Press, the official news service of the SBC, reported that giving to the Cooperative Program was up about 3% from last year. Last year Baptists had given $64.5 million by the end of January. This year, giving totaled just under $66.5 million by the same point in the year.

Similar complaints were raised against ERLC in 2017 over Moore’s anti-Trump comments. At that time, Moore met with Frank Page, the former president of the Executive Committee, and the two agreed to work together for the good of the convention.

Stone said the task force is not an attempt to remove Moore from office.

[…]

Given the controversy the organization has generated, Stone was asked if the ERLC had outlived its usefulness and whether funding the commission was still a good use of Cooperative Program funds.

He said he expects the task force will look into that question.

The task force will “review the past and present activities” of the ERLC, said Stone, and “assess whether the actions of the commission and its leadership are affecting Cooperative Program giving or the further advancement of the Cooperative Program.”

[…]
This goes deeper than just mere anti-Trump comments. …

[…]
And yet, that's the common denominator.

Things That Make You Go Hmmm…

Image
If by common denominator you mean progressive ideologies leading to Trump-hate, then sure.

Are there people who hate Moore solely because he's a Trump critic? I'm sure there are. But I assure you, that is not the reason for the investigations.

Somewhere round these parts I actually admired Moore for his anti-Trump comments. I thought Trump was a dumb ape saying Moore is a terrible guy with a bad heart.

But let's play with this for a second. Let's say the bulk of the SBC did not have my initial reaction of admiration regarding his comments (I think that quite true). Let's say some people suspected his comments sprung from a possible progressive basis. I think you can rightly say such a reaction would be unfair. Moore, to that point hadn't indicated a leftward leaning. But as his leadership of the ERLC has unequivocally panned left, and has validated the initial, albeit perhaps unfair, reaction. If such was the case, I still believe his comments on Trump functioned less as a motivator and more as an indicator. Had the ERLC maintained baptist/Christian fidelity on LGBT issues, had they stood with fellow baptists in litigation, had they spent less time talking about baptizing robots, etc, then just a small minority of Falwell types would be the only people griping about his anti-Trump comments.
"The Evangelium has not abrogated legends; it has hallowed them" -JRR Tolkien

"Better to die cheerfully with the aid of a little tobacco, than to live disagreeably and remorseful without." -CS Lewis

User avatar
wosbald
Crux' Cleveland Correspondent
Crux' Cleveland Correspondent
Posts: 22590
Joined: Mon Feb 25, 2008 6:00 pm
Location: Cleveland, Ohio
Contact:

Re: Faith in the News

Post by wosbald » Mon Feb 24, 2020 5:36 pm

+JMJ+

Intra-Thread Trackbacks: pg 115


The stunning Southern Baptist controversy over Donald Trump and Russell Moore, explained [In-Depth]
Image
Illustrated | Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images, AP Photo/Mark Humphrey, Shacil/iStock

Russell Moore is a public theologian and, since 2013, president of the Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission (ERLC), the public policy organ of the Southern Baptist Convention (SBC). His theology is consistently conservative. The top article on his personal website, as of this writing, advocates legal protection for abortion survivors — Moore himself is the father of adopted sons — and it was originally published at National Review, long the flagship magazine of conservative politics. A former pastor and professor at multiple Baptist universities, Moore's most recent book is about shaping family life around the gospel. His office is decorated with bobbleheads of Thomas Jefferson and Billy Graham. He is a teetotaler.

How could this man be the target of what many see as an attempted purge by his fellow Southern Baptists?

Donald Trump, of course. Here's what's happening.

During the 2016 Republican primary campaign, Moore was one of many who publicly questioned whether Trump represented the values of evangelical voters — but while other voices fell quiet, he maintained his opposition after it became apparent Trump would be the GOP nominee.

Now, as Religion News Service detailed in a lengthy report Thursday, a small but vocal cadre of Southern Baptists has initiated a dispute over Moore's tenure at the ERLC and the merits of the organization itself. First, a tiny fraction of the denomination's 46,000 congregations have indicated they will no longer contribute to the ERLC budget. Among those churches is First Baptist Dallas, led by Robert Jeffress, one of President Trump's most enthusiastic court evangelicals. Also on the list is Prestonwood Baptist Church, pastored by two-time SBC President Jack Graham, who is a member of Trump's Religious Advisory Council. Graham "felt that Moore's criticisms of Trump and his evangelical supporters [were] out of bounds," RNS reports.

More seriously, the Southern Baptist Convention Executive Committee voted Tuesday to create a task force to "review the past and present activities" of the ERLC in response to "ongoing concerns" from "state leadership and other pastors across the country." And while the committee's chair, Mike Stone, who will head up the task force, told Baptist Press it's "not an attempt to remove Dr. Moore," the notion that Moore is not under scrutiny is hardly credible.

The attention to Moore personally certainly seemed obvious to the ERLC executive committee, which responded to news of the task force Thursday with a pointed letter calling the investigation "unwarranted, divisive, and disrespectful." The letter's fifth and final item is a categorical expression of trust in Moore's leadership, theology, and character, and it closes with an announcement of noncompliance unless elected representatives of the denomination at large "have an opportunity to signal their belief that such a task force is appropriate and legitimate" at the SBC Annual Meeting in June.

Other Moore defenders as well as his critics also see the task force in this light. "Churches have left the SBC in ever-growing numbers since the 2016 presidential election fiasco — a campaign season that saw Russell Moore attacking conservative Southern Baptists on the pages of The Washington Post and New York Times," one blog alleged in a post asking what the ERLC "has to hide."

"Some are still unhappy given [Moore's] posture on President Trump," Daniel Akin, president of Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary and an opponent of the investigation, told RNS. "That's a sticking point for many people. It's a point of contention."

So what exactly did Moore say to cause all this commotion? …

[…]

ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

User avatar
tuttle
Tomnoddy Attercop
Tomnoddy Attercop
Posts: 15542
Joined: Tue Dec 02, 2008 6:00 pm
Location: Middle-west
Contact:

Re: Faith in the News

Post by tuttle » Tue Feb 25, 2020 9:15 am

wosbald wrote:
Mon Feb 24, 2020 5:36 pm
+JMJ+

Intra-Thread Trackbacks: pg 115


The stunning Southern Baptist controversy over Donald Trump and Russell Moore, explained [In-Depth]
Image
Illustrated | Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images, AP Photo/Mark Humphrey, Shacil/iStock

Russell Moore is a public theologian and, since 2013, president of the Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission (ERLC), the public policy organ of the Southern Baptist Convention (SBC). His theology is consistently conservative. The top article on his personal website, as of this writing, advocates legal protection for abortion survivors — Moore himself is the father of adopted sons — and it was originally published at National Review, long the flagship magazine of conservative politics. A former pastor and professor at multiple Baptist universities, Moore's most recent book is about shaping family life around the gospel. His office is decorated with bobbleheads of Thomas Jefferson and Billy Graham. He is a teetotaler.

How could this man be the target of what many see as an attempted purge by his fellow Southern Baptists?

Donald Trump, of course. Here's what's happening.

During the 2016 Republican primary campaign, Moore was one of many who publicly questioned whether Trump represented the values of evangelical voters — but while other voices fell quiet, he maintained his opposition after it became apparent Trump would be the GOP nominee.

Now, as Religion News Service detailed in a lengthy report Thursday, a small but vocal cadre of Southern Baptists has initiated a dispute over Moore's tenure at the ERLC and the merits of the organization itself. First, a tiny fraction of the denomination's 46,000 congregations have indicated they will no longer contribute to the ERLC budget. Among those churches is First Baptist Dallas, led by Robert Jeffress, one of President Trump's most enthusiastic court evangelicals. Also on the list is Prestonwood Baptist Church, pastored by two-time SBC President Jack Graham, who is a member of Trump's Religious Advisory Council. Graham "felt that Moore's criticisms of Trump and his evangelical supporters [were] out of bounds," RNS reports.

More seriously, the Southern Baptist Convention Executive Committee voted Tuesday to create a task force to "review the past and present activities" of the ERLC in response to "ongoing concerns" from "state leadership and other pastors across the country." And while the committee's chair, Mike Stone, who will head up the task force, told Baptist Press it's "not an attempt to remove Dr. Moore," the notion that Moore is not under scrutiny is hardly credible.

The attention to Moore personally certainly seemed obvious to the ERLC executive committee, which responded to news of the task force Thursday with a pointed letter calling the investigation "unwarranted, divisive, and disrespectful." The letter's fifth and final item is a categorical expression of trust in Moore's leadership, theology, and character, and it closes with an announcement of noncompliance unless elected representatives of the denomination at large "have an opportunity to signal their belief that such a task force is appropriate and legitimate" at the SBC Annual Meeting in June.

Other Moore defenders as well as his critics also see the task force in this light. "Churches have left the SBC in ever-growing numbers since the 2016 presidential election fiasco — a campaign season that saw Russell Moore attacking conservative Southern Baptists on the pages of The Washington Post and New York Times," one blog alleged in a post asking what the ERLC "has to hide."

"Some are still unhappy given [Moore's] posture on President Trump," Daniel Akin, president of Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary and an opponent of the investigation, told RNS. "That's a sticking point for many people. It's a point of contention."

So what exactly did Moore say to cause all this commotion? …

[…]
It was inevitable that this would be about Trump.

I'll reiterate what I said above, the SBC doesn't reach this point merely because Moore made anti-Trump comments.

The real issue is that the SBC elites got woke and despite their affirmations and even past comments on what we all consider conservative issues, things like how they view the LGBT communities, the roles of men and women (including women in pastoral roles), viewpoint on race, viewpoint on nations, have all shifted noticeably to the left. Again, even to the left of what they've said in the past. It's not uncommon to find SBC people passing around fantastic, substantive, well articulated articles by Moore written just five years ago on subjects where he's shifty, dodgy, and riddled with woke language today. People are asking, "What happened?"

Does Trump have something to do with it? I theorize, yes, but I fear it's too nuanced for media outlets to be responsible (or really, capable) enough to see it, much less write about it.

Moore is just one of many heads of organizations/committees/seminaries whose comments, leadership, people he 'platforms', have been called into question in the SBC. He's the 'political' voice of the SBC so it makes sense why the stories that keep getting reported are centered on him, but he's part of a larger (problem for some, solution for others) controversy brewing in the SBC.
"The Evangelium has not abrogated legends; it has hallowed them" -JRR Tolkien

"Better to die cheerfully with the aid of a little tobacco, than to live disagreeably and remorseful without." -CS Lewis

User avatar
wosbald
Crux' Cleveland Correspondent
Crux' Cleveland Correspondent
Posts: 22590
Joined: Mon Feb 25, 2008 6:00 pm
Location: Cleveland, Ohio
Contact:

Re: Faith in the News

Post by wosbald » Wed Feb 26, 2020 11:54 am

+JMJ+
tuttle wrote:
Tue Feb 25, 2020 9:15 am
It was inevitable that this would be about Trump.

I'll reiterate what I said above, the SBC doesn't reach this point merely because Moore made anti-Trump comments.

The real issue is that the SBC elites …

Does Trump have something to do with it? I theorize, yes, but I fear it's too nuanced for media outlets to be responsible (or really, capable) enough to see it, much less write about it.

[…]
So, the media should be "responsible" and "capable" enough to know that, when every thread they pull leads to a common hub, the real issue must, therefore, be … something else entirely?

ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

User avatar
tuttle
Tomnoddy Attercop
Tomnoddy Attercop
Posts: 15542
Joined: Tue Dec 02, 2008 6:00 pm
Location: Middle-west
Contact:

Re: Faith in the News

Post by tuttle » Wed Feb 26, 2020 12:25 pm

wosbald wrote:
Wed Feb 26, 2020 11:54 am
+JMJ+
tuttle wrote:
Tue Feb 25, 2020 9:15 am
It was inevitable that this would be about Trump.

I'll reiterate what I said above, the SBC doesn't reach this point merely because Moore made anti-Trump comments.

The real issue is that …

Does Trump have something to do with it? I theorize, yes, but I fear it's too nuanced for media outlets to be responsible (or really, capable) enough to see it, much less write about it.

[…]
So, the media should be "responsible" and "capable" enough to know that, when every thread they pull leads to a common hub, the real issue must, therefore, be … something else entirely?
Well my comments weren't a chastisement of the media so much as an explanation of something I know as a type of insider. It was a recognition of the reality of how the media handles things. I don't expect the media, who for the last 4 years have been incapable of pulling any tab that doesn't attach to Trump, to report the deeper issues of how critical race theory and intersectionality have impacted the SBC causing leaders within to compromise doctrines. They hear Trump! so it naturally falls into their wheelhouse. Thus the inevitability.

So yeah, the real issue actually is something else, but not entirely. As I said, Moore's critical comments about Trump were seen by many as a bellwether of things to come. I didn't interpret them as such at the time, but as it stands, I was wrong. Honestly, if the wokening of the SBC hadn't occurred there would be no real controversy. Trump is peripheral to the meat of the controversy, unless you want to say his election served to reveal divisions already at play. Even still, he's not so much the center of the controversy as much as he was an accelerant of it.
"The Evangelium has not abrogated legends; it has hallowed them" -JRR Tolkien

"Better to die cheerfully with the aid of a little tobacco, than to live disagreeably and remorseful without." -CS Lewis

User avatar
wosbald
Crux' Cleveland Correspondent
Crux' Cleveland Correspondent
Posts: 22590
Joined: Mon Feb 25, 2008 6:00 pm
Location: Cleveland, Ohio
Contact:

Re: Faith in the News

Post by wosbald » Tue Mar 03, 2020 1:58 pm

+JMJ+

Social justice lobby’s roundtable tour reveals rural needs [In-Depth]
Image
Information packets with Network's report "Raising Rural Voices: Listening to the Hopes and Hardships of Rural Communities" are seen on chairs at the National Press Club in Washington Feb. 25, 2020. (Credit: Tyler Orsburn/AP)

WASHINGTON, D.C. — Few people might have noticed it, but Network, a Catholic social justice lobby, conducted a series of rural roundtables in 2018 and 2019 to take the pulse of Americans living in the heartland.

The results, released at a Feb. 25 breakfast in Washington, show a series of economic, communication and social challenges that have confounded communities’ ability to fight back.

“The shifting of my awareness, and I think our awareness here at Network, is really an important piece to talk about with an equal level of respect for rural communities as we do for our urban communities,” said Sister Simone Campbell, a Sister of Social Service who is executive director of Network.

[…]

In the report, “Raising Rural Voices: Listening to the Hopes and Hardships of Rural Communities,” Campbell said, “Time and time again, I heard how rural areas are trying to cope with national challenges that affect their communities in unique ways. But problems rural residents face accessing health care or other issues are not easily solved with telehealth or other ‘city answers.'”

At a roundtable in Poetry, Texas — “who knew there was a Poetry, Texas?” exclaimed Campbell — residents were, surprisingly, glad the nearby hospital had closed. The quality of care there was so bad, she noted, that its last remaining physician said, “I wouldn’t send the dog of my worst enemy” there.

But they lamented the closing of the town grocery store. Poetry is 90 minutes from Dallas, and more Dallas residents are moving to Poetry to find affordable housing. But they do their grocery shopping in Dallas because the prices are better, but this is “undermining the local economy,” Campbell told CNS. “They commute so far every day they have no energy left for the community.” She added roundtable participants asked, “How can we get to these newcomers? How can we include them?”

The report said, “Economic circumstances are also depressing volunteerism. In Tiffin (Ohio), surrounding towns that rely on volunteer fire departments can’t staff them because so many people need to work two jobs and don’t have time to help.”

One common lament is the lack of broadband access.

“Every place we went, there is a crisis in access to broadband, the internet, except where they have small cooperatives,” Campbell told CNS. “For the big players — Comcast, Verizon — there’s not enough profit margin” to provide services.

“In Waukesha, Wisconsin, the idea of the local 25-bed hospital and nursing home not having broadband was a big deal. Nurses making visits couldn’t access patients’ files,” she added, “so the quality of care for rural America is lower.”

Moreover, “it’s hard to get professionals to move to rural communities,” she noted. One or more adults in a family may have professional jobs they can do remotely from home, “but if you don’t have broadband you can’t do that. It’s undercutting who the rural communities can recruit,” Campbell said.

But agriculture — what rural America is known for — fares no better. Three roundtables “noted that agricultural facilities like slaughterhouses, meat processing plants and dairy farms are heavily dependent on undocumented immigrants for labor,” the report said, “and in Adrian (Michigan), workers who are exploited dare not speak out for fear of being deported. Many expressed their experiences of poor working conditions, meager wages and long hours.”

The roundtable sessions — 17 of them in 16 states — and the resulting report provided no policy prescriptions — yet. But Campbell said in preparing testimony for a recent House hearing on child poverty, “I was able to reach out to our participants at the rural roundtable to get their input.”

Campbell said participants will be asked to list their top three priorities, and Network will take those responses into account when it fashions its four-year legislative agenda following the 2020 presidential election.

[…]

ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

User avatar
wosbald
Crux' Cleveland Correspondent
Crux' Cleveland Correspondent
Posts: 22590
Joined: Mon Feb 25, 2008 6:00 pm
Location: Cleveland, Ohio
Contact:

Re: Faith in the News

Post by wosbald » Fri Mar 13, 2020 9:59 am

+JMJ+

Director: Church Leaders Find It Easier to Praise Dorothy Day in ‘Historical Lens’ [In-Depth]
Image


NEW YORK — Dorothy Day was once considered by the FBI as a “dangerous American,” but the Catholic Church may one day soon declare her to be a saint.

In his new documentary film, “Revolution of the Heart: The Dorothy Day Story,” filmmaker Martin Doblmeier takes a new look at why the twentieth century social activist and author was one of the most polarizing public figures in her lifetime to now but is now considered a hero to Catholics on both the left and the right.

The film includes new interviews with the likes of Hollywood star Martin Sheen, Day’s family members, Senator Tim Kaine, and dozens of others who were personally shaped by her ministry.

Doblmeier spoke with The Tablet about why he believes Day was “one of the most outspoken Catholic conscience for America in the twentieth century,” how her activism was shaped by her own experience as a journalist, and who he believes are the Dorothy Day’s of our time.

[…]



ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

User avatar
wosbald
Crux' Cleveland Correspondent
Crux' Cleveland Correspondent
Posts: 22590
Joined: Mon Feb 25, 2008 6:00 pm
Location: Cleveland, Ohio
Contact:

Re: Faith in the News

Post by wosbald » Mon Mar 16, 2020 2:43 pm

+JMJ+

Perceived Discrimination toward Christians is Highest Living Among Christians [In-Depth, Analysis]
Image

[…]

I want to push on why people might believe such things [i.e. that Christians are under threat]. I suspect that they are mobilized from elite communication and are not the result of personal experience. One way of checking that out without communication data is to see if these beliefs cluster geographically. That is, the elite rhetoric above suggests that Democrats and the non-religious are the source of the discrimination, so is perceived discrimination more common in parts of the country that are more secular?

The analysis draws on newly released survey data from the Voter Study Group called Nationscape. We’re used to big datasets like the CCES, but this one is a monster. In 2019, the Nationscape is composed of 155,000 interviews. It’s amazing in some ways, limited in others, but helpful for this analysis. They adopted the PRRI scheme of asking, “How much discrimination is there in the United States today against each of the following groups?” The groups included Christians, Muslims, whites, Blacks, Jews, women, and men. I’m going to focus on responses about Christians for this post.

I thought I’d start by examining which religious groups think that Christians are discriminated against. Shown below, it’s no surprise that evangelicals — white or non-white — are the most likely to believe this, while religious minorities and nones are the least. Catholics, mainline Protestants, and Orthodox Christians are in between. It’s not as if groups reject that there is any discrimination — even atheists admit that there probably is “a little” — though evangelicals believe that there is somewhere between “a moderate amount” and “a lot.”

Image

The following figure shows how much Christians within each state believe that Christians face discrimination. If Christians are persecuted by the non-religious, then Christians in Vermont and Oregon would be on top of the list. However, the opposite is true — the highest reported values come from Christians in Mississippi, Alabama, and Tennessee. The lowest rates are reported in the northeast — Connecticut, Massachusetts, Maine, Vermont, and New Hampshire. This is not the pattern that the elite rhetoric leads us to expect.

Image

[…]

ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

User avatar
wosbald
Crux' Cleveland Correspondent
Crux' Cleveland Correspondent
Posts: 22590
Joined: Mon Feb 25, 2008 6:00 pm
Location: Cleveland, Ohio
Contact:

Re: Faith in the News

Post by wosbald » Thu Mar 19, 2020 6:33 am

+JMJ+

National Catholic Prayer Breakfast scrubbed due to coronavirus concerns [In-Depth]
Image
(Credit: CNS)

NEW YORK — As the global coronavirus pandemic continues to lead to a cancellation of events, organizers of the National Catholic Prayer Breakfast have cancelled this year’s scheduled gathering scheduled for March 30.

“Out of concern for our guests and speakers, the 16th annual National Catholic Prayer Breakfast has been cancelled,” said a statement posted to the website. “Within a few days, each registered guest will receive an email with additional information, including refund options. No additional information is available at this time. Please continue to pray for all affected by the Coronavirus.”

The National Catholic Prayer breakfast takes place each spring and brings together more than 1,000 Catholic leaders to the nation’s capital for a morning of prayer and speeches.

The event was founded in 2004 as a response to Saint Pope John Paul II’s call for “a new evangelization.”

[…]

ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

User avatar
wosbald
Crux' Cleveland Correspondent
Crux' Cleveland Correspondent
Posts: 22590
Joined: Mon Feb 25, 2008 6:00 pm
Location: Cleveland, Ohio
Contact:

Re: Faith in the News

Post by wosbald » Fri Mar 20, 2020 7:33 am

+JMJ+

Nigerian Christians divided by conference on witchcraft [In-Depth]
Image
Participants at the witchcraft conference at the University of Nigeria, Nsukka, in November 2019 (Patrick Egwu)

Enugu, Nigeria — Last November an international conference on witchcraft divided Nigerians across religious lines. The B.I.C Ijomah Centre for Policy Studies and Research at the University of Nigeria, Nsukka — Nigeria's first public institution — organized the conference, the first in the country that aimed to demystify the concept of witchcraft that has been shrouded in secrecies and mysteries for decades in Nigeria, the West African region and all around the world.

"All cultures do not share a consistent pattern of witchcraft practice and beliefs," Egodi Uchendu, director of the center, said. "In Nigeria, for instance, the practice of witchcraft often intercepts with other concepts like magic, sorcery, esotericism, diabolism and even religion. From an interdisciplinary point of view, this conference seeks to find answers to pertinent questions such as: What is witchcraft? What factors influence witchcraft labeling in various communities? How does the practice of witchcraft affect society?"

Greeted with protests

Immediately after the announcement of the conference was made public, a group of Christian associations, affiliated organizations and some students, including the Christian Association of Nigeria, protested against the conference and called for its cancellation. For instance, the Pentecostal Fellowship of Nigeria declared a "prayer of warfare" against the conference which they said was "sponsoring evil" and did not "give God glory," according to The Cable.

However, other Christian groups differed in opinion and support of the conference, which they said would add knowledge and create awareness on the mysteries of witchcraft.

During the conference, a Catholic priest, Fr. Innocent Enweh from the department of religious studies at the university, said the opening prayers and asked for God's intercession and blessings on the success of the event.

In reacting to the debates and controversies generated by the conference, Bishop Matthew Hassan Kukah of the Diocese of Sokoto, said witchcraft exists and made reference to Jesus' encounter with demonic spirits, as reported by Crux.

"Church pastors discuss witchcraft regularly and preach against it all the time, drawing from their experiences during their training and in their ministries," Uchendu, a professor of history and international studies at the university, said in response to the protests about the conference. "I am sure the information from this conference and the research findings would assist them in their work for the gospel."

Uchendu continued: "Some persons erroneously concluded that only witches can discuss witchcraft. We are not witches. We are professors and scholars who are intrigued by this phenomenon of witchcraft."

"I don't see anything wrong with this event," Enweh told NCR. "People are just being ignorant about an academic event that wants to promote knowledge and help people better understand the concept of witchcraft."

Despite the protests, more than 1,000 students, scholars and researchers attended the conference. Scholars and researchers from the fields of psychology, philosophy, humanities and anthropology attended, presented papers and shared thoughts on the concept of witchcraft and sorcery, and the mysteries behind them.

Uchendu said the conference was all about "provoking intellectual reflections that guide the shaping of thoughts and the development of a pro-positive developmental mindset in Nigeria and Africa."

Image
A poster for the conference (Courtesy of B.I.C Ijomah Centre for Policy Studies and Research)

[…]

ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

Locked