Faith in the News

For those deep thinkers out there.

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Re: Faith in the News

Post by tuttle » Thu Apr 26, 2018 7:28 am

It took me a little bit to realize that this wasn't satire...I actually had to read it twice, once, thinking it was satire and chuckling along, and then, I went back to re-read upon realization that he's serious (I think).

If I'm going to take the author's post at face value I'll conclude that 1) (minor point) he's not reformed...or Catholic, because home-brewed ale and/or wine would quite possibly be the drink of choice for sermon writing. At least it is for me when crafting liturgy/songs/etc. and 2) (main point) his real complaint I think resides, not ultimately with coffee, but with over-work and our modern, as he puts it, 'work-life balance'. That's the real idol. He has a point if he lingers on coffee as being a status symbol, but he only briefly addresses that. I think coffee is getting the shaft here. Smells to me like a fundamentalist, damning the symptom and not the source.
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Re: Faith in the News

Post by Del » Thu Apr 26, 2018 9:33 am

tuttle wrote:
Thu Apr 26, 2018 7:28 am
It took me a little bit to realize that this wasn't satire...I actually had to read it twice, once, thinking it was satire and chuckling along, and then, I went back to re-read upon realization that he's serious (I think).

If I'm going to take the author's post at face value I'll conclude that 1) (minor point) he's not reformed...or Catholic, because home-brewed ale and/or wine would quite possibly be the drink of choice for sermon writing. At least it is for me when crafting liturgy/songs/etc. and 2) (main point) his real complaint I think resides, not ultimately with coffee, but with over-work and our modern, as he puts it, 'work-life balance'. That's the real idol. He has a point if he lingers on coffee as being a status symbol, but he only briefly addresses that. I think coffee is getting the shaft here. Smells to me like a fundamentalist, damning the symptom and not the source.
Nobody goes to church for the coffee.

I did a little digging on the author. He is British, and living in Britain. We should not assume that he is much aware of American fundamentalism.
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Re: Faith in the News

Post by tuttle » Thu Apr 26, 2018 10:04 am

Del wrote:
Thu Apr 26, 2018 9:33 am
tuttle wrote:
Thu Apr 26, 2018 7:28 am
It took me a little bit to realize that this wasn't satire...I actually had to read it twice, once, thinking it was satire and chuckling along, and then, I went back to re-read upon realization that he's serious (I think).

If I'm going to take the author's post at face value I'll conclude that 1) (minor point) he's not reformed...or Catholic, because home-brewed ale and/or wine would quite possibly be the drink of choice for sermon writing. At least it is for me when crafting liturgy/songs/etc. and 2) (main point) his real complaint I think resides, not ultimately with coffee, but with over-work and our modern, as he puts it, 'work-life balance'. That's the real idol. He has a point if he lingers on coffee as being a status symbol, but he only briefly addresses that. I think coffee is getting the shaft here. Smells to me like a fundamentalist, damning the symptom and not the source.
Nobody goes to church for the coffee.

I did a little digging on the author. He is British, and living in Britain. We should not assume that he is much aware of American fundamentalism.
I didn't say anything about American fundamentalism. British people can be stupid too. :wink:
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Re: Faith in the News

Post by Hovannes » Thu Apr 26, 2018 10:06 am

Del wrote:
Thu Apr 26, 2018 9:33 am
tuttle wrote:
Thu Apr 26, 2018 7:28 am
It took me a little bit to realize that this wasn't satire...I actually had to read it twice, once, thinking it was satire and chuckling along, and then, I went back to re-read upon realization that he's serious (I think).

If I'm going to take the author's post at face value I'll conclude that 1) (minor point) he's not reformed...or Catholic, because home-brewed ale and/or wine would quite possibly be the drink of choice for sermon writing. At least it is for me when crafting liturgy/songs/etc. and 2) (main point) his real complaint I think resides, not ultimately with coffee, but with over-work and our modern, as he puts it, 'work-life balance'. That's the real idol. He has a point if he lingers on coffee as being a status symbol, but he only briefly addresses that. I think coffee is getting the shaft here. Smells to me like a fundamentalist, damning the symptom and not the source.
Nobody goes to church for the coffee.

I did a little digging on the author. He is British, and living in Britain. We should not assume that he is much aware of American fundamentalism.
My theory is that the poor chap has run out of things to complain about, which is quite unusual for Brits.

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Re: Faith in the News

Post by wosbald » Thu Apr 26, 2018 10:16 am

+JMJ+

Coffee shops brew a cup of community at Los Angeles churches
Image
Paco Orocco, 25, creates a work of art on each coffee at Holy Grounds at St. Monica Catholic Community in Santa Monica, California. All the baristas the church hires for the café are formerly incarcerated youth — giving them a second chance. (Heather Adams)

Los Angeles — Jimmy Valdez danced on Skid Row, dressed in wedding attire with his bride. They handed out donated food. They celebrated their marriage in a way only someone whose life was saved from the peril of addiction could celebrate. For Valdez, that salvation started with a church preaching more than just religion but service.

"We danced our first dance in the middle of San Pedro [Street] — middle of the grimy, gritty streets of Skid Row," Valdez said. "It was such a beautiful, beautiful experience to see the smiles of the people there."

Valdez, 29, grew up around violence, spent three years of his youth incarcerated and spent a majority of his 20s battling drug and alcohol addiction. He said it wasn't until he gave his life to God and got a job at Holy Grounds, a café run by St. Monica Catholic Community in the greater Los Angeles area, that he started turning his life around.

Holy Grounds in Santa Monica, California, is part of a larger trend of coffee shops being attached to and run by churches. In the Los Angeles area, there are about a dozen of these types of coffee shops, many popping up over the last few years.

But the cafés — attached to Catholic churches — tend to have a longer history.

Holy Grounds has only been open since 2013 but plans for the store started almost 15 years ago.

[…]

Image
Holy Grounds is a coffee shop inside St. Monica Catholic Community in Santa Monica, California. The door to the café opens to the sidewalk, attracting customers from the community. (Heather Adams)

A couple of the church's parishioners had connections to Urth Caffe, a nearby coffee shop, which helped establish a partnership and get experienced managers.

"They've just opened up access," Siebenaler said.

The coffee shop is just one of 120 ministries run by St. Monica Catholic Community. They were able to use one of those ministries' connections to give formerly incarcerated youth jobs to staff the café — giving Valdez and others like him a second chance to turn things around.

[…]

Ignatius Café at St. Agnes Korean Catholic Church in Los Angeles creates a similar community space by providing fresh coffee in a beautiful paradise-like garden attached to the church.

Image
Ignatius Café at St. Agnes Korean Catholic Church in Los Angeles is known for its fresh coffee and lemon drinks. (Heather Adams)

"God created all things. This means God is the God of all people. Not Christian, not Catholic," said Jesuit Fr. Robert Choi, pastor of St. Agnes. "Since God is open to all people, the church must be open to the public."

Choi said the café is like a house. The foundation of the café is "finding God in all things."

"We find God in coffee," Choi said.

Next, four pillars — philosophy, love, theory and technique — hold up the house. Finally, the roof is the mission statement: A cup of coffee contributes to human health.

Because of this mission statement, Ignatius Café is completely run by volunteers and donates its profits to 14 charities.

Another one of its mission statements is, "Don't give others what you wouldn't have yourself." Or, in other words, don't give others coffee that you wouldn't drink yourself, Choi said.

"I drink good coffee. I give you good coffee, like me," he said.

Many in Southern California know Choi as the "Coffee Priest." He is an expert on coffee, grows coffee beans outside the café and hosts a four-hour class every few months to pass on his wisdom.

Image
Jesuit Fr. Robert Choi, known as the "Coffee Priest," is meticulous about his coffee. He teaches a class all about coffee, including about where his beans come from and how to make the best coffee. (Heather Adams)

[…]

"Our mission is spiritual, not temporal," said Eileen Bonaduce, business manager at Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels, which has Galero Grill.

The cathedral has 1 million to 2 million visitors a year and has the downtown Los Angeles community bringing in more business for the café.

Bonaduce recognizes the cathedral's size allows it to offer unique experiences like the Galero Grill, but just like how Jesus broke bread, smaller places can do something, even if that's doughnuts or monthly dinners after Mass.

Image
Galero Grill serves coffee and fresh baked pastries in downtown Los Angeles. Galero Grill is located on the property of Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels and attracts workers from the downtown area, Mass attendees and others. (Heather Adams)

[…]




"In the end, My Immaculate Heart will triumph." - Our Lady of Fatima

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Re: Faith in the News

Post by wosbald » Tue May 01, 2018 9:37 am

+JMJ+

Liberty University is no longer the largest Christian university
Image
The logos of Liberty University and Grand Canyon University. Composite of AP images by Religion News Service.

(RNS) — Since as far back as 2012, Liberty University has touted itself as the “world’s largest Christian university.” The claim has been repeated by journalists and prominent figures, such as Liberty President Jerry Falwell Jr. during his 2016 speech before the Republican National Convention and President Donald Trump during his May 2017 commencement speech at the Lynchburg, Va., evangelical Christian school.

It also appeared on the “Quick Facts” section of the Liberty website as recently as January 2018: “Liberty University is the largest private, nonprofit university in the nation, the largest university in Virginia, and the largest Christian university in the world.”

That line has since been removed, and no longer appears on Liberty press releases.

Following an inquiry from Religion News Service this week, school officials said it will erase similar references on possibly “hundreds” of pages across the school’s website, such as one that still appeared as of Thursday (April 26) on a page promoting its booming online degree program; that page was also changed by mid-afternoon the following day.

Liberty officials are downplaying the loss of the distinction they can no longer tout.

[…]

And what is now the largest Christian university? According to federal enrollment data Liberty also cites, that title in the U.S. — and perhaps the world — belongs to Grand Canyon University, a for-profit Christian school in Phoenix. --

[…]




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Re: Faith in the News

Post by wosbald » Sat May 05, 2018 7:15 am

+JMJ+

Holy Land Christians feel abandoned by U.S. evangelicals [In-Depth]
Image
The Rev. Munther Isaac, right, leads a service in Bethlehem. Dusan Vranic / for NBC News

In and around Bethlehem, Christians have gone from being 80 percent of the population when Israel was founded in 1950, to around 12 percent today.

[…]

Residents and church leaders describe the intense pressure on the tiny Christian communities in Israel where they are caught between much-larger Muslim and Jewish populations. Along with other Palestinians in the West Bank, Christians face land seizures, arbitrary detentions and collective punishment that are part and parcel of the Israeli occupation, residents and rights groups say.

In January, the Greek Orthodox Patriarch of Jerusalem, Theophilos III, warned that “radical settler groups” threatened Christians in the Holy Land. Anna Koulouris, a spokesperson for the patriarch, told NBC News that within the past two years there had been "a change in the air" regarding the treatment of Christians in Jerusalem.

[…]

The Rev. Robert Jeffress, the influential pastor of the 13,000-member First Baptist church in Dallas and an informal adviser to Trump, explains evangelicals' stalwart support of Israel this way: “The Bible says this land belongs to the Jewish people — period."

He added, "God has pronounced judgment after judgment in the Old Testament to those who would ‘divide the land,’ endquote, and hand it over to non-Jews.”

[…]

Spiritually speaking, Jeffress says, Americans need to be “sympathetic to the plight of our fellow brothers and sisters in Christ who are Palestinian."

"If they do not want to continue to live under that arrangement," Jeffress said, "perhaps some need to go someplace else.”

Munther Isaac, the pastor in Bethlehem, has heard this sort of talk before.

"We are secondary to Christians in America," he says. "These Christians do not think about or care about us.”

While acknowledging that a few evangelicals appeared to be questioning long-held beliefs, “the overall picture is not very encouraging,” Munther said.

[…]

The decision to hew so closely to Israel’s hard-line government comes out of a fundamental misunderstanding of the dynamics that drive the region, according to Wadie Abunassar, a lay official with the Roman Catholic Church in Israel.

A “dominant trend on the radical right” in Israel is threatening the Holy Land’s “fragile” Christian community, says Abunassar, an Israeli citizen from the northern city of Haifa.

Abunassar, who says he finds common cause with Palestinian Christians living in the Israel occupied territories, feels evangelicals like Pence who do not question hard-line Israeli policies are ignorant — at best.

“These so-called Christians are causing us more damage than help — they understand the Middle East as I understand Micronesia,” he said.

[…]




"In the end, My Immaculate Heart will triumph." - Our Lady of Fatima

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Re: Faith in the News

Post by UncleBob » Thu May 10, 2018 1:44 pm

"One man's theology is another man's belly laugh." - Robert A. Heinlein

"Many of the points here, taken to their logical conclusions, don't hold up to logic; they're simply Godded-up ways of saying "I don't like that." - Skip

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Re: Faith in the News

Post by infidel » Thu May 10, 2018 1:59 pm

The future of religion? No. The future of oddball death cults? Perhaps.
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Re: Faith in the News

Post by UncleBob » Mon May 14, 2018 9:43 am

How an Obscure Religious Sect Mapped the Cosmos

Image

BONUS: Sect was called "The Muggletonians".
"One man's theology is another man's belly laugh." - Robert A. Heinlein

"Many of the points here, taken to their logical conclusions, don't hold up to logic; they're simply Godded-up ways of saying "I don't like that." - Skip

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Re: Faith in the News

Post by tuttle » Tue May 15, 2018 6:56 am

UncleBob wrote:
Mon May 14, 2018 9:43 am
How an Obscure Religious Sect Mapped the Cosmos

Image

BONUS: Sect was called "The Muggletonians".
Frost was on the wrong side of history and science. Even so, his maps remain strangely alluring. They are completely unreasonable, but their soft glowing colors given them an ethereal beauty and—like Muggletonianism itself—surprisingly enduring appeal.
That's the same kind of feeling I get when looking at evolutionists artistic rendering of dinosaurs according to their narrative. :wink:
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Re: Faith in the News

Post by UncleBob » Tue May 15, 2018 7:13 am

"One man's theology is another man's belly laugh." - Robert A. Heinlein

"Many of the points here, taken to their logical conclusions, don't hold up to logic; they're simply Godded-up ways of saying "I don't like that." - Skip

"You guys are weird." - Mrs. FredS

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Re: Faith in the News

Post by Jocose » Tue May 15, 2018 7:29 pm

Maybe a bird or a moth.
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Re: Faith in the News

Post by wosbald » Wed May 16, 2018 8:55 am

+JMJ+

Preaching social justice is 'evil,' a Southern Baptist pastor in Texas says

Image
Saying the whole idea of justice and equality is way too liberal, the Rev. Grady Arnold of Cuero has filed a resolution calling for the denomination to reject social justice as “evil.” Courtesy photo

A Southern Baptist pastor in South Texas says the church has a problem: too much talk about justice.

Racial justice, social justice, global justice — you name it. He's heard enough.

He's against all this justice. Not only that, but he wants Southern Baptist Convention churches to stop preaching about it.

Saying the whole idea of justice and equality is way too liberal, the Rev. Grady Arnold of Cuero has filed a resolution calling for the denomination to reject social justice as “evil.”

Saying social justice is based on “Marxist ideology,” he decries it as not about rights and compassion but about “liberal theology” and compassion for “groups they deem as 'victims.'”

[…]

Pastor Dwight McKissic of Cornerstone Baptist Church in Arlington, a leading conservative voice for civil rights, called it “the most divisive resolution ever proposed in the 40 years” he's been part of SBC.

“This resolution denigrates the entire civil rights, abolitionist, equal pay for equal work and suffrage movements,” McKissic wrote. “This resolution spits on the grave of Susan B. Anthony, Sojourner Truth, Harriet Tubman, Mary Bethune, Frederick Douglass, Booker T. Washington. … It will make a statement to women and minorities to 'stay in your place.'

“I was taken aback that somebody wrote that in 2018,” McKissic said by phone Tuesday.

“The words 'justice' and 'righteousness' are inseparable in scripture. … They're trying to demonize that term. When Jesus talked to the poor about the gospel, he was talking about justice.”

Southern Baptists appear headed for a rocky convention June 12-13 in Dallas. There's tension over equality, Patterson, the politicking of Dallas' Rev. Robert Jeffress and the racial justice work of Baptists' ethics leader, the Rev. Russell Moore.

“This social justice is creeping down into local churches,” Arnold said, as if that were a bad thing.

Bet you guessed what's coming next: the slippery slope.

“If we start down this road today,” he asked, “where will it end?”

More justice?


Image
[color]Pastor Dwight McKissic of Cornerstone Baptist Church in Arlington, a leading conservative voice for civil rights, called Arnold's resolution “the most divisive resolution ever proposed in the 40 years” he's been part of the SBC. Ross D. Franklin AP file[/color]




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Re: Faith in the News

Post by wosbald » Sat May 19, 2018 8:05 am

+JMJ+

Christian Radio Show Warns Of Satanic Merger Of Catholicism And Islam
Image
Mike Gendron seeks to convert Catholics to evangelical Christianity (Image from interview by The Master's Academy International)

Wednesday’s CrossTalk program on VCY America featured a conversation about the danger of Catholicism merging with Islam to create the false one world religion warned about in the biblical book of Revelation. VCY America is a Milwaukee-based Christian broadcasting operation that owns 25 full-power radio stations, mostly in the Midwest, and reaches others through affiliate stations and online.

The featured guest was Mike Gendron, described as a former Catholic and the founder and director of Proclaiming the Gospel ministry, which is dedicated to trying to rescue Catholics who are “victims of deception” and convert them to “biblical Christianity.” Gendron’s group also sells an audio recording of his one world religion warning.

As RWW has reported, major Religious Right figures have said that Islam is not really a religion but a totalitarian ideology and therefore not worthy of First Amendment protection. Gendron has similar thoughts about the Catholic Church. He says that Catholicism is, like Islam, not only a religion but a political identity, and says that “they share a similar political ideology.”

On the Crosstalk page promoting the show, they list what Gendron calls the “common bonds” between the two religions, and he and host Jim Schneider talked through them. He says Catholicism and Islam both:
  • esteem and honor Mary.
  • seek messages from apparitions of Mary.
  • are anti-Semitic.
  • embrace another Jesus.
  • seek world dominion.
  • deny the authority of Scripture.
  • use prayer beads to avoid punishment.
  • take pilgrimages to obtain favor from God.
  • have human mediators.
  • have a works righteousness salvation.
Gendron is unsparing in his criticism of the Catholic church, what he calls its “false Christ” and false theology of salvation, and its devotion to apparitions of Mary that he calls “signs and wonders of Satan.” He says that Catholics and Muslims both worship the God of the world, who is Satan.

For additional “evidence” of the coming merger with Islam, Gendron cites ecumenical comments by Pope Francis along the lines of “all people are the children of God” as well as older Church documents about Christian-Muslim dialogue. Host Jim Schneider read a news story about a Catholic University in Iowa dedicating a room to be available for daily prayers by Muslims and other students who didn’t want to use the chapel.

[…]




"In the end, My Immaculate Heart will triumph." - Our Lady of Fatima

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Re: Faith in the News

Post by Eruannu » Sun May 20, 2018 10:27 pm

wosbald wrote:+JMJ+

Christian Radio Show Warns Of Satanic Merger Of Catholicism And Islam
Image
Mike Gendron seeks to convert Catholics to evangelical Christianity (Image from interview by The Master's Academy International)

Wednesday’s CrossTalk program on VCY America featured a conversation about the danger of Catholicism merging with Islam to create the false one world religion warned about in the biblical book of Revelation. VCY America is a Milwaukee-based Christian broadcasting operation that owns 25 full-power radio stations, mostly in the Midwest, and reaches others through affiliate stations and online.

The featured guest was Mike Gendron, described as a former Catholic and the founder and director of Proclaiming the Gospel ministry, which is dedicated to trying to rescue Catholics who are “victims of deception” and convert them to “biblical Christianity.” Gendron’s group also sells an audio recording of his one world religion warning.

As RWW has reported, major Religious Right figures have said that Islam is not really a religion but a totalitarian ideology and therefore not worthy of First Amendment protection. Gendron has similar thoughts about the Catholic Church. He says that Catholicism is, like Islam, not only a religion but a political identity, and says that “they share a similar political ideology.”

On the Crosstalk page promoting the show, they list what Gendron calls the “common bonds” between the two religions, and he and host Jim Schneider talked through them. He says Catholicism and Islam both:
  • esteem and honor Mary.
  • seek messages from apparitions of Mary.
  • are anti-Semitic.
  • embrace another Jesus.
  • seek world dominion.
  • deny the authority of Scripture.
  • use prayer beads to avoid punishment.
  • take pilgrimages to obtain favor from God.
  • have human mediators.
  • have a works righteousness salvation.
Gendron is unsparing in his criticism of the Catholic church, what he calls its “false Christ” and false theology of salvation, and its devotion to apparitions of Mary that he calls “signs and wonders of Satan.” He says that Catholics and Muslims both worship the God of the world, who is Satan.

For additional “evidence” of the coming merger with Islam, Gendron cites ecumenical comments by Pope Francis along the lines of “all people are the children of God” as well as older Church documents about Christian-Muslim dialogue. Host Jim Schneider read a news story about a Catholic University in Iowa dedicating a room to be available for daily prayers by Muslims and other students who didn’t want to use the chapel.

[…]
From my perspective this is ludicrous. Some might say this has already happened behind the scenes. I'm not going to speculate on that however.

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Re: Faith in the News

Post by sweetandsour » Sun May 20, 2018 11:22 pm

wosbald wrote:
Wed May 16, 2018 8:55 am
+JMJ+

Preaching social justice is 'evil,' a Southern Baptist pastor in Texas says

Image
Saying the whole idea of justice and equality is way too liberal, the Rev. Grady Arnold of Cuero has filed a resolution calling for the denomination to reject social justice as “evil.” Courtesy photo

A Southern Baptist pastor in South Texas says the church has a problem: too much talk about justice.

Racial justice, social justice, global justice — you name it. He's heard enough.

He's against all this justice. Not only that, but he wants Southern Baptist Convention churches to stop preaching about it.

Saying the whole idea of justice and equality is way too liberal, the Rev. Grady Arnold of Cuero has filed a resolution calling for the denomination to reject social justice as “evil.”

Saying social justice is based on “Marxist ideology,” he decries it as not about rights and compassion but about “liberal theology” and compassion for “groups they deem as 'victims.'”

[…]

Pastor Dwight McKissic of Cornerstone Baptist Church in Arlington, a leading conservative voice for civil rights, called it “the most divisive resolution ever proposed in the 40 years” he's been part of SBC.

“This resolution denigrates the entire civil rights, abolitionist, equal pay for equal work and suffrage movements,” McKissic wrote. “This resolution spits on the grave of Susan B. Anthony, Sojourner Truth, Harriet Tubman, Mary Bethune, Frederick Douglass, Booker T. Washington. … It will make a statement to women and minorities to 'stay in your place.'

“I was taken aback that somebody wrote that in 2018,” McKissic said by phone Tuesday.

“The words 'justice' and 'righteousness' are inseparable in scripture. … They're trying to demonize that term. When Jesus talked to the poor about the gospel, he was talking about justice.”

Southern Baptists appear headed for a rocky convention June 12-13 in Dallas. There's tension over equality, Patterson, the politicking of Dallas' Rev. Robert Jeffress and the racial justice work of Baptists' ethics leader, the Rev. Russell Moore.

“This social justice is creeping down into local churches,” Arnold said, as if that were a bad thing.

Bet you guessed what's coming next: the slippery slope.

“If we start down this road today,” he asked, “where will it end?”

More justice?


Image
[color]Pastor Dwight McKissic of Cornerstone Baptist Church in Arlington, a leading conservative voice for civil rights, called Arnold's resolution “the most divisive resolution ever proposed in the 40 years” he's been part of the SBC. Ross D. Franklin AP file[/color]
1. When I looked at his photo I guessed correctly that his name was Grady.
2. There's some excellent Mexican food in Cuero.
3. There's some excellent BBQ in Cuero.
4. If you're headed to Yorktown, Nordheim, or Runge, and want some good BBQ, you'd best stop in Cuero.
5. See #4 above as well, if you're headed to Weesatch or Goliad.
I'm old but I'm happy. (Most of the time.)

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Re: Faith in the News

Post by sweetandsour » Sun May 20, 2018 11:36 pm

tuttle wrote:
Thu Apr 26, 2018 7:28 am
It took me a little bit to realize that this wasn't satire...I actually had to read it twice, once, thinking it was satire and chuckling along, and then, I went back to re-read upon realization that he's serious (I think).

If I'm going to take the author's post at face value I'll conclude that 1) (minor point) he's not reformed...or Catholic, because home-brewed ale and/or wine would quite possibly be the drink of choice for sermon writing. At least it is for me when crafting liturgy/songs/etc. and 2) (main point) his real complaint I think resides, not ultimately with coffee, but with over-work and our modern, as he puts it, 'work-life balance'. That's the real idol. He has a point if he lingers on coffee as being a status symbol, but he only briefly addresses that. I think coffee is getting the shaft here. Smells to me like a fundamentalist, damning the symptom and not the source.
At first glance, I take it as being written in jest. And rather poorly at that.
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Re: Faith in the News

Post by FredS » Mon May 21, 2018 9:10 am

sweetandsour wrote:
Sun May 20, 2018 11:36 pm
tuttle wrote:
Thu Apr 26, 2018 7:28 am
It took me a little bit to realize that this wasn't satire...I actually had to read it twice, once, thinking it was satire and chuckling along, and then, I went back to re-read upon realization that he's serious (I think).

If I'm going to take the author's post at face value I'll conclude that 1) (minor point) he's not reformed...or Catholic, because home-brewed ale and/or wine would quite possibly be the drink of choice for sermon writing. At least it is for me when crafting liturgy/songs/etc. and 2) (main point) his real complaint I think resides, not ultimately with coffee, but with over-work and our modern, as he puts it, 'work-life balance'. That's the real idol. He has a point if he lingers on coffee as being a status symbol, but he only briefly addresses that. I think coffee is getting the shaft here. Smells to me like a fundamentalist, damning the symptom and not the source.
At first glance, I take it as being written in jest. And rather poorly at that.
I should think the Baptist Boyz would be all over this. In modern America, caffeine is the mood-altering substance of choice. Above nicotine and alcohol. Big Coffee develops ever stronger blends to keep their customers addicted. They set up cozy cafe's (like the neighborhood bar of our grandfather) with hip music, free wi-fi, and candy flavored drinks to cater to an ever-younger market segment. The coffee available today isn't like the stuff you experimented with when you were young. This is strong stuff that's very addictive. Often, it takes only one venti vulva free-trade andean shade grown blend with cashmere goat milk and columbian cacow to hook 14 year old Sally for life.

Finally, this author comes along to boldly preach against this menacing juice of Satan and you guys think he's joking?
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Re: Faith in the News

Post by tuttle » Mon May 21, 2018 9:12 am

wosbald wrote:
Wed May 16, 2018 8:55 am
+JMJ+

Preaching social justice is 'evil,' a Southern Baptist pastor in Texas says

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Saying the whole idea of justice and equality is way too liberal, the Rev. Grady Arnold of Cuero has filed a resolution calling for the denomination to reject social justice as “evil.” Courtesy photo

A Southern Baptist pastor in South Texas says the church has a problem: too much talk about justice.

Racial justice, social justice, global justice — you name it. He's heard enough.

He's against all this justice. Not only that, but he wants Southern Baptist Convention churches to stop preaching about it.

Saying the whole idea of justice and equality is way too liberal, the Rev. Grady Arnold of Cuero has filed a resolution calling for the denomination to reject social justice as “evil.”

Saying social justice is based on “Marxist ideology,” he decries it as not about rights and compassion but about “liberal theology” and compassion for “groups they deem as 'victims.'”

[…]

Pastor Dwight McKissic of Cornerstone Baptist Church in Arlington, a leading conservative voice for civil rights, called it “the most divisive resolution ever proposed in the 40 years” he's been part of SBC.

“This resolution denigrates the entire civil rights, abolitionist, equal pay for equal work and suffrage movements,” McKissic wrote. “This resolution spits on the grave of Susan B. Anthony, Sojourner Truth, Harriet Tubman, Mary Bethune, Frederick Douglass, Booker T. Washington. … It will make a statement to women and minorities to 'stay in your place.'

“I was taken aback that somebody wrote that in 2018,” McKissic said by phone Tuesday.

“The words 'justice' and 'righteousness' are inseparable in scripture. … They're trying to demonize that term. When Jesus talked to the poor about the gospel, he was talking about justice.”

Southern Baptists appear headed for a rocky convention June 12-13 in Dallas. There's tension over equality, Patterson, the politicking of Dallas' Rev. Robert Jeffress and the racial justice work of Baptists' ethics leader, the Rev. Russell Moore.

“This social justice is creeping down into local churches,” Arnold said, as if that were a bad thing.

Bet you guessed what's coming next: the slippery slope.

“If we start down this road today,” he asked, “where will it end?”

More justice?


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[color]Pastor Dwight McKissic of Cornerstone Baptist Church in Arlington, a leading conservative voice for civil rights, called Arnold's resolution “the most divisive resolution ever proposed in the 40 years” he's been part of the SBC. Ross D. Franklin AP file[/color]
I skimmed through the proposed resolution and outside of naming individuals (Glen Beck/Jerry Fallwell Jr./Russel Moore) because that seems like his own grudge, I...pretty much agree with him. On the whole he's highlighting an ideology that is antithetical to the biblical understanding of justice. And there is certainly a push for 'social justice' among the S. Baptists conferences and blogs, etc. It's unfortunate, but he's going to be labeled a racist, and if this gains any traction within the SBC it'll be labeled a racist movement.

I feel like the Southern Baptist Convention has been sort of roller skating down a mountain for the past few years. It seems every year there's some new issue that they can't help but fight and bicker and secretly hate each other over. At some point I think they're going to wipe out. I'm not sure what it'll look like, but there'll probably be some blood.
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