Science in the News

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durangopipe
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Re: Science in the News

Post by durangopipe » Wed Dec 26, 2018 11:58 am

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/12/26/scie ... e=Homepage

A science article in the New York Times today about a new AI algorithm that allows a computer to teach itself to win games not through brute computing power, but by learning (on its own) the deeper principles underlying the game.

AlphaZero played the previously stronger number crunching chess program, Stockfish:
Most unnerving was that AlphaZero seemed to express insight. It played like no computer ever has, intuitively and beautifully, with a romantic, attacking style. It played gambits and took risks. In some games it paralyzed Stockfish and toyed with it. While conducting its attack in Game 10, AlphaZero retreated its queen back into the corner of the board on its own side, far from Stockfish’s king, not normally where an attacking queen should be placed.

Yet this peculiar retreat was venomous: No matter how Stockfish replied, it was doomed. It was almost as if AlphaZero was waiting for Stockfish to realize, after billions of brutish calculations, how hopeless its position truly was, so that the beast could relax and expire peacefully, like a vanquished bull before a matador. Grandmasters had never seen anything like it. AlphaZero had the finesse of a virtuoso and the power of a machine. It was humankind’s first glimpse of an awesome new kind of intelligence.
We seem to be entering the unnerving territory envisioned in the science fiction I devoured as a youth:
Suppose that deeper patterns exist to be discovered — in the ways genes are regulated or cancer progresses; in the orchestration of the immune system; in the dance of subatomic particles. And suppose that these patterns can be predicted, but only by an intelligence far superior to ours. If AlphaInfinity could identify and understand them, it would seem to us like an oracle.

We would sit at its feet and listen intently. We would not understand why the oracle was always right, but we could check its calculations and predictions against experiments and observations, and confirm its revelations. Science, that signal human endeavor, would reduce our role to that of spectators, gaping in wonder and confusion.

Maybe eventually our lack of insight would no longer bother us. After all, AlphaInfinity could cure all our diseases, solve all our scientific problems and make all our other intellectual trains run on time. We did pretty well without much insight for the first 300,000 years or so of our existence as Homosapiens. And we’ll have no shortage of memory: we will recall with pride the golden era of human insight, this glorious interlude, a few thousand years long, between our uncomprehending past and our incomprehensible future.
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Nature of a Man
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Re: Science in the News

Post by Nature of a Man » Thu Dec 27, 2018 4:58 pm

durangopipe wrote:
Wed Dec 26, 2018 11:58 am
https://www.nytimes.com/2018/12/26/scie ... e=Homepage

A science article in the New York Times today about a new AI algorithm that allows a computer to teach itself to win games not through brute computing power, but by learning (on its own) the deeper principles underlying the game.

AlphaZero played the previously stronger number crunching chess program, Stockfish:
Most unnerving was that AlphaZero seemed to express insight. It played like no computer ever has, intuitively and beautifully, with a romantic, attacking style. It played gambits and took risks. In some games it paralyzed Stockfish and toyed with it. While conducting its attack in Game 10, AlphaZero retreated its queen back into the corner of the board on its own side, far from Stockfish’s king, not normally where an attacking queen should be placed.

Yet this peculiar retreat was venomous: No matter how Stockfish replied, it was doomed. It was almost as if AlphaZero was waiting for Stockfish to realize, after billions of brutish calculations, how hopeless its position truly was, so that the beast could relax and expire peacefully, like a vanquished bull before a matador. Grandmasters had never seen anything like it. AlphaZero had the finesse of a virtuoso and the power of a machine. It was humankind’s first glimpse of an awesome new kind of intelligence.
We seem to be entering the unnerving territory envisioned in the science fiction I devoured as a youth:
Suppose that deeper patterns exist to be discovered — in the ways genes are regulated or cancer progresses; in the orchestration of the immune system; in the dance of subatomic particles. And suppose that these patterns can be predicted, but only by an intelligence far superior to ours. If AlphaInfinity could identify and understand them, it would seem to us like an oracle.

We would sit at its feet and listen intently. We would not understand why the oracle was always right, but we could check its calculations and predictions against experiments and observations, and confirm its revelations. Science, that signal human endeavor, would reduce our role to that of spectators, gaping in wonder and confusion.

Maybe eventually our lack of insight would no longer bother us. After all, AlphaInfinity could cure all our diseases, solve all our scientific problems and make all our other intellectual trains run on time. We did pretty well without much insight for the first 300,000 years or so of our existence as Homosapiens. And we’ll have no shortage of memory: we will recall with pride the golden era of human insight, this glorious interlude, a few thousand years long, between our uncomprehending past and our incomprehensible future.
That's fascinating.

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Re: Science in the News

Post by Kerdy » Sun Feb 24, 2019 11:47 am

There are many more reports on this and I am not sure if it has been mentioned previously, but this is very interesting. Personally, I think this has more to do with any apparently Climate Change than anything else we want to blame. The last I heard the North Pole was closer to Siberia and last month an emergency update to GPS systems was required due to the increased speed at which they are shifting.

https://news.nationalgeographic.com/201 ... s-science/
Many times over our planet’s history, Earth’s magnetic poles have reversed, meaning that sometimes a compass pointing north will be aimed at Antarctica rather than the Arctic. This might sound strange, but it’s a relatively predictable quirk. Powered by the machinations of the planet’s spinning iron core, this process of geomagnetic reversal has been doing its thing without much fanfare for eons.
https://www.indiatoday.in/education-tod ... 2019-01-14
Rapid shifts in the Earth's north magnetic pole are forcing researchers to make an unprecedented early update to a model that helps navigation by ships, planes and submarines in the Arctic, scientists said. Compass needles point towards the north magnetic pole, a point which has crept unpredictably from the coast of northern Canada -- a century ago -- to the middle of the Arctic Ocean, moving towards Russia. "It's moving at about 50 km (30 miles) a year," Ciaran Beggan, of the British Geological Survey (BGS) in Edinburgh, told Reuters on January 11.
"It didn't move much between 1900 and 1980 but it's really accelerated in the past 40 years," said Beggan.
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