The Climate Change Thread

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wosbald
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Re: The Climate Change Thread

Post by wosbald » Tue Jun 23, 2020 8:41 am

+JMJ+
tuttle wrote:
Tue Jun 23, 2020 6:53 am
I haven't read anything yet, but waiting to hear from the alarmists that the COVID-19 shutdown gave us an oh, so brief respite in the doomsday countdown. That it was the earth fighting back in her last gasps. SO LET'S NOT WASTE IT! ACT NOW!
Dimestore Prophet wrote: The next thing Man-being-punched-in-the-nose will say — after being punched in the nose — is, "Ow!"

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"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: The Climate Change Thread

Post by tuttle » Tue Jun 23, 2020 8:49 am

wosbald wrote:
Tue Jun 23, 2020 8:41 am
+JMJ+
tuttle wrote:
Tue Jun 23, 2020 6:53 am
I haven't read anything yet, but waiting to hear from the alarmists that the COVID-19 shutdown gave us an oh, so brief respite in the doomsday countdown. That it was the earth fighting back in her last gasps. SO LET'S NOT WASTE IT! ACT NOW!
Dimestore Prophet wrote: The next thing Man-being-punched-in-the-nose will say — after being punched in the nose — is, "Ow!"

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I'm glad you see it that way, it is rather obvious.

Funny thing is though that we live in a day and age when obvious predictions are shouted down as conspiracy theories promoted by people with a persecution complex.
"The Evangelium has not abrogated legends; it has hallowed them" -JRR Tolkien

"Better to die cheerfully with the aid of a little tobacco, than to live disagreeably and remorseful without." -CS Lewis

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wosbald
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Re: The Climate Change Thread

Post by wosbald » Tue Jun 23, 2020 11:47 am

+JMJ+

For indigenous protesters, defending the environment can be fatal
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Paulo Paulino Guajajara, one of the Guardians of the Forest in Brazil's Amazon, paints his face Sept.10, 2019, on Arariboia indigenous territory near Amarante, Brazil. Guajajara, 26, was killed Nov. 1 inside the Arariboia Indigenous Territory, where he lived with his wife and son. (CNS/ Reuters/Ueslei Marcelino)

This story, originally published by Grist, is republished here as part of Covering Climate Now, a global journalism collaboration committed to strengthening coverage of the climate story.

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Adán Vez Lira, a prominent defender of an ecological reserve in Mexico, was shot while riding his motorcycle in April. Four years earlier, the renowned activist Berta Cáceres was shot dead in her home in Honduras by assailants taking direction from executives responsible for a dam she had opposed. Four years before that, Cambodian forest and land activist Chut Wutty was killed during a brawl with the country's military police while investigating illegal logging.

These are some of the most prominent examples of violence faced by environmental activists in recent years — but, according to a new report, they are not unusual. As police crack down on protests demanding justice and equity in the wake of the police killing of George Floyd in the U.S., it's clear that activism in general comes at a heavy price.

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Environmental activists specifically — particularly indigenous activists and activists of color — have for years faced high rates of criminalization, physical violence, and even murder for their efforts to protect the planet, according to a comprehensive analysis by researchers from the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, which was released earlier this month.

The researchers analyzed nearly 2,800 social conflicts related to the environment using the Environmental Justice Atlas (EJAtlas) database, which they created in 2011 to monitor environmental conflicts around the world. The study, published in the journal Global Environmental Change, found that 20% of environmental defenders faced criminal charges or were imprisoned, 18% were victims of physical violence, and 13% were killed between 2011 and 2019. The likelihood of these consequences increased significantly for indigenous environmental defenders: 27% faced criminalization, 25% were victims of physical violence, and 19% were murdered.

"We can think of this as compounded injustice, highlighting the extreme risks vulnerable communities opposing social and environmental violence against them face when they stand up for their rights," one of the study's researchers, Leah Temper, told Grist.

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Guadalupe Lara holds up a sign that reads ""Temaca, You Are Not Alone," in defense of Temacapulín, a village threatened by a dam, at July 2019 press conference in Guadalajara by the Mexican Institute for Community Development. The institute accused the government of following inequitable water management policies. (Tracy L. Barnett)

[…]

The lead author of the study, Arnim Scheidel, said he hopes that the analysis gives lawmakers and the public a better understanding of the causes of the violence that protesters still face around the world.

"Globally, indigenous peoples suffer significantly higher rates of violence in environmental conflicts," Scheidel said. "Being aware of these connections may help to connect struggles against various forms of racism worldwide. Protest is key for the success of such struggles, particularly when using diverse channels and building on broad alliances."

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"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: The Climate Change Thread

Post by wosbald » Tue Jun 30, 2020 9:37 pm

+JMJ+

New ‘ecclesial conference’ established for Amazon region
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An Amazonian indigenous girl gives Pope Francis a plant during the offertory of a Mass for the closing of Amazon synod in St. Peter's Basilica at the Vatican, Sunday, Oct. 27, 2019. (Credit: Alessandra Tarantino/AP)

ROSARIO, Argentina — Answering a call made by those who took part in the October 2019 meeting of bishops on the Amazon region held in Rome, on Monday leaders of the Catholic Church in Latin America announced the creation of the Amazonian Ecclesial Conference.

The hope is that the new organism will help “delineate a Church with an Amazonian face, and to continue the task of finding new paths for the evangelizing mission,” says a statement signed by Archbishop Miguel Cabrejos of Trujillo and president of CELAM, the Latin American Episcopal Conference, and Cardinal Claudio Hummes, emeritus of São Paulo and president of REPAM, the church’s Amazonian network.

The new body will be an “ecclesial conference” as opposed to an “episcopal conference,” denoting that the newly created body will be composed of lay people and religious men and women, as well as bishops.

[…]

As the statement notes, the conference was created on the feast of Sts. Peter and Paul, which they read as a “very especial sign,” and as a gesture of its vocation to “affirm the identity of the Church, it’s prophetic option,” and the call to be a “missionary” church that is an “ineludible call in this present time.”

Pope Francis, they said, has “accompanied this process closely.”

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Brazilian Cardinal Claudio Hummes says Mass in the Catacombs of Domitila, Oct. 20, 2019. A group of prelates participating in the Synod of Bishops on the Amazon, together with lay women and men, signed a declaration called “Pact of the Catacombs for the Common Home.” (Credit: Ines San Martin/Crux)

[…]

“In these difficult and exceptional times for humanity, when the pandemic of coronavirus strongly affects the pan-Amazonian region; and the realities of violence, exclusion and death against the biome and the peoples that live in it, clamor for an urgent and imminent integral conversion,” the statement says.

The Amazonian Ecclesial Conference, they argue, hopes to be “good news” and an opportune answer to the “screams of the poor and the sister mother Earth,” as well as an efficient way to see many of the suggestions of the Amazon Synod come to fruition.

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"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: The Climate Change Thread

Post by wosbald » Thu Jul 02, 2020 9:31 am

+JMJ+

Climate crisis poses serious risks for pregnancy, investigation finds
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Young people gather for a climate change rally in New York City Sept. 20, 2019. (CNS/Gregory A. Shemitz)

This story, originally published by the Guardian, is republished here as part of Covering Climate Now, a global journalism collaboration committed to strengthening coverage of the climate story.

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More than a decade of overwhelming evidence links air pollution and heat exposure with negative pregnancy outcomes in the U.S., according to a new review of dozens of studies.

The investigation, published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, identified 57 studies since 2007 showing a significant association between the two factors and the risk of pre-term birth, low birth weight and stillbirth.

Black mothers were particularly at risk, as were people with asthma.

The review analyzed 32 million births tracked across 68 studies. Of those, 84% found air pollution and heat to be risk factors.

[…]

The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists already finds climate change to be an urgent threat to women's health, in addition to a major public health challenge. Climate change is linked with worsening cardiac disease, respiratory disease, mental health and exposure to infectious diseases. But pregnant women and developing fetuses are especially vulnerable to its effects.

In the review, 19 studies linked air pollution to pre-term birth, defined as a baby born alive before 37 weeks of pregnancy. Twenty-five studies linked air pollution to low birth weight. And four studies linked air pollution to stillbirth. One study found the risk of stillbirth increased 42% with high third-trimester exposure. Stillbirth is rare, so data on it is limited and it is difficult to draw broad conclusions about why it happens, Bekkar said.

[…]

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[…]

The review confirmed black mothers are at greater risk for pre-term birth and low birth weight. Social determinants of health — including poverty, long-term stress levels and access to healthcare — disproportionately hurt people of color.

The study concludes that "environmental exposures further exacerbate that background risk and could be included among these social determinants".

[…]

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"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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