I'm Starting to Like This Pope

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Re: I'm Starting to Like This Pope

Post by wosbald » Fri Jun 19, 2020 9:45 am

+JMJ+

Intra-thread Trackbacks: pg 63 / pg 64 / pg 65 / pg 65 / pg 66 / pg 66 / pg 73 / pg 84 / pg 120 / pg 123 / pg 124 / pg 124 / pg 124 / pg 125 / pg 125 / pg 125 / pg 125

Inter-Thread Trackbacks:
"Evangelical Fundamentalism and Catholic Integralism": pg 4 / pg 6 / pg 6 / pg6 / pg 6 / pg 6



Podcast: Why is the Vatican silent on Archbishop Viganò? [Audio]
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Archbishop Carlo Maria Vigano, apostolic nuncio to the United States, attends the opening Mass of the National Prayer Vigil for Life at the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception in Washington in this Jan. 22, 2011, file photo. (CNS photo/Nancy Phelan Wiechec)

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Last week, Archbishop Carlo Maria Viganò was back in the spotlight after President Donald Trump tweeted promoting an open letter that Viganò had written to him. The letter praised Mr. Trump for “defending the right to life” and expressed Archbishop Viganò’s belief in a number of conspiracy theories, including the idea of a “deep state” group undermining the American government and a parallel group within the Catholic church.

Archbishop Viganò has published many such letters since his original 11-page “testimony,” published in 2018, accusing a number of top church officials of knowing about abuse by former Cardinal Theodore McCarrick, blaming a “homosexual network” in the Vatican for the abuse crisis, and calling on Pope Francis to resign.

The Vatican has been relatively tight-lipped in response to the archbishop: When journalists asked Pope Francis about the “testimony,” the pope refused to comment beyond saying, “Read that statement attentively and make your own judgment,” adding, “I think the statement speaks for itself, and you have a sufficient journalistic ability to make a conclusion.” Many of the archbishop’s claims have since been called into question, and the Vatican is conducting its own investigation into Mr. McCarrick.

On this episode of “Inside the Vatican,” veteran Vatican reporter Gerard O’Connell and I discuss why the Vatican has remained quiet in response to Archbishop Viganò and whether that is likely to change following President Trump’s endorsement.

We also discuss Pope Francis’ message for the World Day of the Poor, along with the new fund he established with the mayor of Rome and the governor of Lazio to aid workers who had not previously been eligible for government assistance.

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"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: I'm Starting to Like This Pope

Post by Del » Fri Jun 19, 2020 12:59 pm


If the Vatican speaks out against Vigano, then the Curia would be on the same outside as Amerika and Fishwrap.


My working theory is that Pope Francis does not want to confront the Lavender Mafia directly, but he is content to let Vigano speak out as a voice of conscience.
"If somebody serves you something to eat, and it don't taste good? -- Then it ain't Cajun!" -- Paul Prudhomme

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Re: I'm Starting to Like This Pope

Post by wosbald » Wed Jun 24, 2020 8:27 am

+JMJ+

Intra-thread Trackbacks: pg 63 / pg 64 / pg 65 / pg 65 / pg 66 / pg 66 / pg 73 / pg 84 / pg 120 / pg 123 / pg 124 / pg 124 / pg 124 / pg 125 / pg 125 / pg 125 / pg 125 / pg 126

Inter-Thread Trackbacks:
"Evangelical Fundamentalism and Catholic Integralism": pg 4 / pg 6 / pg 6 / pg6 / pg 6 / pg 6



Viganò, QAnon, and the ‘Deep Church’ explained (Part 1) [Audio]
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In this edition of Peter’s Field Hospital, I’m joined by DW Lafferty and Nathan Turowsky. This week, we discuss the origins of some of the more obscure terms used by Archbishop Viganò in his letter to President Trump, and their origins in contemporary conspiracy theories.

DW Lafferty presents his theory about what Viganò was trying to do by publishing this letter, and how he accomplished his goals. We also discuss the troubling fact that many ordinary Catholics seem to be embracing these theories as well.

Part 1 of 2.


ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: I'm Starting to Like This Pope

Post by wosbald » Thu Jun 25, 2020 10:08 am

+JMJ+

Intra-thread Trackbacks: pg 63 / pg 64 / pg 65 / pg 65 / pg 66 / pg 66 / pg 73 / pg 84 / pg 120 / pg 123 / pg 124 / pg 124 / pg 124 / pg 125 / pg 125 / pg 125 / pg 125 / pg 126 / pg 126

Inter-Thread Trackbacks:
"Evangelical Fundamentalism and Catholic Integralism": pg 4 / pg 6 / pg 6 / pg6 / pg 6 / pg 6



The Danger of a Post-Truth Catholic Schism (Part 2 of 2) [Audio]
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This is part two of my discussion with David Lafferty and Nathan Turowsky about the influence of leaders like Archbishop Viganò and Taylor Marshall on ordinary Catholics.

In part one, we discussed the influence of the QAnon conspiracy theory on Archbishop Viganò’s recent letter-writing campaign.

In part two, we talk about the extremes that this kind of rhetoric has reached, the disturbing impact of these messages on ordinary Catholics, and what we can do to reverse this trend.

We also respond to the frequent charge that we aren’t as hard on “liberal” Catholic dissenters as we are of those on the right.

Part 2 of 2.


ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: I'm Starting to Like This Pope

Post by wosbald » Fri Jun 26, 2020 10:57 am

+JMJ+

Intra-Thread Trackbacks: pg 78 / pg 78 / pg 79 / pg 79 / pg 88 / pg 89 / pg 89 / pg 118 / pg 118 / pg 119 / pg 124 / pg 124 / pg 124 / pg 125


Hong Kong cardinal says new security law will not limit religious freedom [In-Depth]
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Cardinal John Tong Hon, of Hong Kong, attends Pope Francis's weekly general audience in St. Peter's Square, at the Vatican, Wednesday, June 12, 2019. (Credit: Credit: Gregorio Borgia/AP)

ROME — In a recent interview, Cardinal John Tong, former bishop and current administer of the Hong Kong diocese, has said he does not believe a new security law, which many fear will limit democracy in the territory, will pose a threat to religious freedom.

Speaking to Kung Kao Po, the Diocese of Hong Kong’s weekly Chinese-language publication, Tong said he understands the need for a security law, which is required as part of Hong Kong’s Basic Law.

However, he voiced hope that the government would clarify confusion surrounding the new law, saying, “because citizens have different backgrounds, different ideas, and different concerns, I hope that the government and the (Special Administrative Region) government can eliminate or minimize the public’s doubt.”

Regarding fears that the new law will open the door to assaults on religious freedom, Tong disagreed, saying, “I personally believe that the National Security Law has no effect on religious freedom,” citing provisions in Hong Kong’s Basic Law which guarantee freedom of belief.

“We can also openly preach and hold religious ceremonies. And participate in religious activities,” Tong said.

These comments contradict fears expressed by Jacky Hung, a member of the diocese’s Justice and Peace commission, who upon hearing of the law voiced concern that it “will be used to suppress religious freedom. Hong Kong should adopt universal suffrage before adopting national security laws.”

[…]

Article four of the law is the most controversial. Among other things, it stipulates that when needed, the Chinese Central government in Beijing can step in and set up agencies to help the territory fulfill its security requirements.

[…]

In his interview Tong stressed the importance of unity within the Church, insisting that he does not believe its activities will be impacted by the new law.

“The participation of the Church in social affairs should also not be affected,” he said, citing a separate article of Hong Kong’s Basic Law which specifies “that the Hong Kong SAR government does not interfere in the internal affairs of religious organizations and provides services to the general public.”

Asked whether he feared that the Church in Hong Kong’s relationship with the Vatican would constitute “collusion with foreign forces” under the new security law, Tong also voiced doubt.

“I think the Hong Kong Catholic Church has always had a direct relationship with the Vatican; the relationship between the Hong Kong diocese and the Vatican should be regarded as an internal matter,” he said, insisting that even under the new security legislation, he does not believe this relationship will be considered as collusion.

“In fact, China and the Vatican already have friendly exchanges, and our church focuses on spirituality and pastoralism,” he said.

ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: I'm Starting to Like This Pope

Post by wosbald » Mon Jun 29, 2020 8:34 am

+JMJ+

Francis praises early Christians: 'They did not complain about Peter'
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Pope Francis arrives to celebrate Mass marking the feast of Sts. Peter and Paul in St. Peter's Basilica at the Vatican June 29, 2020. (CNS photo/Paul Haring)

Rome — Pope Francis praised the example of the early Christian community in his homily for the annual feast of saints Peter and Paul June 29, saying its members prayed for their leaders instead of criticizing them.

In a small, socially-distanced Mass in the nave of St. Peter's Basilica, the pontiff recalled how the arrest of St. Peter by King Herod had put the first Christians into a moment of crisis.

"Those Christians did not cast blame; they prayed," said the pope. "No one said: 'If Peter had been more careful, we would not be in this situation.'"

"No, they did not complain about Peter; they prayed for him," said Francis. "They did not talk about Peter behind his back; they talked to God."

"What would happen if we prayed more and complained less?" the pope then asked, before responding: "The same thing that happened to Peter in prison: now as then, so many closed doors would be opened, so many chains that bind would be broken."

Francis' comments may be taken as a reference to the small but vocal group of critics of his own seven-year papacy, who malign him on a range of issues — from his frequent focus on the expansive nature of God's mercy to his repeated calls for world leaders to do more to combat global climate change.

The pope's homily focused on two main characteristics that he said were shown by the early Christians: unity and prophecy.

Speaking of his desire for a church that is prophetic, Francis said Christians are not prophetic in the way they talk but in the way they serve others.

"If you want a prophetic church, stay quiet and start serving," the pontiff advised.

"We are not to become rich, but rather to love the poor," said Francis. "We are not to save up for ourselves, but to spend ourselves for others."

The feast of saints Peter and Paul commemorates the martyrdom of the two early Christian leaders, and is also a public holiday in the city of Rome.

[…]

ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: I'm Starting to Like This Pope

Post by wosbald » Tue Jun 30, 2020 11:42 am

+JMJ+

Pope Francis gives his blessing to Jesuit anti-hunger projects in Argentina [In-Depth]
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A man plays the guitar below a mural of Pope Francis during a government-ordered lockdown to curb the spread of the new coronavirus in Buenos Aires, Argentina, Wednesday, April 29, 2020. (Credit: Natacha Pisarenko./AP)

ROSARIO, Argentina — Although Pope Francis hasn’t visited his homeland since his 2013 election, he often gives signs that his heart still belongs to the country of his birth.

Recently, he sent hand-written letters to two charitable causes sponsored by the Jesuits, the religious order to which Francis belongs.

The concept of both campaigns is similar: Deliver food packages to as many families as possible during the COVID-19 coronavirus pandemic with the help of the country’s largest companies in the food industry.

[…]

The United Nations recently estimated that by the end of the pandemic, over 52 percent of the country’s total population will be under the poverty line. Hence the need for charitable projects such as the Jesuit-run “Seamos Uno” [Let’s be one] and “Cordoba urgencia alimentaria” [Cordoba alimentary urgency] programs.

[…]

The Buenos Aires-based Seamos Uno is the larger of the two, and its goal is to deliver a million boxes full of food and cleaning products, that can sustain a family of four for at least a week. Each box is filled with enough for 56 meals, and include name brand goods that are being sold at wholesale prices by some of the country’s largest food companies.

Pope Francis sent a letter addressed to Jesuit Father Rafael Velasco, who heads the local Jesuit community: “Initiatives such as this one is what’s needed everywhere, for the present time but also to sustain the measures of the ‘aftermath’.”

He also thanked the Argentine province of the Jesuits for their witness, saying, “it’s good for me.”

So far, they’ve received 600 million Argentine pesos (over $8 million) in donations, which they’ve used to give over 24 million meals, nearly half of their target. This is sixteen times the amount of food that the government has distributed through the military.

[…]

Father Angel Rossi, also a Jesuit, is behind Cordoba Urgencia Alimentaria, that aims to feed 25,000 families. Organized by several Catholic entities, including Caritas, the Jesuits and Radio Maria, it was launched earlier in June. The food is being distributed through a network of parishes. With less than $10, one can sponsor a family of four with enough food to last a week.

[…]

Rossi also said that, without “oversimplifying” things, he believes that Argentina suffers from the “culture of indifference” that the pope talks so much about. “When, hopefully, comfort comes back to visit us, it won’t find us wrapped in the temptation to forget others, those who will still need help, even if for us, things are ‘back to normal’.”

[…]

The pope wrote that he considers the initiative means a “beginning to change looking to what will be the post-COVID-19. The great danger we must overcome is that society ‘is rebuilt’ as it was before the pandemic, or at most, with a brushstroke of varnish. From a crisis (and this is a crisis) we do not come out the same: either better or worse.”

In this sense, Francis adds: “The Cordoba Urgencia Alimentaria initiative is much more than a charity; it’s aims to change the future, to break sclerotic schemes, to put aside the culture of indifference, to proclaim that people — every person, any person — is more important than money.”

ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: I'm Starting to Like This Pope

Post by Del » Tue Jun 30, 2020 8:19 pm

wosbald wrote:
Tue Jun 30, 2020 11:42 am
+JMJ+

Pope Francis gives his blessing to Jesuit anti-hunger projects in Argentina [In-Depth]
Image
A man plays the guitar below a mural of Pope Francis during a government-ordered lockdown to curb the spread of the new coronavirus in Buenos Aires, Argentina, Wednesday, April 29, 2020. (Credit: Natacha Pisarenko./AP)

ROSARIO, Argentina — Although Pope Francis hasn’t visited his homeland since his 2013 election, he often gives signs that his heart still belongs to the country of his birth.

Recently, he sent hand-written letters to two charitable causes sponsored by the Jesuits, the religious order to which Francis belongs.

The concept of both campaigns is similar: Deliver food packages to as many families as possible during the COVID-19 coronavirus pandemic with the help of the country’s largest companies in the food industry.

[…]

The United Nations recently estimated that by the end of the pandemic, over 52 percent of the country’s total population will be under the poverty line. Hence the need for charitable projects such as the Jesuit-run “Seamos Uno” [Let’s be one] and “Cordoba urgencia alimentaria” [Cordoba alimentary urgency] programs.

[…]

The Buenos Aires-based Seamos Uno is the larger of the two, and its goal is to deliver a million boxes full of food and cleaning products, that can sustain a family of four for at least a week. Each box is filled with enough for 56 meals, and include name brand goods that are being sold at wholesale prices by some of the country’s largest food companies.

Pope Francis sent a letter addressed to Jesuit Father Rafael Velasco, who heads the local Jesuit community: “Initiatives such as this one is what’s needed everywhere, for the present time but also to sustain the measures of the ‘aftermath’.”

He also thanked the Argentine province of the Jesuits for their witness, saying, “it’s good for me.”

So far, they’ve received 600 million Argentine pesos (over $8 million) in donations, which they’ve used to give over 24 million meals, nearly half of their target. This is sixteen times the amount of food that the government has distributed through the military.

[…]

Father Angel Rossi, also a Jesuit, is behind Cordoba Urgencia Alimentaria, that aims to feed 25,000 families. Organized by several Catholic entities, including Caritas, the Jesuits and Radio Maria, it was launched earlier in June. The food is being distributed through a network of parishes. With less than $10, one can sponsor a family of four with enough food to last a week.

[…]

Rossi also said that, without “oversimplifying” things, he believes that Argentina suffers from the “culture of indifference” that the pope talks so much about. “When, hopefully, comfort comes back to visit us, it won’t find us wrapped in the temptation to forget others, those who will still need help, even if for us, things are ‘back to normal’.”

[…]

The pope wrote that he considers the initiative means a “beginning to change looking to what will be the post-COVID-19. The great danger we must overcome is that society ‘is rebuilt’ as it was before the pandemic, or at most, with a brushstroke of varnish. From a crisis (and this is a crisis) we do not come out the same: either better or worse.”

In this sense, Francis adds: “The Cordoba Urgencia Alimentaria initiative is much more than a charity; it’s aims to change the future, to break sclerotic schemes, to put aside the culture of indifference, to proclaim that people — every person, any person — is more important than money.”
If Pope Francis has persuaded the Jesuits to do some charitable action for people in need, it should count as a miracle toward his canonization.
"If somebody serves you something to eat, and it don't taste good? -- Then it ain't Cajun!" -- Paul Prudhomme

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Re: I'm Starting to Like This Pope

Post by wosbald » Fri Jul 03, 2020 9:29 am

+JMJ+

Intra-thread Trackbacks: pg 63 / pg 64 / pg 65 / pg 65 / pg 66 / pg 66 / pg 73 / pg 84 / pg 120 / pg 123 / pg 124 / pg 124 / pg 124 / pg 125 / pg 125 / pg 125 / pg 125 / pg 126 / pg 126 / pg 126

Inter-Thread Trackbacks:
"Evangelical Fundamentalism and Catholic Integralism": pg 4 / pg 6 / pg 6 / pg6 / pg 6 / pg 6
"Mary Alone": pg 18 / pg 20 /pg 20



Podcast: Catholics, COVID-19, pseudoscience, and confirmation bias (Part 2 of 3) [Audio]
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This is part two of my conversation with Pedro Gabriel and Claire Navarro about how the differences in our native cultures shape the approach to politics and the Catholic Church in our countries.

Pedro provides his insights as a medical doctor on the varied responses of Catholics around the world to COVID-19, and describes how the Church in Portugal responded to the pandemic on the anniversary of the first apparition of Our Lady in Fatima this year.

Later, we talk about the role of ideology and confirmation bias in politicizing and deepening the divisions between Catholics over the faith and Pope Francis.

Pedro will be giving a talk on July 9 at the online Immortal Combat Men’s Conference on “Pope Francis and Silence — How to Defeat the False Angel of Light” (Click ).

Click here to listen to part 1.


ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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wosbald
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Re: I'm Starting to Like This Pope

Post by wosbald » Sun Jul 05, 2020 8:52 am

+JMJ+

Intra-thread Trackbacks: pg 63 / pg 64 / pg 65 / pg 65 / pg 66 / pg 66 / pg 73 / pg 84 / pg 120 / pg 123 / pg 124 / pg 124 / pg 124 / pg 125 / pg 125 / pg 125 / pg 125 / pg 126 / pg 126 / pg 126 / pg 126

Inter-Thread Trackbacks:
"Evangelical Fundamentalism and Catholic Integralism": pg 4 / pg 6 / pg 6 / pg6 / pg 6 / pg 6
"Mary Alone": pg 18 / pg 20 /pg 20



Podcast: Was that Paganism in the Vatican? (Part 3 of 3) [Audio]
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This is one of the most important — if not the most important — podcasts we have done to date. Pedro Gabriel and I talk about the work he did to unravel and respond to the controversy surrounding the Vatican prayer service before October’s Vatican Synod.

We discuss how not only did he encounter an unrelenting, angry, and intractable hostility from conservative Catholic outlets and social media, where there was an adamant refusal to entertain any explanation other than that the indigenous Amazonian Catholics had conducted a pagan ritual, and that they were worshipping the goddess Pachamama — with the approval of Pope Francis.

Looking back, the contempt directed towards these Catholics from the Amazon was a preview of what we’re witnessing today: white European cultural supremacy, racism, disdain for the authentic cultural expressions of the historically marginalized, and unhinged, unthinking conspiratorial paranoia about the Holy Father.

Click here to listen to part 1. Click here to listen to part 2.



And don't forget!

Pedro will be giving a talk on July 9 at the online Immortal Combat Men’s Conference on “Pope Francis and Silence — How to Defeat the False Angel of Light” (Click here to register).

ImageImage

"[T]he emergency of irregular migration has to be met with justice, solidarity and mercy. Forms of collective expulsion, which do not allow for the suitable treatment of individual cases, are unacceptable."
— Pope Francis, Morocco

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Re: I'm Starting to Like This Pope

Post by tuttle » Mon Jul 06, 2020 6:28 am

wosbald wrote:
Sun Jul 05, 2020 8:52 am
+JMJ+

Intra-thread Trackbacks: pg 63 / pg 64 / pg 65 / pg 65 / pg 66 / pg 66 / pg 73 / pg 84 / pg 120 / pg 123 / pg 124 / pg 124 / pg 124 / pg 125 / pg 125 / pg 125 / pg 125 / pg 126 / pg 126 / pg 126 / pg 126

Inter-Thread Trackbacks:
"Evangelical Fundamentalism and Catholic Integralism": pg 4 / pg 6 / pg 6 / pg6 / pg 6 / pg 6
"Mary Alone": pg 18 / pg 20 /pg 20



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